Procedure : 2017/2122(INI)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A8-0365/2017

Texts tabled :

A8-0365/2017

Debates :

PV 12/12/2017 - 17
CRE 12/12/2017 - 17

Votes :

PV 13/12/2017 - 13.6
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P8_TA(2017)0494

REPORT     
PDF 1130kWORD 145k
23.11.2017
PE 608.041v02-00 A8-0365/2017

on the Annual Report on Human Rights and Democracy in the World 2016 and the European Union’s policy on the matter

(2017/2122(INI))

Committee on Foreign Affairs

Rapporteur: Godelieve Quisthoudt-Rowohl

AMENDMENTS
MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION
 EXPLANATORY STATEMENT
 ANNEX I: INDIVIDUAL CASES RAISED BY THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT
 ANNEX II: LIST OF RESOLUTIONS
 OPINION of the Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality
 INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE
 FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION

on the Annual Report on Human Rights and Democracy in the World 2016 and the European Union’s policy on the matter

(2017/2122(INI))

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other UN human rights treaties and instruments,

–  having regard to the European Convention on Human Rights,

–  having regard to the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) of 18 December 1979(1),

–  having regard to CEDAW general recommendations 12, 19 and 35 on violence against women, 26 on women migrant workers and 32 on the gender-related dimensions of refugee status, asylum, nationality and statelessness of women,

–  having regard to UN General Assembly (UNGA) resolution 69/167 of 18 December 2014(2), on protecting and promoting the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all migrants, regardless of their migration status,

–  having regard to the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families of 18 December 1990(3),

–  having regard to UN Security Council resolutions 1325, 1820, 1888, 1889, 1960, 2106, 2122 and 2242 on women, peace and security,

–  having regard to the 1951 Convention and 1967 Protocol relating to the Status of Refugees(4), and ILO Conventions Nos 43 and 97,

–  having regard to the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights(5),

–  having regard to the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants adopted by the UNGA on 19 September 2016(6),

–  having regard to the UN's 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which seek to ensure peace and prosperity for people and the planet(7),

–  having regard to the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (Istanbul Convention) of 12 April 2011, which was signed by the EU on 13 June 2017(8),

–  having regard to the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, adopted in 1976 and revised in 2011(9),

–  having regard to the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union,

–  having regard to Articles 2, 3, 8, 21 and 23 of the Treaty on European Union (TEU),

–  having regard to Article 207 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, (TFEU),

–  having regard to the EU Strategic Framework and Action Plan on Human Rights and Democracy adopted by the Council on 25 June 2012(10),

–  having regard to the Action Plan on Human Rights and Democracy 2015-2019, adopted by the Council on 20 July 2015(11),

–  having regard to the joint staff working document entitled ‘EU Action Plan on Human Rights and Democracy (2015-2019): Mid-Term Review June 2017’(12),

–  having regard to the joint staff working document entitled ‘Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment: Transforming the Lives of Girls and Women through EU External Relations 2016-2020’, adopted in 2015(13),

–  having regard to the Global Strategy for the European Union’s Foreign and Security Policy presented by the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy (VP/HR) Federica Mogherini on 28 June 2016(14), as well as the first report on its implementation entitled ‘From Shared Vision to Common Action: Implementing the EU Global Strategy’, published in 2017(15),

–  having regard to Council Decision 2011/168/CFSP of 21 March 2011 on the International Criminal Court and repealing Common Position 2003/444/CFSP(16),

–  having regard to the European Agenda on Migration of 13 May 2015(17) and the Commission communication on establishing a new Partnership Framework with third countries under the European Agenda on Migration of 7 June 2016 (COM/2016/0385)(18),

–  having regard to the EU Guidelines for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of the Child, adopted in 2007 and reviewed in 2017(19),

–  having regard to the joint statement by the Council and the representatives of the governments of the Member States meeting within the Council, the European Parliament and the European Commission entitled ‘The new European Consensus on Development: “Our World, Our Dignity, Our Future”’(20), adopted by the Council, Parliament and the Commission on 7 June 2017,

–  having regard to the EU Human Rights Guidelines on Freedom of Expression Online and Offline, adopted in 2014(21),

–  having regard to the protection of freedom of expression offline and online afforded by Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 19 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights and Article 10 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union,

–  having regard to the EU Guidelines on the promotion and protection of freedom of religion or belief, adopted in 2013(22),

–  having regard to the international protection of freedom of religion or belief afforded by Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 18 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the 1981 Declaration on the Elimination of all Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination based on Religion or Belief, Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights and Article 10 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union,

–  having regard to the Council Conclusions on intolerance, discrimination and violence on the basis of religion or belief, adopted on 21 February 2011(23),

–  having regard to the EU Guidelines on Death Penalty, adopted in 2013(24),

–  having regard to the EU Guidelines to EU Policy towards third countries on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, adopted in 2001 and reviewed in 2012(25),

–  having regard to the UN Protocol to prevent, suppress and punish trafficking in persons especially women and children, supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organised Crime(26) and the Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings,

–  having regard to the EU Guidelines to promote and protect the enjoyment of all human rights by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons, adopted in 2013(27),

–  having regard to the EU Guidelines on human rights dialogues with third countries, adopted in 2001 and reviewed in 2009(28),

–  having regard to the EU Guidelines on Promoting Compliance with International Humanitarian Law (IHL), adopted in 2005 and reviewed in 2009(29),

–  having regard to the EU Guidelines on violence against women and girls and combating all forms of discrimination against them, adopted in 2008(30),

–  having regard to the EU Guidelines on children and armed conflict, adopted in 2003 and reviewed in 2008(31),

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) 2017/821 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 May 2017 laying down supply chain due diligence obligations for Union importers of tin, tantalum and tungsten, their ores, and gold originating in conflict-affected and high-risk areas(32),

–  having regard to the EU Guidelines on human rights defenders, adopted in 2005 and reviewed in 2008(33),

–  having regard to the EU Annual Report on Human Rights and Democracy in the World in 2015(34),

–  having regard to its resolution of 13 September 2017 entitled ‘Arms export: implementation of Common Position 2008/944/CFSP’(35),

–  having regard to its resolution of 14 December 2016 on the Annual Report on human rights and democracy in the world and the European Union’s policy on the matter 2015(36), and previous resolutions on the topic,

–  having regard to its resolution of 25 October 2016 on human rights and migration in third countries(37),

–  having regard to its resolution of 25 October 2016 on corporate liability for serious human rights abuses in third countries(38),

–  having regard to its resolution of 5 July 2016 on the fight against trafficking in human beings in the EU’s external relations(39),

–  having regard to its resolution of 21 January 2016 on the EU’s priorities for the UNHRC sessions in 2016(40),

–  having regard to its resolution of 25 February 2016 on the humanitarian situation in Yemen(41), which calls on the VP/HR to launch an initiative to impose an EU arms embargo on Saudi Arabia,

–  having regard to its urgency resolutions on cases of breaches of human rights, democracy and the rule of law,

–  having regard to its Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought which in 2016 was awarded to Nadia Murad and Lamiya Aji Bashar,

–  having regard to its resolution of 10 October 2013 on caste-based discrimination(42), to the report of the Special Rapporteur on minority issues of 28 January 2016 on minorities and discrimination based on caste and analogous systems of inherited status(43), and to the UN Guidance Tool on descent-based discrimination,

–  having regard to its resolution of 17 November 2011 entitled ‘EU support for the ICC: facing challenges and overcoming difficulties’(44),

–  having regard to Rule 52 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the opinion of the Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality (A8-0365/2017),

A.  whereas Article 21 of the TEU commits the EU to a common foreign and security policy (CFSP) guided by the principles which have inspired its own creation, and which it seeks to advance in the world: democracy, the rule of law, the universality and indivisibility of human rights and fundamental freedoms, respect for human dignity, the principle of equality and solidarity, and compliance with the UN Charter, the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union and international law; whereas the Union is to accede to the European Convention on Human Rights;

B.  whereas today’s worldwide abuses of human rights and fundamental freedoms, including crimes against humanity, war crimes and genocide, necessitate determined efforts on the part of the whole international community;

C.  whereas respect for and the promotion, indivisibility and safeguarding of the universality of human rights are cornerstones of the CFSP; whereas in its role of scrutiny over the CFSP, Parliament has the right to be kept informed of and consulted on its main aspects and basic choices (Article 36 of the TEU);

D.  whereas the Global Strategy for the European Union’s Foreign and Security Policy, adopted by the Council in June 2016, affirms that human rights must be mainstreamed systematically across all policy sectors and institutions, including international trade and commercial policy;

E.  whereas increased coherence between the EU’s internal and external policies, as well as among the external policies themselves, is a fundamental requirement for a successful and effective EU human rights policy; whereas improved consistency should enable the EU to respond more rapidly in the early stages of human rights violations and, in certain cases, predict and prevent their perpetration, including in the field of international trade and commercial policy;

F.  whereas the EU’s commitment to effective multilateralism, with the UN at its core, is an integral part of the Union’s external policy and is rooted in the conviction that a multilateral system founded on universal rules and values is best suited to addressing global crises, challenges and threats;

G.  whereas Article 207 of the TFEU stipulates that the EU’s commercial policy is to be based on the principles and objectives of the Union’s external action; whereas trade and human rights can have an impact on each other in third countries, and whereas under a system of corporate liability, as is currently being discussed in the UN, and global value chains, the business community has an important role to play in offering positive incentives in terms of promoting human rights, democracy and corporate responsibility; whereas good governance and public authorities acting in the general interest play an important role in business behaviour; whereas the EU is participating in efforts to draft a binding treaty on business and human rights;

H.  whereas the protection of the human rights of the most vulnerable groups, such as ethnic, linguistic and religious minorities, people with disabilities, the LGBTI community, women, children, asylum seekers and migrants, deserves special attention;

I.  whereas women and children face threats, discrimination and violence, particularly in war zones and under authoritarian regimes; whereas gender equality incorporates core European values and is enshrined in the EU's legal and political framework; whereas violence and discrimination against women and girls has increased in recent years;

J.  whereas states have the ultimate responsibility to safeguard all human rights by enacting and implementing international human rights treaties and conventions, monitoring human rights violations and ensuring effective recourse for victims;

K.  whereas an increasing number of human rights violations amounting to war crimes and crimes against humanity, including genocide, are being committed by state and non-state actors;

L.  whereas freedom of thought, conscience and religion, including the freedom to believe or not to believe and to practise or not to practise the religion of one's choice, and to take on, abandon or change a religion, must be guaranteed all over the world and preserved unconditionally, in particular through interreligious and intercultural dialogue; whereas laws prohibiting blasphemy are widespread, with states laying down punishments ranging from prison sentences to lashings and the death penalty;

M.  whereas freedom of opinion and expression, freedom of assembly and association, and the holding of regular, transparent and genuine electoral processes, are essential elements of democracy; whereas in fragile, conflict-prone or oppressive societies, elections can at times trigger widespread violence;

N.  whereas engaging with third countries in all bilateral and multilateral fora, for example during human rights dialogues, is one of the most effective tools for addressing human rights concerns;

O.  whereas appropriate resources must be made available and deployed in the most efficient manner in order to enhance the promotion of human rights and democracy in third countries;

P.  whereas access to water and sanitation is a fundamental human right and limiting this access is one of the causes of geopolitical tension in certain regions;

Q.  whereas cultural heritage sites face increasing threats in the form of illicit looting and vandalism, especially in the Middle East;

R.  whereas education has a crucial role to play in preventing human rights violations and conflicts and helps to boost citizens’ participation in decision-making processes within democratic systems; whereas educational institutions that promote human rights, respect and diversity should be supported by states; whereas communication channels, whose numbers have increased, represent an important tool through which to communicate human rights abuses quickly and reach a significant number of victims or potential victims of human rights violations in third countries, providing them with information and assistance; whereas collecting comprehensive disaggregated data is essential in order to safeguard human rights, particularly those of the most vulnerable groups, marginalised groups and groups that are at risk of marginalisation; whereas the use of appropriate indicators is also an effective way of assessing the progress of the fulfilment of states’ obligations under international treaties;

General considerations

1.  Expresses profound concern about the pushback against democracy, human rights and the rule of law, which continue to be under threat worldwide; recalls that the EU has committed to promoting the universality and indivisibility of human rights and fundamental freedoms and values, as well as to advancing democratic principles, which must be enhanced worldwide;

2.  Reiterates its firm belief that the EU and its Member States must actively pursue the principle of mainstreaming human rights and democracy, as mutually reinforcing fundamental principles at the core of the EU, in all EU policies, including those with an external dimension, such as in the fields of development, migration, security, counter-terrorism, enlargement and trade; reiterates, in this regard, the crucial importance of ensuring increased coherence between the EU’s internal and external policies and greater coordination between the external policies of the Member States; stresses that the growing complexity of conflicts around the world necessitates an integrated, united and vigorous international approach and cooperation; recalls that the EU’s objective to increase its international influence as a credible and legitimate international actor is greatly shaped by its ability to pursue human rights and democracy internally and externally, in line with the commitments enshrined in its founding treaties;

3.  Emphasises the importance of enhanced cooperation between the Commission, the Council, the European External Action Service (EEAS), Parliament and the EU delegations to promote and ensure a consistent and united voice in defence of human rights and democratic principles; underlines, moreover, the importance of a strong commitment to promoting those values in multilateral fora, including through timely coordination at EU level and an active approach during negotiations; encourages the EU, in this context, to initiate and co-sponsor resolutions and to intensify the implementation of cross-regional initiatives under all UN human rights mechanisms;

4.  Welcomes the fact that in 2016, the rule of law, democratic principles and breaches of human rights were debated regularly in its plenary sessions, targeted in various parliamentary resolutions, and raised in committee and interparliamentary delegation meetings;

5.  Highlights the work of its Subcommittee on Human Rights (DROI), which maintains close working relations with the EEAS, other EU institutions, civil society, multilateral human rights institutions and the EU Special Representative (EUSR) for Human Rights;

6.  Recalls that in 2016, DROI drafted three reports, namely on human rights and migration in third countries, corporate liability for serious human rights abuses in third countries, and the fight against trafficking in human beings in the EU’s external relations; calls on the Commission to take concrete action following these own-initiative reports;

7.  Notes that in 2016, numerous DROI missions travelled to different countries with a view to collecting information and exchanging it with local governmental and non-governmental human rights actors, presenting Parliament’s position and encouraging improvements to the protection of and respect for human rights;

Addressing human rights challenges

8.  Expresses grave concern about the increasing number of attacks against religious minorities, which are often committed by non-state actors such as ISIS/Daesh; deplores the fact that many countries have and enforce anti-conversion and blasphemy laws, which effectively limit the freedom of religion or belief and the freedom of expression of religious minorities and atheists and even deprive them of these freedoms altogether; calls for measures to protect religious minorities, non-believers and atheists who are victims of blasphemy laws and calls for the EU and the Member States to engage in political discussions to repeal such laws; calls for the EU and its Member States to step up their efforts to enhance respect for freedom of thought, conscience, religion and belief and to promote intercultural and interreligious dialogue when engaging with third countries; requests concrete action towards the effective implementation of the EU Guidelines on the promotion and protection of freedom of religion or belief, including by ensuring the systematic and consistent training of EU staff at headquarters and in delegations; supports fully the EU practice of taking the lead on thematic resolutions on freedom of religion and belief at the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) and the UNGA; supports fully the work of the EU Special Envoy for the Promotion of Freedom of Religion or Belief outside the EU, Mr Ján Figel;

9.  Reiterates the fact that freedom of expression online and offline is a vital component of any democratic society, as it nourishes a culture of pluralism that empowers civil society and citizens to hold their governments and decision-makers to account, and supports respect for the rule of law; emphasises that restriction of online or offline freedom of expression, such as via the removal of online content, is to occur only under exceptional circumstances, where prescribed by law and justified by the pursuit of a legitimate aim; stresses, therefore, that the EU should intensify its efforts to promote freedom of expression through its external policies and instruments; reiterates its request for the EU and its Member States to enhance their monitoring of all types of restrictions on freedom of expression and the media in third countries, to rapidly and systematically condemn such limitations and to use all available diplomatic means and instruments to reverse such restrictions; emphasises the importance of ensuring the effective implementation of the EU Guidelines on Freedom of Expression Online and Offline and of regularly monitoring their impact; condemns the death and imprisonment of many journalists and bloggers in 2016 and calls for the EU to protect them effectively; welcomes the new European Instrument for Democracy and Human Rights (EIDHR) launched in 2016, with its specific focus on training EU delegations and media actors in third countries, on how to apply the Guidelines; stresses the importance of disclosing and condemning hate speech and incitements to violence, both on the internet and elsewhere, since they constitute a threat to the rule of law and the values embodied by human rights;

10.  Is deeply concerned that civil society, including faith-based organisations, is increasingly under attack worldwide, through, inter alia, a growing number of repressive laws adopted throughout the world, in some cases under the pretext of combating terrorism; underlines that the phenomenon of shrinking civil society space is a global one; recalls that independent civil society plays an essential role in the defence and advancement of human rights and in the functioning of democratic societies, notably by promoting transparency, accountability and the separation of powers; calls for the EU and its Member States to constantly monitor and raise cases of violations of freedom of assembly and association, including the various forms of bans and limitations on civil society organisations (CSOs) and their activities, such as laws whose aim is to shrink civil society space or the promotion of NGOs sponsored by authoritarian governments (government-organised non-governmental organisations (GONGOs)); calls, in addition, for the EU, its Member States and the EU delegations to use all available means, such as human rights dialogues, political dialogues and public diplomacy, to systematically raise individual cases of human rights defenders (HRDs) and civil society activists at risk, particularly those who have been detained or imprisoned for arbitrary reasons and/or on account of their political convictions or social engagement, and to unequivocally denounce the repression, harassment and killing of HRDs, including those active in the environmental sphere; calls for the establishment of a system to effectively monitor civil society space, with clear benchmarks and indicators to ensure an enabling and favourable legal environment for civil society;

11.  Encourages the EU delegations and the Member States’ diplomatic staff to continue to actively support HRDs, by systematically monitoring trials, visiting detained activists and issuing statements on individual cases, where appropriate; highlights the importance of silent diplomacy tools in this regard; welcomes the fact that the EU raised HRD cases in dialogues and consultations at EU level with over 50 countries in 2016; highlights the fact that the EIDHR Emergency Fund supported more than 250 HRDs at EU level in 2016, representing an increase of 30 % compared with 2015; welcomes the establishment and successful operation of the EU Human Rights Defenders Mechanism, ProtectDefenders.eu, which has been implemented by civil society and has provided critical support to a large number of HRDs; urges the Commission to ensure the continuation of the programme after October 2018 and to increase its capabilities in order to provide more support to HRDs worldwide;

12.  Considers it deeply regrettable that torture, inhuman or degrading treatment and the death penalty continue in many countries all over the world, and calls for the EU to intensify its efforts to eradicate them; welcomes, in this regard, the revision of EU legislation on trade in certain goods which could be used for capital punishment, torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment; urges the EEAS and the VP/HR to engage more strongly in the fight against torture and other cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment or punishment, including the death penalty, through increased diplomatic efforts and more systematic public positioning; highlights, in this connection, the worrisome conditions of incarceration in some prisons, including the non-treatment of health issues, and recommends that the EEAS, the EU delegations and the Member States use all existing instruments, such as the EU Guidelines on Torture, to their full potential; welcomes the fact that the UN’s resolution on a moratorium on the use of the death penalty was adopted by the UNGA in December 2016 with the support of 117 countries; notes that in 2016, the number of executions carried out globally fell compared with the previous year and expresses its grave concern that the overall number of executions nevertheless remains higher than the average recorded for the previous decade; emphasises that those targeted are often dissenting members of society and vulnerable groups; calls on countries that still pursue this practice to adopt a moratorium and abolish the death penalty;

13.  Acknowledges the potentially great importance of modern information and communication technologies in promoting, defending and redressing human rights worldwide, and invites the EU institutions and the Member States to use their information channels to systematically reiterate within their specific frameworks and remits Parliament’s position on different human rights issues, while contributing to the efficiency and visibility of the EU’s common efforts; expresses its concern about the ever-increasing use of certain cyber-surveillance dual-use technologies against politicians, activists and journalists; welcomes, in this regard, the ongoing work of the EU institutions to update Council Regulation (EC) No 428/2009 of 5 May 2009 setting up a Community regime for the control of exports, transfer, brokering and transit of dual-use items(45); strongly condemns the increasing number of HRDs facing digital threats, including compromised data through confiscation of equipment, remote surveillance and data leakages; expresses concern over online platforms deleting legitimate video evidence of potential war crimes as part of the removal of terrorist content and propaganda from the platforms;

14.  Expresses its concern about the increasing privatisation of the rule of law online, where private companies make decisions about the limitations of fundamental rights, such as freedom of speech, on the basis of their terms of service as opposed to democratically adopted laws;

15.  Calls on the Commission to adopt a notice-and-action directive that increases the transparency and proportionality of takedown procedures, while providing effective remedies for users whose content has been wrongly taken down;

16.  Condemns the use of sexual violence against women and girls, including mass rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, gender-based forms of persecution, trafficking, sex tourism and all other forms of physical, sexual and psychological violence, as a weapon of war; draws attention to the fact that gender-related crimes and crimes of sexual violence are classified in the Rome Statute as war crimes, crimes against humanity or constitutive acts with respect to genocide or torture; stresses the importance of defending women’s rights, including their sexual and reproductive rights, through legislation, education and by supporting CSOs; welcomes the adoption of the EU Gender Action Plan 2016-2020 which sets out a comprehensive list of measures to improve the situation of women in terms of equal rights and empowerment; emphasises the importance of ensuring its effective implementation; welcomes, in addition, the adoption of the Strategic Engagement for Gender Equality 2016-2019, which promotes gender equality and women’s rights worldwide; stresses the importance of the ratification and effective implementation by all Member States of the Istanbul Convention; points out that education is the best tool for combating discrimination and violence against women and children; requests that the Commission, the EEAS and the VP/HR step up their fulfilment of the obligations and commitments in the area of women’s rights under CEDAW and encourages third countries to do the same; believes that the EU should continue mainstreaming support for women within common security and defence policy (CSDP) operations, conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction; reiterates the importance of UN Security Council resolution 1325 on women, peace and security; stresses the importance of women’s systematic, equal, full and active participation in the prevention and resolution of conflicts, in the promotion of human rights and democratic reforms, and in peacekeeping operations, humanitarian assistance, post-conflict reconstruction and democratic transition processes leading to lasting and stable political solutions; recalls that the 2016 Sakharov Prize was awarded to Nadia Murad and Lamiya Aji Bashar, survivors of sexual enslavement perpetrated by ISIS/Daesh;

17.  Recalls that equality between women and men is a core principle of the EU and its Member States, and that gender mainstreaming one of the Union’s principal objectives as enshrined in the Treaties; calls on the Commission, therefore, to integrate gender mainstreaming into all EU legislation, guidelines, actions and funding as a core EU principle, with a special emphasis on EU external relations policies; stresses the need to reinforce the role of the EU delegations, as well as that of the EEAS Principal Advisor on Gender, by ensuring a specific budget dedicated to her area of competence;

18.  Calls on the EEAS to ensure that the outcomes of the 61st session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) will be included in its policies, and will provide renewed impetus in promoting ‘women’s economic empowerment’ and addressing gender inequalities in the changing world of work;

19.  Notes the positive contribution of women’s empowerment to achieving an inclusive, equitable and peaceful society and sustainable development; stresses that the focus on gender equality and women’s empowerment is explicit across all the SDGs and that further efforts should be pursued to ensure that women’s rights are fully upheld and that policies promoting economic and social empowerment and women’s participation in decision-making processes are implemented effectively; stresses that particular attention should be given to empowering indigenous women;

20.  Points out that women should be encouraged to organise themselves in trade unions, and that they should not be discriminated against when seeking business financing;

21.  Calls for the EU to support all women’s associations that work on an everyday basis to support women in humanitarian crises and conflicts;

22.  Reaffirms the urgent need for the universal ratification and effective implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) and its Optional Protocols, in order to provide children with legal protection; underlines that children are often exposed to specific abuse, such as child marriages or genital mutilation, and are therefore in need of enhanced protection; underlines that child labour, recruitment of children in armed conflicts and early and forced marriages remain critical issues in some countries; requests that the EU systematically consult relevant local and international child rights organisations, and raise, in its political and human rights dialogues with third countries, States Parties’ obligations to implement the Convention; welcomes the Council of Europe Strategy for the Rights of the Child (2016-2021); requests that the EU continue to promote the EU-UNICEF Child Rights Toolkit for integrating child rights in development cooperation through its external delegations, and to train the EU delegation staff adequately in this field; reiterates its request for the Commission to propose a comprehensive children’s rights strategy and action plan for the next five years, in order to prioritise children’s rights within EU external policies, welcomes the fact that under the 2016 Development Cooperation Instrument, resources were allocated to support UN agencies in carrying out measures targeted to children’s rights, which must be designed to maximise the effective benefit for children in need, especially in the field of health systems and access to education, water and sanitation; calls for an urgent solution to the issue of stateless children, in particular those born outside their parents’ country of origin, and migrant children;

23.  Condemns in the strongest terms all forms of discrimination, including on grounds of race, colour, religion, gender, sexual orientation, sex characteristics, language, culture, social origin, caste, birth, age, disability or any other status; stresses that the EU should intensify its efforts to eradicate all types of discrimination, racism, xenophobia and other forms of intolerance through human rights and political dialogues, the work of the EU delegations and public diplomacy; stresses, in addition, that the EU should continue promoting the ratification and full implementation of all UN conventions that support this cause;

24.  Reiterates that trafficking in human beings (THB) means the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation; calls for the EU and the Member States to take measures to discourage the demand that fosters all forms of exploitation of persons, especially women and children, that lead to trafficking, while maintaining a human rights-based and victim-centred approach; reiterates the need for all Member States to implement the EU Strategy towards the Eradication of Trafficking in Human Beings and Directive 2011/36/EU(46) on this subject; expresses its profound concern at the extreme vulnerability of migrants and refugees to exploitation, smuggling and THB; stresses the need to maintain a distinction between the concepts of THB and migrant smuggling;

25.  Condemns the continuing human rights violations committed against people suffering as a result of caste hierarchies and caste-based discrimination, including the denial of equality and access to the legal system and employment, continued segregation and caste-induced barriers to the achievement of basic human rights and development; reiterates its call for the development of EU policy on caste discrimination, and for the EU to take advantage of every opportunity to express its grave concern over such human rights violations; urges the EU and its Member States to intensify efforts and support related initiatives at UN and delegation level by implementing and monitoring the 2030 SDGs, monitoring the new UN Guidance Tool on descent-based discrimination and supporting states’ implementation of recommendations by UN human rights mechanisms on the topic of caste discrimination;

26.  Expresses profound concern that minorities are still at a heightened risk of discrimination and are especially vulnerable to political, economic, environmental and labour-related changes and disruptions; notes that many have little or no access to political representation and are acutely affected by poverty; stresses that the EU should intensify its efforts to eradicate the violations of human rights committed against minorities; stresses that minority communities have special needs and that they should be guaranteed full access and equal treatment in all areas of economic, social, political and cultural life;

27.  Welcomes the ratification of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) and reiterates the importance of its ratification and efficient implementation by both the Member States and the EU institutions; emphasises that disabilities do not deprive a person of human dignity, which entails a state duty to protect them; stresses, in particular, the need to mainstream credibly the principle of universal accessibility and the rights of persons with disabilities in all relevant EU policies, including in the area of development cooperation, and underlines the prescriptive and horizontal nature of this issue; calls for the EU to incorporate the fight against discrimination on grounds of disability in its external action and development aid policies; welcomes, in this connection, the inclusion of the rights of people with disabilities in the new European Consensus on Development;

28.  Reiterates its support for the systematic introduction of human rights clauses in international agreements between the EU and third countries, including trade and investment agreements; recalls that all human rights must be considered of equal value, being indivisible, interdependent and interrelated; calls on the Commission to monitor the implementation of such clauses effectively and systematically and to provide Parliament with regular reports on partner countries’ respect for human rights; calls on the Commission to adopt a more structured and strategic approach to human rights dialogues within the framework of future agreements; takes a positive view of the GSP+ preference system as a means to stimulate the effective implementation of 27 core international conventions on human rights and labour standards; calls for the genuine enforcement of GSP+ and expects the Commission to report back to Parliament and to the Council on the status of its ratification and the progress made under this scheme; reiterates the importance of the proper implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights;

29.  Reaffirms the fact that the activities of all companies, including European ones, operating in third countries should be in full compliance with international human rights standards and calls for the EU and its Member States to ensure that this is the case; reaffirms, moreover, the importance of promoting corporate social responsibility and of European enterprises playing a leading role in promoting international standards on business and human rights, emphasising that cooperation between human rights and business organisations would empower local actors and promote civil society; acknowledges that global value chains can contribute to enhancing international core labour, environmental and social standards, and represent opportunities and challenges with regard to sustainable progress and the promotion of human rights, especially in developing countries; calls for the EU to play a more active role in achieving the adequate, fair, transparent and sustainable management of global value chains and to mitigate any negative effects on human rights, including the infringement of labour rights; outlines, however, that in the case of business-related human rights abuses, effective access to remedies for victims should be guaranteed; urges the Commission to ensure that the projects supported by the EIB are in line with EU policy and human rights commitments; takes note of the ongoing negotiations on a binding treaty on transnational corporations and other business enterprises with respect to human rights; encourages the EU to constructively take part in such negotiations;

30.  Calls for the EU and its Member States to use all their political weight to prevent any act that could be considered genocide, a war crime or a crime against humanity from taking place, to respond in an efficient and coordinated manner in cases where such crimes occur, to mobilise all necessary resources to bring to justice all those responsible, including through the application of the principle of universal jurisdiction, and to assist the victims and support stabilisation and reconciliation processes; calls on the international community to set up instruments to minimise the warning-response gap in order to prevent the emergence, re-emergence and escalation of violent conflict, such as the EU’s early warning system;

31.  Calls for the EU to provide support to organisations (including NGOs, open source investigation organisations and civil society) that collect, preserve and protect evidence, digital and otherwise, of crimes committed, in order to facilitate their prosecution internationally;

32.  Expresses grave concern over the destruction of cultural heritage sites in Syria, Iraq, Yemen and Libya; notes that of the world’s 38 endangered cultural heritage sites, 22 are in the Middle East; supports the activities of the Cultural Heritage Initiative and its fact-finding activities in Syria and Iraq related to the destruction of archaeological and cultural heritage;

33.  Welcomes the EU’s efforts to support the International, Impartial and Independent Mechanism (IIIM) set up by the UN to assist in the investigation of serious crimes committed in Syria; emphasises the need to set up a similar independent mechanism in Iraq; calls for the EU and the Member States that have not already done so to contribute financially to the IIIM;

34.  Strongly condemns the heinous crimes and human rights violations committed by state and non-state actors; is horrified at the vast range of crimes committed, including murder, torture, rape as a weapon of war, enslavement and sexual slavery, the recruitment of child soldiers, forced religious conversions and the systematic ‘cleansing’ and killing of religious minorities; recalls that the situation suffered by religious minorities in the territories governed by ISIS/Daesh was qualified by Parliament, in its resolution of 12 February 2015 on the humanitarian crisis in Iraq and Syria, in particular in the IS context(47), as a genocide; emphasises that the EU and its Member States should support the prosecution of members of non-state groups such as ISIS/Daesh by asking the UN Security Council to confer jurisdiction to the International Criminal Court (ICC) or to ensure that justice is rendered by means of an ad-hoc tribunal or universal jurisdiction;

35.  Reiterates its full support for the ICC, the Rome Statute, the Office of the Prosecutor, the Prosecutor’s proprio motu powers, and the progress made in initiating new investigations as an essential means to fight impunity for atrocity crimes; calls on all Member States to ratify the Kampala amendments on the crime of aggression and to add the ‘atrocity crimes’ to the list of crimes for which the EU has competence; condemns any attempt to undermine its legitimacy or independence and calls for the EU and its Member States to cooperate consistently in order to support the ICC’s investigations and decisions with the aim of putting an end to impunity for international crimes, including when referring to the arrest of persons wanted by the ICC; urges the EU and its Member States to consistently support ICC examinations, investigations and decisions and to take steps to prevent and respond effectively to instances of non-cooperation with the ICC and provide for adequate funding; welcomes the meeting of 6 July 2016 between EU and ICC representatives in Brussels in preparation for the 2nd EU-ICC round table meeting, enabling relevant staff at the ICC and the EU institutions to identify common areas of interest, exchange information on relevant activities and ensure better cooperation between both parties; notes, with profound regret, the recent announcements of withdrawals from the Rome Statute, which represent a challenge in terms of victims’ access to justice and which should be firmly condemned; considers that the Commission, the EEAS and the Member States should continue to encourage third countries to ratify and apply the Rome Statute; reiterates its call for the VP/HR to appoint an EUSR for International Humanitarian Law and International Justice with a mandate to promote, mainstream and represent the EU’s commitment to the fight against impunity and to the ICC across EU foreign policies; calls for the EU and its Member States to support UN accountability mechanisms and resolutions at UN multilateral fora, including the Human Rights Council;

36.  Urges the EU to step up its efforts to promote the rule of law and the independence of the judiciary at multilateral and bilateral level as a fundamental principle for the consolidation of democracy; encourages the EU to support the fair administration of justice worldwide by assisting legislative and institutional reform processes in third countries; encourages, in addition, the EU delegations and Member States’ embassies to monitor trials systematically with a view to promoting the independence of the judiciary;

37.  Expresses profound concern and solidarity with the growing number of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers, including an ever larger number of women, as the victims of conflicts, violence, persecution, governance failures, poverty, irregular migration, trafficking and smuggling networks; stresses the urgent need to take genuine steps to tackle the root causes of migration flows and find long-term solutions based on respect for human rights and dignity, and therefore to address the external dimension of the refugee crisis, including by finding sustainable solutions to conflicts in our neighbourhood, for example by developing cooperation and partnerships with the third countries concerned that comply with international law and ensure respect for human rights in these countries; expresses its profound concern over violence against migrant children, including missing, unaccompanied migrant children, and calls for resettlement, family reunification schemes and humanitarian corridors; is deeply concerned at the plight and rising number of internally displaced persons (IDPs) and calls for their safe return, resettlement or local integration; calls for the EU and its Member States to provide humanitarian assistance in the field of education, housing, health and other humanitarian areas that help the refugees closest to their homeland, and for return policies to be properly implemented; underlines the need for a comprehensive human rights-based approach to migration and calls for the EU to collaborate further with the UN, regional organisations, governments and NGOs; calls on Member States to fully implement the common European asylum package and common migration legislation, particularly so as to safeguard vulnerable asylum seekers; stresses that the concepts of safe countries and safe countries of origin must not prevent the consideration of individual asylum applications; warns against the instrumentalisation of EU foreign policy as ‘migration management’; calls for the EU and the Member States to establish full transparency surrounding the funds allocated to third countries for cooperation on migration and to ensure that such cooperation does not benefit structures involved in human rights violations, but rather goes hand in hand with improving the human rights situation within these countries;

38.  Considers that development cooperation and the promotion of human rights and democratic principles, including the rule of law and good governance, should go hand in hand; recalls, in this context, that the UN has stated that without a human rights-based approach, development goals cannot be fully achieved; recalls, in addition, that the EU has committed to supporting partner countries, taking into account their development situation and their progress as regards human rights and democracy;

39.  Points out that the rate of people at risk of poverty or social exclusion is higher among women, and asks the Commission to step up its efforts to implement measures to combat poverty and social exclusion as part of its development policies;

40.  Recalls that criterion two of Council Common Position 944/2008/CFSP obliges Member States to examine each arms export licence against the country of destination's respect for human rights; recalls, in this connection, the commitment made by the Commission in the EU Action Plan on Human Rights and Democracy in connection to security forces and the implementation of the EU’s human rights policy, including the development and implementation of a due diligence policy in this field;

41.  Reiterates its call for a common EU position on the use of armed drones that upholds human rights and international humanitarian law and addresses issues such as the legal framework, proportionality, accountability, the protection of civilians and transparency; insists once again that the EU ban the development, production and use of fully autonomous weapons which enable strikes to be carried out without human intervention;

42.  Considers that the EU should continue its efforts to enhance respect for the human rights of LGBTI people, in line with the EU Guidelines on the topic; calls for the full implementation of the Guidelines, including through the training of EU staff in third countries; denounces the fact that 72 countries still criminalise homosexuality, is concerned that 13 of these countries have the death penalty, and believes that violent practices and acts of violence against individuals on the basis of their sexual orientation, such as forced outings, hate crimes and hate speech both online and offline, and corrective rape should not go unpunished; takes note of the legalisation of same-sex marriage and same-sex civil unions in some countries and encourages their further recognition; condemns violations of bodily integrity against women and minority groups; calls on states to outlaw these practices, tackle perpetrators and support victims;

43.  Emphasises the fundamental importance of combating corruption, in all its forms, so as to safeguard the rule of law, democracy and respect for human rights; strongly condemns any conduct accommodating such corrupt practices;

44.  Recalls that corruption is a threat to the equal enjoyment of human rights and undermines democratic processes such as the rule of law and the fair administration of justice; takes the view that the EU should emphasise in all platforms for dialogue with third countries the importance of integrity, accountability and the proper management of public affairs, finances and property, as stipulated in the UN Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC); recommends that the EU use its expertise to support third countries more consistently and systematically in their efforts to tackle corruption, by setting up and consolidating independent and effective anti-corruption institutions; calls, in particular, on the Commission to negotiate provisions on combating corruption in all the future trade agreements it negotiates with third countries;

45.  Highlights the essential obligations and responsibilities of states and other duty bearers to mitigate climate change, prevent its negative impacts on human rights and foster policy coherence in order to ensure that climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts are adequate, sufficiently ambitious, non-discriminatory and otherwise compliant with human rights obligations; underlines that the UN estimates that there will be many environmentally displaced people by 2050; emphasises the link between trade policies, environmental policies and development policies, and the positive and negative impact such policies can have on respect for human rights; welcomes international dedication to promoting the integration of the issues of environmental and natural disasters and climate change with human rights;

46.  Stresses that land grabbing has increased considerably in recent years in developing countries; considers that the fight against the exploitation and appropriation of resources should be a priority; condemns practices such as land grabbing and the indiscriminate use of natural resources; calls on the Commission to take urgent action in response to Parliament's many recent resolutions in this field;

47.  Underlines the importance of ensuring that human rights and access to goods and services such as water and sanitation are covered in social, education, health and security policies;

48.  Calls on international institutions, national governments, NGOs and individuals to work in synergy to establish an appropriate regulatory framework in order to ensure that everyone in the world has guaranteed access to a minimum amount of water; underlines that water should be considered not merchandise but a question of development and sustainability and that water privatisation does not exempt states from their human rights responsibilities; calls on countries in which water is one of the causes of tension or conflict to cooperate in the sharing of water so as to bring about a win-win situation for the sustainability and peaceful development of the region;

Addressing democracy support challenges and activities

49.  Stresses that the EU should continue to actively support democratic and effective human rights institutions and civil society in their efforts to promote democratisation; welcomes the invaluable assistance provided to CSOs worldwide under the EIDHR, which continues to constitute the flagship instrument of the EU in implementing its external human rights policy; welcomes, in addition, the European Endowment for Democracy’s consistent efforts to promote democracy and respect for fundamental rights and freedoms in the eastern and southern neighbourhoods of the EU;

50.  Recalls that the experience gained and lessons learned from transitions to democracy within the framework of enlargement and neighbourhood policy could contribute positively to the identification of best practices that could be used to support and consolidate other democratisation processes worldwide;

51.  Reiterates, in this context, its call for the Commission to develop EU guidelines for democracy support;

52.  Recommends that the EU step up its efforts to develop a more comprehensive approach to democratisation processes, of which free and fair elections are only one dimension, in order to contribute positively to the strengthening of democratic institutions and public confidence in electoral processes worldwide;

53.  Welcomes the eight Election Observation Missions (EOMs) and the eight Electoral Expert Missions (EEMs) deployed around the globe by the EU in 2016; highlights the fact that since 2015, the EU has deployed 17 EOMs and 23 EEMs; reiterates its positive view of the EU’s continued support for electoral processes and its provision of electoral assistance and support for domestic observers; welcomes and fully supports the work of the Democracy Support and Election Coordination Group (DEG) in this regard;

54.  Recalls the importance of proper follow-up of the reports and recommendations of the EOMs as a way of enhancing their impact and strengthening the EU’s support for democratic standards in the countries concerned;

55.  Welcomes the commitment made by the Commission, the EEAS and the Member States under the current Action Plan on Human Rights and Democracy to engage more firmly and consistently with election management bodies, parliamentary institutions and CSOs in third countries, in order to contribute to their empowerment and thus to the strengthening of democratic processes;

56.  Stresses that enlargement policy is one of the strongest tools for reinforcing respect for democratic principles and human rights in the light of current political developments in candidate and potential candidate countries; calls on the Commission to strengthen its efforts to support the reinforcement of democratic political cultures, respect for the rule of law, the independence of the media and the judiciary, and the fight against corruption in those countries; expresses its conviction that the revised European neighbourhood policy should continue to have the protection, active promotion and enforcement of human rights and democratic principles at its core; reiterates the fact that the protection, active support for and enforcement of human rights and democracy are in the interest of both partner countries and the EU; stresses, furthermore, the need for the EU to uphold the commitment it has made to its partners, especially in its neighbourhood, to support economic, social and political reform, protect human rights and help to establish the rule of law, as the best means of strengthening the international order and ensuring the stability of its neighbourhood; recalls that the Union for the Mediterranean can and should shape political dialogue in this area and push for a strong human rights and democracy agenda in the region; recalls that any country aiming to join the EU has to fully guarantee human rights and strictly fulfil the Copenhagen Criteria, with which non-compliance might lead to the freezing of the negotiations;

57.  Stresses that peacebuilding involves efforts to prevent and reduce conflict and strengthen the resilience of political, socioeconomic, and security institutions, in order to lay the foundation for sustainable peace and development in the long term; underlines that the promotion of the rule of law, good governance and human rights is fundamental to sustaining peace;

Ensuring a comprehensive and coherent human rights and democracy support approach via EU policies

58.  Takes note of the adoption of the EU Annual Report on Human Rights and Democracy in the World 2016; considers that the Annual Report is an indispensable tool for scrutiny, communication and debate on the EU’s policy on human rights and democracy in the world, and a valuable instrument which provides a comprehensive overview of the EU’s priorities, efforts and challenges in this field and which can be used to identify further ways to address them in an effective manner;

59.  Reiterates strongly its invitation to the VP/HR to take part in a debate with MEPs in two plenary sessions per year, once when the Annual Report is presented and once in response to its own report; reiterates the importance of a continuous interinstitutional dialogue, namely regarding the follow-up of Parliament’s urgency resolutions on human rights; recalls that written answers also play an important role in interinstitutional relations, as they allow for a systematic and in-depth follow-up to all the points raised by Parliament and thus contribute to the strengthening of effective coordination; calls on the VP/HR and the EEAS to provide thorough responses to written questions and to address the human rights issues raised at the highest level of dialogue with the countries involved;

60.  Commends the EEAS and the Commission on their exhaustive reporting on the activities undertaken by the EU in the area of human rights and democracy in 2016; considers, nevertheless, that the current format of the Annual Report on Human Rights and Democracy could be improved by offering a better overview of the concrete impact of the EU’s actions on human rights and democracy in third countries;

61.  Reiterates its view that the adoption of the EU Strategic Framework and the first Action Plan on Human Rights and Democracy in 2012 constituted a major milestone for the EU in placing human rights and democracy at the core of its external relations; welcomes the adoption by the Council in July 2015 of a new Action Plan on Human Rights and Democracy for 2015-2019 and the performance of a mid-term review in 2017; calls on the VP/HR, the EEAS, the Commission, the Council and the Member States to ensure the efficient and coherent implementation of the current Action Plan, including through genuine collaboration with CSOs; stresses that the Member States should report back on how they have implemented the Plan; draws particular attention to the importance of increasing the effectiveness and maximising the local impact of the tools used to promote respect for human rights and democracy worldwide;

62.  Reiterates its view that a solid consensus and enhanced coordination between Member States and the EU institutions, as well as genuine collaboration with CSOs at local, national and international level, is required in order to advance the human rights and democracy agenda coherently and consistently; stresses firmly that Member States should take greater ownership of the implementation of the Action Plan and the EU Strategic Framework and use them as a blueprint for promoting human rights and democracy bilaterally and multilaterally;

63.  Recognises the key role of the EUSR for Human Rights, Mr Lambrinidis, in enhancing the EU’s visibility and effectiveness in protecting and promoting human rights and democratic principles around the world, and highlights his role in promoting the consistent and coherent implementation of the EU’s human rights policy; welcomes the extension of the EUSR’s mandate until 28 February 2019 and reiterates its request for this mandate to be made permanent; recommends, in this regard, that the EUSR be given own-initiative powers, higher public visibility and adequate staff and financial resources to work at his full potential; recommends, in addition, that the EUSR increase the transparency of his activities, plans, progress reports and reviews;

64.  Notes that the work and impact of the EUSR for Human Rights can be accessed only partially by reviewing the Annual Report on Human Rights, his social media account and the speeches available;

65.  Supports fully the human rights country strategies (HRCSs), which tailor EU action to each country’s specific situation and needs; reiterates its call for MEPs to be given access to strategy content; underlines strongly the importance of taking into account the HRCSs at all levels of policy-making vis-à-vis individual third countries; reiterates that HRCSs should correspond to EU actions to be implemented in each country depending on specific situations, and should contain measurable progress indicators and the possibility to adjust them if necessary;

66.  Welcomes the designation of human rights and gender focal points by all EU delegations and CSDP missions; recalls its recommendation to the VP/HR and the EEAS to develop clear operational guidelines on the role of focal points in delegations, so that they may improve, act as true human rights advisors and carry out their work efficiently;

67.  Acknowledges that Human Rights Dialogues with third countries can be an efficient tool for bilateral engagement and cooperation in the promotion and protection of human rights; welcomes the establishment of Human Rights Dialogues with a growing number of countries; praises and further encourages the involvement of civil society in preparatory dialogues; reiterates its call for the development of a comprehensive mechanism for monitoring and reviewing the functioning of Human Rights Dialogues;

68.  Recalls the EU’s commitment to placing human rights and democracy at the centre of its relations with third countries; stresses, therefore, that the advancement of human rights and democratic principles, including human rights conditionality clauses in international agreements, needs to be supported through all EU policies with an external dimension, such as enlargement and neighbourhood policy, the CSDP, and environment, development, security, counter-terrorism, trade, migration, justice and home affairs policies;

69.  Recalls that sanctions are an essential tool of the CFSP; urges the Council to adopt the sanctions provided for in EU legislation when they are deemed necessary to achieving the objectives of the CFSP, in particular with a view to protecting human rights and consolidating and supporting democracy, while ensuring that they do not have an impact on the civilian population; asks that these sanctions be focused on officials identified as responsible for human rights violations in order to punish them for their crimes and abuse;

70.  Notes the Commission’s efforts to fulfil its commitment to including human rights provisions in its impact assessments for legislative and non-legislative proposals, implementing measures and trade and investment agreements; urges the Commission to improve the quality and comprehensiveness of the impact assessments and to ensure the systematic incorporation of human rights issues in the text of legislative and non-legislative proposals;

71.  Reiterates its full support for the EU’s strong engagement in promoting the advancement of human rights and democratic principles through cooperation with UN structures and UN specialised agencies, the Council of Europe, the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), regional organisations such as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC), the African Union, and the Arab League, and other organisations, in line with Articles 21 and 220 of the TEU;

72.  Stresses that in order to fulfil the ambitious objectives set out in the new Action Plan, the EU must set aside sufficient resources and expertise, in terms of both dedicated human resources in delegations and headquarters, and funds available;

73.  Reiterates, furthermore, that active and consistent EU engagement in all UN human rights mechanisms, in particular the Third Committee of the UNGA and the UNHRC, is of the utmost importance; acknowledges the efforts of the EEAS, the EU delegations in New York and Geneva and the Member States to increase EU coherence on human rights issues at UN level; encourages the EU to step up its efforts to make its voice heard, including by intensifying the growing implementation of cross-regional initiatives and by co-sponsoring and taking the lead on resolutions; underlines the need for EU leadership to push for UN reform with the goal of reinforcing the impact and strength of the rules-based multilateral system, and of ensuring more efficient human rights protection and the advancement of international law;

°

°  °

74.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission, the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, the EU Special Representative for Human Rights, the governments and parliaments of the Member States, the UN Security Council, the UN Secretary-General, the President of the 70th UN General Assembly, the President of the UN Human Rights Council, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and the EU heads of delegation.

(1)

http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/ProfessionalInterest/cedaw.pdf

(2)

http://www.un.org/en/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=A/RES/69/167

(3)

https://treaties.un.org/doc/source/docs/A_RES_45_158-E.pdf

(4)

http://www.unhcr.org/3b66c2aa10

(5)

http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Publications/GuidingPrinciplesBusinessHR_EN.pdf

(6)

http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/migration/generalassembly/docs/globalcompact/A_RES‌_71_1.pdf

(7)

https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015/transformingourworld

(8)

https://www.coe.int/en/web/conventions/full-list/-/conventions/rms/090000168008482e

(9)

http://www.oecd.org/corporate/mne/oecdguidelinesformultinationalenterprises.htm

(10)

https://www.consilium.europa.eu/uedocs/cms_data/docs/pressdata/EN/foraff/131181.pdf

(11)

http://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-10897-2015-INIT/en/pdf

(12)

http://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-11138-2017-INIT/en/pdf

(13)

https://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/sites/devco/files/staff-working-document-gender-2016-2020-20150922_en.pdf

(14)

http://europa.eu/globalstrategy/sites/globalstrategy/files/regions/files/eugs_review_web_0.pdf

(15)

http://europa.eu/globalstrategy/sites/globalstrategy/files/full_brochure_year_1.pdf

(16)

OJ L 76, 22.3.2011, p. 56.

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2011:076:0056:0058:EN:PDF

(17)

https://ec.europa.eu/anti-trafficking/sites/antitrafficking/files/communication_on_the_european_agenda_on_migration_en.pdf

(18)

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A52016DC0385

(19)

https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/eu_guidelines_rights_of_child_0.pdf

(20)

https://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/sites/devco/files/european-consensus-on-development-final-20170626_en.pdf

(21)

 https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/eu_human_rights_guidelines_on_freedom_of_expression_online_and_offline_en.pdf

(22)

https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/137585.pdf

(23)

http://www.ceceurope.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/CofEU_119404.pdf

(24)

https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/guidelines_death_penalty_st08416_en.pdf

(25)

https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/20120626_guidelines_en.pdf

(26)

https://www.osce.org/odihr/19223?download=true

(27)

https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/137584.pdf

(28)

https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/eu_guidelines_on_human_rights_dialogues_with_third_countries.pdf

(29)

https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/guidelines_en.pdf

(30)

 https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/16173_08_en.pdf

(31)

https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/10019_08_en.pdf

(32)

OJ L 130, 19.5.2017, p. 1.

(33)

https://eeas.europa.eu/sites/eeas/files/eu_guidelines_hrd_en.pdf

(34)

http://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-10255-2016-INIT/en/pdf

(35)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2017)0344.

(36)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0502.

(37)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0404.

(38)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0405.

(39)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0300.

(40)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0020.

(41)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0066.

(42)

OJ C 181, 19.5.2016, p. 69.

(43)

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/HRC/RegularSessions/Session31/Documents/A_HRC_31_56_en.doc

(44)

OJ C 153 E, 31.5.2013, p. 115.

(45)

OJ L 134, 29.5.2009, p. 1.

(46)

OJ L 101, 15.4.2011, p. 1.

(47)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2015)0040.


EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

Scrutiny towards an EU Human Rights cycle

The main aim of this report is to look at the human rights and democracy challenges in third countries and the parliamentary scrutiny of human rights in external policies for the year 2016. The rapporteur also seeks to clarify the cycle of human rights policy-making within the European Union. The rapporteur sees the role of Parliament as essential for the mainstreaming of human rights in the EU’s external policy.

The rapporteur will therefore

–  scrutinise and comment on the human rights policy of the European Union while keeping a clear focus on the year 2016,

–  give an overview of the actions of the European Parliament in the area of human rights including the awarding of the Sakharov Prize for 2016 and the urgency resolutions adopted,

–  take into account the mid-term review of the 2015-2019 Action Plan which has just been completed by the Council and the Commission and which accompanies the 10-year strategic framework, 2012-2022,

The European Union’s external action and Human Rights

The European Union is founded on a strong engagement to promote and protect human rights, democracy and the rule of law worldwide. Sustainable peace, development and prosperity cannot exist without respect for human rights. This commitment underpins all internal and external policies of the European Union. The European Union actively promotes and defends universal human rights within its borders and when engaging in relations with non-EU countries. Over the years, the EU has adopted important reference documents on the promotion and protection of human rights and developed a range of diplomatic and cooperation tools to support the worldwide advancement of human rights.

The Lisbon Treaty

The Lisbon Treaty places human rights and democracy at the heart of the external relations of the European Union by stating that

The Union’s action on the international scene shall be guided by the principles which have inspired its own creation, development and enlargement, and which it seeks to advance in the wider world: democracy, the rule of law, the universality and indivisibility of human rights and fundamental freedoms, respect for human dignity, the principles of equality and solidarity, and respect for the principles of the United Nations Charter and international law. The Union shall seek to develop relations and build partnerships with third countries, and international, regional or global organisations which share the principles referred to in the first subparagraph. It shall promote multilateral solutions to common problems, in particular in the framework of the United Nations”. (Art 21(1) TEU)

The role of the Council and the HR/VP

Since the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty, the external relations of the EU are mainly formulated and implemented by the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, who simultaneously serves as the Vice-President of the Commission. She is assisted by the European External Action Service (EEAS).

Strategic Framework on Human Rights 2012-2021 and Action Plans

In June 2012, the Council adopted a Strategic Framework on Human Rights and Democracy. The framework sets out the general human rights objectives of the EU. The framework defines the principles, objectives and priorities for improving the effectiveness and consistency of EU policy over ten years, 2012 - 2021. These principles include mainstreaming human rights into all EU policies.

The framework is operationalised by the periodic action plan, which accompanies the framework. This Action Plan sets concrete goals associated with timeframes and assigns relevant stakeholders. A first Action Plan for 2012-2014 was adopted which was then followed by a second action plan for 2015-2019. It builds upon the existing body of EU human rights and democracy support policies in the external action area, notably EU Guidelines, toolkits and other agreed positions, and the various external financing instruments. The current Action Plan contains 34 types of actions, which correspond to the following broader objectives: boosting ownership of local actors, addressing human rights challenges, ensuring a comprehensive human rights approach to conflict and crises, fostering better coherence and consistency and a more effective EU human rights and democracy support policy. A midterm review of the Action Plan has recently been adopted.

Human Rights Guidelines

EU Guidelines are not legally binding but they represent a strong political signal that they are priorities for the Union. Guidelines are pragmatic instruments of EU Human Rights policy and practical tools to help EU representations in the field better advance our Human Rights policy. There are 11 Guidelines.


ANNEX I: INDIVIDUAL CASES RAISED BY THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT

(JANUARY - DECEMBER 2016)

COUNTRY

Individual

BACKGROUND

ACTION TAKEN BY THE PARLIAMENT

BAHRAIN

 

 

Mohamed Ramadan

Ali Moosa

Mohammed Ramadan, a 32-year-old airport security guard, was arrested by the Bahraini authorities for allegedly taking part in a bombing in Al Dair on 14 February 2014, together with Ali Moosa, that killed a security officer and wounded several others.

 

A Bahraini court sentenced Ramadan and Moosa to death. However, both retracted their confession, claiming that they confessed after being tortured in the custody of the Criminal Investigations Directorate (CID). This sentence was upheld by the Court of Cassation, Bahrain’s highest court of appeal, in late 2015. A final date for the execution is still to be cleared.

In its Resolution of 4 February 2016, the European Parliament:

- Expresses its concern and disappointment over Bahrain’s return to the practice of capital punishment; calls for the reintroduction of the moratorium on the death penalty as a first step towards its abolition; calls on the Government of Bahrain, and in particular His Majesty Sheikh Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa, to grant Mohammed Ramadan a royal pardon or to commute his sentence;

- Condemns firmly the continuing use of torture and other cruel or degrading treatment or punishment against prisoners by the security forces; is extremely worried about the prisoners’ physical and mental integrity; Expresses its concern about the use of anti-terrorism laws in Bahrain to punish political beliefs and convictions and prevent citizens from pursuing political activities; Stresses the obligation to ensure that human rights defenders are protected and allowed to conduct their work without hindrance, intimidation or harassment;

Ali Salman

Zainab al-Khawaja

Nabeel Rajab

 

During 2016, Bahrain has intensified its campaign of repression and persecution of human rights defenders and political opposition, with the re-arrest of Nabeel Rajab, in relation to twitter posts published in 2015 and faces up to 13 years of prison charge. Poor prison conditions have brought him to hospital in numerous occasions. Equally, it forced Zainab Al-Khawaja into exile after threats of re-arrest.

 

Bahrain has also targeted opposition groups, such as the Al-Wefaq, whose head, Ali Salman, has been in prison since July 2015

In its resolution, adopted on 7 July 2016, the European Parliament:

- Expresses grave concern about the ongoing campaign of repression against human rights defenders, political opposition and civil society, as well as the restriction of fundamental democratic rights, notably the freedoms of expression, association and assembly, political pluralism and the rule of law in Bahrain; calls for an end to all acts of violence, harassment and intimidation, including at judicial level, and to the censorship of human rights defenders, political opponents, peaceful protesters and civil society actors by state authorities and the security forces and services;

- Calls for the immediate and unconditional release of Nabeel Rajab and other human rights defenders jailed on allegations relating to their rights to free expression, assembly, and association, and for all charges against them to be dropped; calls on the authorities to guarantee the physical and psychological integrity of Nabeel Rajab and to provide him with all necessary medical treatment;

- notes with concern the Bahraini Government’s suppression of legitimate political opposition, including the extension of Sheikh Ali Salman’s sentence, the suspension of the Al-Wefaq National Islamic Society and the freezing of its assets; calls for greater basic freedoms for all Bahraini citizens; insists on an immediate halt to the suppression of different political opinions in the country and the repression of their leading representatives, regardless of their political or religious affiliation;

BRAZIL

 

 

Simiao Vilharva

Clodiodi de Souza

The Guarani-Kaiowá people

According to official local data, in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, at least 400 indigenous people and 14 indigenous leaders have been murdered, including S. Vilharva and C. de Souza.

The Guarani-Kaiowá people is acutely affected by the poor and inadequate provision of appropriate health care, education and social services. At the same time, most of their lands are located in the Amazon region, and they are entitled by virtue of the Brazilian Constitution of 1988 and international legislations to their ancestral territories.

In its resolution of 24 November 2016, the European Parliament:

- Strongly condemns the violence perpetrated against the indigenous communities of Brazil; deplores the poverty and human rights situation of the Guarani-Kaiowá population in Mato Grosso do Sul;

- Calls on the Brazilian authorities to take immediate action to protect indigenous people’s security and to ensure that independent investigations are carried out into the murder and assault of indigenous people in their attempts to defend their human and territorial rights, so that the perpetrators can be brought to justice;

- Expresses concern about the proposed constitutional amendment 215/2000 (PEC 215), to which Brazilian indigenous peoples are fiercely opposed, given that, if approved, it will threaten indigenous land rights by making it possible for anti-Indian interests related to the agro-business, timber, mining and energy industries to block the new indigenous territories from being recognised;

CAMBODIA

 

 

Sam Rainsy

Kem Sokha

Hong Sok Hour

Pin Ratana

 

Sam Rainsy, the president of the leading opposition party, the CNRP, remains in self-emposed exile and faces trial in absentia, with the acting CNRP president, Kem Sokha, being under investigation. A senator from the opposition, Hong Sok Hour has been under arrest since August 2015.

In its resolution of 9 June 2016, the European Parliament:

- Expresses its deep concerns about the worsening climate for opposition politicians and human rights activists in Cambodia, and condemns all acts of violence, politically motivated charges, arbitrary detention, questioning, sentences and convictions in respect of these individuals;

- Urges the Cambodian authorities to revoke the arrest warrant for, and drop all charges against, opposition leader Sam Rainsy and CNRP members of the National Assembly and Senate, including Senator Hong Sok Hour; calls for the immediate release of the five human rights defenders still in preventive custody, namely Ny Sokha, Nay Vanda, Yi Soksan, Lim Mony and Ny Chakra, for these politicians, activists and human rights defenders to be allowed to work freely without fear of arrest or persecution, and for an end to political use of the courts to prosecute people on politically motivated and trumped-up charges; calls on the National Assembly to reinstate Sam Rainsy, Um Sam An and Hong Sok Hour immediately and to restore their parliamentary immunity;

- Urges the Cambodian authorities to drop all politically motivated charges and other criminal proceedings against ADHOC and other Cambodian human rights defenders, to cease all threats to apply repressive LANGO provisions, together with all other attempts to intimidate and harass human rights defenders and national and international organisations, and to release immediately and unconditionally all those jailed on politically motivated and trumped-up charges;

Ny Sokha, Nay Vanda and Yi Soksan, Ny Chakrya, Soen Sally, Ee Sarom, Thav Khimsan and Rong Chlun

Notable human rights advocates and staffers of national human rights organs and UN agencies are facing charges in politically motivated cases. This is also the case for trade union leaders, such as R. Chlun. This happens in a growing restrictive climate, as the promulgation of the Law on Associations and NGOs (LANGO) and that of the Law on Trade Unions tighten the space for these entities to act.

CHINA

 

 

Gui Minhai, Lui Bo, Zhang Zhiping, Lin Rongji and Lee Po

Gui Minhai, Lui Bo, Zhang Zhiping, Lin Rongji and Lee Po, associated with the publishing house Mighty Current and its bookstore, sold literary works critical of Beijing. They were allegedly abducted by China’s mainland authorities, from Hong Kong and other locations. In early January 2016, Gui Minhai released a media statement in mainland China, maintaining that the travelled voluntarily to mainland China, in what appeared to be a forced confession to an earlier conviction by China.

In the resolution of 04 February 2016, the European Parliament:

- Calls on the Chinese Government to report without delay any information relating to the missing booksellers, and to engage in immediate inclusive and transparent dialogue and communication on the matter between the mainland authorities and those in Hong Kong; notes as a positive development the communication from Lee Po and his reunification with his spouse;

- Expresses its concerns over allegations of mainland China’s law enforcement agencies operating in Hong Kong; recalls that it would be a violation of the Basic Law if mainland law enforcement agencies had been operating in Hong Kong; believes this would be inconsistent with the ‘one country, two systems’ principle; calls on China to respect the guarantees of autonomy granted to Hong Kong in the Basic Law.

Gui Minhai

Gui Minhai, a book publisher and shareholder of the publishing house and of a bookstore selling literary works critical of Beijing, disappeared in Pattaya, Thailand, on 17 October 2015 without trace. Between October and December 2015 four other Hong Kong residents (Lui Bo, Zhang Zhiping, Lam Wing-Kee and Lee Bo) who worked for the same bookstore also disappeared. Apart from Gui Minhai, the other four disappeared ones have returned to Hong kong. There is enough evidence to believe that Chinese authorities detained all detainees, forcing them to record fake confessions in front of TV cameras.

In its resolution of 24 November 2016, the European Parliament:

- Expresses its grave concern over the lack of knowledge of the whereabouts of Gui Minhai; calls for the immediate publication of detailed information on his whereabouts and calls for his immediate safe release and for him to be given the right to communication;

Larung Gar Tibetan Buddhist Academy

The Larung Gar Institute, the largest Tibetan Buddhist centre in the world founded in 1980, is currently facing extensive demolition by the Chinese Government with the objective of downsizing the academy by fifty percent, evicting around 4 600 residents by force and destroying around 1 500 dwellings. The evictees are to be forcibly enrolled in so-called ‘patriotic education’ exercises.

In its resolution of 15 December 2016, the European Parliament:

- Calls on the Chinese authorities to initiate a dialogue and to engage constructively on developments in Larung Gar with the local community and its religious leaders, and to address concerns regarding overcrowded religious institutes by allowing Tibetans to establish more institutes and build more facilities; calls for adequate compensation and the re-housing of Tibetans who have been evicted during the demolitions in Larung Gar at the place of their choice to continue their religious activities;

- Strongly condemns the imprisonment of Ilham Tohti who is serving a life sentence on alleged charges of separatism; deplores the fact that the due process of law was not respected and that he did not benefit from the right to a proper defence; urges the Chinese authorities to respect the norm of granting one visit per month for family members;

- Calls for the immediate and unconditional release of Ilham Tohti and of his supporters detained in relation to his case; further calls for Ilham Tohti’s teaching permit to be restored and for his free movement to be guaranteed within and outside China;

- Is worried about the adoption of the package of security laws and its impact on minorities in China, particularly the law on counter-terrorism that could lead to the penalisation of peaceful expression of Tibetan culture and religion and the law on the management of international NGOs which will come into effect on 1 January 2017 and will place human rights groups under the strict control of the government, as this constitutes a strictly top-down approach instead of encouraging partnership between local and central government and civil society;

Ilham Tohti

Uighur economics professor Ilham Tohti was sentenced to life imprisonment on 23 September 2014 on the charge of alleged separatism after being arrested in January of the same year. There are allegations that the due process of law was not respected, in particular with regard to the right to a proper defence.

In the Xinjiang region, in which the Muslim Uighur ethnic minority is mainly located, has experienced repeated outbreaks of ethnic unrest and violence. Ilham Tohti has always rejected separatism and violence and sought reconciliation based on respect for Uighur culture;

DJIBOUTI

 

 

Omar Ali Ewado

Omar Ali Ewado, was detained incommunicado from 29 December 2015 to 14 February 2016 for publishing a list of the victims of a massacre in which 27 people were killed and more than 150 wounded by the authorities at a cultural celebration in Buldugo on 21 December 2015 and those still missing.

In its resolution of 12 May 2016, the European Parliament:

- Deplores the killings carried out at the cultural ceremony on 21 December 2015 and the ensuing detentions and acts of harassment of human rights defenders and opposition members; expresses its condolences to the families of the victims and demands a full and independent inquiry with a view to identifying and bringing to justice those responsible; reiterates its condemnation of arbitrary detention and calls for the rights of the defence to be respected;

DRC

 

 

Fred Bauma, Yves Makwambala

F. Bauma and Y. Makwambala, human rights activists from the Filimbi (‘Whistle’) movement, were arrested for participating in a workshop intended to encourage Congolese young people to perform their civic duties peacefully and responsibly, were put in jail in May 2015. They were released on 23 August 2016 after a ruling by the Supreme Court of Justice.

In its resolution of 10 March 2016, the European Parliament:

- Expresses deep concern about the deteriorating security and human rights situation in the DRC, and in particular about the continual reports of increasing political violence and the severe restrictions and intimidation faced by human rights defenders, political opponents and journalists ahead of the upcoming electoral cycle; insists on the government’s responsibility to prevent any deepening of the current political crisis or escalation of violence and to respect, protect and promote the civil and political rights of its citizens;

- Strongly condemns any use of force against peaceful, unarmed demonstrators; recalls that freedom of expression, association and assembly is the basis of a dynamic political and democratic life; strongly condemns the increasing restrictions of the democratic space and the targeted repression of members of the opposition, civil society and the media; calls for the immediate and unconditional release of all political prisoners, including Yves Makwambala, Fred Bauma and other Filimbi and LUCHA activists and supporters, and the human rights defender Christopher Ngoyi;

EGYPT

 

 

Giulio Regeni

Giulio Regeni, a 28-year-old Italian doctoral student at Cambridge University, disappeared on 25 January 2016 after leaving his home in Cairo; his body was found on 3 February 2016 next to a road in the outskirts of Cairo. Giulio Regeni was conducting research in Egypt on trade union politics. According to the Italian ambassador to Cairo, G. Regeni was found to have been subjected to severe beating and torture

In its resolution of 10 March 2016, the European Parliament:

- Calls on the Egyptian authorities to provide the Italian authorities with all the documents and information necessary to enable a swift, transparent and impartial joint investigation into the case of Giulio Regeni in accordance with international obligations, and for every effort to be made to bring the perpetrators of the crime to justice as soon as possible;

- Underlines with grave concern that the case of Giulio Regeni is not an isolated incident, but that it occurred within a context of torture, death in custody and enforced disappearances across Egypt in recent years, in clear violation of Article 2 of the EU-Egypt Association Agreement, which states that the relations between the EU and Egypt are to be based on respect for democratic principles and fundamental human rights as set out in the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, which is an essential element of the agreement; calls, therefore, on the European External Action Service (EEAS) and the Member States to raise with the Egyptian authorities the routine practice of enforced disappearances and torture and to press for effective reform of Egypt’s security apparatus and judiciary;

ETHIOPIA

 

 

Bekele Gerba

B. Gerba, Deputy Chairman of the Oromo Federalist Congress (OFC), was arrested on 23 December 2015 and reportedly hospitalised shortly afterwards.

 

In its resolution of 21 January 2016, the European Parliament:

- Strongly condemns the recent use of excessive force by the security forces in Oromia and in all Ethiopian regions, and the increased number of cases of human rights violations; expresses its condolences to the families of the victims and urges the immediate release of all those jailed for exercising their rights to peaceful assembly and freedom of expression;

- Condemns the excessive restrictions placed on human rights work by the Charities and Societies Proclamation, which denies human rights organisations access to essential funding, endows the Charities and Societies Agency with excessive powers of interference in human rights organisations and further endangers victims of human rights violations by contravening principles of confidentiality;

 

Getachew Shiferaw, Yoanathan Teressa and Fikadu Mirkana

These leading activists were arbitrarily arrested, without the Ethiopian authorities presenting any charges when doing so.

 

Eskinder Nega, Temesghen Desalegn, Solomon Kebede, Yesuf Getachew, Woubshet Taye, Saleh Edris and Tesfalidet Kidane

Ethiopia continues to imprison journalists and opposition political party members for their views and opinions, with them having been convicted in unfair trials or are detained without charge.

 

Andargachew Tsege

The British-Ethiopian citizen and leader of an opposition party in exile was arrested in June 2014, after being condemned in absentia to death years earlier. He is still in the death row.

GAMBIA (The)

 

 

Solo Sandeng

Opposition leader and member of the United Democratic Party, was arrested on 14 April 2016 and died in detention shortly after his arrest in suspicious circumstances.

In its resolution of 12 May 2016, the European Parliament:

- Calls for the immediate release of all protestors arrested in relation to the 14 and 16 April 2016 protests; requests that the Government of the Republic of The Gambia ensure due process for any suspects detained on allegations of participating in the attempted unconstitutional change of government; calls on the authorities of The Gambia to guarantee the physical and psychological integrity of these suspects in all circumstances and to secure medical treatment for those injured without delay; expresses its concern regarding the testimonies of torture and ill-treatment of other prisoners;

Ousainou Darboe

O. Darboe was arrested and put in state custody, allegedly suffering from torture.

Alagie Abdoulie Ceesay, Ousman Jammeh, Sheikh Omar Colley, Imam Ousman Sawaneh and Imam Cherno Gassama

Director of the independent radio station Teranga FM, A.A. Ceesay, was arrested on 2 July 2015 by state authorities arbitrarily. The other individuals are former key political figures and religious personalities, and they have also suffered from arbitrary detention by state authorities.

HONDURAS

 

 

Berta Cáceres and Nelson García

On 3 March 2016 Berta Cáceres, a prominent environmentalist and indigenous rights leader and the founder of the Civic Council of Popular and Indigenous Organisations of Honduras (COPINH), was assassinated in her home by unidentified men. Shortly after, on 16 March 2016, Nelson García, also a member of COPINH, was murdered. Both human rights defenders had for many years had resisted the Agua Zacra hydroelectric dam in the Gualcarque River. The Honduran Government has been actively engaged in the investigation of both murderers. However, these deaths come to enlarge the list of human rights defenders killed between 2010 and 2016, amounting to 15 in late 2016.

In its resolution of 14 April 2016, the European Parliament:

- Condemns in the strongest terms the recent assassination of Berta Cáceres, Nelson García and Paola Barraza, as well as each of the earlier assassinations of other human rights defenders in Honduras; extends its sincere condolences to the families and friends of all of those human rights defenders;

- Calls, as a matter of urgency, for immediate, independent, objective and thorough investigations into these and previous murders in order to bring their intellectual and material authors to justice and to put an end to impunity; welcomes the fact that, at the request of the Honduran Government, the investigation into the murder of Ms Cáceres includes representatives of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and of the OAS; takes the view that instruments available within the framework of the UN and the IACHR, such as an independent international investigation, as requested by the victims, could help to ensure impartial and fair investigation of these murders;

- Expresses its deep concern at the climate of extreme violence, particularly against LGBTI people and those who defend their rights; stresses the need to carry out immediate, thorough and impartial investigations into the killings of active members of various LGBTI human rights organisations;

Paola Barraza

On 24 January 2016, Paola Barraza was murdered, who was a defender of LGBTI rights, a transexual woman and a member of the Arcoiris association. Her death increases the toll of other prominent LGBTI activists, amounting at least to seven in 2015, and at least 235 since 1994.

CHINA

 

 

Gui Minhai, Lui Bo, Zhang Zhiping, Lin Rongji and Lee Po

Gui Minhai, Lui Bo, Zhang Zhiping, Lin Rongji and Lee Po, associated with the publishing house Mighty Current and its bookstore, sold literary works critical of Beijing. They were allegedly abducted by China’s mainland authorities, from Hong Kong and other locations. In early January 2016, Gui Minhai released a media statement in mainland China, maintaining that the travelled voluntarily to mainland China, in what appeared to be a forced confession to an earlier conviction by China.

In the resolution of 04 February 2016, the European Parliament:

- Calls on the Chinese Government to report without delay any information relating to the missing booksellers, and to engage in immediate inclusive and transparent dialogue and communication on the matter between the mainland authorities and those in Hong Kong; notes as a positive development the communication from Lee Po and his reunification with his spouse;

- Expresses its concerns over allegations of mainland China’s law enforcement agencies operating in Hong Kong; recalls that it would be a violation of the Basic Law if mainland law enforcement agencies had been operating in Hong Kong; believes this would be inconsistent with the ‘one country, two systems’ principle; calls on China to respect the guarantees of autonomy granted to Hong Kong in the Basic Law.

INDIA

 

 

35 crew members, among which Estonians and Britons

On 12 October 2013 the 35-strong crew (including 14 Estonians and 6 Britons, as well as Indians and Ukrainians) of the US-based, Sierra Leone-flagged and privately owned ship the MV Seaman Guard Ohio were arrested in Tamil Nadu state (India) and charged with illegally possessing weapons in Indian waters. Despite attempts to drop the charges against them, the Supreme Court ordered the trial to proceed, which on 12 January 2016 sentenced the 35 sailors to a maximum of five years prison term and a fine of INR 3 000 (EUR 40).

In its resolution of 21 January 2016, the European Parliament:

- Calls on the Indian authorities to ensure that the case of the MV Seaman Guard Ohio crew is dealt with on a basis of full respect for the human and legal rights of the defendants, in line with the obligations enshrined in the various human rights charters, treaties and conventions that India has signed up to.

 

IRAQ

 

 

Yazidi and other minorities

August 2014 ISIS/Daesh attacked Yazidi communities around Sinjar city in Iraq’s Nineveh province, reportedly killing thousands. Several mass graves were found after Kurdish forces retook areas north of Mount Sinjar by December 2014. When the Kurdish forces retook Sinjar city in mid-November 2015, additional killing sites and apparent mass graves were discovered.

The European Parliament recognised on 4 February 2016 that ISIS/Daesh is committing genocide against Christians and Yazidis, among other minorities, which amount to war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.

In its resolution of 15 December 2016, the European Parliament:

- Strongly appeals to the international community, in particular to the UN Security Council, to consider the reported mass graves in Iraq as further evidence of genocide and to refer ISIS/Daesh to the International Criminal Court (ICC);

- Is particularly alarmed by the situation of women and children in the conflict, in particular the Yazidi women and children who are victims of persecution, executions, torture, sexual exploitation and other atrocities; insist that a full range of medical services should be made available, in particular for rape victims; calls, as a matter of urgency, for the EU and its Members States to work closely with the World Health Organisation (WHO) and to support it to this end; calls for the immediate release of all women and children who remain captives of ISIS/Daesh.

KAZAKHSTAN

 

 

Guzal Baidalinova and Yulia Kozlova

In December 2015 the Kazakh authorities detained Guzal Baidalinova, a journalist and the owner of the Nakanune.kz online news site, in connection with a criminal case on charges of ‘deliberately publishing false information’. On 29 February 2016 a court acquitted journalist Yulia Kozlova, who also writes for Nakanune.kz.

In its resolution of 10 March 2016, the European Parliament:

- Expresses its concerns about the climate for media and free speech in Kazakhstan; is very concerned about the pressure on independent media outlets and the possible negative implications of new draft legislation on the funding of civil society organisations; points out that freedom of speech for independent media, bloggers and individual citizens is a universal value that cannot be bargained away;

- Regrets the indiscriminate blocking of news, social media and other websites on the grounds that they feature unlawful content, and calls on the Kazakh authorities to ensure that any measure to restrict access to internet resources is based on law; is concerned about the amendments to the Communications Law adopted in 2014;

- Calls on the Kazakh authorities to quash the convictions of bloggers, including Ermek Narymbaev, Serikzhan Mambetalin and Bolatbek Blyalov; calls for the release of Guzal Baidalinova; calls for an end to the harassment of Seytkazy and Aset Matayev; points out, in this connection, that cases involving journalists should be public and that there should be no harassment during the proceedings;

- Is deeply worried about the disrespect and violation of prisoners’ rights in Kazakhstan’s prison system; is concerned about the physical and mental well-being of prisoners Vladimir Kozlov, Vadim Kuramshin (who won the Ludovic Trarieux International Human Rights Prize 2013) and Aron Atabek, who have been convicted on political grounds, and demands that they receive immediate access to necessary medical treatment and are allowed regular visits, including by family members, legal representatives and representatives of human rights and prisoners’ rights organisations;

 

Seytkazy Matayev and Aset Matayev

The head of the National Press Club and journalists’ union, Seytkazy Matayev, underwent a criminal investigation accused of corruption of public funds.

Ermek Narymbaev and Serikzhan Mambetalin, Bolatbek Blyalov

Ermek Narymbaev and Serikzhan Mambetalin were convcited on 22 January 2016 on charges of ‘inciting national discord’ to three years and two years in prison respectively. Bolatbek Blyalov was put under limited house arrest on similar grounds

Vladimir Kozlov, Vadim Kuramshin and Aron Atabek

V. Kozlov, C. Kuramshin and A. Atabek, human rights defenders and lawyers, were convicted on political grounds, and are being deprived of their rights as prisoners.

MALAWI

 

 

Persons with albanism

PWA are facing some of the most extreme forms of persecution and human rights violations, ranging from widespread societal discrimination, verbal abuse and exclusion from public services to killings, abductions, rape and mutilations; whereas human rights observers reported 448 attacks on albinos in 2015 alone across 25 African countries.

It is highly likely that these numbers are underestimated as the authorities do not systematically monitor and document such crimes or lack the capacity and resources to conduct thorough investigations.

In its resolution of 7 July 2017, the European Parliament:

- Expresses its deep concern at the continuous and widespread discrimination and persecution faced by persons with albinism in Africa, in particular following the recent rise in violence in Malawi; strongly condemns all killings, abductions, mutilations and other inhuman and degrading treatment suffered by PWA and expresses its condolences and solidarity to the families of the victims; condemns also any speculative trading in PWA’s body parts;

- Deplores the silence and inertia surrounding these events; recalls that the primary responsibility of a state is to protect its citizens, including vulnerable groups, and urges the Government of Malawi and the authorities of all the countries affected to take all the necessary measures to eliminate all forms of violence and discrimination against PWA and protect their dignity, human rights and well-being, as well as those of their family members.

MYANMAR

 

 

The Rohingya people

Approximately one million Rohingya are one of the world’s most persecuted minorities, and have been officially stateless since the 1982 Burmese Citizenship Law. The Rohingya are unwanted by the Myanmar authorities and by neighbouring countries, although some of the latter host large refugee populations.

The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, in his report of 20 June 2016, described the continued serious rights violations against the Rohingya, including arbitrary deprivation of nationality, which renders them stateless, severe restriction of freedom of movement, threats to life and security, denial of the rights to health and education, forced labour, sexual violence and limitations on their political rights, ‘which may amount to crimes against humanity’.

In its resolution of 7 July 2016, the European Parliament:

- Reiterates its deepest concern about the plight of Rohingya refugees in South-East Asia and calls for regional and international mobilisation to provide them with urgent assistance in their extremely vulnerable situation; expresses its condolences to the families of victims of human traffickers, violence and lack of protection from official authorities in destination countries;

- Calls on the Government of Myanmar to safeguard the Rohingya people from any form of discrimination and to end impunity for violations against the Rohingya; recalls the long-overdue statement of 18 May 2015 by the spokesperson for Ms Suu Kyi’s party, the NLD, that the Government of Myanmar should grant citizenship to the Rohingya minority; calls on Ms Suu Kyi, a winner of the Sakharov Prize, to use her key positions in the Government of Myanmar to improve the situation of the Rohingya minority.

The Rohingya people

On 9 October 2016 gunmen attacked three police outposts near the Bangladesh border, leaving nine police officers dead and many weapons missing; whereas the Government of Myanmar claimed the gunmen were Rohingya militiamen and, following this, declared Maungdaw district an ‘operation zone’ with curfews and other severe restrictions, including for journalists and outside observers, who are not allowed to access the area.

According to human rights organisations, local sources report serious human rights abuses by government forces in the so-called operation zone. The Government of Myanmar has reported the deaths of 69 alleged militants and 17 members of the security forces, a claim which cannot be independently verified due to access restrictions.

In its resolution of 15 December 2016, the European Parliament:

- Is extremely concerned about the reports of violent clashes in northern Rakhine State and deplores the loss of lives, livelihoods and shelter and the reported disproportionate use of force by the armed forces of Myanmar; confirms that the Myanmar authorities have a duty to investigate the 9 October 2016 attacks and prosecute those responsible, but that this must be done in accordance with human rights standards and obligations;

- Recommends that the governments of the countries that cope with the influx of Rohingya refugees cooperate closely with the UNHCR, which has the technical expertise to screen for refugee status and the mandate to protect refugees and stateless people; urges those countries to respect the principle of non-refoulement and not to push the Rohingya refugees back, at least until a satisfactory and dignified solution for their situation has been found; calls in particular upon Bangladesh to allow the entry of Rohingya refugees, whilst acknowledging the efforts already made by Bangladesh to host several hundred thousand refugees.

NIGERIA

 

 

Victims of Boko Haram

Boko Haram killed at least 8 200 civilians in 2014 and 2015. It is estimated that more than 2,6 million people have been displaced and more than 14,8 million affected by the Boko Haram insurgency.

Around 270 schoolgirls were abducted by Boko Haram on 14-15 April 2014 from a school in Chibok, north-east Nigeria, and whereas the majority are still missing. It is feared that most were forced to either marry insurgents or to become insurgents themselves, subjected to sexual violence or sold into slavery, and non-Muslim girls were forced to convert to Islam. Boko Haram has abducted more than 2 000 women and girls since 2009, including around 400 from Damasak in Borno state on 24 November 2014.

In its resolution of 14 April 2016, the European Parliament:

- Strongly condemns the recent violence and attacks by Boko Haram, and calls on the Federal Government to protect its population and address the root causes of the violence by ensuring equal rights for all citizens, including by addressing the issues of inequality, control of fertile farmlands, unemployment and poverty; rejects any violent retaliation in breach of humanitarian law perpetrated by the Nigerian military; welcomes, however, the Nigerian Army’s ‘Safe Corridor’ programme designed to rehabilitate Boko Haram fighters;

- Calls on the Nigerian Government to develop a comprehensive strategy that addresses the root causes of terrorism, and to investigate, as promised, evidence that the Nigerian military might have committed human rights violations; welcomes the Abuja Security Summit, to take place in May 2016, and calls on all stakeholders to identify concrete, viable solutions to fight terrorism without sacrificing respect for human rights and democracy; further underlines the importance of regional cooperation in addressing the threat posed by Boko Haram;

PAKISTAN

 

 

Asia Bibi

Asia Bibi has been charged with a blasphemy crime and sentenced to death. Her case is embedded in a more general atmosphere of lack of freedom of religion and belief, where Christians and other minorities face not only persecution by extremists, but also legal discrimination, in particular through Pakistan’s blasphemy laws, which are discriminatory and are widely misused by those with personal and political motives.

Certain student unions at the universities and the Khatm-e-Nubuwwat Lawyers’ Forum, are reportedly the driving force behind the rise in prosecutions for blasphemy charges in the Pakistani courts and is against any attempts by legislators to reform the relevant law.

In its resolution of 14 April 2016, the European Parliament:

- Expresses deep concern at the systemic and grave violations of freedom of religion and belief in Pakistan; stresses the importance of respect for the fundamental rights of all religious and ethnic minorities living in Pakistan so that they can continue to live in dignity, equality and safety, and practise their religion in complete freedom without any kind of coercion, discrimination, intimidation or harassment, in accordance with the founding principles of Pakistan;

 

PHILIPPINES (The)

 

 

Victims of the war on drugs

During his election campaign and first days in office, President Duterte repeatedly urged law enforcement agencies and the public to kill suspected drug traffickers who did not surrender, as well as drug users.

Figures released by the Philippine National Police show that from 1 July to 4 September 2016 police killed over a thousand suspected drug pushers and users, and whereas further police statistics attribute the killing of over a thousand alleged drug dealers and users in the past two months to unknown gunmen; whereas, as reported by Al Jazeera, more than 15 000 drug suspects have been arrested, mostly on the basis of hearsay and allegations put forward by fellow citizens, and whereas almost 700 000 have surrendered ‘voluntarily’ to police and registered for treatment under the Tokhang programme in order to avoid being targeted by police or vigilantes.

In its resolution of 15 September 2016, the European Parliament:

- Understands that in the Philippines millions of people are negatively affected by the high level of drug addiction and its consequences; expresses its strongest concerns, however, at the extraordinarily high numbers killed during police operations and by vigilante groups in the context of an intensified anti-crime and anti-drug campaign targeting drug dealers and users, and urges the Government of the Philippines to put an end to the current wave of extrajudicial executions and killings;

- Urges the Philippine Government to condemn the actions of vigilante groups and to investigate their responsibility for the killings; urges the Philippine authorities to conduct an immediate, thorough, effective and impartial investigation in order to identify all those responsible, to bring them before a competent and impartial civil tribunal and to apply the penal sanctions provided for by the law.

RUSSIA

 

 

Ildar Dadin

In early December 2015 the Russian opposition activist Ildar Dadin was sentenced to three years in jail after organising a series of peaceful anti-war protests and assemblies, being the first person in Russia to be convicted under a tough public assembly law adopted in 2014.

Ildar Dadin was sentenced to two years and a half on appeal, and has reporterdly suffered repeated torture, beatings, inhumane treatment and threats of murder at the hands of the Russian authorities.

The number of political prisoners in Russia has significantly increased in recent years, which was in November 2016 of 102, according to the Memorial Human Rights Centre. At the same time, Russia is severely tightening its control and repression over human rights organisations.

In its resolution of 24 November 2016, the European Parliament:

- Urges the Russian authorities to conduct a thorough and transparent investigation of the allegations made by Ildar Dadin of torture and ill-treatment, with the participation of independent human rights experts; calls for an independent investigation into the allegations of torture, abuse and degrading and inhumane treatment on the part of state officials in Russian detention facilities, labour camps and prisons;

- Reminds Russia of the importance of full compliance with its international legal obligations, as a member of the Council of Europe and the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe, and with fundamental human rights and the rule of law as enshrined in various international treaties and agreements that Russia has signed and is party to; underlines that the Russian Federation can be considered a reliable partner in the sphere of international cooperation only if it keeps up its obligations under international law; in this regard, expresses its concern over the presidential decree withdrawing Russia from the Rome Statute of the ICC;

RWANDA

 

 

Victoire Ingabire

On 30 October 2012 Victoire Ingabire, President of the Unified Democratic Forces (UDF), was sentenced to eight years’ imprisonment for conspiracy to harm the authorities using terrorism, and for minimising the 1994 genocide, on the basis of relations with the Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR).

In September 2016 a delegation from the European Parliament was denied access to jailed opposition leader Victoire Ingabire.

Human rights organisations have denounced the first-instance trial of Victoire Ingabire, as serious irregularities were observed and she was treated unfairly. In its report, Amnesty International points to prejudicial public statements made by the Rwandan President in advance of her trial, and a reliance on confessions from detainees in Camp Kami where torture is alleged to be used.

In 2015, Ms Ingabire appealed to the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights, accusing the Rwandan Government of violating her rights. In March 2015, Rwanda withdrew from the jurisdiction of the African Court, claiming that Rwanda’s courts were capable of dealing with all local cases. On year later, the Rwandan Government withdrew its declaration allowing individuals to file complaints directly with the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights, only days before judges were to hear a case brought against the Rwandan Government by Victoire Ingabire.

In its resolution of 6 October 2016, the European Parliament:

- Strongly condemns politically motivated trials, the prosecution of political opponents and the prejudging of the outcome of the trial; urges the Government of Rwanda to extend economic and social achievements to the field of human rights in order to fully move towards a modern and inclusive democracy; urges the Rwandan authorities to ensure that Victoire Ingabire’s appeal process is fair and meets the standards set under Rwandan and international law; underlines that trials and the charges brought against accused persons cannot be based on vague and imprecise laws, and the misuse thereof, as is occurring in the case of Victoire Ingabire;

- Expresses its deep concerns at the Rwandan Supreme Court’s denial of appeal and judgement sentencing Victoire Ingabire to 15 years’ imprisonment and at the worsening conditions of her detention; believes that the appeal process conducted in Rwanda did not meet international standards, including Ms Ingabire’s right to presumption of innocence;

- Stresses that Rwanda’s withdrawal in March 2016 from the jurisdiction of the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights (ACHPR) just a few days prior to the hearing of the appeal case by Ms Ingabire is circumstantial and is aimed at limiting the direct access of individuals and NGOs to the Court;

- Urges the Rwandan authorities to step up their efforts to investigate the cases of Illuminée Iragena, John Ndabarasa, Léonille Gasangayire and other individuals who are feared to have been forcibly disappeared, to reveal their whereabouts and release or try them, if they are in detention, as well as to ensure the fairness of the trials of actual or suspected government opponents or critics, including those of Frank Rusagara, Joel Mutabazi, Kizito Mihigo and their respective co-accused;

Illuminée Iragena and Léonille Gasengayire

FDU-Inkingi, V. Ingabire’s party, is not able to register as a political party and several of its members were threatened, arrested or detained, including Illuminée Iragena and Léonille Gasengayire

SUDAN

 

 

Khalfálah Alafif Muktar, Arwa Ahmed Elrabie, Al-Hassan Kheiry, Imani-Leyla Raye, Abu Hureira Abdelrahman, Al-Baqir Al-Afif Mukhtar, Midhat Afifadeen and Mustafa Adam

On 29 February 2016 the NISS brutally raided the Khartoum Centre for Training and Human Development (TRACKS), a civil society organisation, following which the director Khalfálah Alafif Muktar and activists Arwa Ahmed Elrabie, Al-Hassan Kheiry, Imani-Leyla Raye, Abu Hureira Abdelrahman, Al-Baqir Al-Afif Mukhtar, Midhat Afifadeen and Mustafa Adam were arrested and charged with criminal conspiracy and waging war against the state, charges which carry the death penalty.

In its resolution of 6 October 2016, the European Parliament:

- Condemns the arbitrary arrest and detention of activists and the ongoing detention of human rights defenders and journalists in Sudan; urges the Government of Sudan to guarantee the peaceful exercise of the freedoms of expression, association and assembly; underlines that the National Dialogue will only succeed if carried out in an atmosphere in which the freedoms of expression, media, association and assembly are guaranteed;

- Reaffirms that freedom of religion, conscience or belief is a universal human right that needs to be protected everywhere and for everyone; demands that the Sudanese Government repeal any legal provisions that penalise or discriminate against individuals for their religious beliefs, especially in the case of apostasy and especially concerning Czech Christian aid worker Petr Jašek, Sudanese pastors Hassan Abduraheem Kodi Taour, Kuwa Shamal and Darfuri graduate student Abdulmonem Abdumawla Issa Abdumawla.

Petr Jašek, Hassan Abduraheem Kodi Taour, Kuwa Shamal and Abdulmonem Abdumawla Issa Abdumawla

Petr Jašek, Hassan Abduraheem Kodi Taour, Kuwa Shamal and Abdulmonem Abdumawla Issa Abdumawla were detained and faced trial on charges of highlighting alleged Christian suffering in war-ravaged areas of Sudan.

TAJIKISTAN

 

 

Abubakr Azizkhodzhaev, Zaid Saidov, Umarali Kuvatov and Maksud Ibragimov

Abubakr Azizkhodzhaev was detained in February 2016 after raising critical concerns about corrupt business practices. Zaid Saidov was sentenced to 29 years in prison in prosecutions linked to his having run for office in the November 2013 presidential elections. Umarali Kuvatov was killed in Istanbul in March 2015 and Maksud Ibragimov was stabbed and kidnapped in Russia before being returned to Tajikistan and sentenced in July 2015 to 17 years’ imprisonment.

In its resolution of 9 June 2016, the European Parliament:

- Calls for the release of all those imprisoned on politically motived charges, including Abubakr Azizkhodzhaev, Zaid Saidov, Maksud Ibragimov, IRPT deputy leaders Mahmadali Hayit and Saidumar Hussaini, and 11 other IRPT members;

- Urges the Tajik authorities to quash the convictions of, and to release, attorneys and lawyers, including Buzurgmehr Yorov, Nodira Dodajanova, Nuriddin Mahkamov, Shukhrat Kudratov and Firuz and Daler Tabarov;

- Urges the authorities of Tajikistan to give defence attorneys and political figures fair, open and transparent trials, to provide substantive protections and procedural guarantees in accordance with Tajikistan’s international obligations and to authorise the reinvestigation by international organisations of all reported violations of human rights and dignity; calls for all those imprisoned or detained to be granted access to independent legal services, together with the right to meet their family members regularly; recalls that, for every sentence issued, clear evidence must be presented to justify the criminal charges brought against the defendant.

Mahmadali Hayit, Saidumar Hussaini, Buzurgmehr Yorov, Nodira Dodajanova, Nuriddin Mahkamov, Shukhrat Kudratov and Firuz and Daler Tabarov

Tajikistan’s political opposition have been systematically targeted; In September 2015 the Islamic Renaissance Party of Tajikistan (IRPT) was banned after being linked to a failed coup earlier that month.

On 2 June 2016 the Supreme Court in Dushanbe sentenced Mahmadali Hayit and Saidumar Hussaini, deputy leaders of the banned IRPT, to life imprisonment on charges of having been behind an attempted coup in 2015.

Several lawyers who applied to act as defence attorneys for IRPT defendants have received death threats and have been arrested, detained and imprisoned; whereas the arrests of Buzurgmehr Yorov, Nodira Dodajanova, Nuriddin Mahkamov, Shukhrat Kudratov and Firuz and Daler Tabarov raise major concerns about compliance with international standards relating to the independence of lawyers, closed trials and limited access to legal representation.

THAILAND

 

 

Andy Hall

The workers’ rights defender Mr Andy Hall, an EU citizen, was sentenced on 20 September 2016 to a three-year suspended jail term and fined THB 150 000 after contributing to a report by Finnish NGO Finnwatch exposing labour rights violations in a Thai pineapple processing plant, Natural Fruit Company Ltd.

Andy Hall was formally indicted for criminal defamation and a computer crime relating to the online publication of the report, and whereas Mr Hall’s two criminal cases were allowed to proceed through the Thai judicial system.

On 18 September 2015 the Prakanong Court in Bangkok, ruling in favour of Mr Hall, upheld the dismissal of the other criminal defamation proceedings brought against him, which have been appealed by Natural Fruit Company Ltd and the Thai Attorney General and which are currently before the Supreme Court

In its resolution of 6 October 2016, the European Parliament:

- Calls on the Thai Government to take all necessary measures to ensure that the rights – including the right to a fair trial – of Mr Hall and other human rights defenders are respected and protected, and to create an enabling environment conducive to the enjoyment of human rights and, specifically, to ensure that the promotion and protection of human rights are not criminalised;

- Calls on the Thai authorities to ensure that the country’s defamation laws are compliant with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), to which it is a state party, and also to revise the Computer Crime Act, the current wording of which is too vague.

UKRAINE

 

 

Crimean Tatars

The Russian Federation has illegally annexed Crimea and Sevastopol and therefore violated international law, including the UN Charter, the Helsinki Final Act, the 1994 Budapest Memorandum and the 1997 Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Partnership between the Russian Federation and Ukraine.

Targeted abuses have been registered against the Tatar community, the majority of which opposed the Russian takeover and boycotted the so-called referendum on 16 March 2014, particularly through the enforcement of Russia’s vague and overly broad ‘antiextremist’ legislation to intimidate or silence critics; whereas these abuses include abduction, forced disappearance, violence, torture and extrajudicial killings that the de facto authorities have failed to investigate and prosecute

In its resolution of 4 February 2016, the European Parliament:

- Condemns the severe restrictions on the freedoms of expression, association and peaceful assembly, including at traditional commemorative events such as the anniversary of the deportation of the Crimean Tatars by Stalin’s totalitarian Soviet Union regime and cultural gatherings of the Crimean Tatars; stresses that, in line with international law, the Tatars, as an indigenous people of Crimea, have the right to maintain and strengthen their distinct political, legal, economic, social and cultural institutions; calls for respect for the Mejlis as the legitimate representation of the Crimean Tatar community, and for avoidance of any harassment and systematic persecution of its members; expresses concern at the infringement of their property rights and liberties, their intimidation and incarceration, and disrespect of their civic, political and cultural rights; notes with equal concern the restrictive re-registration requirements for media outlets, as well as for civil society organisations;

- Calls on the Russian Federation authorities and the de facto authorities in Crimea, which are bound by international humanitarian law and international human rights law, to grant unimpeded access to Crimea for international institutions and independent experts from the OSCE, the United Nations and the Council of Europe, as well as for any human rights NGOs or news media outlets that wish to visit, assess and report on the situation in Crimea; calls on the Council and the EEAS to put pressure on Russia in this regard; welcomes the decision of the Secretary General of the Council of Europe to send his Special Representative for Human Rights to Crimea, as this was the first visit following the Russian annexation and is expected to provide a fresh assessment of the situation on the ground; looks forward to his findings; stresses that any international presence on the ground should be coordinated with Ukraine;

Crimean Tatars

On 26 April 2016 the so-called Supreme Court of Crimea ruled in favour of a request by the so-called Prosecutor-General of Crimea, Natalia Poklonskaya, accusing the Mejlis, which had been the representative body of the Crimean Tatars since its establishment in 1991 and had enjoyed full legal status since May 1999, of extremism, terrorism, human rights violations, illegal actions and acts of sabotage against the authorities

The Mejlis has now been declared an extremist organisation and included in the Russian Justice Ministry’s list of NGOs whose activities must be suspended. The activities of the Mejlis have consequently been banned in Crimea and in Russia.

The decision of the so-called Prosecutor-General and so-called Supreme Court of Crimea are intrinsic parts of the policy of repression and intimidation on the part of the Russian Federation, which is punishing this minority for its loyalty towards the Ukrainian state during the illegal annexation of the peninsula in 2014.

In its resolution of 12 May 2016, the European Parliament:

- Strongly condemns the decision of the so-called Supreme Court of Crimea to ban the Mejlis of the Crimean Tatar People, and demands its immediate reversal; considers this decision to constitute systemic and targeted persecution of the Crimean Tatars, and to be a politically motivated action aimed at further intimidating the legitimate representatives of the Tatar community; stresses the importance of this democratically elected decision-making body representing the Crimean Tatar people;

- Points out that the ban on the Mejlis of the Crimean Tatar People, which is the legitimate and recognised representative body of the indigenous people of Crimea, will provide fertile ground for stigmatising the Crimean Tatars, further discriminating against them and violating their human rights and basic civil liberties, and is an attempt to expel them from Crimea, which is their historical motherland; is concerned that the branding of the Mejlis as an extremist organisation may lead to additional charges in accordance with provisions of the Criminal Code of the Russian Federation;

- Recalls that the banning of the Mejlis means that it will be prohibited from convening, publishing its views in the mass media, holding public events or using bank accounts; calls for the EU to provide financial support for the activities of the Mejlis while it is in exile; calls for increased financing for human rights organisations working on behalf of Crimea;

 

VIETNAM

 

 

Lê Thu Hà, Nguyễn

Văn Đài, Trần Minh Nhật, Trần Huỳnh Duy Thức, Thích Quảng Độ,

Vietnamese lawyer and human rights activist, Lê Thu Hà, was arrested on 16 December 2015, at the same time as a prominent fellow human rights lawyer, Nguyễn Văn Đài, who was arrested for conducting propaganda against the state.

On 22 February 2016 human rights defender Trần Minh Nhật was attacked by a police officer at his home in Lâm Hà district, Lâm Đồng Province. Trần Huỳnh Duy Thức, who was imprisoned in 2009 after a trial with no meaningful defence, received a sentence of 16 years followed by five years under house arrest. There is serious concern for the deteriorating health of Buddhist dissident Thích Quảng Độ, who was currently under house arrest.

In its resolution of 9 June 2016, the European Parliament:

- Calls on the Government of Vietnam to put an immediate stop to all harassment, intimidation, and persecution of human rights, social and environmental activists; insists that the government respect these activists’ right to peaceful protest and release anyone still wrongfully held; asks for the immediate release of all activists who have been unduly arrested and imprisoned such as Lê Thu Hà, Nguyễn Văn Đài, Trần Minh Nhật, Trần Huỳnh Duy Thức and Thích Quảng Độ;

- Condemns the conviction and harsh sentencing of journalists and bloggers in Vietnam such as Nguyễn Hữu Vinh and his colleague Nguyễn Thị Minh Thúy, and Đặng Xuân Diệu, and calls for their release;

- Deplores the continuing violations of human rights in Vietnam, including political intimidation, harassment, assaults, arbitrary arrests, heavy prison sentences and unfair trials, perpetrated against political activists, journalists, bloggers, dissidents and human rights defenders, both on- and offline, in clear violation of Vietnam’s international human rights obligations;

Kim Quốc Hoa

The former editor-in-chief of the newspaper Người Cao Tuổi, had his journalist’s licence revoked in early 2015 and was later prosecuted under Article 258 of the criminal code for abusing democratic freedoms, after the newspaper exposed a number of corrupt officials.

ZIMBABWE

 

 

Promise Mkwananzi and Linda Masarira

In May 2016 thousands of demonstrators – informal traders, unemployed young people and, now, professional people – have taken to the streets in a number of urban centres across Zimbabwe to protest against job losses, mass unemployment and the government’s failure to meet people’s basic economic expectations, namely a labour market that provides jobs, a public workforce that is paid on time, a trustworthy stable currency and an affordable price regime.

The protest movement led by clergyman Evan Mawarire, using the hashtag #ThisFlag, has drawn support from churches and the middle class, which had hitherto tended to steer clear of street politics.

On 6 July 2016 the opposition movement #ThisFlag called for a national ‘stay-away’ day in protest against the government’s inaction against corruption, impunity and poverty. This resulted in a massive shutdown of most shops and businesses in the capital and led to a severe crackdown by the authorities.

Promise Mkwananzi, the leader of #Tajamuka, a social movement linked to the July stay-away, who was arrested and charged for inciting public violence, has been released on bail. #Tajamuka activist, Linda Masarira, was arrested during the protest in July 2016.

In its resolution of 15 September 2016, the European Parliament:

- Expresses serious concern about the increase in violence against demonstrators in Zimbabwe in recent months; notes with alarm the recently announced one-month ban on demonstrations; calls on the government and all parties in Zimbabwe to respect the right to demonstrate peacefully in order to address genuine concerns, and urges the Zimbabwean authorities to investigate allegations of excessive use of force and other human rights abuses by elements within the Zimbabwe police, and to hold them to account;

- Expresses its continued concern about the abduction of Itai Dzamara; demands that habeas corpus be respected and that those responsible for his abduction be brought to justice;


ANNEX II: LIST OF RESOLUTIONS

List of resolutions adopted by the European Parliament during the year 2016 and relating directly or indirectly to human rights violations in the world

Country

Date of adoption in plenary

Title

Africa

Ethiopia +(1)

21.01.2016

Ethiopia

Libya *(2)

04.02.2016

Situation in Libya

Egypt +

10.03.2016

Egypt, notably the case of Giulio Regeni

DRC +

10.03.2016

The Democratic Republic of the Congo

DRC *

01.12.2016

Situation in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Nigeria +

14.04.2016

Nigeria

The Gambia +

12.05.2016

The Gambia

Djibouti +

12.05.2016

Djibouti

Malawi +

07.07.2016

Situation of persons with albinism in Africa, notably in Malawi

Somalia (no individual cases or minority) +

15.09.2016

Somalia

Zimbabwe +

15.09.2016

Zimbabwe

Sudan +

06.10.2016

Sudan

Rwanda +

06.10.2016

Rwanda, the case of Victoire Ingabire

Americas

Honduras +

14.04.2016

Honduras: situation of human rights defenders

Brazil +

24.11.2016

Situation of the Guarani-Kaiowá in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul

Asia

North Korea (no individual cases or minority) +

21.01.2016

North Korea

India +

21.01.2016

EU citizens under detention in India, notably Estonian and UK seamen

China +

04.02.2016

The case of the missing book publishers in Hong Kong

Kazakhstan +

10.03.2016

Freedom of expression in Kazakhstan

Pakistan +

14.04.2016

Pakistan, in particular the attack in Lahore

Cambodia +

09.06.2016

Cambodia

Tajikistan +

09.06.2016

Tajikistan: situation of prisoners of conscience

Vietnam +

09.06.2016

Vietnam

Myanmar +

07.07.2016

Myanmar, notably the situation of the Rohingya

The Philippines +

15.09.2016

The Philippines

Thailand +

06.10.2016

Thailand, notably the situation of Andy Hall

China +

24.11.2016

The case of Gui Minhai, jailed publisher in China

Myanmar +

15.12.2016

The situation of the Rohingya minority in Myanmar

China +

15.12.2016

The cases of the Larung Gar Tibetan Buddhist Academy and Ilham Tohti

Europe

Ukraine +

04.02.2016

Human rights situation in Crimea, in particular of the Crimean Tatars

Ukraine +

12.05.2016

Crimean Tatars

Turkey *

27.10.2016

Situation of Journalists in Turkey

Russia +

24.11.2016

The case of Ildar Dadin, prisoner of conscience in Russia

Middle East

Bahrain +

04.02.2016

Bahrain: the case of Mohammed Ramadan

Bahrain +

07.07.2016

Bahrain

Syria *

06.10.2016

Situation in Syria

Iraq *

27.10.2016

Situation in Northern Iraq/Mosul

Syria *

26.11.2016

Situation in Syria

Iraq +

15.12.2016

Mass graves in Iraq

Yemen *

25.02.2016

Situation in Yemen

Cross-cutting issues

UNHRC sessions

21.01.2016

EU priorities for the UNHRC sessions in 2016

Persecution of religious minorities

04.02.2016

Systematic mass murder of religious minorities by ISIS

Migration

12.04.2016

The situation in the Mediterranean and the need for a holistic EU approach to migration

International Humanitarian Law

28.04.2016

Attacks on hospitals and schools as violations of international humanitarian law

Women & migration

08.03.2016

The situation of women refugees and asylum seekers in the EU

Trafficking

12.05.2016

Preventing and combating trafficking in human beings

Trafficking

05.07.2016

The fight against trafficking in human beings in the EU’s external relations

Torture

04.10.2016

Trade in certain goods which could be used for capital punishment, torture or other treatment or punishment

Migration

25.10.2016

Human rights in migration in third countries

Women

13.12.2016

Rights of Women in the Eastern Partnership States

Corporate liability and human rights

25.10.2016

Corporate liability for serious human rights abuses in third countries

Social and environmental standards and human rights

05.07.2016

Social and environmental standards, human rights and corporate responsibility

(1)

+ - urgency resolution according to rule 135, EP RoP

(2)

* - resolutions with human rights-related issues


OPINION of the Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality (7.11.2017)

for the Committee on Foreign Affairs

on the Annual Report on Human Rights and Democracy in the World 2016 and the European Union’s policy on the matter

(2017/2122(INI))

Rapporteur: Jordi Solé

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality calls on the Committee on Foreign Affairs, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

A.  whereas the EU is committed to promoting gender equality and ensuring gender mainstreaming in all of its actions;

B.  whereas, in times of armed conflict, women and children, including female and child refugees, are among the most vulnerable groups in society;

C.  whereas sexual and reproductive health and rights are grounded on basic human rights and are essential elements of human dignity; whereas these have not yet been secured in all parts of the world;

D.  whereas violence against women and girls is one of the world’s most widespread human rights violations, affecting all levels of society, regardless age, education, income, social position or country of origin or residence, and representing a mayor barrier for gender equality;

E.  whereas the EU strategy for equality between men and women provides for the integration for gender equality into its trade policies;

1.  Recalls that equality between women and men is a core principle of the European Union and its Member States, and that gender mainstreaming one of the Union’s principal objectives as enshrined in the treaties; calls, therefore, on the Commission to integrate gender mainstreaming into all EU legislation, guidelines, actions and funding as a core EU principle, with a special emphasis on EU external relations polices; stresses the need to reinforce the role of the EU delegations, as well as the role of the EEAS Principal Advisor on Gender, by ensuring a specific budget dedicated to her area of competences;

2.  Recalls that the EU Plan of Action on Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment in Development is one of the fundamental tools of the EU to improve gender equality in third countries and believes, therefore, that GAP2 should take the form of a Commission communication; calls on the Commission to take into account Parliament’s resolution on the renewal of the GAP;

3.  Calls on the Commission to include, in free-trade agreements with third countries where women’s rights are limited or non-existent, clauses calling on those states to implement active policies for the recognition of those rights;

4.  Calls on the Member States and the Commission to provide continued support to protect human rights defenders, women’s organisations and women leaders as active actors committed to promoting, protecting and raising awareness of women’s rights;

5.  Calls on the EEAS to ensure that the outcomes of the 61st session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) will be included in its policies, and will provide a renewed impetus in promoting ‘women’s economic empowerment’ in addressing gender inequalities in the changing world of work;

6.  Points at the positive contribution of women’s empowerment in achieving an inclusive, equitable and peaceful society, and sustainable development; stresses that the focus on gender equality and women’s empowerment is explicit across all the Sustainable Development Goals and that more efforts should be pursued to seek the full realisation of women’s rights and the effective implementation of policies promoting economic and social empowerment and women’s participation in decision-making processes; stresses that particular attention should be given to ‘empowering indigenous women’;

7.  Points out that women should be encouraged to organise, via trade unions, and that they should not be discriminated against when seeking businesses financing;

8.  Strongly recommends including education at the core of EEAS policies with the aim of ensuring full and equal access to education to all children, in particular in the context of conflict, and in humanitarian and migration crises, where children can be deprived of basic education; stresses that special attention should be given to girls’ access to education without risks;

9.  Calls on the EEAS to promote the role of women as peace-builders, to encourage women’s participation in leadership and decision-making process, and to place these tasks at the core of the EU Global Strategy and Political Dialogues, particularly when it comes to conflict prevention and promoting human rights and democratic reform in post-conflict reconstruction;

10.  Is concerned about the vulnerable situation of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers, especially women and children, and members of marginalised groups, and calls for the urgent development of proper, safe and legal channels for migration, while taking all necessary measures to ensure their protection, such as access to legal counselling, psychological support, safe spaces for women and children and access to sexual and reproductive health and rights, including safe abortions, as well as other health services; stresses the need for family reunification procedures to afford individual rights for women and girls joining their families in the EU, ensuring that they do not have to depend on a possibly abusive relationship with a male family member for access to health, education or work;

11.  Calls for the EU to support all women’s associations that work on an everyday basis to support women in humanitarian crises and conflicts;

12.  Condemns all forms of violence against women and girls, and all forms of gender-based violence, including trafficking in human beings, forced marriage, honour crimes, female genital mutilation and the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war; calls for the EU and its Member States to ratify the Istanbul Convention, the first legally binding international instrument seeking to prevent and combat violence against women, in all its parts in order to ensure coherence between EU internal and external action in this area; underlines that religious, cultural or traditional differences, or any other circumstances, can in no way justify discrimination or any form of violence; calls for the EU to implement active and effective policies to prevent and combat all forms of violence against women and girls and gender-based violence;

13.  Stresses that one of the obstacles to women’s economic empowerment is violence against women, in particular sexual harassment and sexism inflicted on many women in their workplaces;

14.  Condemns the fact that, in some third countries, marriages between adults and minors are legal;

15.  Calls on the Commission and the Member States to tackle trafficking in human beings effectively and efficiently; notes that research has shown that the majority of victims of trafficking in human beings are women, who, once they have arrived in Europe, are forced into the prostitution market;

16.  Emphasises that accessible health care and universal respect for, and access to, sexual and reproductive health and rights contributes to prenatal care and the ability to avoid high-risk births, reducing infant and child mortality; points out that family planning and access to adequate feminine hygiene products, and to maternal, prenatal and neonatal health care and safe abortion services, are important elements in saving women’s lives and contribute to avoiding high-risk births and to reducing infant and child mortality;

17.  Condemns and rejects laws, regulations and government pressure that impose undue restrictions on the freedom of expression, especially for women and other discriminated gender categories;

18.  Finds it unacceptable that women’s and girls’ bodies, specifically with respect to their sexual and reproductive health and rights, still remain an ideological battleground; calls for the EU and its Member States to recognise the inalienable rights of women and girls to bodily integrity and autonomous decision-making, and condemns the frequent violations of women’s sexual and reproductive rights, including the denial of access to family planning services, contraceptives and safe and legal abortion services;

19.  Strongly condemns the reinstatement and expansion of the US ‘global gag rule’ and its impact on women’s and girls’ global health care and rights, including sex education and safe and legal abortions; reiterates its call on the EU and its Member States to fill the financing gap left by the US in the area of sexual and reproductive health and rights, in particular through funding explicitly destined to ensure access to birth control and safe and legal abortions, using both national as well as EU development funding;

20.  Condemns all forms of discrimination and violence against LGBTI people, especially the criminalisation of homosexuality in some third countries; calls on the EEAS to raise and promote global awareness on LGBTI rights through EU external action in order to end the discrimination they face on a daily basis;

21.  Stresses that gender stereotypes are among the main reasons for violations of women’s rights and inequalities between men and women, and calls, therefore, on the Member States to implement new public awareness campaigns to combat violence against women, sexual assaults, cyber bullying and gender stereotypes; emphasises the importance of the involvement of men and boys in these campaigns, both as targets and as agents of change;

22.  Points out that the rates of people at risk of poverty or social exclusion are higher among women, and asks the Commission to increase its efforts to implement measures to combat poverty and social exclusion as part of its development policies.

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

6.11.2017

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

14

7

1

Members present for the final vote

Maria Arena, Malin Björk, Vilija Blinkevičiūtė, Anna Maria Corazza Bildt, Arne Gericke, Mary Honeyball, Agnieszka Kozłowska-Rajewicz, Florent Marcellesi, Angelika Niebler, Marijana Petir, Terry Reintke, Michaela Šojdrová, Anna Záborská, Jana Žitňanská

Substitutes present for the final vote

Kostadinka Kuneva, Edouard Martin, Jordi Solé, Marc Tarabella, Mylène Troszczynski, Julie Ward

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Ulrike Müller, Gabriele Preuß

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

14

+

ALDE

Ulrike Müller

GUE/NGL

Malin Björk, Kostadinka Kuneva

PPE

Anna Maria Corazza Bildt

S&D

Maria Arena, Vilija Blinkevičiūtė, Mary Honeyball, Edouard Martin, Gabriele Preuß, Marc Tarabella, Julie Ward

VERTS/ALE

Florent Marcellesi, Terry Reintke, Jordi Solé

7

-

ECR

Arne Gericke, Jana Žitňanská, Mylène Troszczynski, Angelika Niebler, Marijana Petir, Michaela Šojdrová, Anna Záborská

1

0

PPE

Agnieszka Kozłowska-Rajewicz

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

Date adopted

13.11.2017

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

43

1

3

Members present for the final vote

Michèle Alliot-Marie, Petras Auštrevičius, Victor Boştinaru, Klaus Buchner, James Carver, Lorenzo Cesa, Andi Cristea, Knut Fleckenstein, Eugen Freund, Michael Gahler, Iveta Grigule-Pēterse, Tunne Kelam, Janusz Korwin-Mikke, Eduard Kukan, Barbara Lochbihler, Sabine Lösing, Andrejs Mamikins, Ramona Nicole Mănescu, Alex Mayer, David McAllister, Francisco José Millán Mon, Clare Moody, Javier Nart, Pier Antonio Panzeri, Alojz Peterle, Tonino Picula, Julia Pitera, Jozo Radoš, Michel Reimon, Jordi Solé, Jaromír Štětina, Dubravka Šuica, Charles Tannock, Miguel Urbán Crespo, Ivo Vajgl, Elena Valenciano

Substitutes present for the final vote

Ana Gomes, Urmas Paet, Soraya Post, Godelieve Quisthoudt-Rowohl, José Ignacio Salafranca Sánchez-Neyra, Traian Ungureanu, Marie-Christine Vergiat, Željana Zovko

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Ignazio Corrao, Liliana Rodrigues, Renate Weber


FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

43

+

ALDE

Petras Auštrevičius, Iveta Grigule-Pēterse, Javier Nart, Urmas Paet, Jozo Radoš, Ivo Vajgl, Renate Weber

ECR

Charles Tannock

EFDD

Ignazio Corrao

GUE/NGL

Marie-Christine Vergiat

PPE

Michèle Alliot-Marie, Lorenzo Cesa, Michael Gahler, Tunne Kelam, Eduard Kukan, David McAllister, Francisco José Millán Mon, Ramona Nicole Mănescu, Alojz Peterle, Julia Pitera, Godelieve Quisthoudt-Rowohl, José Ignacio Salafranca Sánchez-Neyra, Traian Ungureanu, Željana Zovko, Jaromír Štětina, Dubravka Šuica

S&D

Victor Boştinaru, Andi Cristea, Knut Fleckenstein, Eugen Freund, Ana Gomes, Andrejs Mamikins, Alex Mayer, Clare Moody, Pier Antonio Panzeri, Tonino Picula, Soraya Post, Liliana Rodrigues, Elena Valenciano

VERTS/ALE

Klaus Buchner, Barbara Lochbihler, Michel Reimon, Jordi Solé

1

NI

Janusz Korwin-Mikke

3

0

EFDD

James Carver

GUE/NGL

Sabine Lösing, Miguel Urbán Crespo

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention

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