Procedure : 2017/2226(INI)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A8-0047/2018

Texts tabled :

A8-0047/2018

Debates :

PV 13/03/2018 - 20
CRE 13/03/2018 - 20

Votes :

PV 14/03/2018 - 8.11
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P8_TA(2018)0077

REPORT     
PDF 591kWORD 84k
28.2.2018
PE 615.386v02-00 A8-0047/2018

on the European Semester for economic policy coordination: Annual Growth Survey 2018

(2017/2226(INI))

Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs

Rapporteur: Hugues Bayet

Rapporteur for the opinion (*):

Jean Arthuis, Committee on Budgets

(*)  Associated committee – Rule 54 of the Rules of Procedure

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION
 EXPLANATORY STATEMENT
 OPINION of the Committee on Budgets
 OPINION of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety
 OPINION of the Committee on Regional Development
 POSITION IN THE FORM OF AMENDMENTS of the Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality
 INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE
 FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION

on the European Semester for economic policy coordination: Annual Growth Survey 2018

(2017/2226(INI))

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and in particular Articles 121(2), 136 and 148 thereof,

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) No 1175/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 November 2011 amending Council Regulation (EC) No 1466/97 on the strengthening of the surveillance of budgetary positions and the surveillance and coordination of economic policies(1),

–  having regard to Council Directive 2011/85/EU of 8 November 2011 on requirements for budgetary frameworks of the Member States(2),

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) No 1174/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 November 2011 on enforcement measures to correct excessive macroeconomic imbalances in the euro area(3),

–  having regard to Council Regulation (EU) No 1177/2011 of 8 November 2011 amending Regulation (EC) No 1467/97 on speeding up and clarifying the implementation of the excessive deficit procedure(4),

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) No 1176/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 November 2011 on the prevention and correction of macroeconomic imbalances(5),

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) No 1173/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 November 2011 on the effective enforcement of budgetary surveillance in the euro area(6),

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) No 473/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013 on common provisions for monitoring and assessing draft budgetary plans and ensuring the correction of excessive deficit of the Member States in the euro area(7),

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) No 472/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013 on the strengthening of economic and budgetary surveillance of Member States in the euro area experiencing or threatened with serious difficulties with respect to their financial stability(8),

–  having regard to the assessment of the European Fiscal Board of 20 June 2017 on the prospective fiscal stance appropriate for the euro area,

–  having regard to the conclusions of the European Council of 25-26 March 2010 and 17 June 2010, as well as to the Commission communication of 3 March 2010 entitled ‘Europe 2020: A strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth’ (COM(2010)2020),

–  having regard to Council Recommendation (EU) 2015/1184 of 14 July 2015 on broad guidelines for the economic policies of the Member States and of the European Union(9),

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) 2015/1017 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 June 2015 on the European Fund for Strategic Investments, the European Investment Advisory Hub and the European Investment Project Portal and amending Regulations (EU) No 1291/2013 and (EU) No 1316/2013 – the European Fund for Strategic Investments(10),

–  having regard to the Commission communication of 13 January 2015 on making the best use of the flexibility within the existing rules of the Stability and Growth Pact (COM(2015)0012),

–  having regard to its resolution of 24 June 2015 on the review of the economic governance framework: stocktaking and challenges(11),

–  having regard to the Report on completing Europe’s economic and monetary union (‘Five Presidents’ Report’),

–  having regard to the Treaty on Stability, Coordination and Governance in the Economic and Monetary Union;

–  having regard to the Commission communication of 21 October 2015 on steps towards Completing Economic and Monetary Union (COM(2015)0600),

–  having regard to the Commission’s communication of 6 December 2017 on further steps towards completing the Economic and Monetary Union (COM(2017)0821),

–  having regard to the Commission’s European Economic Forecast of Autumn 2017,

–  having regard to the studies and in-depth analyses on economic policy coordination in the euro area under the European Semester prepared for the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (November 2015),

–  having regard to the Commission communication of 26 November 2015 on the Annual Growth Survey 2016 (COM(2015)0690), the Alert Mechanism Report 2016 (COM(2015)0691) and the draft Joint Employment Report (COM(2015)0700),

–  having regard the Interinstitutional Proclamation on the European Pillar of Social Rights signed and proclaimed in Gothenburg on 17 November 2017,

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) 2017/825 of the European Parliament and of the Council on the establishment of the Structural Reform Support Programme for the period 2017 to 2020 and amending Regulations (EU) Nos 1303/2013 and 1305/2013,

–  having regard to its resolution of 17 December 2015 on completing Europe’s Economic and Monetary Union(12),

–  having regards to its resolution of 13 December 2017 on a recommendation following the inquiry on money laundering, tax evasion and tax avoidance(13),

–  having regard to the recommendation for a Council recommendation of 22 November 2017 on the economic policy of the euro area,

–  having regard to the debate with representatives of national parliaments on the priorities of the 2018 European Semester,

–  having regard to the debate with the Commission in the European Parliament on the European Semester package – Annual Growth Survey 2018,

–  having regard to Rule 52 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs and the opinions of the Committee on Budgets, the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, the Committee on Regional Development and the position in the form of amendments of the Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality (A8-0047/2018),

A.  whereas, according to Commission forecasts, while the expansion of the European economy is expected to continue, the pace of job creation and household purchasing power growth implies a slight loss of momentum over the next two years, with growth reaching 2.4 % in 2017 in the EU and then marginally slowing down to 2.2 % in 2018 and to 2.0 % in 2019; whereas further policy action will nonetheless be required to address unresolved legacies of the global economic crisis;

B.  whereas the current situation of the EU’s economy calls for ambitious and socially balanced structural reforms and investment in Member States in order to bring about sustained growth, employment and competitiveness, and achieve upward convergence;

C.  whereas private consumption growth is expected to drop slightly this year before easing in 2019, as a result of higher inflation compared to 2017, although it is lower than the ECB target of below, but close to, 2 %;

D.  whereas the European Investment Bank and the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI) have, in addition to the European Structural and Investment Funds, provided important support for investment in the EU; whereas, however, private investment still remains below 2008 levels, with negative implications for potential growth, job creation and productivity;

E.  whereas employment is expected to continue to expand, with a record 235.4 million people in jobs in the second quarter of 2017; while some labour market indicators suggest persistent difficulties, such as increasing labour market segmentation, aggravating inequalities, especially with regard to young people and those with low educational attainment; whereas unemployment stands at 7.5 % in the EU and 8.9 % in the euro area, which, while the lowest levels in nine and eight years, respectively, is still too high, particularly among young people; whereas very substantial differences between many Member States persist, and whereas employment rates have still some way to go to recover from the crisis and, not the least, to attain the Europe 2020 national targets; whereas hidden unemployment (of persons unemployed, willing to work, but not actively searching for employment) stood at 20 % in 2016;

F.  whereas, as a result of tax avoidance, tax evasion and tax fraud benefiting certain large corporations and individuals, several Member States have lost billions of euros in revenue for managing public finances, to the detriment of SMEs and other taxpayers;

G.  whereas the improved economic situation provides opportunities for implementing ambitious and socially balanced structural reforms, in particular measures to encourage investment, given that the level of investment as a proportion of GDP today is still lower than in the period immediately preceding the financial crisis, and to improve the situation with regard to public finances, taking into account the burden that demographic developments place on their debt sustainability;

1.  Takes note of the publication of the 2018 Annual Growth Survey (AGS) package and the proposed policy mix of investments, ambitious and socially balanced structural reforms and responsible public finances, presented as a means of further promoting higher growth levels and strengthening European recovery, upward convergence and competitiveness; agrees that further progress on the implementation of structural reform is needed to deliver on growth and jobs, and to carry on the fight against those inequalities that hamper economic growth;

Chapter 1 – Investments and growth

2.  Highlights the persistent structural problem of insufficient growth of potential output, productivity and competitiveness, associated with too low a level of public and private investment and a lack of ambitious and socially balanced structural reforms in some Member States;

3.  Recalls that some Member States still have large current account surpluses that could be used to sustain public and private investments and boost economic growth;

4.  Recalls the importance of combining public and private investment with structural reforms to boost and leverage economic growth;

5.  Underlines the importance of boosting public investment in the EU in order to remedy the current decrease in public investment; urges, moreover, the completion of the Capital Market Union with a view to boosting private investments across the single market; considers that the regulatory framework for private investment should be improved further;

6.  Stresses the need for more investments in research, development and innovation, as well as in technological modernisation, in order to boost productivity; recalls that investments in areas such as infrastructures, childcare, social housing, education, training, health, research, digital innovation and the circular economy can increase productivity and/or employment; calls on the Commission to address country-specific recommendations (CSRs) in the field of energy efficiency and resource consumption, and to ensure that CSRs are fully consistent with the Paris climate agreement;

7.  Asks the Commission to assess current obstacles to significant growth-enhancing infrastructure projects over the lifetime of such investments, and to discuss with Parliament and the Council ways to address such obstacles within the existing legal framework;

Chapter 2 – Responsible public finance

8.   Takes note of the overall neutral fiscal stance proposed in the recommendations for the euro area, noting that the fiscal stance is expected to be slightly expansionary in a number of Member States in 2018; recalls that consistent implementation and compliance with Union fiscal rules, including full respect of the existing flexibility clauses, are key to the proper functioning of the EMU;

9.  Underlines the fact that the fiscal stances at national and euro area level must balance the long-term sustainability of public finances and investment, in full compliance with the Stability and Growth Pact, with short-term macroeconomic stabilisation;

10.  Welcomes the improvements made in public finances, which is key to reach a more solid, sustainable and efficient growth, in particular the gradually declining debt-to-GDP ratios for the EU and euro area, and falling headline budget deficits, while emphasising that the gross debt-to-GDP ratio within the euro area still hovers around 90 %, with several Member States being well above that level; stresses that these Member states should reduce their high debt-to-GDP ratios as a matter of urgency, as this is markedly easier to do in times of economic recovery; recalls that ageing societies and other demographic developments place a massive burden on the sustainability of public finances; calls, therefore, on the Member States to take responsibility for future generations;

11.  Underlines the need for a stronger focus on the composition and management of national budgets; welcomes, therefore, the increasing practice of spending reviews. and further encourages Member States to assess the quality of their budgets;

Chapter 3 – Structural reforms

12.   Recalls that some Member States need to continue implementing socially and environmentally sustainable, growth-friendly structural reforms, in particular given the context of an improved economic situation across the EU, with GDP growth in almost all Member States, with a view to boosting competitiveness, job creation, growth and upward convergence;

13.  Insists on bringing expenditure on R&D closer to the EU 2020 targets; calls on the Member States to set in place proper policies, and to provide investment, to ensure or maintain equal access to lifelong education and training, taking into account the evolution of the labour market, including the emergence of new professions;

14.  Stresses that digitalisation, globalisation and technological change are radically transforming our labour markets, involving e.g. deep changes in employment forms and statuses which need an adapted transition; stresses, therefore, the importance of dynamic labour markets with accessible and high-quality social security systems, capable of responding to these new labour market realities;

15.  Considers that reforms removing investment bottlenecks would allow for immediate support for economic activity and, at the same time, set the conditions for long-term growth;

16.  Calls for taxation reviews aimed at achieving a fair balance of taxation on capital, labour and consumption;

Chapter 4 – Convergence and inclusion

17.  Underlines that the European Semester and the CSRs should contribute to the achievement of the objectives of EU 2020 strategy, including those set out in the Pillar of Social Rights, and should deliver on growth and jobs; welcomes, therefore, the ‘social scoreboard’ as a tool for monitoring the implementation of the Social Pillar;

18.  Highlights the fact that, in the recent period, real wage growth has lagged behind productivity growth, while improvements have occurred in the labour market; stresses, against this background, that there could be room for wage increases in certain sectors and areas, in line with productivity goals to ensure good standards of living, taking into account competitiveness and the need to tackle inequalities;

19.  Points out that fiscal policies need to take into account monetary policy respecting the independence of the ECB;

20.  Urges the Commission to develop a comprehensive strategy to support investment that enhances environmental sustainability, and to ensure a proper link between the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the European Semester;

21.  Welcomes the fact that the AGS 2018 acknowledges the need for efficient and fair tax systems that provide the right incentives for economic activity; supports the Commission’s initiatives to achieve increased transparency and a reformed VAT system, and notes the work that has been done on the common consolidated corporate tax base; welcomes efforts on the international level to fight tax fraud, tax evasion and tax avoidance; notes that improving the effectiveness of national tax systems can increase government revenues significantly;

22.  Calls on the Member States to adopt adequate measures to help and integrate young persons not in education, employment or training (NEETs) and refugees, anticipating at an early stage the requirements for facilitating their smooth transition to the labour market, in order to prevent them from being sucked into the black economy and to ensure that public services are provided with sufficient resources; stresses that the social partners should play a key role in facilitating the integration of NEETs and refugees, and in making sure that they do not suffer labour market discrimination;

23.  Is concerned that gaps and discrimination continue to shape labour markets in some Members States, contributing to differences between men and women in remuneration, retirement and participation in decision making;

Chapter 5 – European Semester framework: ownership and implementation

24.  Welcomes the increased attention given to the euro area’s aggregate fiscal stance, while pointing to the obligations of individual Member States to comply with the Stability and Growth Pact, including full respect of its existing flexibility clauses; emphasises that the concept of an aggregate fiscal stance does not imply that surpluses and deficits in different Member States offset each other;

25.  Is concerned about the low rate of compliance with the CSRs, including those aimed at fostering convergence, increasing competitiveness and reducing macroeconomic imbalances; believes that more national ownership through genuine public debates at national level would lead to better implementation of the CSRs; considers it important to ensure that national parliaments debate country reports and CSRs; believes that regional and local authorities should be better involved in the European Semester process; calls on the Commission to use all existing tools to enforce those CSRs aimed at addressing these challenges, which represent a threat to the sustainability of the monetary union;

26.  Stresses that any further step towards a deepening of the EMU must go hand in hand with stronger democratic controls; insists that, to this end, the role of both the European Parliament and the national parliaments must be strengthened in line with the liability principle; asks that the social partners be consulted in the negotiation process, at both national and European level;

Sectorial contributions to the 2018 AGS Report

Budgets

27.  Considers that EU budgets must provide an incentive for sustainable growth, convergence, investments and reforms, through solutions and synergies as regards national budgets; believes, therefore, that the AGS serves as a guideline for the Member States, and for the preparation of national and EU budgets, particularly in the context of the preparation of the post-2020 multiannual financial framework;

28.  Reiterates, in this regard, that there should be greater synergies between national budgets and the EU budget; points out that the Commission, given its involvement in the European Semester as well as in the preparation and execution of the EU budget, has a key role to play in this regard;

29.  Welcomes the proposal for greater synergy and non-fragmentation of the EU budget set out in the recommendations presented in ‘Future Financing of the EU’, the final report of the High Level Group on Own Resources from December 2016;

Environment, public health and food safety

30.  Welcomes the initiative shown by the Commission in launching the web portal on health promotion and disease prevention, which provides up-to-date information on topics relating to the promotion of health and well-being, and constitutes an important source of clear and reliable information for citizens; stresses that this portal should be fully accessible to all EU citizens, including those suffering from dyslexia or other such difficulties;

31.  Calls for greater coherence with other EU policies in the field of disaster prevention and preparedness, such as the EU strategy on adaptation to climate change, the European Structural and Investment Funds, the Solidarity Fund, environmental legislation and research and innovation policies;

32.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council and the Commission, the governments and national parliaments of the Member States and the European Central Bank.

(1)

OJ L 306, 23.11.2011, p. 12.

(2)

OJ L 306, 23.11.2011, p. 41.

(3)

OJ L 306, 23.11.2011, p. 8.

(4)

OJ L 306, 23.11.2011, p. 33.

(5)

OJ L 306, 23.11.2011, p. 25.

(6)

OJ L 306, 23.11.2011, p. 1.

(7)

OJ L 140, 27.5.2013, p. 11.

(8)

OJ L 140, 27.5.2013, p. 1.

(9)

OJ L 192, 18.7.2015, p. 27.

(10)

OJ L 169, 1.7.2015, p. 1.

(11)

OJ C 407, 4.11.2016, p. 105.

(12)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2015)0469.

(13)

Text adopted, P8_TA-PROV(2017)0491


EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

The European Union has been in a deep economic and monetary crisis since 2008. Ten years on, improvements in economic results and an upturn in growth are beginning to be detected in the euro area.

Yet these macro-economic indicators cannot prevent growing inequality in the Member States, with rising in-work poverty and a lack of convergence between the Member States in the euro area.

The 2018 European Semester has to be the opportunity to apply an economic policy which ensures growth, investment and full employment. It must also contribute fully to implementing the objectives enshrined by the European Union in the Pillar of Social Rights.

The current European economic governance framework has shown its limitations. Without a change in direction of the euro area’s budgetary policy, there can be no hope of sustainable growth and high-quality employment. This is why the rapporteur advocates reforming the Stability and Growth Pact and introducing a budgetary capacity for the euro area and an ambitious public investment plan.

The Juncker Plan was an important first stage for the private sector, but it must be accompanied by an investment plan for the public sector.

High-quality public infrastructure is one of the drivers of competitiveness in Europe.

But there is a danger of Europe losing this trump card due to the current lack of investment, visible in the ageing infrastructure and the resultant traffic congestion, delays on the railways, and uncertainty for investors in the energy market.

The European Union must also apply a sustainable development policy which ensures the necessary environmental transition and will enable the European Union to achieve the objectives it has set itself. The European Semester must fully integrate this priority.

Other priorities will be supported by the rapporteur, such as:

  wage increases and the protection of social systems;

  the harmonisation of European taxation and the fight against tax evasion to achieve fair taxation;

  increased financing for research and development to increase the level of productivity at European level.


OPINION of the Committee on Budgets  (25.1.2018)

for the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs

on the European Semester for economic policy coordination: Annual Growth Survey 2018

(2017/2226(INI))

Rapporteur: Jean Arthuis

(*)  Associated committee – Rule 54 of the Rules of Procedure

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Budgets calls on the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1.  Considers that EU budgets must provide an incentive for sustainable growth, convergence, investments and reforms, through solutions and synergies as regards national budgets; believes, therefore, that the Annual Growth Survey (AGS) serves as a guideline for Member States and for the preparation of national and EU budgets, particularly in the context of the preparation of the post-2020 multiannual financial framework (MFF);

2.  Calls on the Commission, within the framework of the next MFF, to ensure a substantial increase in the European Social Fund, with the specific aim of supporting the implementation of the European Pillar of Social Rights (EPSR);

3.  Calls on the Commission to put forward a concrete legislative plan for the period 2018-2019 aimed at improving living and working conditions in the context of the proclamation of the European Pillar of Social Rights, and specifically to encourage the proclamation of a Social Protocol to be annexed to the Treaties in order to ensure that fundamental social rights take precedence over economic freedoms;

4.  Reiterates, in this regard, that there should be greater synergies between national budgets and the EU budget; points out that the Commission, given its involvement in the European Semester as well as in the preparation and execution of the EU budget, has a key role to play in this respect;

5.  Urges the Commission to propose ambitious reforms of the governance of the euro area, including the introduction and use of a special instrument to support the adoption of the euro by the non-euro area Member States; welcomes the proposal for greater synergy and non-fragmentation of the EU budget, set out in the final report and recommendations of the High Level Group on Own Resources, published in December 2016 and entitled ‘Future Financing of the EU’;

6.  Recalls its support for the creation of a euro area fiscal capacity in order to ensure convergence and cope with macroeconomic symmetric and asymmetric shocks, as well as increasing the competitiveness and stability of Member States’ economies, as proposed in its resolution of 16 February 2017 on budgetary capacity for the euro area; considers that the funding should come from euro area and other participating members via a source of revenue to be agreed between participating Member States, as part of the transfer of competences, and believes that in a steady state, this fiscal capacity should also be financed through own resources such as the financial transaction tax; considers that this budgetary capacity should be part of the EU budget, over and above the current ceilings of the MFF, and considered as assigned revenue and guarantees;

7.  Calls on the Commission to encourage reforms of tax systems that are focused on increasing the top rate of income tax, and specifically of taxation on income from capital, generating resources for transferring public goods and services, and reversing trends that threaten growth and job creation arising from inequalities in income and wealth and primarily affect the 40 % of the population who are at the bottom end of income distribution;

8.  Takes note of the document entitled ‘A Roadmap for deepening the Economic and Monetary Union’, presented by the Commission on 6 December 2017; welcomes, in particular, the proposal to transform the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) into a European Monetary Fund to be integrated into the EU framework; regrets that the Commission’s proposal to integrate intergovernmental tools related to the euro into the EU framework has been put forward using a legal basis excluding adequate involvement of the European Parliament as co-legislator; stresses the need to express greater ambitions with a view to establishing a full budgetary capacity for the euro area;

9.  Recalls the importance for the budgetary resources of the EU and its Member States of fighting tax evasion, tax avoidance and aggressive tax planning; welcomes the EU’s blacklist of tax havens, but regrets that the Council has watered down the listing criteria; underlines that the blacklist has to be accompanied by strong deterrent sanctions against listed countries; calls for public country-by-country reporting and the introduction of a common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB) to promote tax transparency and a level playing field;

10.  Considers it necessary to encourage public and private investment in infrastructure, research and development, innovation and education, with the aim of increasing productivity and impacting positively on economic growth and wages; calls for a strong and efficient cohesion policy which will, among other priorities, support the implementation of an economic policy mix aimed at achieving high levels of development and growth and boosting job creation;

11.  Believes with regard to this proposal that further detail and reinforcement are required as regards the provisions concerning the accountability of the EMF to the European Parliament and Parliament’s ability to endorse all its functions, notably as a common backstop to the Banking Union, as well as its concrete capacity for decision when assuming its stabilisation function;

12.  Is concerned at the low inflation levels prevailing in the euro area, as repeatedly pointed out by the ECB; considers that wages in some Member States are being maintained at artificially low levels, with a detrimental effect on the whole of the EU economy;

13.  Recommends that all Member States which have committed themselves to adopting the euro and have not yet done so approve tangible plans for the adoption of the common European currency as soon as possible;

14.  Stresses that youth unemployment stands at 17 % in the EU, and welcomes the fact that the EU has committed budgetary resources to tackle this issue, in particular under the Youth Employment Initiative (YEI); recalls that 75 % of the total YEI budget up to 2020 has been allocated to projects and 19 % has already been spent by the Member States, which makes the YEI’s budget implementation rate the highest among the European Structural and Investment Funds (ESI Funds); calls on the Commission and the Member States, given the importance of the issue, to take action to further improve take-up.

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

24.1.2018

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

25

6

3

Members present for the final vote

Nedzhmi Ali, Jean Arthuis, Richard Ashworth, Gérard Deprez, Manuel dos Santos, André Elissen, José Manuel Fernandes, Eider Gardiazabal Rubial, Jens Geier, Ingeborg Gräßle, Monika Hohlmeier, John Howarth, Zbigniew Kuźmiuk, Siegfried Mureşan, Liadh Ní Riada, Jan Olbrycht, Răzvan Popa, Paul Rübig, Petri Sarvamaa, Patricija Šulin, Eleftherios Synadinos, Indrek Tarand, Isabelle Thomas, Inese Vaidere, Monika Vana, Tiemo Wölken

Substitutes present for the final vote

Xabier Benito Ziluaga, Heidi Hautala, Ivana Maletić, Stanisław Ożóg, Ivan Štefanec

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Rosa Estaràs Ferragut, Dietmar Köster, Monika Smolková

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

25

+

ALDE

Nedzhmi Ali, Jean Arthuis, Gérard Deprez

ECR

Zbigniew Kuźmiuk,

PPE

Rosa Estaràs Ferragut, José Manuel Fernandes, Ingeborg Gräßle, Monika Hohlmeier, Ivana Maletić, Siegfried Mureşan, Jan Olbrycht, Paul Rübig, Petri Sarvamaa, Ivan Štefanec, Patricija Šulin, Inese Vaidere

S&D

Eider Gardiazabal Rubial, Jens Geier, John Howarth, Dietmar Köster, Răzvan Popa, Monika Smolková, Isabelle Thomas, Tiemo Wölken, Manuel dos Santos

6

-

ECR

Richard Ashworth, Stanisław Ożóg

ENF

André Elissen

GUE/NGL

Xabier Benito Ziluaga, Liadh Ní Riada

NI

Eleftherios Synadinos

3

0

VERTS/ALE

Heidi Hautala, Indrek Tarand, Monika Vana

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention


OPINION of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (2.2.2018)

for the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs

on the European Semester for economic policy coordination: Annual Growth Survey 2018

(2017/2226(INI))

Rapporteur: Nuno Melo

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety calls on the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1.  Emphasises that the protection of the environment is not an obstacle to economic growth and employment, and that, on the contrary, the decarbonisation of the economy should be seen as a key source of new and sustainable economic growth and employment; considers that the EU must invest more in order to maintain its status as the global frontrunner of the transition to a low-carbon economy and a sustainable production-consumption system;

2.  Emphasises that environmental and sustainability policy must be given a more prominent role in the European Semester, particularly for key issues such as resource efficiency, natural capital and ecosystem services, green jobs, sustainable innovation and green financing;

3.  Reiterates that since at least 20 % of the EU budget for 2014-2020 should be spent on climate change-related action, the contribution for 2018 should overshoot the overall target in order to offset the lower allocations from the first half of the current multiannual financial framework; stresses that stable and appropriate funding is essential to achieving the European Union’s commitments, especially in the light of the Paris Agreement; calls on the Commission, in this regard, to guarantee that the mechanism of climate change mainstreaming is fully optimised;

4.  Welcomes the Commission’s commitment to mainstreaming the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) into all EU policies and initiatives; stresses that is essential that the goals of the 2030 Agenda are comprehensively reflected in the European Semester in order for the EU to achieve them; calls on the Commission to develop, without delay, a long-term roadmap for the full implementation of the SDGs in the EU, recognising their interrelationships and the equal importance of each; calls on the Commission, moreover, to integrate all outstanding aspects of the 2030 Agenda and the 7th Environment Action Programme into the European Semester;

5.  Stresses that the European Semester debate is of particular importance in view of the need to find a new development model for structural reforms and selective investments – investing in strategic areas;

6.  Highlights the environmental significance and socio-economic benefits of biodiversity, such as the Natura 2000 network, which contributes between 1.7 and 2.5 % of EU GDP through the provision of ecosystem services such as carbon storage, water purification, pollination and tourism; notes with concern that the EU’s 2020 biodiversity targets will not be met without substantial additional efforts and adequate financial commitments, for which the European Semester is an essential tool;

7.  Regrets the fact that the Commission’s Annual Growth Survey for 2018 still fails to place the future of the EU economy in the context of the necessary phasing out of carbon emissions and a shift to a circular economy, and is therefore missing the opportunity to guide the EU economy to a more stable, inclusive, productive and resilient path;

8.  Emphasises the need for horizontal application of sustainability criteria and performance-based objectives for all EU structural and investment funds, including the European Fund for Strategic Investments, in order to achieve a comprehensive transition to sustainable and inclusive economic growth; calls on the Commission and the Member States to re-direct investments towards sustainable technologies and businesses in order to finance growth in a sustainable manner over the long term;

9.  Considers that measurement and benchmarking methodologies for resource efficiency and greenhouse gas intensity should be included in both the European Semester – within the framework of the scoreboard for macroeconomic imbalances – and in the review of the Europe 2020 strategy;

10.  Welcomes the increasing amount of institutional and private capital allocated towards financing the SDGs; invites the Commission and the Member States to develop sustainable development criteria for EU institutional spending, to identify potential regulatory barriers and incentives to SDG investment and to explore opportunities for convergence and cooperation between public and private investments;

11.  Recommends that measures to support the continuation of the recovery focus on the delivery of investments that support transition to a fossil-free, efficient and renewable economy in support of domestic employment and demand;

12.  Stresses that investment in resource efficiency, energy savings and emission reductions will both increase productivity across the economy and reduce external costs and impacts; highlights the opportunities to support the transition towards a circular economy with a view to creating new jobs in innovative, maintenance and repair services and designing and making new, more sustainable products;

13.  Considers that, as part of the discussion on the European Semester, the Commission should come forward with new policies and incentives to encourage Member States to rapidly phase out fossil fuel subsidies by 2020, as these constitute one of the most pressing hurdles to the achievement of EU climate and renewables targets, the EU 2020 goals and the SDGs;

14.  Reiterates the need to phase out other environmentally harmful subsidies by 2020 and to shift taxes from labour to environmental taxation;

15.  Welcomes the proclamation at the Social Summit for Fair Employment and Growth in Gothenburg of the European Pillar of Social Rights, which is based on 20 principles, including, in the area of health care, the right to access affordable, preventive and curative health care of good quality;

16.  Calls on the Commission and the Member States to step up their efforts to develop, reform, and implement effectively policies that address health promotion and disease prevention, including with technical support from the Commission’s Structural Reform Support Programme (SRSP);

17.  Welcomes the initiative shown by the Commission in launching the web portal on health promotion and disease prevention, which provides up-to-date information on topics relating to the promotion of health and well-being, and constitutes an important source of clear and reliable information for citizens; stresses that this portal should be fully accessible to all EU citizens, including those suffering from dyslexia or other such difficulties;

18.  Stresses the need, in the context of the review of the European Civil Protection Mechanism, to effectively create an EU civil protection response reserve of civil protection assets, as a complement to national resources, in order to strengthen the European common response capacity to disasters such as forest fires and earthquakes; stresses the need to encourage greater cooperation on the advanced planning of European disaster-response operations by, among other measures, mapping Member States’ assets, drawing up contingency plans and improving risk-management planning;

19.  Calls for greater coherence with other EU policies in the field of disaster prevention and preparedness, such as the EU strategy on adaptation to climate change, the European Structural and Investment Funds, the Solidarity Fund, environmental legislation, and research and innovation policies;

20.  Stresses that extreme events, such as drought in southern European countries, hurricanes and catastrophic floods, require the signatories to the Paris Agreement to show greater ambition to meet the established targets;

21.  Calls on the Commission to create a real sustainable management and protection strategy for forests in order to help combat the effects of climate change, with an emphasis on ‘sustainable’ and an added emphasis on the species of trees grown in those forests; calls on the Commission, furthermore, to implement and incentivise a project to encourage tree and shrub growth along the banks of streams and rivers, thus helping to alleviate the effects of prolonged heavy precipitation;

22.  Calls for greater and structured involvement of civil society and environmental organisations within the European Semester process, and for greater involvement of environment ministers within the European Semester process at Council level.

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

24.1.2018

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

50

1

0

Members present for the final vote

Marco Affronte, Pilar Ayuso, Ivo Belet, Simona Bonafè, Biljana Borzan, Paul Brannen, Soledad Cabezón Ruiz, Nessa Childers, Birgit Collin-Langen, Seb Dance, Stefan Eck, José Inácio Faria, Francesc Gambús, Elisabetta Gardini, Gerben-Jan Gerbrandy, Arne Gericke, Julie Girling, Françoise Grossetête, Andrzej Grzyb, Jytte Guteland, Anneli Jäätteenmäki, Karin Kadenbach, Urszula Krupa, Giovanni La Via, Jo Leinen, Peter Liese, Susanne Melior, Gilles Pargneaux, Piernicola Pedicini, Bolesław G. Piecha, John Procter, Julia Reid, Frédérique Ries, Daciana Octavia Sârbu, Annie Schreijer-Pierik, Renate Sommer, Claudiu Ciprian Tănăsescu, Ivica Tolić, Adina-Ioana Vălean, Jadwiga Wiśniewska, Damiano Zoffoli

Substitutes present for the final vote

Elena Gentile, Martin Häusling, Norbert Lins, Nuno Melo, Ulrike Müller, Christel Schaldemose, Bart Staes, Keith Taylor, Carlos Zorrinho

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Jiří Maštálka

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

50

+

ALDE

Gerben-Jan Gerbrandy, Anneli Jäätteenmäki, Ulrike Müller, Frédérique Ries

ECR

Arne Gericke, Julie Girling, Urszula Krupa, Bolesław G. Piecha, John Procter, Jadwiga Wiśniewska

EFDD

Piernicola Pedicini

GUE/NGL

Stefan Eck, Jiří Maštálka

EPP

Pilar Ayuso, Ivo Belet, Birgit Collin-Langen, José Inácio Faria, Francesc Gambús, Elisabetta Gardini, Françoise Grossetête, Andrzej Grzyb, Giovanni La Via, Peter Liese, Norbert Lins, Nuno Melo, Annie Schreijer-Pierik, Renate Sommer, Ivica Tolić, Adina-Ioana Vălean

S&D

Simona Bonafè, Biljana Borzan, Paul Brannen, Soledad Cabezón Ruiz, Nessa Childers, Seb Dance, Elena Gentile, Jytte Guteland, Karin Kadenbach, Jo Leinen, Susanne Melior, Gilles Pargneaux, Christel Schaldemose, Daciana Octavia Sârbu, Claudiu Ciprian Tănăsescu, Damiano Zoffoli, Carlos Zorrinho

Verts/ALE

Marco Affronte, Martin Häusling, Bart Staes, Keith Taylor

1

-

EFDD

Julia Reid

0

0

 

 

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention


OPINION of the Committee on Regional Development (20.2.2018)

for the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs

on the European Semester for economic policy coordination: Annual Growth Survey 2018

(2017/2226(INI))

Rapporteur: Iskra Mihaylova

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Regional Development calls on the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1.  Takes note that Europe’s economy has been showing signs of recovery over the past 18 quarters, with Member States displaying positive and steady growth and unemployment reaching its lowest level since the crisis; stresses however that, according to the latest results of the OECD’s well-being index, there are clear and deep divisions between societies and individuals in terms of level of education, income, wealth, age and birthplace; notes that such inequalities, especially youth and long-term unemployment and poverty levels, remain at crisis levels in several regions which are still experiencing a slow degree of recovery; draws attention, in this context, to the issue of structural unemployment and its unfortunate economic, social and political implications; expresses its concern that people under the age of 25 are particularly hard hit and are 60 % more likely to be unemployed than those aged 25-54; underlines the importance of the extension of the Youth Employment Initiative (YEI) for the 2017-2020 period and the EUR 1.2 billion increase in its budget;

2.  Stresses, therefore, the need to foster greater convergence and inclusion; welcomes the fact that the Commission recognises there is a momentum to support the continuation of the recovery through economic growth, social convergence, structural reforms and territorial cohesion, and that it is moving away from its austerity path of the past; underlines that the European Union as a whole, in order to promote its overall harmonious development, should develop and pursue actions leading to the strengthening of its economic, social and territorial cohesion and aiming at reducing disparities between the levels of development of the various regions and addressing the backwardness of the least favoured, particularly the low-income and low-growth regions of the EU (the lagging regions); points out the need for an all-encompassing qualitative transformation of the existing policy mix by prioritising the urgent implementation of the principles and rights contained in the European Pillar of Social Rights; stresses, in this regard, that cohesion policy must be provided with adequate financial resources in the post-2020 period and asks the Commission to make a corresponding proposal; notes that investments in innovation, education and new skills are needed to achieve increased productivity, which is one of the preconditions for better growth;

3.  Welcomes the streamlining and focus of the Country Specific Recommendations (CSRs); expresses its concern, however, regarding the uneven degree of implementation of the CSRs across policy areas and countries; recalls the importance of a synergetic approach to the use of all available EU funds and calls on the Commission and Member States to closely collaborate and coordinate the process in order to ensure support for enhanced economic, social and territorial cohesion and for boosting investment, employment and growth, and to recognise the supportive role that local and regional authorities can have in the process; stresses the need for capacity-building measures and further simplification of the implementation of EU funds, considering that a major part of the 2017 CSRs addressed issues of administrative capacity; stresses that the CSRs should better reflect the specificities of the Member States; stresses the need for greater synergy between the EU budget and Member States’ budgets with the aim of achieving Annual Growth Survey (AGS) priorities and implementing CSRs;

4.  Emphasises the important role in the recovery process of cohesion policy as the main public investment, growth and development policy aligned with the goals of the Europe 2020 strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth; recalls that, between 2015 and 2017, cohesion policy provided funding equivalent to 8.5 % of government capital investment in the European Union (EU) – a figure that rises to 41 % for the last 13 Member States to join the EU after 2004 and to over 50 % in seven Member States; is of the opinion that it should be maintained at least at a similar budgetary level in the future Multiannual Financial Framework; considers, however, that its interaction with the European Semester should not impede the achievement of its proper objectives as stipulated in the Treaties, including its territorial dimension, while such interaction should be balanced and should enhance implementation of the European Structural and Investment funds (ESI funds) and further increase the multiplier effect of cohesion spending and its contribution to sustainable and inclusive growth conducive to the creation of decent jobs and social development; considers, in this context, that it is useful to involve local and regional authorities in defining the parameters of the European semester; points out that more flexibility is needed in defining the activities and projects which should be financed from ESI funds and linked with annually defined CSRs and Annual Growth Surveys (AGSs);

5.  Reiterates the need to speed up the implementation of the ESI funds as they are an extremely relevant tool for economic growth, sustainable development and job creation, thus providing important support to national investment policies and contributing to relevant structural reforms; calls on the Member States to develop stronger coordination and planning structures and governance frameworks, as well as more efficient public administrations, and to reduce the administrative burden in order to make their use more effective and efficient; calls also on the Commission to assist Member States with all available tools and resources in order to avoid the risk of decommitment, as well as the accumulation of payment backlogs;

6.  Welcomes the extension in duration and size of the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI) until 2020 to help boost investment, avoid disruptions in financing and reassure project promoters that they can still plan projects after the initial investment period; underlines the need for complementarities and synergies between ESI funds, EFSI and other financial instruments, as well as with the horizontal Community programmes, while maintaining the ESI funds as the EU’s main investment policy; insists that EFSI be implemented in a more territorially balanced way, thus contributing to harmonious EU development and avoiding further increases in disparities between Member States, regions and people; recalls that projects under the extended EFSI should continue to address sub-optimal investment situations and market gaps; calls for a rebalancing of the territorial distribution of investment and for reinforced take-up in less developed regions; stresses, therefore, that in this context there is a stronger need to facilitate the combination of EFSI with other sources of EU funding;

7.  Underlines the role of the Structural Reform Support Programme (SRSP) in supporting tailor-made assistance in order to help Member States carry out their reforms with a view to enhancing cohesion, applying EU law in a timely manner and using EU funds more efficiently and effectively; highlights, that experience to date has shown that many Member States have requested support under the Programme and that requests for support are distributed across all support policy areas; calls on the Commission to ensure full transparency related to the implementation of the programme in the annual monitoring report concerning concrete results on individual projects; stresses, in this respect, the importance of identifying and implementing relevant structural reforms at all levels of government and the removal of red tape surrounding ongoing investments so as to help improve the implementation of ESIF and business and investment environments;

8.  Stresses the need for certainty about the resources for financing the SRSP after 2020, resources which should not be diverted from the aims and objectives of the ESI funds.

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

20.2.2018

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

31

7

0

Members present for the final vote

Mercedes Bresso, Steeve Briois, Andrea Cozzolino, Raymond Finch, John Flack, Iratxe García Pérez, Michela Giuffrida, Krzysztof Hetman, Ivan Jakovčić, Constanze Krehl, Sławomir Kłosowski, Louis-Joseph Manscour, Martina Michels, Iskra Mihaylova, Andrey Novakov, Paul Nuttall, Mirosław Piotrowski, Stanislav Polčák, Liliana Rodrigues, Fernando Ruas, Monika Smolková, Ruža Tomašić, Ramón Luis Valcárcel Siso, Ángela Vallina, Lambert van Nistelrooij, Kerstin Westphal, Joachim Zeller

Substitutes present for the final vote

Daniel Buda, Andor Deli, Ivana Maletić, Urmas Paet, Tonino Picula, Georgi Pirinski, Bronis Ropė, Milan Zver

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Eleonora Evi, Anna Hedh, Bogdan Brunon Wenta

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

31

+

ALDE

Ivan Jakovčić, Iskra Mihaylova, Paet Urmas

ECR

John Flack, Sławomir Kłosowski, Mirosław Piotrowski, Ruža Tomašić

PPE

Daniel Buda, Andor Deli, Krzysztof Hetman, Ivana Maletić, Andrey Novakov, Stanislav Polčák, Fernando Ruas, Ramón Luis Valcárcel Siso, Bogdan Brunon Wenta, Milan Zver, Lambert van Nistelrooij

S&D

Mercedes Bresso, Andrea Cozzolino, Iratxe García Pérez, Michela Giuffrida, Anna Hedh, Constanze Krehl, Louis-Joseph Manscour, Tonino Picula, Georgi Pirinski, Liliana Rodrigues, Monika Smolková, Kerstin Westphal

VERTS/ALE

Bronis Ropė

7

-

EFDD

Eleonora Evi, Raymond Finch, Paul Nuttall

ENF

Steeve Briois

GUE/NGL

Martina Michels, Ángela Vallina

PPE

Joachim Zeller

0

0

 

 

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention


POSITION IN THE FORM OF AMENDMENTS of the Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality (11.1.2018)

for the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs

on the European Semester for economic policy coordination: Annual Growth Survey 2018

(2017/2226(INI))

Rapporteur: Evelyn Regner

AMENDMENTS

The Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality calls on the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, as the committee responsible, to take into account the following amendments:

Amendment    1

Motion for a resolution

Paragraph 4 a (new)

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

4 a. Emphasises that European economic governance needs to be refocused from the narrow objective of GDP growth towards wellbeing and convergence with high minimum standards for gender equality; considers that the new well-being-oriented economic policymaking should be based on a ‘magic polygon’ consisting of fairly distributed material well-being, quality of life, financial stability, price stability, full employment and decent jobs, ecological sustainability, stable public sector activity and balanced external economic relations;

Amendment    2

Motion for a resolution

Paragraph 6 a (new)

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

6 a. Notes that debates on a smart allocation of public spending and policy priorities in the EU budget are taking place regularly, and that such a critical assessment is indispensable for improving the quality of Member States’ public budgets in the medium and long term and to prevent linear budget cuts that could particularly affect women, among others;

Amendment    3

Motion for a resolution

Paragraph 6 b (new)

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

6 b. Takes the view that improving the structure and quality of public budgets is a key lever to ensure compliance with EU fiscal rules and to allow for the financing of indispensable expenditure, for example in relation to social security systems, which are of particular importance for women, the building of buffers for unforeseen needs and, lastly, the financing of non-essential spending;

Amendment    4

Motion for a resolution

Paragraph 7 a (new)

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

7 a. Points out the need for an in-depth analysis and more comprehensive assessment of social indicators within the framework of the European Semester; calls on the Commission to add further social indicators, which should be placed on an equal footing with economic indicators;

Amendment    5

Motion for a resolution

Paragraph 7 b (new)

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

7 b. Remains concerned about the lack of gender perspective and indicators within the framework of the European Semester and calls for greater inclusion of the gender mainstreaming perspective in the formulation of country-specific recommendations, convergence programmes and national reform programmes; stresses the need to monitor social and gender progress and the impact of reforms over time; requests, therefore, the use of gender-segregated data, the calculation of new indicators and the inclusion of new information encompassing each of the Europe 2020 Strategy’s five headline targets, including R&D and energy targets, in order to monitor progress and bring to light gender differences;

Amendment    6

Motion for a resolution

Paragraph 7 c (new)

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

7 c. Calls for an increase in minimum wages, greater wage transparency and for pay audits to be undertaken at company level in order to achieve equal pay for the same work in all sectors and professions; calls on the Member States, moreover, to stop their blockage of the Women on Boards directive; underlines, furthermore, the importance of working towards achieving an effective work-life balance framework for all men and women to be able to reconcile their private and professional lives;

Amendment    7

Motion for a resolution

Paragraph 7 d (new)

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

7 d. Stresses the need to prioritise action to tackle unemployment, poverty and social exclusion, which affect women above all, and to give priority to sustainable employment and quality jobs, investment, and quality public services which ensure social inclusion, especially in the areas of education, health, childcare, care of dependent persons, public transport and social services;

Amendment    8

Motion for a resolution

Paragraph 7 e (new)

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

7 e. Calls for the second principle of the Pillar of Social Rights, namely that equality of treatment and opportunities between women and men must be ensured and fostered in all areas, including regarding participation in the labour market, terms and conditions of employment and career progression, and that women and men have the right to equal pay for work of equal value, to be fully integrated into the European Semester;

Amendment    9

Motion for a resolution

Paragraph 16 a (new)

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

16 a. Is concerned that disparities remain considerable and labour market segregation remains high throughout the European Union, which is contributing to gender differences, including substantial gaps in pay, pensions and wealth, unequal decision-making processes and shorter careers for women; stresses that even though the employment rate of women has reached a record high, it is still 11 % below that of men; emphasises that the employment gap is especially high for mothers and women with caring responsibilities;

Amendment    10

Motion for a resolution

Paragraph 16 b (new)

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

16 b. Is concerned at the extent to which women are affected by austerity policies; underlines, in this regard, the fact that women have been more severely affected in the long term, through public spending cuts, redistributions in work-life balance policies and cutbacks in social security systems;

Amendment    11

Motion for a resolution

Paragraph 16 c (new)

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

16 c. Highlights the fact that gender discrimination is still great, as evidenced by the gender pay gap and the gap in the employment rate between men and woman, with the average gross hourly earnings of male employees about 16 % higher than those of female employees; stresses that these gaps are due to the underrepresentation of women in well-paid sectors, discrimination in the labour market and the high rate of women in part-time work; urges that further progress is needed to narrow these gaps; calls on the Commission, in this context, to introduce a gender equality pillar and an overarching gender equality objective into the Europe 2020 strategy; encourages the Member States to strengthen efforts to eradicate the gender pay gap and to take more active measures to strengthen women’s participation in the labour market;

Amendment    12

Motion for a resolution

Paragraph 19 a (new)

 

Motion for a resolution

Amendment

 

19 a. Invites the Commissioners responsible to discuss the gender aspects of the Annual Growth Survey with the Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality each year;

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

4.12.2017

 

 

 


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

Date adopted

21.2.2018

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

45

7

1

Members present for the final vote

Burkhard Balz, Hugues Bayet, Udo Bullmann, Thierry Cornillet, Esther de Lange, Markus Ferber, Jonás Fernández, Sven Giegold, Neena Gill, Roberto Gualtieri, Gunnar Hökmark, Danuta Maria Hübner, Cătălin Sorin Ivan, Petr Ježek, Wolf Klinz, Georgios Kyrtsos, Werner Langen, Sander Loones, Olle Ludvigsson, Ivana Maletić, Gabriel Mato, Costas Mavrides, Alex Mayer, Bernard Monot, Luděk Niedermayer, Stanisław Ożóg, Sirpa Pietikäinen, Dariusz Rosati, Pirkko Ruohonen-Lerner, Anne Sander, Alfred Sant, Martin Schirdewan, Molly Scott Cato, Pedro Silva Pereira, Peter Simon, Theodor Dumitru Stolojan, Kay Swinburne, Paul Tang, Ramon Tremosa i Balcells, Ernest Urtasun, Marco Valli, Miguel Viegas, Jakob von Weizsäcker

Substitutes present for the final vote

Matt Carthy, Bas Eickhout, Ramón Jáuregui Atondo, Alain Lamassoure, Paloma López Bermejo, Thomas Mann, Luigi Morgano, Laurenţiu Rebega, Joachim Starbatty, Lieve Wierinck


FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

45

+

ALDE

Thierry Cornillet, Petr Ježek, Wolf Klinz, Ramon Tremosa i Balcells, Lieve Wierinck

ECR

Sander Loones, Stanisław Ożóg, Pirkko Ruohonen-Lerner, Joachim Starbatty, Kay Swinburne

PPE

Burkhard Balz, Gunnar Hökmark, Danuta Maria Hübner, Georgios Kyrtsos, Alain Lamassoure, Esther de Lange, Werner Langen, Ivana Maletić, Thomas Mann, Gabriel Mato, Luděk Niedermayer, Sirpa Pietikäinen, Dariusz Rosati, Anne Sander, Theodor Dumitru Stolojan

S&D

Hugues Bayet, Udo Bullmann, Jonás Fernández, Neena Gill, Roberto Gualtieri, Cătălin Sorin Ivan, Ramón Jáuregui Atondo, Olle Ludvigsson, Costas Mavrides, Alex Mayer, Luigi Morgano, Alfred Sant, Pedro Silva Pereira, Peter Simon, Paul Tang, Jakob von Weizsäcker

VERTS/ALE

Bas Eickhout, Sven Giegold, Molly Scott Cato, Ernest Urtasun

7

-

EFDD

Marco Valli

ENF

Bernard Monot

GUE/NGL

Matt Carthy, Paloma López Bermejo, Martin Schirdewan, Miguel Viegas

PPE

Markus Ferber

1

0

ENF

Laurenţiu Rebega

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention

Last updated: 1 March 2018Legal notice