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EU texts

Short-stay visa waiver agreements with Colombia and Peru

The "Agreement between the European Union and the Republic of Colombia on the short-stay visa waiver" was signed in Brussels on 2 December 2015 and entered into force on 1 December 2016.

The Agreement provides for visa-free travel for the citizens of the Union and for the citizens of Colombia when travelling to the territory of the other Contracting Party for a maximum period of 90 days in any 180-day period.

A parallel agreement (the "Agreement between the European Union and the Republic of Peru on the short-stay visa waiver") was signed in Brussels on 14 March 2016 and entered into force on 1 November 2016. This agreement also provides visa-free travel for a maximum period of 90 days in any 180-day period.

Multiparty Trade Agreement between EU, Peru and Colombia, also joined by Ecuador

An ambitious, comprehensive trade agreement was signed by the EU, Peru and Colombia in June 2012. The agreement has opened their markets into a free trade area, thereby promoting trade and investment.

The agreement, which has been in force since 1 March 2013, has meant a strong boost to the economic relations of both trading blocks, benefiting their principal exporting industries through the removal of tariffs.

The agreement has had a direct impact on growth and employment in Peru and Colombia, and has helped, among other things, in the effective and reciprocal opening of the signatories' public procurement markets, the protection of intellectual property rights, free competition, the liberalisation of current payments and movements of capital related to direct investment and the development of a trading climate conducive to greater investment flow.

The agreement also includes a chapter on cooperation to improve competitiveness and innovation, modernise production and facilitate trade and the transfer of technology between the signatories.

In 2016, Ecuador and the EU signed a protocol to allow Ecuador to join the agreement. This asymmetric agreement is tailored towards the developmental needs of Ecuador: the country's cuts in tariffs will be implemented gradually over 17 years. While the EU has agreed to liberalise almost 95% of tariff lines upon entry into force, the percentage for Ecuador is about 60%.