Procedure : 2018/2023(INI)
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Document selected : A8-0297/2018

Texts tabled :

A8-0297/2018

Debates :

PV 25/10/2018 - 8
CRE 25/10/2018 - 8

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PV 25/10/2018 - 13.22

Texts adopted :

P8_TA(2018)0438

REPORT     
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1.10.2018
PE 621.006v02-00 A8-0297/2018

on deployment of infrastructure for alternative fuels in the European Union: time to act!

(2018/2023(INI))

Committee on Transport and Tourism

Rapporteur: Ismail Ertug

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION
 EXPLANATORY STATEMENT
 OPINION of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety
 OPINION of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy
 OPINION of the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection
 INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE
 FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION

on deployment of infrastructure for alternative fuels in the European Union: time to act!

(2018/2023(INI))

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission communication of 8 November 2017 entitled ‘Towards the broadest use of alternative fuels - an Action Plan on Alternative Fuels Infrastructure under Article 10(6) of Directive 2014/94/EU, including the assessment of national policy frameworks under Article 10(2) of Directive 2014/94/EU’ (COM(2017)0652),

–  having regard to Directive 2014/94/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2014 on the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure(1),

–  having regard to Directive 2009/33/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 April 2009 on the promotion of clean and energy-efficient road transport vehicles(2),

–  having regard to the Paris Agreement, Decision 1/CP.21 and the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP 21) to the UNFCCC, and the 11th Conference of the Parties serving as the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP 11) held in Paris, France from 30 November to 11 December 2015,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council setting emission performance standards for new passenger cars and for new light commercial vehicles as part of the Union’s integrated approach to reduce CO2 emissions from light-duty vehicles and amending Regulation (EC) No 715/2007 (recast) (COM(2017)0676),

–  having regard to the International Code of Safety for Ships using Gases or other Low-flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code), along with the proposed amendments to make the Code mandatory under the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), addressing the challenges posed by the adoption of alternative fuels at regulatory level in the shipping sector and aiming at minimising the risk to the ships, their crew and the environment, and having regard to the nature of the fuels involved,

–  having regard to the opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee,

–  having regard to Rule 52 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Transport and Tourism and the opinions of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy and the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (A8-0297/2018),

A.  whereas mobility is a basic need and the backbone of our societies and economies, and should be clean, sustainable, reliable, affordable and safe in all respects; whereas, in this context, clean technologies offer huge opportunities and benefits for society, having a significant impact on health and on the environment, as well as on the automotive industry, energy suppliers, utilities, and grid operators;

B.  whereas Member States have adopted their national policy frameworks (NPF) that were assessed by the Commission in its recent communication COM(2017)0652, which noted that the objectives and the implementation of charging infrastructure for electric vehicles vary from one Member State to another, as only eight out of 25 Member States fully meet the NPF requirements set out in Directive 2014/94/EU(3), and that two Member States failed to submit their NPF by 16 November 2016, as required under Article 3 of Directive 2014/94/EU;

C.  whereas the decarbonisation of transport will improve air quality and strengthen Europe’s energy security and independence vis-à-vis imported energy and fossil fuels, and will therefore require a swift and substantial change in the type of energy, fuels and powertrains used, as well as an increase in energy efficiency, by deploying the most efficient and advanced technologies, making the transition to multimodal transport and changing mobility behaviour;

D.  whereas transport is the only major economic sector in the European Union where greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have increased since 1990; whereas it is responsible for 23 % of CO2 emissions, and this share is still growing; whereas road transport accounts for almost 75 % of all energy used in transport and causes almost 73 % of the transport sector’s greenhouse gas emissions; whereas there is a constant increase in traffic linked to the growth in movements and volumes of goods transported in the EU and the increased mobility of people; whereas this increase, as projected for 2030, will have consequences for climate change, air quality and energy consumption, and will also have an impact on infrastructure; whereas decarbonisation of road transport through the use of sustainable alternative fuels will require a flexible approach, meaning that different alternative fuels could be needed for different vehicle segments;

E.  whereas shipping accounts for over 80 % of world trade by volume and 3 % of global greenhouse gas emissions, contributing to air pollution close to coastal areas and ports; whereas, taking into consideration its substantial contribution to the worldwide transport market, the gradual adoption of alternative fuels by shipping would have a significant positive effect on the environment;

F.  whereas, in order to keep the increase in the global temperature to well below 2°C while pursuing the 1.5°C target as signed up to in the Paris Agreement, road transport needs to be fully decarbonised with zero net emissions by 2050 at the latest; whereas a shift to alternative fuels can help achieve this goal, although conventional fuels will still be needed for the foreseeable future until such time as demand can be met in full by alternative fuels;

G.  whereas switching to sustainable alternative fuels and powertrains, taking into account the whole life-cycle of vehicles, is the best means to decarbonise the existing and future vehicle fleet; whereas the overall effect will be even greater when combined with increased vehicle efficiency, use of public transport and bikes, the development of shared mobility and improvements to the overall efficiency of transport systems through C-ITS systems and automation and digitalisation technology; whereas urban and spatial planning can support and complement the technological efforts and support the deployment of charging and refuelling infrastructure; whereas the promotion of alternative fuels can make an important contribution to the improvement of air quality in cities;

H.  whereas the price disadvantages of alternative-fuel vehicles compared to regular internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, together with the lack of deployment of refuelling and recharging infrastructure, are still among the main barriers to customers’ purchasing decisions; whereas, in this context, buyers’ premiums, tax exemptions and non-fiscal incentives have proven to accelerate market uptake and should reflect the GHG and pollutants emission performance of different alternative fuels;

I.  whereas shifting towards alternative fuels and powertrains represents an opportunity, and a research incentive, for a competitive European industry to reaffirm its technological leadership; whereas this transition is crucial for international competitiveness in terms of knowledge, technology and market share;

J.  whereas the recast of the Regulation on emission standards for new passenger cars and for new light commercial vehicles will hopefully set ambitious reduction targets and incentivise low- and zero-tailpipe-emission vehicles, whilst preserving a technology neutral approach, thus leading the way to a decarbonised European vehicle fleet, which will require the deployment of an adequate infrastructure network for alternative fuels; whereas the revision of the Directive on the promotion of clean and energy-efficient road transport vehicles complements the Directive on alternative fuels by guaranteeing demand for suppliers and increasing the uptake of clean vehicles;

K.  whereas 94 % of Europe’s transport sector is dependent on oil, 90 % of which has to be imported, including from some politically unstable countries;

L.  whereas according to Directive 2014/94/EU, alternative fuels still encompass fuels of fossil origin, thus contradicting the goal of decarbonisation and the phasing out of fossil fuels; whereas priority should be assigned to low- and zero-tailpipe emission solutions over the entire life-cycle of vehicles; whereas for heavy-duty vehicles and in the shipping sector, however, LNG and CNG may contribute in the short and medium-term to the improvement of air quality, in particular around ports and along coastlines;

M.  whereas the energy and transport sectors need to be coupled more closely together in order to allow for deep decarbonisation in mobility; whereas energy carriers such as electricity and hydrogen allow for zero-emission mobility while integrating renewable energy sources (RES); whereas with the energy sector progressively shifting towards using RES only, storage for excess energy in periods of low demand has to be provided; whereas Battery Electric Vehicles (BEVs) and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (FCEVs) can contribute to that end; whereas low-emission energy sources will be an intermediate step in the shift towards zero-emission mobility; whereas technology neutrality should therefore be the starting point for the roll-out of alternative fuels infrastructure;

N.  whereas lithium-ion cells, a key component of electric vehicle batteries, are nearly all produced outside of the European Union, mainly in Asia;

O.  whereas smart, robust electricity grids, better integration of power and gas grids via power-to-gas, access to the grid for charging service providers and private charging points and the roll-out of Hydrogen Refuelling Stations are key to electromobility; whereas with BEV and FCEV smart and controlled charging can help balance grids, but there is still a lack of regulatory, tax and technical frameworks;

P.  whereas the TEN-T networks constitute the main transport networks in the European Union; whereas focussing on deploying alternative fuels infrastructure and pursuing the goal established in the communication to provide full coverage of the trans-European transport network (TEN-T) core network corridors with charging points by 2025 should be a key priority; whereas this target should be further complemented with the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure both on the comprehensive TEN-T network and in urban, rural and sparsely populated areas, taking into consideration structural and economic constraints, in order to achieve a balanced coverage;

1.  Welcomes the aforementioned Commission communication on the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure; highlights that further coordination and cooperation at EU level is needed in order to decarbonise the transport sector by 2050 and underlines the opportunities for industry, technology and employment presented by the deployment of alternative fuels and the corresponding infrastructure;

Stepping up efforts

2.  Calls, however, on the Commission to bring forward a revision of Directive 2014/94/EU, while maintaining the current definition of alternative fuels as listed in Article 2, and to focus on its proper implementation, taking into account that only 8 of 25 Member States have so far fully implemented it, in order to fill the gaps in alternative fuels infrastructure throughout the European Union; stresses the need to increase the uptake of alternative fuels and to create a stable environment for investment;

3.  Notes that the Commission’s evaluation of the National Framework Plans (NFPs) reveals differing levels of effort, ambition and available funding between Member States and that the deployment of alternative fuels falls short of being comprehensive and evenly distributed; calls therefore on the Commission to thoroughly assess the NFP projects and ambition levels, to suggest additional measures where needed and to support Member States with best practice examples; invites the Commission to replace the system of NFPs with more efficient instruments, including concrete, binding and enforceable targets, to formulate sustainability criteria; suggests that the Commission take into account the projected and realised uptake of alternative-fuel vehicles and their technological progress, allow Member States flexibility in determining how to reach the targets, and pursue the goal of having a trans-European infrastructure network for all alternative fuels that is accessible, compatible and interoperable;

4.  Calls for the projected increase in journeys and in the volumes transported up to 2030 to be taken into account in order to calculate the scale and appropriately equip the new infrastructure; stresses the importance of the technological advances that are already under way or in the pipeline in the fields of batteries, hydrogen and energy storage, and stresses the need to take account of these advances in the strategic choices that are to be made; notes that new infrastructure must be adaptable to changes, both in terms of volumes and in terms of technologies; stresses, for example, that a massive increase in the number of electric vehicles coupled with an increase in the range of those vehicles to 400 km will have an impact on the deployment density of the network of charging stations, as well as on the type of charging required;

5.  Suggests an annual evaluation of the Member States’ implementation status and broadening of the Directive’s scope to shift it from deployment along the TEN-T core network to also covering the TEN-T comprehensive network, urban and regional nodes, and areas reaching the 'high' level of the European Air Quality Index (EAQI) on more than 35 days in a year and with a population density six times higher than the EU average density, in order to achieve a geographically broad coverage, and to also include the infrastructure for public fleets; calls on the Commission to extend the CEF’s scope in this regard and to increase its funding;

6.  Supports electrified roads that allow electric vehicles to charge as they drive; calls for their wider development, at least along the TEN-T Core and Comprehensive network roads; believes that electrified roads could be a solution making it possible to reduce battery size and, consequently, the prices of new vehicles;

7.  Calls on the Commission to create a level playing field between the different alternative fuels ensuring technology neutrality, especially when promoting distribution infrastructure, thus making hydrogen infrastructure mandatory with deployment requirements equal to those for CNG, but adjusting these deployment requirements;

8.  Underlines the importance of sustainable urban planning, shifting from private use to shared and public use of transport and calling on the Commission and Member States to particularly turn their attention to the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure for collective and public transport services, such as buses, trams, trains, shared cars, taxis and mini vans, as well as for bicycles, scooters and motorcycles; encourages the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure in urban and suburban areas, giving priority to those where air quality is poor;

9.  Encourages the local and regional authorities participating in the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy to strive to include concrete measures in their Sustainable Energy Action Plans (SEAPs), in particular for the construction or completion of charging infrastructure for electric vehicles;

10.  Calls on the Commission to complement the climate-related goals of Directive 2014/94/EC with additional clean air measures following the fitness check of the EU Ambient Air Quality Directives(4);

11.  Draws attention to the importance of sustainable public procurement of alternatively powered vehicles as a driver of demand for alternative fuels and alternative fuels infrastructure;

12.  Encourages the provision of clean power supply at airports (for use in stationary planes as well as for mobile equipment at airports) in order to cut kerosene consumption, improve air quality, and reduce climate change impact and noise pollution;

Clean Mobility Fund: financing alternative fuels infrastructure

13.  Welcomes the Commission’s effort to provide an additional EUR 800 million as start-up financing to support the uptake of alternative fuels infrastructure; doubts, however, that the leverage will be sufficient given the projected need for EUR 5.2 billion up to 2020 and an additional EUR 16-22 billion of overall investment up to 2025(5); urges the Commission to increase the initial funding, to support not only the deployment but also the operation of such infrastructure during the unprofitable market uptake phase, and to focus on the needs of public transport operators, including for supporting infrastructure such as maintenance workshops; highlights that additional public and especially private investment is needed;

14.  Suggests that the estimated necessary investment of EUR 25 billion up to 2025 could be co-funded, with the European Union contributing around 10 % and around 90 % coming from industry, notably manufacturers, suppliers, energy and fuel producers and other interested parties; stresses that alternative fuels infrastructure projects should have access to grants and loans provided by the CEF, EIB and EC IPE, while always ensuring there is no distortion of the market; requests that financial resources from the fund should be awarded according to the criteria of sustainability, feasibility, technology neutrality, climate targets, European added value, the achievement of deployment goals and cohesion policy; asks that the INEA, which already oversees the CEF, become the responsible agency;

15.  Considers that the European Structural and Investment Funds 2 (ESIF 2), as well as the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), the Cohesion Fund (CF), Invest EU and Horizon Europe, are appropriate instruments to support the deployment of alternative fuel infrastructure and continuous investment in research and innovation in order to achieve a better level of sector coupling, such as transport and energy;

16.  Calls on the Commission to review Directive 1999/94/EC on consumer information on cars; takes the view that such a review should aim to substantially improve the information consumers receive about fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and pollutant emissions, and to make it possible to compare the efficiency of and emissions from traditional and alternative fuel technologies for transport under real-life conditions;

17.  Calls on the Commission to draw up a regulation on roaming on alternative publicly accessible fuels infrastructure, at least in the TEN-T network;

18.  Notes that taxation has a major impact on the price competitiveness of alternative fuels; calls therefore on Member States to review their energy taxation frameworks in order to facilitate and incentivise the uptake of low-carbon and carbon-free alternative fuels and to remove present disparities in energy taxation between different transport modes, for example on electricity used for shore-side supply for ships and energy used to generate alternative fuels, including power-to-gas as storage for intermittent renewable energies;

19.  Calls on the Commission to support the decarbonisation of the maritime and shipping sector with a clear focus on innovation, digitisation and adaptation of ports and ships; calls on the Commission, Member States and their regions, to establish a common ‘LNG blue corridors project for islands’, in particular for the outermost regions; emphasises that shore-side energy supply at both inland and maritime ports can contribute substantially to reducing noise, CO2 and other pollutant emissions while improving air quality;

Alternative fuels - an alternative industrial policy

20.  Regrets that progress regarding the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure and the availability of alternatively powered vehicles is too slow, with only 19 Battery Electric Vehicles and 25 Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles available in 2017 compared to 417 models with internal combustion engines, and calls on manufacturers to step up efforts in this regard; recognises the need for policies that incentivise the use of zero- and low-tailpipe-emission vehicles and stimulate the offer of alternatively fuelled light and heavy-duty vehicles, such as ambitious emissions standards in 2025 and 2030 for new light and heavy-duty vehicles, including strong incentives for zero- and low-tailpipe emission vehicles; recognises at the same time the need for greater public and private investment;

21.  Emphasises the connection between the availability of alternatively fuelled vehicles, the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure and consumer demand for these technologies; highlights, in this regard, that moving towards alternative fuels and powertrains could help the industry to be globally competitive and keep high-quality jobs in Europe, while making up for the missed opportunities in decarbonising the car industry and for the lack of investment in sustainable transport; stresses that the increased uptake of alternatively fuelled vehicles will lower production costs and accelerate the reduction in the total cost of ownership;

22.  Recalls the importance of a functioning internal market ensuring easy accessibility of fuelling stations, interoperability of payment services and technical standards, transparent fuel pricing and interoperability between servers and data formats; stresses in this respect the importance of timely, easily understandable, accurate, accessible and transparent information to consumers and the accessibility of this information through an open data platform; calls for the deployment of multi-energy stations so as to avoid the creation of various different distribution networks for each type of power supply;

23.  Notes that most charging of electric vehicles will occur at home or at work, complemented by charging at public and semi-public places such as supermarkets, train stations or airports; stresses in this regard that a greater focus on smart charging solutions is needed, grid stability must be ensured and self-consumption enabled; underlines that for long-distance electromobility fast- and ultra-fast charging stations are needed along highways, main road systems and network nodes; highlights that open access to charging points, interoperability of technology and payments and the free choice of energy, including renewable energy, and suppliers are key factors for a functioning system;

24.  Welcomes the Commission’s initiative for a sustainable European Battery Alliance and strongly supports the establishment of European battery cell production focussing on next-generation technology; calls on the Commission to extend the initiative to other powertrains such as fuel cells in order to maintain European technology leadership;

25.  Calls on the Commission to assess the feasibility of life-cycle assessments for all alternative fuels, batteries and powertrain solutions in order to sustainably decarbonise the transport sector and evaluate their emissions and impact on energy and water demand, land use, the environment and communities;

°

°    °

26.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council and the Commission.

(1)

OJ L 307, 28.10.2014, p. 1.

(2)

OJ L 120, 15.5.2009, p. 1.

(3)

OJ L 307, 28.10.2014, p. 1.

(4)

2004/107/EC and 2008/50/EC

(5)

COM(2017)0652.


EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

In 2015, 195 member states of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) signed the Paris Agreement; they especially agreed on the goal to keep global temperature rise this century well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase even further to 1.5 degrees Celsius. This translates into a reduction of 80 to 95% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for the EU. Currently responsible for a quarter of the EU’s GHG emissions, the transport sector has to contribute a considerable effort to reach this goal.

Transport is the only major economic sector in the EU where greenhouse gas emissions have increased since 1990. It is responsible for 23% of CO2-emissions, and this share is still growing. Road transport represents almost 75% of all energy used in transport and causes almost 73% of transport’s GHG emissions. 94% of Europe’s transport sector is depending on oil, 90% of which have to be imported, including from some countries with an unstable political situation.

In order to fulfill its commitments to fight climate change, protect the environment and to strengthen its energy independence, Europe will have to increase efforts in decarbonising its economy. In the transport sector, there are many ways to achieve this goal. Standards for efficiency, emissions and fuel consumption have proven very effective. The use of new technologies like C-ITS or automated driving can help to improve traffic flows and lower consumption. Urban and spatial planning can also create traffic systems that support the use of public and shared transport, encourage environmental choices like walking or bikes and thereby reducing emissions. Promoting a modal shift from the road towards railways or inland waterways is another approach to lower transport emissions. Especially for road transport, shifting to alternative fuels and alternative powertrains is a direct method of decarbonisation. As those fuels need specific infrastructure, legislation is needed to foster its uptake.

Deficits of existing directive

In 2014, Directive 2014/94/EU on the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure was adopted. Unfortunately, the binding targets for each Member State as foreseen in the European Commission’s proposal were deleted. The evaluation of the National Framework Plans (NFP), which were introduced by the directive, showed, that the ambition and effort differs widely between Member States and that the NFPs. In their actual form they are not suitable to stimulate the fast deployment of a sufficient and comprehensive alternative fuels infrastructure.

As a consequence, the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure is lagging behind the initial plans: of roughly 800.000 charging points envisaged for 2025 only a bit more than 100.000 are already there. For CNG more than two thirds of filling stations are yet to build. For hydrogen - which is not mandatory under the directive - the situation is even worse.

Therefore, the directive should be revised as soon as possible. It should include concrete and binding targets for the Member States reflecting the actual and projected market uptake of alternative fuels vehicles and providing a decent network of alternative fuels infrastructure alongside the TEN-T-network as well as in urban areas and regional nodes.

Alternative Fuels

The Directive defines three types of fuels as alternatives: electricity, hydrogen and gas (CNG and LNG). While renewable electricity and green hydrogen are real alternatives to fossil fuels, CNG and LNG are still mainly of fossil origin. It is possible to replace them by biogas or synthetic gasses. However, in order to be really sustainable, the former should be produced locally, preferably from waste and the latter have a high loss of energy compared to the direct use of electricity for transport and should therefore only be produced of excess energy that would otherwise be curtailed. A complete shift to alternative fuels without fossil origin must be the main goal.

As there are different modes, different types and environments of transport which have their own specific requirements as regards fuels and powertrain technologies, a mix of alternative fuels is the most promising approach in the medium term. Energy should also be used as efficiently as possible to decarbonise. This touches upon vehicle and engine efficiency, but also on fuel production and energy generation.

Tank-to-wheel efficiencies of alternative powertrains may vary but are usually higher than those of internal combustion engines (ICE) running on petrol or diesel. Their total cost of ownership (tco) is expected to drop significantly in the near future and some alternative fuels vehicles already have cost advantages. Yet, there are three main barriers to their mass deployment, compared to traditional ICE vehicles. First, purchase prices are still higher but they might fall due to technological progress and higher production volumes. Second, the number of vehicle models available is still lower. Third, the network of refilling infrastructure for alternative fuels is less dense. While public authorities should support the deployment of sufficient alternative fuels infrastructure, industry must also contribute by offering more attractive alternative fuels vehicles.

Sector coupling

Increased use of electricity-based fuels will bring the transport and energy sector closer together. However, it is important to also pursue the goal of decarbonising energy generation by a complete shift to renewables. As renewable energies are intermittent, energy supply and demand will have to be matched by using storage mechanisms.

Surplus energy can be used in power-to-gas applications to generate green hydrogen which in turn can be used directly as fuel for FCEVs or fed into gas grids. This technology is rapidly developing and will bring green hydrogen to the market at a competitive price. It is crucial to ensure non-discriminatory access to the gas grid for this application.

Another option to balance energy grids is smart and controlled charging. With an increasing number of Battery Electric Vehicles (BEV) significant storage capacity will be built up in the form of car batteries. In order to avoid demand peaks at certain times of the day, charging of BEVs could be remotely controlled and delayed thus spreading energy demand and charging activity over a longer period. While this is still unidirectional, so-called smart charging solutions would allow for bi-directional charging which would allow energy suppliers to charge and discharge batteries during a certain period and more actively balance their grids. However, for consumers, full price transparency must be guaranteed and high standards of data and consumer protection must be respected.

Similarly, for electricity, non-discriminatory access to the grid is crucial. This accounts for customers’ access to public charging points as well. There should be full price transparency, no subscription obligation and interoperability for payment methods. Public charging points must be complemented by private ones. Charging behaviour for BEV is slightly different than for ICE for which you need a central place to refill in a short period of time. Fast charging is essential for electric long-distance travel and consumers’ trust, yet most charging will be done when the vehicle is parked – for example overnight or at work – and charging behaviour will change over time with customer experience.

To realise coverage with private charging points grids and connections have to be reinforced to allow for the connection of charging points on the one hand and on the other hand authorities’ authorisation procedures must be easier, and faster.

Taxation and regulatory environment

Taxation has a major impact on the price competitiveness of alternative fuels. Taxation of renewable energy used in the production of green hydrogen can be a burden for its market price. The same accounts for land side electric charging of ships where energy generation with dirty combustion engines on board is exempted from taxation while landside electricity has to cope with taxation and higher provision cost due to the very special nature of the demand.

The objective of this report is to address specifically infrastructure gaps by taking into account the bigger picture and the different issues and perspectives when it comes to decarbonisation of the transport sector.


OPINION of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (17.8.2018)

for the Committee on Transport and Tourism

on deployment of infrastructure for alternative fuels in the European Union: Time to act!

(2018/2023(INI))

Rapporteur for opinion: Christel Schaldemose

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety calls on the Committee on Transport and Tourism, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1.  Welcomes the Action Plan on Alternative Fuels Infrastructure; recalls that transport is one of Europe’s main sources of carbon emissions and the only sector in which emissions are still rising; highlights that further coordination at local, regional and EU level in all policy areas linked to alternative fuels infrastructure is needed in order to ensure continued European competitiveness with regard to knowledge, technology and market share; underlines the objective of deploying an adequate infrastructure network for alternative fuels with a view to achieving the total decarbonisation of the transport sector by 2050; calls on the Commission in this regard to propose a roadmap for the next five years outlining the common policy framework and common goals for all Member States;

2.  Urges Member States to ensure the rapid deployment of and further funding for sufficient alternative fuels infrastructure and fast and ultra-fast charging solutions along the TEN-T Core and Comprehensive networks, including in urban and rural areas, by further developing and implementing ambitious and coherent national policy frameworks; underlines that the availability and accessibility of private and public charging and refuelling infrastructure is crucial for increasing consumer acceptance of alternative fuels vehicles; believes that priority should be given to the solutions with the greatest potential for reducing emissions over the whole life-cycle of a vehicle, taking into account the principle of technological neutrality;

3.  Calls on the Member States to pay due regard to the principles enshrined in the TEN-T Core and Comprehensive networks and in the common transport policy when drafting their national policy frameworks;

4.  Urges those Member States whose national strategic frameworks are predominantly concentrated on natural gas to reconsider this choice, which is at odds with the electromobility-oriented scenario that is emerging in Europe and which ultimately does not help accelerate the reduction of emissions in the transport sector in the long run; calls on those Member States to redirect their national strategic frameworks towards electricity produced from renewable sources, synthetic methane from electricity, biogas and biomethane;

5.  Underlines the importance of sustainable urban planning, shifting from private use to shared and public use of transport, and of investing in the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure in public transport services, in particular for the uptake of electric buses, which represented only 10 % of all new buses purchased in Europe in 2017;

6.  Calls for priority to be given to fast and ultra-fast charging solutions in ring roads, parking spaces and main streets in densely populated urban areas; believes that for this purpose cooperation and coordination between local authorities, power distribution companies and private investors should be reinforced;

7.  Supports electrified roads that allow electric vehicles to charge as they drive; calls for their wider development, at least along the TEN-T Core and Comprehensive network roads; believes that electrified roads could be a solution making it possible to reduce battery size and, consequently, the prices of new vehicles;

8.  Notes with concern that the level of ambition and the degree of fulfilment of national policy frameworks differ profoundly between Member States and that the overall development of alternative fuels infrastructures, including electrical charging infrastructure, is falling behind; deplores the fact that only eight Member States fully meet the National Policy Framework requirements set out in Directive 2014/94/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2014 on the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure(1), and that two Member States failed to submit their National Policy Framework in accordance with the deadlines set out in Article 3 of the directive; highlights in this regard that the National Policy Frameworks are essential for the purpose of attracting private partners to finance charging infrastructure; therefore invites the Commission to consider introducing binding national targets as well as regular national reporting in order to ensure the development of a backbone infrastructure for alternative fuels along the TEN-T network by 2025;

9.  Stresses that Member States should be set concrete, binding and enforceable targets for the distribution network for alternative fuels that reflect both the actual and the planned market penetration of vehicles running on such fuels;

10.  Regrets that fuels of fossil origin, such as natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, are still considered as alternative fuels under Directive 2014/94/EU, thus undermining the Union’s objective of decarbonising the transport sector by mid-century;

11.  Calls on the Commission to conduct a detailed analysis of the various national policy frameworks and to take account of successful national and regional measures in its recommendations to other Member States;

12.  Calls on the Commission to come forward with sustainability criteria for hydrogen and synthetic fuels, based on life-cycle emissions that take into account the upstream emissions of electricity production required for all production processes and their impact on water demand and land use;

13.  Encourages Member States to step up the provision of charging points for electric vehicles that are accessible to the public in urban and suburban areas;

14.  Believes that the development of electric vehicle charging infrastructure should be encouraged as a matter of priority wherever air quality is poor, and that information on measures taken or planned to encourage electro-mobility should be reported in the air quality plans;

15.  Calls for continuous investment in research and innovation in order to further combine renewable energy sources and sustainable modes of transport, with the aim of attaining net zero-emission mobility by mid-century;

16.  Notes that electric vehicle owners most frequently charge their vehicles at home or at work; underlines the need for comprehensive and interoperable private and shared public charging infrastructure for electric vehicles and bicycles at home and in the workplace, as well as on the basis of an obligation to provide such charging infrastructure at service stations located on long-distance routes; takes account of the need for both public and private investment in order to achieve optimal coverage; emphasises in this regard the need to install sufficient charging infrastructure in both new and existing buildings; notes that increased dissemination of information and the involvement of the private sector are critical to achieving the proposed targets;

17.  Notes with concern that in 2017 there were only 19 Battery Electric Vehicles and 25 Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles available for purchase in Europe, compared to over 417 vehicle models available to European customers with petrol and diesel internal combustion engines(2);

18.  Stresses that without an adequate distribution network the use of alternative fuels cannot be increased; stresses the need for distribution obligations in order to reduce uncertainty about the extent of the infrastructure;

19.  Calls on the Commission to draw up a regulation on roaming on alternative publicly accessible fuels infrastructure, at least in the TEN-T network;

20.  Notes that the national plans submitted to the Commission as part of the implementation of Directive 2014/94/EU show that the current number of recharging points available in the Union is sufficient for the number of EVs on the road, based on the Commission’s recommendation of one recharging point for every 10 EVs;

21.  Notes too that national plans for rollout of public charging infrastructures by 2020 EU-wide are also expected to keep pace with the anticipated growth in the number of vehicles, and that there will also be sufficient fast chargers alongside the principal highway routes, with at least one fast recharger every 40 km;

22.  Stresses that from 2020 onwards there will need to be significant further investment, beyond existing plans, to match the number of EVs expected to be on the road, and that EU funding will be important, particularly in less developed markets;

23.  Stresses that more emphasis on smart charging solutions is needed; notes that this can be achieved by ensuring that requirements in private and shared public charging infrastructure go further than the minimum provisions outlined in the revision of Directive 2010/31/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 19 May 2010 on the energy performance of buildings(3); stresses that insufficient recharging infrastructure is one of the main barriers to implementing sustainable transport in the EU;

24.  Stresses that since it is not possible for all users to charge electric vehicles at home, it is necessary to come up with integrated solutions for residential and non-residential buildings and to combine charging facilities with other existing infrastructure, such as lampposts;

25.  Notes that growth in the market for electric vehicles will increase demand for electricity on the grid, but that, according to the European Environment Agency (EEA), having an 80 % electrified fleet in 2050 will result in, on average, only a 10 % increase in electricity demand in the EU;

26.  Considers that in urban areas charging infrastructure should be made available for all types of vehicles, including shared vehicles, electric vans, electric bicycles and motorised two-wheelers;

27.  Emphasises the improvements which will arise from shore-side electricity in terms of reduced CO2 emissions, less noise pollution, improved air quality and other environmental benefits; calls on the Commission and the Member States to create policy-based incentives for the development of shore-side electricity supply at both inland and maritime ports with the aim of reducing emissions from transport powered by fossil fuels; encourages in this regard Member States to develop integrated plans for the rapid deployment of all-electric ferries; notes that complementary national regulations will be needed to ensure that berthed ships are obliged to use any clean on-shore power available; encourages furthermore the provision of increased financial support for the development of shore-side electricity supply at both inland and maritime ports, as high costs hamper its economic feasibility; stresses the opportunities offered by the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) for supporting further developments in this field;

28.  Regrets the excessively slow progress in the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure and the availability of vehicles powered by alternative fuels, and calls on manufacturers to step up efforts in this regard;

29.  Calls on the Member States to review their energy taxation frameworks in order to facilitate and incentivise the uptake of alternative fuels and to remove burdensome taxation on electricity used to generate alternative fuels, including power-to-gas, as storage for intermittent renewable energies;

30.  Encourages the provision of clean power supply at airports (for use in stationary planes as well as for mobile equipment at airports) in order to cut kerosene consumption, improve air quality, and reduce climate change impact and noise pollution;

31.  Notes that one cruise ship with an auxiliary load of 4.6 MW is likely to burn more than 700 litres of fuel per hour, exceeding the equivalent of 688 lorries running their engines;

32.  Encourages European car manufacturers to increase investment in developing ultra-low emission vehicles as one of the ways to accelerate their uptake on the EU market; calls on the Commission, the Member States and the automotive industry to further develop the offer of alternatively fuelled light and heavy-duty vehicles, such as by supporting ambitious average emissions reduction targets to be reached by 2025 or 2030 for the EU-wide fleets of new passenger cars, light commercial vehicles and heavy-duty vehicles;

33.  Calls on the co-legislators to determine the timeline, the right system of incentives and the level of ambition for the share of low and zero-emission vehicles in the total EU fleet with the aim of achieving total decarbonisation of the transport sector by 2050; considers that this is necessary in order to create investment certainty for the market in alternatively fuelled vehicles and accelerate the deployment of sufficient accompanying infrastructure; recognises that the challenges associated with transition towards sustainable transport are created throughout the supply chain;

34.  Encourages the Member States to step up the deployment of charging infrastructure for public transport, as well as to stimulate demand for alternatively fuelled buses and other electric public transport vehicles, giving priority to those systems which are the most emissions-neutral from a full vehicle life-cycle perspective;

35.  Encourages the local and regional authorities participating in the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy to strive to include concrete measures in their Sustainable Energy Action Plans (SEAPs), in particular for the construction or completion of charging infrastructure for electric vehicles;

36.  Encourages local and regional public authorities to make greater use of existing cofinancing possibilities for sustainable urban mobility under the Cohesion Fund (CF) and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), in order to complete the infrastructure for the charging and refuelling of vehicles with zero and low emissions.

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

10.7.2018

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

47

2

8

Members present for the final vote

Marco Affronte, Margrete Auken, Pilar Ayuso, Zoltán Balczó, Catherine Bearder, Ivo Belet, Biljana Borzan, Paul Brannen, Soledad Cabezón Ruiz, Nessa Childers, Miriam Dalli, Seb Dance, Mark Demesmaeker, Stefan Eck, Bas Eickhout, Karl-Heinz Florenz, Francesc Gambús, Arne Gericke, Jens Gieseke, Julie Girling, Sylvie Goddyn, Françoise Grossetête, Andrzej Grzyb, Jytte Guteland, György Hölvényi, Anneli Jäätteenmäki, Karin Kadenbach, Urszula Krupa, Giovanni La Via, Jo Leinen, Peter Liese, Valentinas Mazuronis, Susanne Melior, Miroslav Mikolášik, Rory Palmer, Massimo Paolucci, Piernicola Pedicini, Bolesław G. Piecha, Pavel Poc, John Procter, Julia Reid, Frédérique Ries, Daciana Octavia Sârbu, Annie Schreijer-Pierik, Davor Škrlec, Renate Sommer, Adina-Ioana Vălean, Damiano Zoffoli

Substitutes present for the final vote

Guillaume Balas, Anja Hazekamp, Jan Huitema, Merja Kyllönen, Alojz Peterle, Christel Schaldemose, Keith Taylor

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Marc Joulaud, Stanisław Ożóg

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

47

+

ALDE

Catherine Bearder, Jan Huitema, Frédérique Ries

EFDD

Piernicola Pedicini

GUE/NGL

Stefan Eck, Anja Hazekamp, Merja Kyllönen

NI

Zoltán Balczó

PPE

Pilar Ayuso, Ivo Belet, Karl Heinz Florenz, Francesc Gambús, Jens Gieseke, Julie Girling, Françoise Grossetête, Andrzej Grzyb, György Hölvényi, Marc Joulaud, Giovanni La Via, Peter Liese, Miroslav Mikolášik, Alojz Peterle, Annie Schreijer Pierik, Renate Sommer, Adina Ioana Vălean

S&D

Guillaume Balas, Biljana Borzan, Paul Brannen, Soledad Cabezón Ruiz, Nessa Childers, Miriam Dalli, Seb Dance, Jytte Guteland, Karin Kadenbach, Jo Leinen, Susanne Melior, Rory Palmer, Massimo Paolucci, Pavel Poc, Christel Schaldemose, Daciana Octavia Sârbu, Damiano Zoffoli

VERTS/ALE

Marco Affronte, Margrete Auken, Bas Eickhout, Davor Škrlec, Keith Taylor

2

-

EFDD

Julie Reid

ENF

Sylvie Goddyn

8

0

ALDE

Anneli Jäätteenmäki, Valentinas Mazuronis

ECR

Mark Demesmaeker, Arne Gericke, Urszula Krupa, Stanisław Ożóg, Bolesław G. Piecha, John Procter

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention

(1)

OJ L 307, 28.10.2014, p. 1.

(2)

Availability and Affordability of ZEVs Interim Report, Element Energy, October 2017

(3)

OJ L 153, 18.6.2010, p. 13.


OPINION of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (10.7.2018)

for the Committee on Transport and Tourism

on deployment of infrastructure for alternative fuels in the European Union: Time to act!

(2018/2023(INI))

Rapporteur for opinion: Zdzisław Krasnodębski

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Industry, Research and Energy calls on the Committee on Transport and Tourism, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

A.  whereas Member States have adopted their national policy frameworks (NPF), which were assessed by the Commission in its recent communication COM(2017)0652, which noted that the objectives and the implementation of charging infrastructure for electric vehicles vary from one Member State to another, as only eight out of 25 Member States fully meet the NPF requirements set out in Directive 2014/94/EU(1), and that two Member States failed to submit their NPF by 16 November 2016, as required under Article 3 of Directive 2014/94/EU;

B.  whereas the transport sector is the Union’s main source of carbon emissions and the only sector in which emissions are still rising; whereas further coordination at EU level is needed in order to ensure the deployment of an adequate infrastructure network for alternative fuels in view of the objective of decarbonising the transport sector by 2050;

C.  whereas the decarbonisation of transport in the EU should follow the principle of technology neutrality, thus ensuring a level playing field for the various low emission technologies for clean mobility and encouraging a competitive environment and further innovation in this area;

1.  Stresses that the Union has the potential to become a forerunner in clean transport and lead this global shift; notes that the clean energy transition offers plenty of new growth opportunities for the industry and strengthens the energy security of Europe; underlines that currently more than 65 % of battery electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles are produced outside the Union and that new mobility will lead to a shift in required skills, meaning it is crucial to ensure the momentum to boost our industry and create new quality jobs in the Union; believes it is crucial to boost our battery industry by creating sustainable battery cell manufacturing in the Union and ensuring a fully EU-based value chain while making use of the potential of battery and raw material recycling in line with the circular economy principle;

2.  Welcomes the aforementioned Commission communication on the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure, notes, however, that the NPFs do not add up to a sufficient deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure for the projected uptake of alternative-fuel mobility by 2025; calls on the Commission, therefore, to require Member States to include in their NPFs mandatory minimum targets, while also taking into account the projected and realised uptake of alternative-fuel vehicles and their technological progress, as well as with a view to realising a trans-European infrastructure network for alternative fuels;

3.  Notes with concern that the level of ambition among Member States differs greatly; urges the Member States to ensure the rapid deployment of sufficient alternative fuels infrastructure; calls on the Member States to develop and adjust their NPFs to this end by taking into account the projected and realised uptake of alternative-fuel vehicles and their technological progress; calls on the Member States to scale up implementation efforts with sufficiently ambitious goals;

4.  Calls on the Member States to accelerate the uptake of research related to electro-mobility by making full use of EU funds; welcomes the Commission’s proposal to provide an additional EUR 800 million through European funding; highlights, however, that additional support instruments at Union and Member State level are needed to mobilise appropriate public and private investment;

5.  Notes that electrification is a necessary step in decarbonising the Union’s transport sector and meeting its climate goals; stresses the importance of focusing on combining the most effective measures available in order to meet the EU’s climate targets, as several low-emission options are available, such as electricity, advanced biofuels, hydrogen and LNG; calls, therefore, for the technology neutral approach to be maintained while ensuring the reduction of CO2 emissions;

6.  Calls on transmission system operators and distribution system operators to ensure the stability of local grids, while taking into account the need for better cross-border flows, and to mitigate a future energy consumption peak; emphasises that the electricity market design reform should set the correct regulatory framework to ensure grid stability, affordable prices and security of supply, and to enable self-consumption, demand response and active consumers; underlines, therefore, the importance of investment in smart charging technologies, including smart grids, in contributing to a successful energy transition;

7.  Stresses the importance of ensuring fair access to the development, operation and fuelling of recharging points for all relevant actors, including local authorities, municipal enterprises and actors from other Member States, in order to avoid monopoly situations; calls on the Commission to promote open access for all relevant actors to the market and to encourage initiatives for the deployment of recharging points to ensure that consumers have a free choice of energy suppliers and sources; stresses that infrastructure solutions should be market-based; insists that the distribution networks of different fuels and the publically accessible recharging points required for electric vehicles must be mainly built on market terms, provided that market players are able to deliver services at a reasonable cost and in a timely manner;

8.  Underlines the need for comprehensive private and shared public charging infrastructure to allow charging of electric vehicles and bikes at home and at the workplace, taking into account the need for both public and private investments to meet the minimum provisions outlined in the revision of the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive(2);

9.  Underlines that although digital opportunities will arise from further developments in electro-mobility, such as smart grids, e-payment or connectivity with other associated services, new challenges will result from smart charging and data exchange, such as data protection, interoperability of systems, future-proof systems or free flow of data;

10.  Recalls the importance of maintaining a harmonised market by promoting the interoperability between servers and data formats, and standardised protocols for the fleet of vehicles; welcomes the recent achievements by CEN-CENELEC in partially overcoming the problem of standardisation.

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

10.7.2018

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

53

3

1

Members present for the final vote

Zigmantas Balčytis, Bendt Bendtsen, Xabier Benito Ziluaga, José Blanco López, Cristian-Silviu Buşoi, Jerzy Buzek, Angelo Ciocca, Edward Czesak, Jakop Dalunde, Pilar del Castillo Vera, Christian Ehler, Fredrick Federley, Adam Gierek, Theresa Griffin, Rebecca Harms, Barbara Kappel, Krišjānis Kariņš, Seán Kelly, Jeppe Kofod, Jaromír Kohlíček, Peter Kouroumbashev, Zdzisław Krasnodębski, Christelle Lechevalier, Janusz Lewandowski, Edouard Martin, Tilly Metz, Csaba Molnár, Nadine Morano, Dan Nica, Angelika Niebler, Morten Helveg Petersen, Miroslav Poche, Paul Rübig, Massimiliano Salini, Algirdas Saudargas, Sven Schulze, Neoklis Sylikiotis, Dario Tamburrano, Patrizia Toia, Evžen Tošenovský, Vladimir Urutchev, Kathleen Van Brempt, Henna Virkkunen, Lieve Wierinck, Hermann Winkler, Anna Záborská, Flavio Zanonato, Carlos Zorrinho

Substitutes present for the final vote

Michał Boni, Benedek Jávor, Olle Ludvigsson, Marisa Matias, Rupert Matthews, Gesine Meissner, Dominique Riquet

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Romeo Franz, Ulrike Rodust

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

53

+

ALDE

Fredrick Federley, Gesine Meissner, Morten Helveg Petersen, Dominique Riquet, Lieve Wierinck

ECR

Edward Czesak, Zdzisław Krasnodębski, Rupert Matthews, Evžen Tošenovský

EFDD

Dario Tamburrano

ENF

Angelo Ciocca, Barbara Kappel, Christelle Lechevalier

EPP

Bendt Bendtsen, Michał Boni, Jerzy Buzek, Cristian‑Silviu Buşoi, Christian Ehler, Krišjānis Kariņš, Seán Kelly, Janusz Lewandowski, Nadine Morano, Angelika Niebler, Paul Rübig, Massimiliano Salini, Algirdas Saudargas, Sven Schulze, Vladimir Urutchev, Henna Virkkunen, Hermann Winkler, Anna Záborská, Pilar del Castillo Vera

S&D

Zigmantas Balčytis, José Blanco López, Jakop Dalunde, Romeo Franz, Adam Gierek, Theresa Griffin, Rebecca Harms, Benedek Jávor, Jeppe Kofod, Peter Kouroumbashev, Olle Ludvigsson, Edouard Martin, Tilly Metz, Csaba Molnár, Dan Nica, Miroslav Poche, Ulrike Rodust, Patrizia Toia, Kathleen Van Brempt, Flavio Zanonato, Carlos Zorrinho

3

-

GUE/NGL

Xabier Benito Ziluaga, Marisa Matias, Neoklis Sylikiotis

1

0

GUE/NGL

Jaromír Kohlíček

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention

(1)

OJ L 307, 28.10.2014, p. 1.

(2)

OJ L 153, 18.6.2010, p. 13.


OPINION of the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (5.6.2018)

for the Committee on Transport and Tourism

on deployment of infrastructure for alternative fuels in the European Union: Time to act!

(2018/2023(INI))

Rapporteur for opinion: Matthijs van Miltenburg

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection calls on the Committee on Transport and Tourism, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1.  Welcomes the Action Plan on Alternative Fuels Infrastructure; recalls the impact of transport on climate change and notes that in order to comply with the Paris Agreement objectives, greenhouse gas emissions from the transport sector will need to be near zero by 2050; highlights therefore that the sustainability of alternative fuel vehicles depends highly on the use of renewable energy sources and underlines the need to focus on uniform requirements for all Member States regarding the quality of alternative fuels and conformity assessment systems; stresses that closer cooperation among all relevant stakeholders, especially the car industry and the Commission, must take place in order for the Union to achieve its decarbonisation goals;

2.  Stresses the benefits of low-carbon innovations to the EU’s global competitive position and energy security; calls for the EU to become a global leader on decarbonisation in the transport sector; urges, furthermore, the Member States, notably those lagging furthest behind, and industry to demonstrate an enhanced level of ambition and to speed up the implementation of the Action Plan, including by developing efficient, complete and coherent national policy frameworks, implemented in a timely manner, in order to ensure the necessary stability for investments from both public and private sources;

3.  Highlights the correlation between the availability and accessibility of charging and refuelling infrastructure for alternative fuels across the EU, both in public and private facilities, and consumers’ acceptance of new mobility systems; underlines the need for a more harmonised EU approach, also with regard to common technical standards, in order to ensure interoperability of payment services and recharging points, allowing users of alternative fuels to fully use the available infrastructure when traveling in the EU; stresses the need for transparent consumer information and cross-border continuity; urges greater collaboration between public and private actors in this respect; calls on the Commission to strengthen the consumer dimension and provide a harmonised consumer information strategy on the use of alternative fuels, data on recharging points in the Member States and methods of payment;

4.  Stresses the importance of timely, easily understandable, accurate, accessible and transparent information to consumers; notes in this respect the relevance of the planned price comparison between alternative and conventional fuels; requests that this information be collected and processed by an open data platform;

5.  Appreciates the coordination at EU level; encourages the Commission to assess in the course of 2018 whether interoperability of payment services can be best advanced by legislative or non-legislative action, while not hampering market innovation;

6.  Encourages the Commission to take advantage of the synergies between European transport, energy and digitalisation policies, for instance in relation to smart charging and intelligent transport systems, while ensuring compliance with data protection standards; calls on the Member States to cooperate more closely, for example within the Sustainable Transport Forum, to ensure cross-border continuity;

7.  Supports a technology neutral approach for the development of a market-based alternative fuels infrastructure, with a particular focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions as well as ensuring more and better choice for consumers; states that the roll-out of digitally connected alternative fuels infrastructure should be regarded in conjunction with the actual number of alternative fuel vehicles; highlights therefore the need to bring more alternative fuel vehicles onto the market in order to raise their profile in the medium-to-long term, thus encouraging public and private investment in them;

8.  Urges the Commission, the Member States and the private sector to step up financial support for the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure; stresses in particular the need to enhance EU funding for alternative fuels infrastructure in the next MFF; asks that geographical differences in alternative fuels infrastructure and support for alternative fuels infrastructure, as well as the high costs of transition in rural areas, which could prevent deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure, be taken into account as a major barrier; calls on the Member States to acknowledge the positive effects of grant schemes, public-private partnerships and fiscal incentives for the market up-take of alternative fuel vehicles.

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

4.6.2018

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

28

1

2

Members present for the final vote

John Stuart Agnew, Pascal Arimont, Carlos Coelho, Sergio Gaetano Cofferati, Daniel Dalton, Nicola Danti, Dennis de Jong, Pascal Durand, Liisa Jaakonsaari, Philippe Juvin, Nosheena Mobarik, Jiří Pospíšil, Virginie Rozière, Christel Schaldemose, Olga Sehnalová, Jasenko Selimovic, Mylène Troszczynski, Anneleen Van Bossuyt, Marco Zullo

Substitutes present for the final vote

Cristian-Silviu Buşoi, Birgit Collin-Langen, Roberta Metsola, Marc Tarabella, Sabine Verheyen

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Asim Ademov, Clara Eugenia Aguilera García, Klaus Buchner, Peter Liese, Emilian Pavel, Annie Schreijer-Pierik, Tomáš Zdechovský

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

28

+

ALDE

Jasenko Selimovic

ECR

Daniel Dalton, Nosheena Mobarik, Anneleen Van Bossuyt

EFDD

Marco Zullo

PPE

Asim Ademov, Pascal Arimont, Cristian-Silviu Buşoi, Carlos Coelho, Birgit Collin-Langen, Philippe Juvin, Peter Liese, Roberta Metsola, Jiří Pospíšil, Annie Schreijer-Pierik, Sabine Verheyen, Tomáš Zdechovský

S&D

Clara Eugenia Aguilera García, Sergio Gaetano Cofferati, Nicola Danti, Liisa Jaakonsaari, Emilian Pavel, Virginie Rozière, Christel Schaldemose, Olga Sehnalová, Marc Tarabella

VERTS/ALE

Klaus Buchner, Pascal Durand

1

-

EFDD

John Stuart Agnew

2

0

ENF

Mylène Troszczynski

GUE/NGL

Dennis de Jong

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

Date adopted

24.9.2018

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

29

0

6

Members present for the final vote

Georges Bach, Deirdre Clune, Michael Cramer, Isabella De Monte, Andor Deli, Ismail Ertug, Dieter-Lebrecht Koch, Innocenzo Leontini, Peter Lundgren, Gesine Meissner, Markus Pieper, Tomasz Piotr Poręba, Gabriele Preuß, Christine Revault d’Allonnes Bonnefoy, Dominique Riquet, Massimiliano Salini, David-Maria Sassoli, Keith Taylor, Pavel Telička, Janusz Zemke, Roberts Zīle, Kosma Złotowski, Wim van de Camp

Substitutes present for the final vote

Francisco Assis, Jakop Dalunde, Mark Demesmaeker, Maria Grapini, Werner Kuhn, Ramona Nicole Mănescu, Evžen Tošenovský

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Miriam Dalli, Aleksander Gabelic, John Howarth, Martina Werner


FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

29

+

ALDE

PPE

 

S&D

 

VERTS/ALE

 

Izaskun Bilbao Barandica, Gesine Meissner, Dominique Riquet, Pavel Telička

Georges Bach, Deirdre Clune, Andor Deli, Dieter-Lebrecht Koch, Werner Kuhn, Innocenzo Leontini, Ramona Nicole Mănescu, Markus Pieper, Massimiliano Salini, Wim van de Camp

Francisco Assis, Miriam Dalli, Isabella De Monte, Ismail Ertug, Aleksander Gabelic, Maria Grapini, John Howarth, Gabriele Preuß, Christine Revault d'Allonnes Bonnefoy, David-Maria Sassoli, Martina Werner, Janusz Zemke

 

Michael Cramer, Jakop Dalunde, Keith Taylor

 

0

-

 

 

6

0

ECR

 

Mark Demesmaeker, Peter Lundgren, Tomasz Piotr Poręba, Evžen Tošenovský, Roberts Zīle, Kosma Złotowski

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention

Last updated: 10 October 2018Legal notice