Procedure : 2017/2067(INI)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A8-0036/2018

Texts tabled :

A8-0036/2018

Debates :

PV 12/03/2018 - 19
CRE 12/03/2018 - 19

Votes :

PV 13/03/2018 - 7.3
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P8_TA(2018)0063

REPORT     
PDF 549kWORD 80k
23.2.2018
PE 610.712v02-00 A8-0036/2018

on a European strategy on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems

(2017/2067(INI))

Committee on Transport and Tourism

Rapporteur: István Ujhelyi

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION
 EXPLANATORY STATEMENT
 OPINION of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety
 OPINION of the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection
 OPINION of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs
 INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE
 FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION

on a European strategy on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems

(2017/2067(INI))

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission communication of 30 November 2016 entitled ‘A European strategy on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems, a milestone towards cooperative, connected and automated mobility’ (COM(2016)0766),

–  having regard to Directive 2010/40/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 July 2010 on the framework for the deployment of Intelligent Transport Systems in the field of road transport and for interfaces with other modes of transport(1), and the extension of the timeframe of the mandate to adopt delegated acts,

–  having regard to the opinion of the European Committee of the Regions of 11 October 2017 on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems(2),

–  having regard to the opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee of 31 May 2017 on the ‘Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions – A European strategy on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems, a milestone towards cooperative, connected and automated mobility’(3),

–  having regard to the reports of the Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS) Deployment Platform, in particular on C-ITS certificate and security policy,

–  having regard to its resolution of 14 November 2017 entitled ‘Saving lives: Boosting car safety in the EU’(4),

–  having regard to the Declaration of Amsterdam of 14 April 2016 on cooperation in the field of connected and automated driving,

–  having regard to its resolution of 1 June 2017 entitled ‘Internet connectivity for growth, competitiveness and cohesion: European gigabit society and 5G’(5),

–  having regard to Rule 52 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Transport and Tourism and the opinions of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection and the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (A8-0036/2018),

A.  whereas the European strategy on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (the Strategy) is closely linked to the Commission’s political priorities, notably its Agenda for Jobs, Growth and Investment, the creation of a single European transport area, the digital single market, climate protection and the Energy Union strategy;

B.  whereas Member States’ authorities and the industrial sector must respond to the pressing need to make transport safer, cleaner, more efficient, sustainable, multimodal and accessible for all road users, including the most vulnerable and those with reduced mobility;

C.  whereas the positive trend in road safety that the EU has witnessed over the last decade has slowed down, whereas 92 % of road accidents are due to human error and whereas the use of C-ITS technologies is important for the efficient functioning of certain driver assistance systems; whereas road transport is still responsible for the bulk of space use in cities, accidents and transport emissions in terms of noise, greenhouse gases and air pollutants;

D.  whereas the system of C-ITS will allow road users and traffic managers to share and use information and to coordinate their actions more effectively;

E.  whereas the cyber-security of C-ITS is a key element of their implementation, whereas fragmented security solutions would jeopardise the interoperability and safety of the end user, and whereas there is therefore a clear need for action at EU level;

F.  whereas algorithmic accountability and transparency means implementing technical and operational measures that ensure the transparency and non-discriminatory nature of automated decision-making and of the process of calculating the probability of individual behaviour; whereas transparency should give individuals meaningful information about the logic involved, and the significance of the process and its consequences; whereas this should include information about the data used for training the analytics and enable individuals to understand and monitor the decisions affecting them;

G.  whereas the EU should encourage and further develop digital technologies not only to reduce human error and other inefficiencies, but also to cut costs and optimise the use of infrastructure by relieving traffic congestion, thereby reducing CO2 emissions;

H.  whereas this cooperative element, thanks to digital and mobile connectivity, will significantly improve road safety, traffic efficiency, sustainability and multimodality; whereas at the same time it will generate huge economic potential and reduce road traffic accidents and energy consumption; whereas C-ITS are fundamental to the development of autonomous vehicles and driving systems;

I.  whereas connected and automated driving is an important digital development in the sector and whereas coordination with all new technologies used in the sector, such as the European global satellite-based navigation systems GALILEO and EGNOS, has now reached a high level of technological capacity;

J.  whereas the EU is bound to respect the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, notably Articles 7 and 8 on the right to privacy and the protection of personal data;

K.  whereas several countries around the world (for example, the US, Australia, Japan, Korea and China) are moving rapidly towards deploying new digital technologies and whereas C-ITS vehicles and services are already available on the market;

General framework

1.  Welcomes the Commission communication on a European strategy on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems and the intensive work it has done with experts from both the public and private sectors, which laid the groundwork for the communication; supports the results and calls, therefore, for the introduction of interoperable C-ITS services throughout Europe without delay;

2.  Highlights the need for a clear legal framework to support the deployment of C-ITS and welcomes a future delegated act under the ITS Directive (Directive 2010/40/EU) to ensure the continuity of services, deliver interoperability and support backward compatibility;

3.  Notes the potential of C-ITS to improve fuel efficiency, lowering the cost of individual transport and reducing the negative impact of traffic on the environment;

4.  Highlights the potential of digital technologies and related business models in road transport and recognises the Strategy as an important milestone towards the development of C-ITS and, ultimately, fully connected and automated mobility; notes that cooperative, connected and automated vehicles can boost the competitiveness of European industry, make transport seamless and safer, reduce congestion, energy consumption and emissions, and improve interconnectivity between different modes of transport; points out, with that in mind, that infrastructure requirements must be established to ensure that the systems concerned can function safely and effectively;

5.  Notes that EU industries should capitalise on their advantageous position on the global scene in the development and application of C-ITS technologies; underlines the urgent need to establish an ambitious EU strategy that coordinates national and regional efforts, prevents fragmentation, speeds up the deployment of C-ITS technologies that have proven to have safety benefits, and maximises cooperation between different sectors such as transport, energy and telecommunications; urges the Commission to present a specific timetable with clear targets for what the EU needs to achieve between 2019 and 2029, to prioritise the deployment by 2019 of those C-ITS services that have the highest safety potential as set out in the list of services prepared by the C-ITS Platform in its Phase II Report, and to ensure that these services are available in all new vehicles across Europe;

6.  Emphasises the need to introduce a coherent framework of social, environmental and safety rules in order to enforce the rights of workers and consumers and guarantee fair competition in the sector;

7.  Welcomes the results of the C-ITS Platform Phase II and underlines the importance of the results(6);

8.  Underlines that while the communication constitutes an important milestone towards an EU strategy on cooperative, connected and automated vehicles, there should be no confusion between C-ITS and these different concepts;

9.  Urges the need to ensure that the development and deployment of connected and automated vehicles and C-ITS will fully comply with and support the aims of decarbonising the transport system and vision zero in road safety;

10.  Recalls that C-ITS are systems allowing different ITS stations (vehicles, roadside equipment, traffic control centres and nomadic devices) to communicate and share information using a standardised communication architecture and that interoperability of the individual systems is therefore essential;

11.  Recalls that connected vehicles are vehicles using C-ITS technologies that allow all road vehicles to communicate with other vehicles, with traffic signals, with durable roadside and horizontal infrastructure – which needs to be enhanced and adapted, but which can also provide innovative on-the-go charging systems and communicate safely with vehicles – and with other road users; recalls that 92 % of road accidents are due to human error and that the use of C-ITS technologies is important for the efficient functioning of certain driver assistance systems;

12.  Recalls that automated vehicles are vehicles capable of operating and manoeuvring independently in real traffic situations and where one or more of the primary driving controls (steering, acceleration, braking) are automated for a sustained period of time;

13.  Highlights the necessity of incorporating safeguard systems during the transition phase of co-existence between connected and automated vehicles and traditional non-connected vehicles, so as not to jeopardise road safety; points out that certain driver assistance systems should be further developed and installed on a compulsory basis;

14.  Calls on the Commission to consider how to address the coexistence on the roads of cooperative, connected and automated vehicles and non-connected vehicles and drivers, taking into account that the age of the vehicle fleet and the residual proportion of non-connected people mean that provision needs to be made for a persistently large number of vehicles not being part of the system;

15.  Regrets the absence of clear time scheduling for recommended Day 1.5 services and beyond, as well as the absence of a full impact assessment and precise information on the deployment initiatives in developing C-ITS services and potential service extensions;

16.  Calls on the Commission to give priority to the C-ITS services providing the highest safety potential and to drawing up the definitions and requirements needed, and to update without further delay the European Statement of Principles on human-machine interface (HMI) for in-vehicle information and communication systems, as interaction between the human driver and the machine is important(7)

;

17.  Reiterates the key role of connected and automated vehicles, C-ITS and new technologies in meeting climate targets, and the need to ensure that their development and deployment will fully comply with and support the aim of decarbonising the transport system; welcomes the use of C-ITS as a means to improve traffic efficiency, lower fuel consumption and the impact of road transport on the environment (for example, in terms of CO2 emissions) and optimise the use of urban infrastructure;

18.  Stresses the potential of innovative technologies such as automated driving and ‘platooning’ (grouping diverse vehicles) in road freight transport, which enable better use of slipstream, thereby reducing fuel consumption and emissions; calls for further support for research and development in that area, notably in relation to the requisite digital infrastructure;

19.  Underlines the need to provide road users with more choices, more user-friendly, affordable and customised products, and more information; encourages the Commission, in this regard, to facilitate the exchange of best practices aimed inter alia at achieving economic efficiency; urges all Member States to join the C-Roads Platform, as it is intended to play a significant coordination role in implementing the Strategy, provided that it observes technology neutrality which is needed to encourage innovations; underlines the need to ensure that advanced digital tools are deployed widely and in a coordinated manner in Member States, and that they also cover public transport; invites car manufacturers to initiate C-ITS deployment to implement the Strategy;

20.  Urges the Commission to develop statistics that complement existing ones, in order to better evaluate the digitalisation progress in different areas of the road transport sector; highlights the importance of further investment in research into sensor systems and stresses that in the development of C-ITS, special attention should be paid to urban driving, which is very different from out-of-town driving; notes that urban driving in particular involves greater interaction with motorcyclists, cyclists, pedestrians and other vulnerable road users, including persons with disabilities;

21.  Urges the Member States to make every effort to ensure that vocational training and university courses meet the knowledge needs of the industry that is to develop the ITS strategy; calls for prospective analyses of the new careers and jobs linked to this new approach to mobility, and for the exchange of best practices in the development of models for cooperation between businesses and the education system, geared towards creating integrated areas for training, innovation and manufacturing;

22.  Believes that C-ITS services should be integrated into the Space Strategy for Europe since the deployment of C-ITS is to be based on geolocation technologies such as satellite positioning;

23.  Points out that the Member States should take into account the deployment of C-ITS services within a broader perspective of mobility as a service (MaaS) and integration with other modes of transport, in particular in order to prevent any rebound effects such as an increase in the modal share of road transport;

Privacy and data protection

24.  Draws attention to the importance of applying the EU legislation on privacy and data protection with regard to C-ITS and connected ecosystem data, for which reason these data should, as a matter of priority, be used for C-ITS purposes only and not be retained or used for other ends; stresses that smart vehicles should comply fully with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and related rules, and that C-ITS service providers must offer easily accessible information and clear terms and conditions to drivers, enabling them to give their freely informed consent, in accordance with the provisions and restrictions laid down in the GDPR;

25.  Emphasises the need for much greater transparency and algorithmic accountability with regard to data processing and analytics performed by businesses; recalls that the GDPR already foresees a right to be informed about the logic involved in data processing; underlines, furthermore, the need to prevent ‘driving walls’, which would mean that users could not drive their own smart car if they refused to give consent; calls for an ‘offline mode’ option to be made available in smart cars, which would enable the user to turn off transfers of personal data to other devices without hampering their ability to drive the car;

26.  Draws attention to the fact that data protection and confidentiality must be taken into account throughout the processing of data; stresses that the implementation of ‘privacy and data protection by design and default’ should be the starting point when designing ITS applications and systems; recalls that anonymisation techniques may increase the trust of users in the services they are using;

Cybersecurity

27.  Points to the importance of the application of high standards of cybersecurity in preventing hacking and cyber-attacks in all Member States, particularly in the light of the critical nature of security of C-ITS communications; notes that cybersecurity is an essential challenge to be tackled as the transport system becomes more digitised and connected; stresses that automated and connected vehicles and the databases in which the data are processed and/or stored are at risk of cyber-attack, and therefore that all weaknesses and risks that are identifiable and conceivable in the light of the stage of development reached should be excluded through the development of a common security policy, including strict security standards, and certificate policy for C-ITS deployment;

28.  Underlines that equally high and harmonised standards of security should be applied in the EU and all Member States and in any possible cooperation arrangements with third countries; points out that those standards should not, however, impede the access of third-party repairers to on-board systems, in order to ensure that vehicle owners are not dependent on car manufacturers to carry out any necessary checks on and/or repairs to on-board software;

Communication technologies and frequencies

29.  Believes that a technology-neutral hybrid communication approach that ensures interoperability and backward compatibility and combines complementary communication technologies is the appropriate approach and that the most promising hybrid communication mix appears to be a combination of wireless short-range communication and cellular and satellite technologies, which will ensure the best possible support for deployment of the basic C-ITS services;

30.  Takes note of the mention of the link between connected cars and the European satellite navigation systems, EGNOS and GALILEO; suggests, therefore, that strategies centred around connected cars should be included in space technologies; considers interoperability to be essential for both safety and consumer choice and underlines that vehicles’ capacity to communicate with 5G and satellite navigation systems must be included in the hybrid communication mix in the future, as noted in the Commission’s 5G Action Plan;

31.  Encourages car manufacturers and telecom operators that support C-ITS services to cooperate, inter alia, for the smooth deployment of C-ITS communication technologies, road charging and smart digital tachograph services without interference between these services;

32.  Calls on the Commission and the Member States to continue to provide funding for research and innovation (Horizon 2020), in particular to pave the way for the development, in the long term, of infrastructure that is suitable for the deployment of C-ITS;

33.  Stresses the importance of sensor systems in providing data on vehicle dynamics, congestion and air quality, for example; calls for more and properly coordinated investment in the Member States to ensure the full interoperability of the sensors used and in their possible usage for applications other than safety, for example remote emission sensing;

34.  Calls for the Commission to come forward with proposals to ensure that information on pollutant emissions available through sensors installed in vehicles is collected and made available to competent authorities;

Common European approach

35.  Encourages the Member States and local authorities, vehicle manufacturers, road operators and the ITS industry to implement C-ITS by 2019, and recommends that the Commission, local authorities and Member States designate proper funding under the Connecting Europe Facility, European Structural and Investment Funds and the European Fund for Strategic Investments for the upgrading and maintenance of the future road infrastructure by means of a cross-cutting thematic approach; calls on the Commission and the Member States to continue to provide funding for research and innovation (Horizon 2020) in full respect of the principle of transparency and with the provision of regular information on EU co-financing;

36.  Encourages the Member States and the Commission to support initiatives and actions to promote more research and fact-finding on the development and impact of C-ITS in EU transport policy; is of the opinion that if no significant progress is made by 2022, legislative action may be required to introduce ‘minimum rules’ and enforce integration in this respect;

37.  Stresses the importance of the quality of physical road infrastructure which should gradually be complemented by digital infrastructure; calls for the upgrading and maintenance of the future road infrastructure;

38.  Stresses that a truly multimodal transport system should be created, integrating all modes of transport into a single mobility service using real-time information, taking into account integrated ticketing and shared mobility services as well as walking and cycling, allowing people and freight to travel smoothly from door to door, and enhancing overall transport efficiency, sustainability and durability; calls on the Commission, in this regard, to ensure and promote cooperation and investments at EU level in the field of transport industry digitalisation through existing and new funds, in order to integrate smart transport systems into the various modes of transport (C-ITS, ERTMS, SESAR, RIS(8)); underlines the importance of an integrated approach to information, booking and ticketing tools in establishing attractive door-to-door mobility chains;

39.  Calls for this planning process to draw on users’ vision of passenger and goods transport as a basic source of information, in order to broaden the scope of C-ITS application and create business models linked to this new concept of sustainable integrated mobility;

40.  Encourages the EU and the Member States to properly enforce the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and the forthcoming directive on accessibility requirements for products and services, in order to achieve barrier-free accessibility to C-ITS for all citizens;

41.  Recommends that the Commission rapidly establish an adequate legal framework to achieve EU-wide cross-border interoperability and a framework laying down rules on liability for the use of the various forms of connected transport; calls on the Commission to publish a legislative proposal on access to in-vehicle data and resources by the end of the year; recommends that this proposal should enable the entire automotive value chain and end users to benefit from digitalisation and guarantee a level playing field and maximum security with regard to storage of in-vehicle data and access thereto for all third-parties, which should be fair, timely and unrestricted in order to protect consumer rights, promote innovation and ensure fair, non-discriminatory competition on this market in line with the principle of technological neutrality; stresses the need to contribute to the modernisation of all urban and rural infrastructure linked to public transport services; calls on the Commission to guarantee that it will, in all cases, ensure full compliance with the GDPR, reporting to Parliament on its monitoring on an annual basis;

42.  Calls on the Commission to adopt a global approach to technical harmonisation and standardisation of data, in order to ensure the compatibility of C-ITS, economies of scale for manufacturers and improved consumer comfort;

43.  Underlines the importance of opening a dialogue with the social partners and consumer representatives at an early stage in order to establish an atmosphere of transparency and confidence, with a view to finding a proper balance between positive and negative effects on social and employment conditions and on consumer rights; notes that a road map for C-ITS deployment must be established by the eSafety Forum in the same way as for the eCall system;

44.  Stresses that in order to fulfil international climate commitments and meet internal EU targets, a comprehensive move towards a low-carbon economy is required; highlights the need, therefore, for the renewal of the allocation criteria of different EU funds so as to foster decarbonisation and energy-efficiency measures, including in C-ITS; considers that EU funding should not under any circumstances be allocated to projects that are not compliant with CO2 reduction targets and policies;

45.  Calls on car manufacturers to provide consumers with sufficient and clear information about their rights and the benefits and limitations of new C-ITS technologies in terms of safety; encourages the use of information campaigns to familiarise current drivers with new C-ITS technologies, to create the necessary trust among end users and to achieve public acceptance; considers that the use of C-ITS can improve the safety and efficiency of the transport system while ensuring compliance with data protection and privacy rules;

°

°  °

46.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council and the Commission.

(1)

OJ L 207, 6.8.2010, p. 1.

(2)

COTER-VI/028.

(3)

OJ C 288, 31.8.2017, p. 85.

(4)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2017)0423.

(5)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2017)0234.

(6)

Final report of the C-ITS Platform Phase II: https://ec.europa.eu/transport/sites/transport/files/2017-09-c-its-platform-final-report.pdf

(7)

Commission Recommendation of 26 May 2008 entitled ‘Safe and efficient in-vehicle information and communication systems: update of the European Statement of Principles on human-machine interface’; OJ L 216, 12.8.2008, p. 1.Available at: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A32008H0653

(8)

European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS); Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR); River Information Services (RIS).


EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

Introduction

The world is about to experience an extremely fast-moving industrial and digital revolution, to which the EU is also in some way a party but for which neither Europe’s economy nor its society is properly prepared. There are major discrepancies in the level of development and preparedness of the Member States, but we must not allow digitalisation and technological advances to heighten this imbalance. Every European citizen must benefit equally from the modern industrial revolution and the benefits it brings. The transport sector is similarly on the cusp of dramatic change, and the EU must contribute with meaningful, long-term responses of its own. We must satisfy at once the requirements of safety, effectiveness and sustainability. Advances in digital technologies in the transport sector enable real-time data exchange among the various means of transport, thereby reducing, for example, the number of accidents, rationalising transport systems and lowering emissions of noxious substances. The new technologies, which include the Cooperative Intelligent Transport System (C-ITS) discussed in this report, represent both dramatic progress and a real task for European decision-makers, among other things in terms of harmonising legislation, which has hitherto been disorganised and constantly given rise to new problems. What is certain is that the Commission and the European institutions are lagging behind in this field and cannot keep up with the speed at which the technological revolution is advancing. The task of resolving this situation is a real and urgent one. Similarly, we must recognise that the EU needs parallel cooperation rather than isolated competition in the field of digital advances where these impact on the transport sector, as only in this way can it face up to the challenges of global development posed by the US and China, for example, who are ahead in terms of advances in C-ITS technology. The modern industrial revolution, then, is at once an outstanding opportunity for us to develop and ensure the safety of our transport systems but at the same time in need of continuous, responsible regulatory work.

Background

The Commission and Parliament have been working on the topic of intelligent transport systems and vehicles for nearly 10 years. The introduction of intelligent cars and the eCall system is an important part of this process. The rapporteur welcomes the legislative procedure as a result of which Parliament is giving its opinion on increasing car safety, driving licences and driver training, and the European low-emission mobility strategy. Amending Directive 2010/40/EU on extending the application of delegated acts is particularly important. These supplement the strategy set out in the Commission Communication on introducing intelligent transport systems (COM(2016)0766).

The rapporteur considers it important for a number of EU R&D programmes and community initiatives such as the C-Roads and GEAR 2030 programmes to be undertaken in parallel. Of particular significance are the results of the ITS Platform 2016-2017 programme, as part of which the results of the work done by eight working groups have recently been published by the Commission.

It is crucial for all industrial sectors to join forces – the telecommunication, car manufacturing, energy and transport sectors – so that the results of digital advances can be properly put in place and applied. Equally important is the cooperation of the European institutions and involvement of the Member States. The rapporteur welcomes the opinion drawn up by the Committee of the Regions and the European Economic and Social Committee. Most vehicles in use in the EU are old and were constructed with technologies which preclude connecting them to the latest technologies and digital dialogue. The same is true of road systems which are not part of the Trans-European Networks and are not motorways. The question of how we should ensure the connectability of these vehicles and who would pay for this might justifiably be asked.

Who pays the ferryman?

Nearly EUR 3 billion a year will be needed to finance the introduction of ‘D1’ C services to enable some 30 million cars to be connected. CEF, ESIF and EFSI funding is available to finance the development of broadband networks and transport infrastructure. In addition, R&D projects are currently being undertaken under Horizon 2020. The rapporteur is convinced that development is happening much faster than is shown by the target dates of strategic planning. This is why the Member States must be involved and funding decided on. The biggest question is how we should take account of the role of digital technologies in the next round of financial planning.

Security and safety

The rapporteur agrees with the Commission proposal to introduce both the D1 and the D1.5-day protocols and also to introduce the first package in 2019, whilst welcoming the ambitious targets. At the same time he regrets the lack of a precise timetable and a feasibility study needed to achieve this. He supports the conclusion of the specialist working group dealing with security and safety in the second phase of the C-ITS platform that every vehicle must conform to a minimum set of requirements(1). He is convinced that this technology and automation will only be of value if every single vehicle is connected to the transport system. We must advance one step at a time. In the interim period until the whole C-ITS becomes accessible, it is vital to draw up a safety protocol which includes the human factor and gives sufficient time to ‘human-machine’(2) interaction.

Data security

Fast, real-time data exchange on a broad scale is making huge strides and becoming the norm, which raises the question of the use of appropriate technology and data security. It is vital that existing European regulations are extended to cover the field of automation. The Commission has recently submitted a proposal on cyber-security which includes the task of creating a new European certification system to ensure that digital products and services can be used safely. The rapporteur also believes that one of the most important tasks which await is the issue of precisely determining access to data generated by moving vehicles and access to ‘third-party’ data. We must ensure that the opinions and suggestions of all the parties involved are listened to and that we find the best common solutions.

Issues of communication technology and frequency

If we consider the whole of the EU and at the same time the programmes undertaken in recent months, we can see huge discrepancies in terms of their implementation. At one end of the number line is internet coverage with a value of 0 (no WiFi and no more than 2G overall coverage), whilst at the other we find trucks and lorries ‘platooning’ in convoys. We must take great care not to widen the digital divide. There is agreement on the ‘technology’ question in so far as there is no exclusivity, so that a hybrid application of existing technologies might be the answer. There is constant coordination on this between professional bodies and the Commission.

Other areas of importance / observations

The future of urban mobility is another important part of automation, and its advancement must be a key issue. Organising urban centres and surrounding regions into an intelligent transport network is a key part of regional development. We spend all the time talking only about connecting vehicles and the infrastructure. But what about the so-called ‘actors at risk’ – pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists? How can they be integrated into intelligent systems which work together? And let us not forget, as we aim for total automation, how the stipulations for obtaining driving licences will change and what skills must be imparted. How should driver training be supplemented?

(1)

C-ITS platform final phase II. https://ec.europa.eu/transport/sites/transport/files/2017-09-c-its-platform-final-report.pdf

(2)

European Commission (2008) European Statement of Principles on Human Machine Interface. https://goo.gl/zXSXHe


OPINION of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (2.2.2018)

for the Committee on Transport and Tourism

on the European strategy on cooperative intelligent transport systems

(2017/2067(INI))

Rapporteur: Christel Schaldemose

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety calls on the Committee on Transport and Tourism, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1.  Recalls the European Strategy for Low-Emission Mobility adopted in July 2016, which highlights the potential of cooperative, connected and automated vehicles in the creation of a mobility ecosystem and thus in the reduction of energy consumption and emissions from road transport, which still account for the bulk of transport emissions;

2.  Calls on the Commission to recognise the growing significance of life-cycle emissions, including in the energy supply, manufacturing and end-of-life phases, by putting forward holistic proposals that guide manufacturers towards optimal solutions, in order to ensure that upstream and downstream emissions do not erode the benefits related to the improved operational use of connected and automated vehicles;

3.  Welcomes the European Strategy on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS) as a common framework of action; strongly supports the development of an appropriate EU legal framework for the deployment of C-ITS, including for EU territories not connected to mainland Europe, and for facilitating investment in the requisite infrastructure; calls on the Commission to examine the possibilities of the ITS Directive (2010/40/EU) in this regard;

4.  Calls on the Commission to include urban air and waterborne transport in the C-ITS Strategy, focusing on multimodality and the integration of different modes of transport, which can render transport more efficient and sustainable;

5.  Stresses the need to prioritise public support for C-ITS in terms of its potential to enhance collective modes of transport and ride-sharing; urges the Commission and the Member States, in this regard, to cooperate closely with the local and regional authorities that provide public transport services to examine the possibilities of C-ITS for public and intermodal transport in order to achieve a high level of integration of private and public transport with a view to a more sustainable mobility;

6.  Strongly believes that the deployment of C-ITS should focus on the user and that citizens should be able to connect to these systems with their private car;

7.  Welcomes the potential of C-ITS to improve enforcement of road safety and traffic rules; welcomes also the benefits of C-ITS communication, which include making driving safer by quickly and accurately informing drivers of the state of traffic, dangerous areas and other problems occurring around them, and the fact that transport management and information centres can receive accurate and comprehensive information about the current traffic situation directly from vehicles, making it possible for them to quickly and effectively manage and influence the stream of traffic and increase safety;

8.  Points out that the creation of C-ITS based on communication (data exchange) not only between individual vehicles but also between vehicles and infrastructure is another significant challenge in the field of car electronics and ITS; stresses that C-ITS make it possible for vehicles to communicate directly with each other, and for vehicles and ITS units to send information to the transport infrastructure, which then passes this information on to transport management and information centres, thereby helping to lower the impact of traffic on the environment;

9.  Calls on the Commission and the Member States to make full use of the potential of C-ITS for taking preventive action against smog and high ozone concentration levels and reducing noise levels and particle, NOx and CO2 emissions;

10.  Recalls that end-user acceptance of alternative fuels strongly depends on the availability of fuelling or charging infrastructure, and highlights that making information on such infrastructure (for example. unoccupied recharging points nearby) accessible could boost demand; urges the Commission to give enabling these services higher priority;

11.  Notes the high potential of C-ITS to improve fuel efficiency, lowering the cost of individual transport and reducing the negative impact of traffic on the environment;

12.  Reiterates the key role of connected and automated vehicles, C-ITS and new technologies in meeting climate targets, and the need to ensure that their development and deployment will fully comply with and support the aim of decarbonising the transport system; welcomes the use of C-ITS as a means to improve traffic efficiency, lower fuel consumption and the impact of road transport on the environment (for example, in terms of CO2 emissions) and optimise the use of urban infrastructure;

13.  Stresses the potential of innovative technologies such as automated driving and ‘platooning’ (grouping diverse vehicles) in road freight transport, which enable better use of slipstream, thereby reducing fuel consumption and emissions; calls for further support for research and development in that area, notably in relation to the requisite digital infrastructure;

14.  Highlights the importance of interoperability and considers that the Commission should facilitate interoperable systems in a technology-neutral way;

15.  Stresses the importance of sensor systems in providing data on vehicle dynamics, congestion and air quality, for example; calls for more and properly coordinated investment in the Member States to ensure the full interoperability of the sensors used and in their possible usage for applications other than safety, for example remote emission sensing;

16.  Calls for the Commission to come forward with proposals to ensure that information on pollutant emissions available through sensors installed in vehicles is collected and made available to competent authorities;

17.  Underlines the potential of C-ITS to advance the integration of autonomous vehicles, with the aim of overcoming the ‘last mile’ problem, i.e. the distance from the transportation hub to the final destination;

18.  Highlights that C-ITS may improve road safety significantly by reducing human error, which is still the leading cause of transport accidents;

19.  Calls on the Commission to facilitate access to traffic-related data for public and private actors, such as digital map and navigation service providers, since these services are key to enabling intermodal transport, more efficient routing and automated driving; underlines, however, that end-user trust in the protection of personal data and privacy is crucial to gaining acceptance of the sharing of individual data; supports, therefore, the Commission’s ‘data protection by design and by default’ approach, as outlined in the C-ITS Strategy;

20.  Underlines that cooperation at local and regional level on the development and implementation of interoperable and, where necessary, harmonised C-ITS across the EU, including EU territories not connected to mainland Europe, is crucial;

21.  Stresses that the establishment of cross-border C-ITS is one of the EU’s goals, and that action taken with that goal in mind lays the foundations for Europe-wide use of C-ITS; considers that cooperative system technologies have been developed as part of European scientific and research projects, and have been launched for pilot testing across Europe; highlights that the majority of the necessary and suitable technology for cooperative systems has already been standardised by the European Committee for Standardisation (CEN), the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) and the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO);

22.  Calls on the Commission to take into account the feedback and results of the pilot projects in the context of the Connecting Europe Facility;

23.  Points out that the systematic construction of an intelligent transport system that creates the conditions for the safe, smooth, economical and environmentally friendly movement of persons and goods is an important challenge for today’s society; considers that one possible way of meeting the challenge would be to create stable, long-term partnerships between the relevant European and national bodies and research institutions, which would bring the development of technologies and transport systems to a point where their daily use could help to achieve the long-term goals of EU policies;

24.  Notes that substantial funding for cooperative, connected and automated vehicles has already been made available at EU level; calls on the Commission and the Member States to ensure the provision of the necessary funding for the deployment of C-ITS in the long term, while ensuring the compatibility and interoperability of the various systems at international level;

25.  Stresses that in order to fulfil international climate commitments and meet internal EU targets, a comprehensive move towards a low-carbon economy is required; highlights the need, therefore, for the renewal of the allocation criteria of different EU funds so as to foster decarbonisation and energy-efficiency measures, including in C-ITS; considers that EU funding should not under any circumstances be allocated to projects that are not compliant with CO2 reduction targets and policies;

26.  Calls on the Commission to give due attention to data protection, liability rules and counterterrorism in the development of C-ITS.

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

24.1.2018

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

50

1

1

Members present for the final vote

Marco Affronte, Pilar Ayuso, Ivo Belet, Simona Bonafè, Biljana Borzan, Paul Brannen, Soledad Cabezón Ruiz, Nessa Childers, Birgit Collin-Langen, Seb Dance, Mark Demesmaeker, Stefan Eck, José Inácio Faria, Francesc Gambús, Elisabetta Gardini, Gerben-Jan Gerbrandy, Arne Gericke, Julie Girling, Françoise Grossetête, Andrzej Grzyb, Jytte Guteland, Anneli Jäätteenmäki, Karin Kadenbach, Urszula Krupa, Giovanni La Via, Jo Leinen, Peter Liese, Susanne Melior, Gilles Pargneaux, Piernicola Pedicini, Bolesław G. Piecha, John Procter, Julia Reid, Frédérique Ries, Daciana Octavia Sârbu, Annie Schreijer-Pierik, Renate Sommer, Claudiu Ciprian Tănăsescu, Ivica Tolić, Adina-Ioana Vălean, Jadwiga Wiśniewska, Damiano Zoffoli

Substitutes present for the final vote

Elena Gentile, Martin Häusling, Norbert Lins, Nuno Melo, Ulrike Müller, Christel Schaldemose, Bart Staes, Keith Taylor, Carlos Zorrinho

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Jiří Maštálka

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

50

+

ALDE

Gerben-Jan Gerbrandy, Anneli Jäätteenmäki, Ulrike Müller, Frédérique Ries

ECR

Mark Demesmaeker, Arne Gericke, Julie Girling, Urszula Krupa, Bolesław G. Piecha, John Procter, Jadwiga Wiśniewska

EFDD

Piernicola Pedicini

GUE/NGL

Stefan Eck, Jiří Maštálka

EPP

Pilar Ayuso, Ivo Belet, Birgit Collin-Langen, José Inácio Faria, Francesc Gambús, Elisabetta Gardini, Françoise Grossetête, Andrzej Grzyb, Giovanni La Via, Peter Liese, Norbert Lins, Nuno Melo, Annie Schreijer-Pierik, Ivica Tolić, Adina-Ioana Vălean

S&D

Simona Bonafè, Biljana Borzan, Paul Brannen, Soledad Cabezón Ruiz, Nessa Childers, Seb Dance, Elena Gentile, Jytte Guteland, Karin Kadenbach, Jo Leinen, Susanne Melior, Gilles Pargneaux, Christel Schaldemose, Daciana Octavia Sârbu, Claudiu Ciprian Tănăsescu, Damiano Zoffoli, Carlos Zorrinho

Verts/ALE

Marco Affronte, Martin Häusling, Bart Staes, Keith Taylor

1

-

EFDD

Julia Reid

1

0

PPE

Renate Sommer

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention


OPINION of the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (5.12.2017)

for the Committee on Transport and Tourism

on a European Strategy on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems

(2017/2067(INI))

Rapporteur: Matthijs van Miltenburg

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection calls on the Committee on Transport and Tourism, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1.  Welcomes the Commission’s Strategy on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS); recognises the potential both for users, including the special needs of persons with disabilities, and for companies in a smarter use of data in the transport sector; considers C-ITS a valuable contributor to making transport safer, more efficient, more user‑ and environmentally‑friendly and more sustainable through greater energy efficiency, lower emissions and a reduced risk of accidents;

2.  Urges the European Union, for the sake of the economic growth and competitiveness of Member States, to promote, through higher standards, its leading global position in the field of C-ITS; encourages all stakeholders to speed up the deployment of C-ITS technologies; underlines, in this respect, the need for high-quality, safe, competitive, accessible, continuous and reliable services throughout the Union;

3.  Deems it essential to ensure from the outset that consumers’ rights to privacy and to the protection of their personal data be fully upheld in accordance with the EU legal framework on data protection; urges the Commission, therefore, to ensure the correct implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation; calls on car manufacturers to inform consumers properly and in a clear manner about their rights, as well as the benefits and limits of new C-ITS technologies in terms of safety; calls, furthermore, on car manufacturers never to sell, keep, use or process in-car data for any other purpose without explicit prior consent;

4.  Points out that, in order for cooperative intelligent transport systems to be successfully developed and implemented, the most meticulous attention must be paid to cyber-security; stresses the need to develop a common policy on the security of C-ITS communications, including strict security standards, in order to protect the transport system against hacking and cyber-attacks;

5.  Stresses the importance of technology neutrality, backward compatibility, technical harmonisation and standardisation of data and definitions regarding C-ITS, also to ensure an open market; considers, furthermore, interoperability to be essential for both safety and consumer choice; asks the Commission, together with the competent authorities of the Member States, to ensure a successful roll-out and interoperability at all levels;

6.  Calls on the Commission to adopt a global approach to technical harmonisation and standardisation of data, where appropriate, in order to ensure the compatibility of C-ITS, economies of scale for manufacturers and improved consumer comfort;

7.  Welcomes the strategy’s focus on user involvement; encourages the Commission to facilitate the exchange of best practices; underlines the need for dedicated cross-border C-ITS pilots, supported by adequate funding; encourages the Member States to join the C-Roads Platform as a matter of urgency, and to work jointly on interoperability;

8.  Welcomes the Commission proposal for the extension of the time frame of the mandate to adopt delegated acts under the ITS Directive 2010/40/EU;

9.  Welcomes the fact that the Regulation concerning type-approval requirements for the eCall in-vehicle system based on the 112 service(1) will enter into force in 2018; reminds the Commission in this connection of its obligation to assess the need for an interoperable, secure and standardised open-access platform.

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

4.12.2017

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

32

1

2

Members present for the final vote

Pascal Arimont, Sergio Gaetano Cofferati, Lara Comi, Daniel Dalton, Nicola Danti, Pascal Durand, Evelyne Gebhardt, Robert Jarosław Iwaszkiewicz, Liisa Jaakonsaari, Nosheena Mobarik, Jiří Pospíšil, Virginie Rozière, Christel Schaldemose, Andreas Schwab, Olga Sehnalová, Jasenko Selimovic, Igor Šoltes, Ivan Štefanec, Catherine Stihler, Róża Gräfin von Thun und Hohenstein, Mylène Troszczynski, Anneleen Van Bossuyt, Marco Zullo

Substitutes present for the final vote

Lucy Anderson, Biljana Borzan, Birgit Collin-Langen, Kaja Kallas, Roberta Metsola, Matthijs van Miltenburg, Lambert van Nistelrooij, Sabine Verheyen

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Jonathan Bullock, Rupert Matthews, Bogdan Brunon Wenta, Flavio Zanonato

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

32

+

ALDE

Kaja Kallas, Jasenko Selimovic, Matthijs van Miltenburg

ECR

Daniel Dalton, Nosheena Mobarik, Rupert Matthews, Anneleen Van Bossuyt

EFDD

Marco Zullo

PPE

Pascal Arimont, Birgit Collin-Langen, Lara Comi, Roberta Metsola, Jiří Pospíšil, Andreas Schwab, Róża Gräfin von Thun und Hohenstein, Sabine Verheyen, Bogdan Brunon Wenta, Lambert van Nistelrooij, Ivan Štefanec

S&D

Lucy Anderson, Biljana Borzan, Sergio Gaetano Cofferati, Nicola Danti, Evelyne Gebhardt, Liisa Jaakonsaari, Virginie Rozière, Christel Schaldemose, Olga Sehnalová, Catherine Stihler, Flavio Zanonato

Verts/ALE

Pascal Durand, Igor Šoltes

1

-

EFDD

Jonathan Bullock

2

0

EFDD

Robert Jarosław Iwaszkiewicz

ENF

Mylène Troszczynski

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention

(1)

Regulation (EU) 2015 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 29 April 2015 concerning type-approval requirements for the deployment of the eCall in-vehicle system based on the 112 service and amending Directive 2007/46/EC, OJ L 123, 19.5.2015, p. 77.


OPINION of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (29.1.2018)

for the Committee on Transport and Tourism

on a European strategy on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems

(2017/2067(INI))

Rapporteur: Maria Grapini

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs calls on the Committee on Transport and Tourism, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

A.  whereas the EU is bound to respect the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, notably Articles 7 and 8 on the right to privacy and the protection of personal data;

B.  whereas the data broadcast by Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS) is personal data relating to an identified or identifiable person, and whereas the C-ITS messages will be transmitted for a wide range of services and between an array of actors;

C.  whereas C-ITS are based on the collection, processing and exchange of a wide variety of data from public and private sources, vehicles, users and infrastructure, and whereas it is essential to choose the most optimal list of C-ITS services for consideration in early consultations with Member States, local authorities, vehicle manufacturers and road operators;

D.  whereas the implementation of the systems will be based on geolocation technologies, such as satellite positioning, and non-contact technologies that will facilitate the provision of a wide range of public and/or commercial services, and whereas they must comply with the EU acquis on privacy and data protection, have strict rules on confidentiality, and also work with the objectives and practices of the Space Strategy for Europe;

E.  whereas cyber-security of the cooperative ITS is a key element of implementation, whereas fragmented security solutions would jeopardise the interoperability and safety of the end-users, and whereas there is therefore a clear need for an EU level action;

F.  whereas algorithmic accountability and transparency means implementing technical and operational measures that ensure the transparency and non-discriminatory nature of automated decision-making and of the process of calculating the probability of individual behaviour; whereas transparency should give individuals meaningful information about the logic involved, the significance of the process and its consequences; whereas this should include information about the data used for training the analytics and enable individuals to understand and monitor the decisions affecting them;

1.  Stresses that Union data protection legislation, namely the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), applicable as from 25 May 2018, and the ePrivacy Directive (2002/58/EC), is fully applicable in all aspects of processing of personal data for C-ITS, in particular as regards the principles of purpose limitation, data minimisation and the rights of data subjects, since C-ITS messages can lead indirectly to the identification of users;

2.  Stresses that in the case of smart cars, the data must by default only be processed in the car or cars themselves, and only insofar as this is technically strictly necessary for the functioning of the C-ITS, and must be deleted immediately thereafter; underlines that any further processing or transmission to other data controllers must only be possible with the informed, freely given, clear and active consent of users and passengers to the collection and processing of their data; underlines, furthermore, the need to prevent ‘driving walls’, which would mean that users could not drive their own smart car if they refused to give consent; calls for an ‘offline mode’ option to be made available in smart cars, which would enable the user to turn off transfers of personal data to other devices without hampering their ability to drive the car;

3.  Stresses that the protection of privacy and personal data is critical to ensuring acceptance of the new services by end-users; draws attention to the fact that if the service provided is based on location data, it must provide relevant information to the user, who must be able to withdraw their consent;

4.  Emphasises the need for much greater transparency and algorithmic accountability with regard to data processing and analytics performed by businesses; recalls that the GDPR already foresees a right to be informed about the logic involved in data processing;

5.  Stresses that data security issues should be taken into account not only during the C-ITS device operation itself, but also in the databases in which the data are processed and/or stored; stresses further that appropriate technical, administrative and organisational requirements, including mandatory end-to-end encryption, must be defined for all stages of the processing, ensuring an adequate level of security;

6.  Reiterates that with respect to C-ITS, producers are the key starting point for tightening up liability regimes, which will lead to better quality products and a more secure environment in terms of external access and the possibility for updates;

7.  Draws attention to the fact that data protection and confidentiality must be taken into account throughout the whole processing; stresses that the implementation of ‘privacy and data protection by design and default’ should be the starting point for the design of ITS applications and systems; recalls that anonymisation techniques may increase the trust of users in the services they are using;

8.  Notes that the Commission will be setting up a legal framework on data protection through the adoption of delegated acts under the ITS Directive (2010/40/EU); asks the Commission, therefore, to ensure the highest level of protection in full compliance with the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union and the EU acquis.

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

25.1.2018

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

50

3

0

Members present for the final vote

Asim Ademov, Jan Philipp Albrecht, Michał Boni, Caterina Chinnici, Daniel Dalton, Rachida Dati, Frank Engel, Cornelia Ernst, Tanja Fajon, Kinga Gál, Ana Gomes, Nathalie Griesbeck, Sylvie Guillaume, Jussi Halla-aho, Sophia in ‘t Veld, Dietmar Köster, Barbara Kudrycka, Cécile Kashetu Kyenge, Juan Fernando López Aguilar, Monica Macovei, Roberta Metsola, Péter Niedermüller, Ivari Padar, Birgit Sippel, Csaba Sógor, Sergei Stanishev, Traian Ungureanu, Bodil Valero, Marie-Christine Vergiat, Udo Voigt, Josef Weidenholzer, Cecilia Wikström, Tomáš Zdechovský, Auke Zijlstra

Substitutes present for the final vote

Ignazio Corrao, Pál Csáky, Dennis de Jong, Maria Grapini, Anna Hedh, Lívia Járóka, Sylvia-Yvonne Kaufmann, Ska Keller, Gilles Lebreton, Jeroen Lenaers, Sander Loones, Angelika Mlinar, Maite Pagazaurtundúa Ruiz, John Procter, Emil Radev, Barbara Spinelli, Jaromír Štětina, Axel Voss

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Anna Záborská

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

50

+

ALDE

Nathalie Griesbeck, Sophia in ‘t Veld, Angelika Mlinar, Maite Pagazaurtundúa Ruiz, Cecilia Wikström

ECR

Daniel Dalton, Jussi Halla-aho, Sander Loones, Monica Macovei, John Procter

EFDD

Ignazio Corrao

ENF

Gilles Lebreton

GUE/NGL

Dennis de Jong, Cornelia Ernst, Barbara Spinelli, Marie-Christine Vergiat

NI

Udo Voigt

PPE

Asim Ademov, Michał Boni, Pál Csáky, Rachida Dati, Kinga Gál, Lívia Járóka, Barbara Kudrycka, Jeroen Lenaers, Roberta Metsola, Emil Radev, Csaba Sógor, Jaromír Štětina, Traian Ungureanu, Anna Záborská, Tomáš Zdechovský

S&D

Caterina Chinnici, Tanja Fajon, Ana Gomes, Maria Grapini, Sylvie Guillaume, Anna Hedh, Sylvia-Yvonne Kaufmann, Dietmar Köster, Cécile Kashetu Kyenge, Juan Fernando López Aguilar, Péter Niedermüller, Ivari Padar, Birgit Sippel, Sergei Stanishev, Josef Weidenholzer

VERTS/ALE

Jan Philipp Albrecht, Ska Keller, Bodil Valero

3

-

ENF

Auke Zijlstra

PPE

Frank Engel, Axel Voss

0

0

 

 

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

Date adopted

20.2.2018

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

39

1

1

Members present for the final vote

Daniela Aiuto, Lucy Anderson, Marie-Christine Arnautu, Georges Bach, Izaskun Bilbao Barandica, Deirdre Clune, Michael Cramer, Luis de Grandes Pascual, Andor Deli, Isabella De Monte, Ismail Ertug, Jacqueline Foster, Dieter-Lebrecht Koch, Miltiadis Kyrkos, Bogusław Liberadzki, Marian-Jean Marinescu, Renaud Muselier, Markus Pieper, Tomasz Piotr Poręba, Gabriele Preuß, Christine Revault d’Allonnes Bonnefoy, Dominique Riquet, Massimiliano Salini, Claudia Schmidt, Jill Seymour, Keith Taylor, Pavel Telička, István Ujhelyi, Wim van de Camp, Marie-Pierre Vieu, Janusz Zemke, Roberts Zīle, Elżbieta Katarzyna Łukacijewska

Substitutes present for the final vote

Jakop Dalunde, Michael Detjen, Markus Ferber, Rolandas Paksas, Jozo Radoš, Evžen Tošenovský, Henna Virkkunen

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Olle Ludvigsson


FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

39

+

ALDE

Izaskun Bilbao Barandica, Jozo Radoš, Dominique Riquet, Pavel Telička

ECR

Jacqueline Foster, Tomasz Piotr Poręba, Evžen Tošenovský, Roberts Zīle

EFDD

Daniela Aiuto, Rolandas Paksas

ENF

Marie-Christine Arnautu

PPE

Georges Bach, Deirdre Clune, Andor Deli, Markus Ferber, Dieter-Lebrecht Koch, Elżbieta Katarzyna Łukacijewska, Marian-Jean Marinescu, Renaud Muselier, Markus Pieper, Massimiliano Salini, Claudia Schmidt, Henna Virkkunen, Luis de Grandes Pascual, Wim van de Camp

S&D

Lucy Anderson, Isabella De Monte, Michael Detjen, Ismail Ertug, Miltiadis Kyrkos, Bogusław Liberadzki, Olle Ludvigsson, Gabriele Preuß, Christine Revault d'Allonnes Bonnefoy, István Ujhelyi, Janusz Zemke

Verts/ALE

Michael Cramer, Jakop Dalunde, Keith Taylor

1

-

EFDD

Jill Seymour

1

0

GUE/NGL

Marie-Pierre Vieu

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention

Last updated: 28 February 2018Legal notice