Procedure : 2018/0332(COD)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A8-0169/2019

Texts tabled :

A8-0169/2019

Debates :

PV 25/03/2019 - 15
CRE 25/03/2019 - 15

Votes :

PV 26/03/2019 - 7.5
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P8_TA(2019)0225

REPORT     ***I
PDF 396kWORD 209k
7.3.2019
PE 629.635v02-00 A8-0169/2019

on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council discontinuing seasonal changes of time and repealing Directive 2000/84/EC

(COM(2018)0639 – C8-0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD))

Committee on Transport and Tourism

Rapporteur: Marita Ulvskog

DRAFT EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT LEGISLATIVE RESOLUTION
 EXPLANATORY STATEMENT
 OPINION of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety
 OPINION of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy
 OPINION of the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection
 OPINION of the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development
 OPINION of the Committee on Legal Affairs
 OPINION of the Committee on Petitions
 PROCEDURE – COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE
 FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

DRAFT EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT LEGISLATIVE RESOLUTION

on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council discontinuing seasonal changes of time and repealing Directive 2000/84/EC

(COM(2018)0639 – C8-0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD))

(Ordinary legislative procedure: first reading)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to Parliament and the Council (COM(2018)0639),

–  having regard to Article 294(2) and Article 114 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Commission submitted the proposal to Parliament (C8-0408/2018),

–  having regard to Article 294(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to the opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee of …(1),

–  having regard to the results of the online consultation conducted by the European Commission between 4 July 2018 - 16 August 2018,

–  having regard to the opinion of the European Committee of the Regions of…(2),

–  having regard to Rule 59 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Transport and Tourism and the opinions of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection, the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development, the Committee on Legal Affairs and the Committee on Petitions (A8-0169/2019),

1.  Adopts its position at first reading hereinafter set out;

2.  Calls on the Commission to refer the matter to Parliament again if it replaces, substantially amends or intends to substantially amend its proposal;

3.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the national parliaments.

Amendment    1

Proposal for a directive

Recital 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(1)  Member States chose in the past to introduce summer-time arrangements at national level. It was, therefore, important for the functioning of the internal market that a common date and time for the beginning and end of the summer-time period be fixed throughout the Union. In accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council21, all Member States currently apply summer-time arrangements from the last Sunday in March until the last Sunday in October of the same year.

(1)  Member States chose in the past to introduce summer-time arrangements at national level. It was, therefore, important for the functioning of the internal market that a common date and time for the beginning and end of the summer-time period be fixed throughout the Union to coordinate the changing of clocks in Member States. In accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council21, all Member States currently apply biannual seasonal changes of time. Standard time is switched to summer-time on the last Sunday in March until the last Sunday in October of the same year.

__________________

__________________

21 Directive 2000/84/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on summer-time arrangements (OJ L 31, 2.2.2001, p. 21).

21 Directive 2000/84/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on summer-time arrangements (OJ L 31, 2.2.2001, p. 21).

Amendment    2

Proposal for a directive

Recital 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(2)  In its resolution of 8 February 2018, the European Parliament called on the Commission to conduct an assessment of the summer-time arrangements provided by Directive 2000/84/EC and, if necessary, to come up with a proposal for its revision. That resolution also confirmed that it is essential to maintain a harmonised approach to time arrangements throughout the Union.

(2)  Against the background of several petitions, citizens’ initiatives and parliamentary questions, the European Parliament, in its resolution of 8 February 2018, called on the Commission to conduct a thorough assessment of the summer-time arrangements provided by Directive 2000/84/EC and, if necessary, to come up with a proposal for its revision. That resolution also stressed the importance of maintaining a harmonised and coordinated approach to time arrangements throughout the Union and a unified EU time regime.

Amendment  3

Proposal for a directive

Recital 3

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(3)  The Commission has examined available evidence, which points to the importance of having harmonised Union rules in this area to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market and avoid, inter alia, disruptions to the scheduling of transport operations and the functioning of information and communication systems, higher costs to cross-border trade, or lower productivity for goods and services. Evidence is not conclusive as to whether the benefits of summer-time arrangements outweigh the inconveniences linked to a biannual change of time.

(3)  The Commission has examined available evidence, which points to the importance of having harmonised Union rules in this area to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market, create predictability and long-term certainty and avoid, inter alia, disruptions to the scheduling of transport operations and the functioning of information and communication systems, higher costs to cross-border trade, or lower productivity for goods and services.

Amendment    4

Proposal for a directive

Recital 3 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(3a)  The public debate on summer-time arrangements is not new and since the introduction of summer-time there have been several initiatives that aimed to discontinue the practice. Some Member States have held national consultations and a majority of businesses and stakeholders have supported the discontinuation of the practice. The consultation initiated by the European Commission has come to the same conclusion.

Justification

The introduction of a time change had its adversaries in the beginning, but the current proposal follows a series of studies and consultations that bring arguments into the ideological debate. To that end, it is proper to mention the previous debates and the process that led to the current proposal.

Amendment    5

Proposal for a directive

Recital 3 b (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(3b)  In this context, the situation of livestock farmers can serve as an example of how the summer-time arrangements were initially deemed incompatible with agricultural working practices, in particular regarding the already very early start of the working day under standard time. Also, the bi-annual transition to summer-time was thought to make it harder to get the produce or animals out to the markets. And finally, due to cows following their natural milking rhythm, a reduction of milk yields was assumed. However, modern agricultural equipment and practices have revolutionised farming in a way that makes most of these concerns no longer relevant, while concerns regarding the biorhythm of animals as well as farmers' working conditions are still relevant.

Amendment    6

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(4)  A lively public debate is taking place on summer-time arrangements and some Member States have already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such arrangements. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to continue safeguarding the proper functioning of the internal market and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area. Therefore, it is appropriate to put an end in a coordinated way to summer-time arrangements.

(4)  A lively public debate is taking place on summer-time arrangements. Around 4.6 million citizens participated in the public consultation held by the Commission, which is the largest number of responses ever received in any Commission consultation. Also a number of citizens' initiatives have highlighted public concern as regards the biannual clock change and some Member States have already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such summer-time arrangements. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to continue safeguarding the proper functioning of the internal market and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area. Therefore, it is appropriate to put an end in a coordinated and harmonised way to summer-time arrangements.

Amendment    7

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4 a)  Chronobiology shows that the biorhythm of the human body is affected by any changes of time, which might have an adverse impact on human health. Recent scientific evidence clearly suggests a link between changes of time and cardiovascular diseases, inflammatory immune diseases or hypertension, linked to the disturbance of the circadian cycle. Certain groups, such as children and older people, are particularly vulnerable. Therefore, in order to protect public health, it is appropriate to put an end to seasonal changes of time.

Amendment    8

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 b (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4b)  Territories other than overseas territories of the Member States are grouped over three different time zones or standard times, i.e. GMT, GMT +1 and GMT +2. The large north-south extension of the European Union means that daylight effects of time vary across the Union. It is therefore important that Member States take into consideration the geographical aspects of time, i.e. natural time zones and geographical position, before changing their time zones. Member States should consult citizens and relevant stakeholders before deciding to change their time zones.

Amendment    9

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 c (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4c)  A number of citizens' initiatives have highlighted citizens' concerns about the biannual clock change and Member States should be given the time and opportunity to carry out their own public consultations and impact assessments in order to better understand the implications of discontinuing season time changes in all regions.

Amendment    10

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 d (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4d)  Summer time, or daylight saving, has enabled later apparent sunsets during the summer months. In the minds of many EU citizens summer is synonymous with sunlight being available late into the evening. A reversion to "standard" time would result in summer sunsets being an hour earlier, with a much-reduced period of the year where late evening daylight is available.

Amendment    11

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 e (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4e)  Numerous studies looked into the link between the switch to summer time and the risk of heart attacks, disrupted body rhythm, sleep deprivation, lack of concentration and attention, increased risk of accidents, lower life satisfaction and even suicide rates. However, longer daylight, outdoor activities after work or school and exposure to sunlight clearly have some positive long-term effects on general well-being.

Amendment  12

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 f (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4f)  Seasonal changes of time also have an adverse impact on the welfare of animals, which is evident in agriculture, for example, where cows milk production suffers.

Amendment    13

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 g (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4g)  It is widely assumed that seasonal changes of time bring about energy savings. Indeed, that was the main reason for their initial introduction in the last century. Research shows, however, that while the seasonal changes of time might be marginally beneficial to reducing energy consumption in the Union as a whole, it is not the case in every Member State. The energy for lighting saved by switching to summer time might be also outweighed by increased consumption of energy for heating. Moreover, results are difficult to interpret as they are strongly influenced by external factors, such as meteorology, behaviour of energy users or ongoing energy transition.

Amendment    14

Proposal for a directive

Recital 5

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(5)  This Directive should not prejudice the right of each Member State to decide on the standard time or times for the territories under its jurisdiction and falling under the territorial scope of the Treaties, and on further changes thereto. However, in order to ensure that the application of summer-time arrangements by some Member States only does not disrupt the functioning of the internal market, Member States should refrain from changing the standard time in any given territory under their jurisdiction for reasons related to seasonal changes, be such change presented as a change of time zone. Moreover, in order to minimise disruptions, inter alia, to transport, communications and other concerned sectors, they should notify the Commission in due time of their intention to change their standard time and subsequently apply the notified changes. The Commission should, on the basis of that notification, inform all other Member States so that they can take all necessary measures. It should also inform the general public and stakeholders by publishing this information.

(5)  This Directive should not prejudice the right of each Member State to decide on the standard time or times for the territories under its jurisdiction and falling under the territorial scope of the Treaties, and on further changes thereto. However, in order to ensure that the application of summer-time arrangements by some Member States only does not disrupt the functioning of the internal market, Member States should refrain from changing the standard time in any given territory under their jurisdiction for reasons related to seasonal changes, be such change presented as a change of time zone. Moreover, in order to minimise disruptions, inter alia, to transport, communications and other concerned sectors, they should notify the Commission by 1 April 2020 at the latest in the event that they intend to change their standard time on the last Sunday in October 2021.

Amendment    15

Proposal for a directive

Recital 6

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(6)  Therefore, it is necessary to put an end to the harmonisation of the period covered by summer-time arrangements as laid down in Directive 2000/84/EC and to introduce common rules preventing Member States from applying different seasonal time arrangements by changing their standard time more than once during the year and establishing the obligation to notify envisaged changes of the standard time. This Directive aims at contributing in a determined manner to the smooth functioning of the internal market and should, consequently, be based on Article 114 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, as interpreted in accordance with the consistent case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Union.

(6)  Therefore, it is necessary to put an end to the harmonisation of the period covered by summer-time arrangements as laid down in Directive 2000/84/EC and to introduce common rules preventing Member States from applying different seasonal time arrangements by changing their standard time more than once during the year. This Directive aims at contributing in a determined manner to the smooth functioning of the internal market and should, consequently, be based on Article 114 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, as interpreted in accordance with the consistent case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Union.

Amendment    16

Proposal for a directive

Recital 6 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(6a)  The decision on which standard time to apply in each Member State needs to be preceded by consultations and studies which would take into account citizens’ preferences, geographical variations, regional differences, standard working arrangements and other factors relevant for the particular Member State. Therefore, Member States should have sufficient time to analyse the impact of the proposal and to choose the solution best serving its populations, while taking into account the well-functioning of the internal market.

Amendment    17

Proposal for a directive

Recital 6 b (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(6b)  A time change unrelated to seasonal shifts will lead to transition costs, especially with regard to IT systems in transport and other sectors. In order to reduce significantly the costs of transition, a reasonable preparation period is needed for implementation of this Directive.

Amendment    18

Proposal for a directive

Recital 7

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(7)  This Directive should apply from 1 April 2019, so that the last summer-time period subject to the rules of Directive 2000/84/EC should start, in every Member State, at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 31 March 2019. Member States that, after that summer-time period, intend to adopt a standard time corresponding to the time applied during the winter season in accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC should change their standard time at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 27 October 2019, so that similar and lasting changes occurring in different Member States take place simultaneously. It is desirable that Member States take the decisions on the standard time that each of them will apply as from 2019 in a concerted manner.

(7)  This Directive should apply from 1 April 2021, so that the last summer-time period subject to the rules of Directive 2000/84/EC should start, in every Member State, at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on the last Sunday in March 2021. Member States that, after that summer-time period, intend to adopt a standard time corresponding to the time applied during the winter season in accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC should change their standard time at 1.00 a.m.,Coordinated Universal Time, on the last Sunday in October 2021, so that similar and lasting changes occurring in different Member States take place simultaneously. It is desirable that Member States take the decisions on the standard time that each of them will apply from 2021 in a concerted manner.

Amendment    19

Proposal for a directive

Recital 7 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(7 a)  For the purpose of ensuring a harmonised implementation of this Directive, Member States should cooperate with one another and take decisions on their envisaged time arrangements in a concerted and coordinated manner. Therefore, a coordination mechanism should be established, consisting of a designated representative from each Member State and a representative of the Commission. The coordination mechanism should discuss and assess the potential impact of any envisaged decision on a Member State’s standard times on the functioning of the internal market, in order to avoid significant disruptions.

Amendment    20

Proposal for a directive

Recital 7 b (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(7 b)  The Commission should assess whether the envisaged time arrangements in the different Member States have the potential to significantly and permanently hamper the proper functioning of the internal market. Where that assessment does not lead to Member States reconsidering their envisaged time arrangements, the Commission should be able to postpone the date of application of this Directive by no more than 12 months and submit a legislative proposal, if appropriate. Therefore, and in order to ensure the proper application of this Directive, the power to adopt acts in accordance with Article 290 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union should be delegated to the Commission to postpone the date of application of this Directive by no more than 12 months.

Amendment    21

Proposal for a directive

Article 1 – paragraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2.  Notwithstanding paragraph 1, Member States may still apply a seasonal change of their standard time or times in 2019, provided that they do so at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 27 October 2019. The Member States shall notify this decision in accordance with Article 2.

2.  By way of derogation from paragraph 1, Member States may still apply a seasonal change of their standard time or times in 2021, provided that they do so at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on the last Sunday in October of that year. The Member States shall notify this decision to the Commission by 1 April 2020 at the latest.

Amendment    22

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1.  Without prejudice to Article 1, if a Member State decides to change its standard time or times in any territory under its jurisdiction, it shall notify the Commission at least 6 months before the change takes effect. Where a Member State has made such a notification and has not withdrawn it at least 6 months before the date of the envisaged change, the Member State shall apply this change.

1.  A coordination mechanism is hereby established with the aim to ensure a harmonised and coordinated approach to time arrangements throughout the Union.

Amendment    23

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 – paragraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2.  Within 1 month of the notification, the Commission shall inform the other Member States thereof and publish that information in the Official Journal of the European Union.

2.  The coordination mechanism shall consist of one representative for each Member State and one representative of the Commission.

Amendment    24

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 – paragraph 2 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

2 a.  Where a Member State notifies the Commission of its decision pursuant to Article 1(2), the coordination mechanism shall convene to discuss and assess the potential impact of the envisaged change on the functioning of the internal market, in order to avoid significant disruptions.

Amendment    25

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 – paragraph 2 b (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

2 b.  Where on the basis of the assessment referred to in paragraph 2a, the Commission considers that the envisaged change will significantly affect the proper functioning of the internal market, it shall inform the notifying Member State thereof.

Amendment    26

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 – paragraph 2 c (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

2 c.  By 31 October 2020 at the latest, the notifying Member State shall decide whether to maintain its intention or not. Where the notifying Member State decides to maintain its intention, it shall provide a detailed explanation of how it will address the negative impact of the change on the functioning of the internal market.

Amendment    27

Proposal for a directive

Article 3 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1.  The Commission shall report to the European Parliament and to the Council on the implementation of this Directive by 31 December 2024 at the latest.

1.  By 31 December 2025 at the latest the Commission shall submit to the European Parliament and to the Council an evaluation report on the application and implementation of this Directive, accompanied, where necessary, by a legislative proposal for its review based on a thorough impact assessment, involving all relevant stakeholders.

Amendment    28

Proposal for a directive

Article 3 – paragraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2.  Member States shall provide the Commission with the relevant information by 30 April 2024 at the latest.

2.  Member States shall provide the Commission with the relevant information by 30 April 2025 at the latest.

Amendment    29

Proposal for a directive

Article 4 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1.  Member States shall adopt and publish, by 1 April 2019 at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive. They shall forthwith communicate to the Commission the text of those provisions.

1.  Member States shall adopt and publish, by 1 April 2021 at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive. They shall forthwith communicate to the Commission the text of those provisions.

They shall apply those provisions from 1 April 2019.

They shall apply those provisions from 1 April 2021.

When Member States adopt those provisions, they shall contain a reference to this Directive or be accompanied by such a reference on the occasion of their official publication. Member States shall determine how such reference is to be made.

When Member States adopt those provisions, they shall contain a reference to this Directive or be accompanied by such a reference on the occasion of their official publication. Member States shall determine how such reference is to be made.

Amendment    30

Proposal for a directive

Article 4 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

Article 4 a

 

1. The Commission, in close cooperation with the coordination mechanism referred to in Article 2, shall closely monitor the foreseen time arrangements throughout the Union.

 

2. Where the Commission determines that the envisaged time arrangements, notified by the Member States pursuant to Article 1(2), have the potential to significantly and permanently hamper the proper functioning of the internal market, it is empowered to adopt delegated acts to postpone the date of application of this Directive by no more than 12 months and submit a legislative proposal, if appropriate.

Amendment    31

Proposal for a directive

Article 4 b (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

Article 4 b

 

1.  The power to adopt delegated acts is conferred on the Commission subject to the conditions laid down in this Article.

 

2.  The power to adopt delegated acts referred to in Article 4a shall be conferred on the Commission from [date of entry into force of this Directive] until [date of application of this Directive].

 

3.  The delegation of power referred to in Article 4a may be revoked at anytime by the European Parliament or by the Council. A decision to revoke shall put an end to the delegation of the power specified in that decision. It shall take effect the day following the publication of the decision in the Official Journal of the European Union or at a later date specified therein. It shall not affect the validity of any delegated acts already in force.

 

4.  Before adopting a delegated act, the Commission shall consult experts designated by each Member State in accordance with the principles laid down in the Interinstitutional Agreement on Better Law-Making of 13 April 2016.

 

5.  As soon as it adopts a delegated act, the Commission shall notify it simultaneously to the European Parliament and to the Council.

 

6.  A delegated act adopted pursuant to Article 4a shall enter into force only if no objection has been expressed either by the European Parliament or the Council within a period of two months of notification of that act to the European Parliament and the Council or if, before the expiry of that period, the European Parliament and the Council have both informed the Commission that they will not object. That period shall be extended by two months at the initiative of the European Parliament or of the Council.

Amendment    32

Proposal for a directive

Article 5

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Article 5

Article 5

Directive 2000/84/EC is repealed with effect from 1 April 2019.

Directive 2000/84/EC is repealed with effect from 1 April 2021.

(1)

OJ C 0, 0.0.0000, p. 0. / Not yet published in the Official Journal.

(2)

OJ C 0, 0.0.0000, p. 0. / Not yet published in the Official Journal.


EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

BACKGROUND

In the past century, seasonal resetting of clocks has been practised from time to time in Europe. The reasons have been various, but energy saving has been a recurrent one. That is one of the reasons why EU Member States have reset clocks seasonally for fairly long periods of time. The current EU legislation was implemented in 2001.

Studies show that seasonal changes of time affect transport, the internal market, agriculture, the energy sector and public health, to mention just a few sectors. It is clear that a harmonised time system is necessary for the functioning of transport and the internal market within the EU.

But in some respects changes of time have an adverse impact. In agriculture, changes of time have a negative impact on crop yields and animal welfare, interrupting the biorhythms of livestock, which, for example, affects the milking of cows. Changes of time also have a negative impact on public health, with children and older people being those most affected. Studies also show that people in general feel less well due to changes of time, suffering from the disruption of the circadian cycle, increased sleep problems and fatigue. In the energy sector it is no longer possible to perceive any clear benefits from changes of time.

Seasonal changes of time have increasingly been debated in recent years, one reflection of that being citizens’ initiatives communicated to national parliaments and the European Parliament.

In February 2018, the European Parliament adopted a resolution calling on the Commission to revise the Directive on seasonal changes of time and, if necessary, to revise the Directive.

In summer 2018, the Commission conducted an open consultation which generated around 4.6 million responses, 84% of them in favour of abolishing seasonal changes of time.

The Commission submitted its proposal for the revision of the Directive on seasonal changes of time in September 2018. In the proposal, the Commission proposes abolishing changes of time from 1 April 2019, while allowing Member States to choose their standard time for themselves.

POSITION OF THE RAPPORTEUR

The rapporteur welcomes the debate on seasonal changes of time. The rapporteur is pleased that the Commission’s open consultation procedure on the resetting of clocks interested members of the public so much that some 4.6 million responses were received. Given that the seasonal resetting of clocks affects many citizens, the rapporteur considers it positive that the debate has also resulted in a revision of the Directive.

The rapporteur supports the Commission’s proposal to abolish the seasonal resetting of clocks. However, the rapporteur considers the Commission proposal to be somewhat premature, as no proper impact assessment was performed before the proposal to revise the Directive was drawn up. The Commission’s open consultation was also conducted over a relatively short period, eight weeks, rather than the customary 12 weeks. This is regrettable, as impact assessments of legislative proposals are an important way of providing policy-makers with sufficient information to base their final decision on.

In order to ensure the proper functioning of transport and the internal market, the rapporteur believes that a harmonised time system within the EU is essential. However, the rapporteur considers it important for Member States to retain the power to determine their own standard time at national level. Therefore, in order to ensure the proper functioning of transport and the internal market, the rapporteur encourages the Member States to coordinate their work on the choice of time zone and standard time among themselves. Decisions on this could be coordinated by exchanging information between responsible contact points in the Member States in the form of a network.

The rapporteur supports the Commission’s proposal that Member States should notify the Commission before any changes are made to standard time. However, the same information should also be given to the Member States at the same time as to the Commission. The coordinated exchange of information may be facilitated by the network between responsible contact points in the Member States proposed by the rapporteur.

As predictability and a long-term view are needed for the proper functioning of transport and the internal market, the rapporteur suggests that, when standard time is to be altered, 18 months before the change occurs is an appropriate notice period for a Member State to inform the Commission and the other Member States.

In order to ensure the proper functioning of transport and the internal market, the rapporteur considers it appropriate to specify a transposition period of two years after the adoption of the Directive, rather than setting a specific date for its entry into force. Nevertheless, your rapporteur believes that this directive should be adopted as soon as possible.


OPINION of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (25.2.2019)

for the Committee on Transport and Tourism

on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council discontinuing seasonal changes of time and repealing Directive 2000/84/EC

(COM(2018)0639 – C8‑0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD))

Rapporteur for opinion: Bolesław G. Piecha

SHORT JUSTIFICATION

Over the last years, the STA (Summer time arrangement) has been the subject of highly debated issues. A number of requests from citizens, from the European Parliament, and from certain EU Member States, have led the Commission to decide for the investigation of the functioning of the current EU summertime arrangements and to assess whether or not they should be changed.

EU summer-time arrangements imply that clocks are changed twice per year in all Member States, in order to cater for the changing patterns of daylight across seasons. Clocks are advanced by one hour in the morning of the last Sunday of March and set back by one hour in the morning of the last Sunday of October to return to standard time.

The spectrum of health issues that are related to Daylight Saving Time (DST) is broad, encompassing short-term (i.e. during the days following the switch) and long-term effects, as well as positive and negative effects. However, the relevant impact of disturbances in the biological rhythm due to time change on human health is still unclear and requires further in-depth research regarding the process of adaptation to time change.

During the public consultation on summertime arrangements, the majority of all respondents (76%) stated that they have a negative experience with the switching from wintertime to summertime. 43% of these answers were related to health issues and health concerns, while 20% were justified by lack of energy savings.

In the context of these negative experiences, the Commission decided to take into consideration potentially adverse health effects of DST, which have been the subject of numerous studies and debates. Some studies look into the link between the switch to summer time and the risk of heart attacks, disrupted body rhythm, sleep deprivation, lack of concentration and attention, increased risk of accidents, lower life satisfaction and even suicide rates.

Although the list of potential negative effects is long, some studies clearly establish positive long-term effects for general well-being from longer daylight, outdoor activities after work or school, exposure to sunlight.

But even though I welcome positively the new initiative of the Commission, and I would accept some potential health effects of EU summertime arrangements, a large scale of choice in the terms of changing time should be left to the discretion of the Members States according to their interests.

That is why I intend to signalise some potential health-related aspects of the proposal, stipulating some positive and negative elements that may be taken into consideration, but at the same time I refrain from imposing decisions on the Member States. Of course, I would like to consider a positive attitude towards the EC proposal, but in order to be in compliance with the subsidiarity principle in the frame of health policy, we should let the Member States take their own decisions in a harmonized manner.

In conclusion, I would like to underline that, even if we would be to take a clear final decision, especially due to the fact that this legislation is heading towards its end, we have to consider the empirical evidence related to health issues. However, a genuine and sincere consideration and gathering of all accessible data of that particular dossier does not facilitate our task in terms of making a decision that is clearly supported by scientifically proven arguments. I strongly believe that we should express an intention to conclude the outstanding work given the clearly expressed will of the European citizens; yet, we have to admit our obvious limitations - scarce empirical data and no common positions of the Member States. For these reasons, it seems appropriate that we may consider the ongoing negotiations to be slightly postponed as we may operate on more concrete data and a clearer message from the Member States providing and guiding us in their still unmet expectations.

AMENDMENTS

The Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety calls on the Committee on Transport and Tourism, as the committee responsible, to take into account the following amendments:

Amendment    1

Proposal for a directive

Recital 3

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(3)  The Commission has examined available evidence, which points to the importance of having harmonised Union rules in this area to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market and avoid, inter alia, disruptions to the scheduling of transport operations and the functioning of information and communication systems, higher costs to cross-border trade, or lower productivity for goods and services. Evidence is not conclusive as to whether the benefits of summer-time arrangements outweigh the inconveniences linked to a biannual change of time

(3)  The Commission has examined available evidence, which points to the importance of having harmonised Union rules in this area to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market, long-termism and predictability, so as to avoid, inter alia, disruptions to the scheduling of transport operations and the functioning of information and communication systems, higher costs to cross-border trade, or lower productivity for goods and services. Evidence is not fully conclusive as to whether the benefits of summer-time arrangements outweigh the inconveniences linked to a biannual change of time and the results differ between areas.

Amendment    2

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4

Present text

Amendment

(4)  A lively public debate is taking place on summer-time arrangements and some Member States have already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such arrangements. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to continue safeguarding the proper functioning of the internal market and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area. Therefore, it is appropriate to put an end in a coordinated way to summer-time arrangements.

(4)  A lively public debate is taking place on summer-time arrangements, as was also evident from the 4.6 million responses from citizens in the Commission’s open consultation procedure, in which a clear majority opposed the current seasonal changes. The main reason for the discontinuation is the impact of time changes on human health (43%), followed by lack of energy savings (20%). Although seventy percent of participants in the public consultation were from one Member State, some Member States have already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such arrangements. Some parliaments have also called on their governments to take action on seasonal changes of time in the EU. National legislative initiatives have been launched to abolish seasonal changes of time. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to continue safeguarding the proper functioning of the internal market and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area. Therefore, it is appropriate to put an end in a coordinated way to summer-time arrangements.

Amendment    3

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4a)  Territories other than overseas territories of the Member States are grouped over three different time zones or standard times, i.e. GMT, GMT +1 and GMT +2. The large north-south extension of the European Union means that daylight effects of time vary across the Union. It is therefore important that Member States take into consideration the geographical aspects of time, i.e. natural time zones and geographical position, before changing their time zones. Member States should consult citizens and relevant stakeholders before deciding to change their time zones.

Amendment    4

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 b (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4b)  Summer time, or daylight saving, has enabled later apparent sunsets during the summer months. In the minds of many EU citizens summer is synonymous with sunlight being available late into the evening. A reversion to "standard" time would result in summer sunsets being an hour earlier, with a much-reduced period of the year where late evening daylight is available.

Amendment    5

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 c (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4c)  Numerous studies looked into the link between the switch to summer time and the risk of heart attacks, disrupted body rhythm, sleep deprivation, lack of concentration and attention, increased risk of accidents, lower life satisfaction and even suicide rates. However, longer daylight, outdoor activities after work or school and exposure to sunlight clearly have some positive long-term effects on general well-being.

Amendment  6

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 d (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4d)  Chronobiology shows that the biorhythm of the human body is affected by any changes of time, which may have an adverse impact on health. While for most people it takes a few days to adapt to new changes, certain chronotypes require several weeks or even longer. Certain groups, such as children and older people, are particularly vulnerable. The springtime change is particularly acute, as some studies suggest, for example, that there is a higher rate of ischemic strokes in the first two days after the change. There is also a link between changes of time and cardiovascular diseases linked to the disturbance of the circadian cycle by changes of time.

Amendment  7

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 e (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4e)  Seasonal changes of time also have an adverse impact on the welfare of animals, which is evident in agriculture, for example, where cows’ milk production suffers.

Amendment    8

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 f (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4f)  It is widely assumed that seasonal changes of time bring about energy savings. Indeed, it was the main reason for their initial introduction in the past century. Research shows, however, that while the seasonal changes of time may be marginally beneficial to reducing energy consumption in the Union as a whole, it is not the case in every Member State. The energy for lighting saved by switching to summer time may be also outweighed by increased consumption of energy for heating. Moreover, results are difficult to interpret as they are strongly influenced by external factors, such as meteorology, behaviour of energy users or ongoing energy transition.

Amendment  9

Proposal for a directive

Recital 5

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(5)  This Directive should not prejudice the right of each Member State to decide on the standard time or times for the territories under its jurisdiction and falling under the territorial scope of the Treaties, and on further changes thereto. However, in order to ensure that the application of summer-time arrangements by some Member States only does not disrupt the functioning of the internal market, Member States should refrain from changing the standard time in any given territory under their jurisdiction for reasons related to seasonal changes, be such change presented as a change of time zone. Moreover, in order to minimise disruptions, inter alia, to transport, communications and other concerned sectors, they should notify the Commission in due time of their intention to change their standard time and subsequently apply the notified changes. The Commission should, on the basis of that notification, inform all other Member States so that they can take all necessary measures. It should also inform the general public and stakeholders by publishing this information.

(5)  This Directive should not prejudice the right of each Member State to decide on the standard time or times for the territories under its jurisdiction and falling under the territorial scope of the Treaties, and on further changes thereto. However, in order to ensure that the functioning of the internal market is not thereby disrupted, Member States should agree on a possible change in standard time in consultation with the other Member States and, where possible, adopt a harmonised approach. In order to prevent the application of summer-time arrangements by some Member States only, Member States should refrain from changing the standard time in any given territory under their jurisdiction for reasons related to seasonal changes, be such change presented as a change of time zone. Moreover, in order to minimise disruptions, inter alia, to transport, communications and other concerned sectors, they should notify the Commission in due time of their intention to change their standard time and subsequently apply the notified changes. The Commission should, on the basis of that notification, inform all other Member States so that they can take all necessary measures. It should also inform the general public and stakeholders by publishing this information without delay after receiving all notifications from the Member States.

Amendment  10

Proposal for a directive

Recital 5 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(5a)  Member States should coordinate among themselves on the standard times for which they opt, which should be as fully harmonised between Member States as possible, in order to avoid excessively different time zones in the Union, so as to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market and make it predictable for the citizens, consumers and sectors concerned. While it is legally not possible to oblige Member States to decide for a dedicated time zone, all efforts should be made to avoid unnecessary complications. Therefore, the Member States should consult among themselves and with the Commission their decisions on discontinuing seasonal time changes. To this end, each Member State should designate one representative to consult the Commission and other Member States.

Amendment  11

Proposal for a directive

Recital 7

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(7)  This Directive should apply from 1 April 2019, so that the last summer-time period subject to the rules of Directive 2000/84/EC should start, in every Member State, at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 31 March 2019. Member States that, after that summer-time period, intend to adopt a standard time corresponding to the time applied during the winter season in accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC should change their standard time at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 27 October 2019, so that similar and lasting changes occurring in different Member States take place simultaneously. It is desirable that Member States take the decisions on the standard time that each of them will apply as from 2019 in a concerted manner.

(7)  This Directive should apply from 30 March 2020, so that the last summer-time period subject to the rules of Directive 2000/84/EC should start, in every Member State, at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 30 March 2020. Member States that, after that summer-time period, intend to adopt a standard time corresponding to the time applied during the winter season in accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC should change their standard time at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 25 October 2020, so that similar and lasting changes occurring in different Member States take place simultaneously. It is desirable that Member States take the decisions on the standard time that each of them will apply as from 2020 in a concerted manner.

Amendment  12

Proposal for a directive

Article 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1.  Member States shall not apply seasonal changes to their standard time or times.

1.  Member States shall not apply seasonal changes to their standard time or times.

2.  Notwithstanding paragraph 1, Member States may still apply a seasonal change of their standard time or times in 2019, provided that they do so at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 27 October 2019. The Member States shall notify this decision in accordance with Article 2.

2.  Notwithstanding paragraph 1, Member States may still apply a seasonal change of their standard time or times in 2020, provided that they do so at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 25 October 2020. The Member States shall notify this decision in accordance with Article 2.

Amendment  13

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 – paragraphs 1 and 1a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1.  Without prejudice to Article 1, if a Member State decides to change its standard time or times in any territory under its jurisdiction, it shall notify the Commission at least 6 months before the change takes effect. Where a Member State has made such a notification and has not withdrawn it at least 6 months before the date of the envisaged change, the Member State shall apply this change.

1.  Without prejudice to Article 1, if a Member State decides to change its standard time or times in any territory under its jurisdiction, it shall notify the Commission at least 6 months before the change takes effect. Where a Member State has made such a notification and has not withdrawn it at least 6 months before the date of the envisaged change, the Member State shall apply this change.

 

1a.  Member States shall consult all other Member States before taking the decision referred to in paragraph 1. The Commission shall facilitate consultation. Each Member States shall designate one representative responsible for consulting other Member States and the Commission.

Amendment  14

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 – paragraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2.  Within 1 month of the notification, the Commission shall inform the other Member States thereof, publish that information in the Official Journal of the European Union.

2.  Within 1 month of the notification, the Commission shall inform the other Member States thereof, publish that information in the Official Journal of the European Union. The Commission shall inform the public in general without delay after receiving all notifications from the Member States.

Amendment    15

Proposal for a directive

Article 3 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1.  The Commission shall report to the European Parliament and to the Council on the implementation of this Directive by 31 December 2024 at the latest.

1.  The Commission shall report to the European Parliament and to the Council on the implementation of this Directive by 31 December seven years after the adoption of this Directive at the latest.

Amendment    16

Proposal for a directive

Article 3 – paragraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2.  Member States shall provide the Commission with the relevant information by 30 April 2024 at the latest.

2.  Member States shall provide the Commission with the relevant information by 30 April seven years after the adoption of this Directive at the latest.

Amendment  17

Proposal for a directive

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States shall adopt and publish, by 1 April 2019 at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive. They shall forthwith communicate to the Commission the text of those provisions.

Member States shall adopt and publish, by 30 March 2020 at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive. They shall forthwith communicate to the Commission the text of those provisions.

Amendment  18

Proposal for a directive

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

They shall apply those provisions from 1 April 2019.

They shall apply those provisions from 30 March 2020.

Amendment  19

Proposal for a directive

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 3

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

When Member States adopt those provisions, they shall contain a reference to this Directive or be accompanied by such a reference on the occasion of their official publication. Member States shall determine how such reference is to be made.

When Member States adopt those provisions, they shall contain a reference to this Directive or be accompanied by such a reference on the occasion of their official publication. Member States shall determine how such reference is to be made.

Amendment  20

Proposal for a directive

Article 5

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Directive 2000/84/EC is repealed with effect from 1 April 2019.

Directive 2000/84/EC is repealed with effect from 30 March 2020.

PROCEDURE – COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Title

Discontinuing seasonal changes of time

References

COM(2018)0639 – C8-0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD)

Committee responsible

       Date announced in plenary

TRAN

13.9.2018

 

 

 

Opinion by

       Date announced in plenary

ENVI

13.9.2018

Rapporteur

       Date appointed

Bolesław G. Piecha

22.10.2018

Discussed in committee

21.1.2019

 

 

 

Date adopted

20.2.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

49

9

1

Members present for the final vote

Marco Affronte, Margrete Auken, Pilar Ayuso, Zoltán Balczó, Ivo Belet, Paul Brannen, Soledad Cabezón Ruiz, Nessa Childers, Birgit Collin-Langen, Miriam Dalli, Seb Dance, Angélique Delahaye, Stefan Eck, Bas Eickhout, José Inácio Faria, Francesc Gambús, Gerben-Jan Gerbrandy, Arne Gericke, Jens Gieseke, Sylvie Goddyn, Françoise Grossetête, Andrzej Grzyb, Jytte Guteland, György Hölvényi, Anneli Jäätteenmäki, Jean-François Jalkh, Benedek Jávor, Karin Kadenbach, Kateřina Konečná, Urszula Krupa, Jo Leinen, Peter Liese, Lukas Mandl, Valentinas Mazuronis, Joëlle Mélin, Susanne Melior, Miroslav Mikolášik, Rory Palmer, Massimo Paolucci, Bolesław G. Piecha, Pavel Poc, Julia Reid, Frédérique Ries, Annie Schreijer-Pierik, Davor Škrlec, Renate Sommer, Ivica Tolić, Nils Torvalds, Jadwiga Wiśniewska, Damiano Zoffoli

Substitutes present for the final vote

Christofer Fjellner, Martin Häusling, Jan Huitema, Christel Schaldemose, Mihai Ţurcanu

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Czesław Hoc, Olle Ludvigsson, Anthea McIntyre, Tonino Picula

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

49

+

ALDE :

Anneli Jäätteenmäki, Frédérique Ries, Nils Torvalds

ECR :

Arne Gericke, Czesław Hoc, Urszula Krupa, Bolesław G. Piecha, Jadwiga Wiśniewska

EFDD :

Sylvie Goddyn

ENF :

Jean‑François Jalkh, Joëlle Mélin

GUE/NGL :

Stefan Eck, Kateřina Konečná

NI :

Zoltán Balczó

PPE:

Pilar Ayuso, Ivo Belet, Birgit Collin‑Langen, Angélique Delahaye, José Inácio Faria, Christofer Fjellner, Francesc Gambús, Jens Gieseke, Françoise Grossetête, Andrzej Grzyb, György Hölvényi, Peter Liese, Lukas Mandl, Miroslav Mikolášik, Annie Schreijer‑Pierik, Renate Sommer, Ivica Tolić, Mihai Ţurcanu

S&D:

Paul Brannen, Soledad Cabezón Ruiz, Nessa Childers, Miriam Dalli, Seb Dance, Jytte Guteland, Karin Kadenbach, Jo Leinen, Olle Ludvigsson, Susanne Melior, Rory Palmer, Tonino Picula, Pavel Poc, Christel Schaldemose

VERTS/ALE:

Marco Affronte, Martin Häusling, Davor Škrlec

9

-

ALDE :

Gerben‑Jan Gerbrandy, Jan Huitema, Valentinas Mazuronis

ECR :

Anthea McIntyre

EFDD:

Julia Reid

S&D:

Massimo Paolucci, Damiano Zoffoli

VERTS/ALE:

Margrete Auken, Benedek Jávor

1

0

VERTS/ALE:

Bas Eickhout

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention


OPINION of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (19.2.2019)

for the Committee on Transport and Tourism

on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council discontinuing seasonal changes of time and repealing Directive 2000/84/EC

(COM(2018)0639 – C8-0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD))

Rapporteur for opinion: Sven Schulze

SHORT JUSTIFICATION

The purpose of summer time is to capitalise on natural daylight. By turning the clock one hour forward as the days get longer in spring, sunset is delayed by this same hour, until the clock is set back again in autumn. This practice is applied in over 60 countries worldwide. In the EU, Member States have a long tradition of daylight saving time (DST), and many have developed their own DST schemes. EU-harmonisation attempts began in the 1970s, to facilitate the effective operation of the internal market.

Today, Directive 2000/84 /EC, whose abolishment is intended, governs the uniform EU-wide application of DST. Most European third countries have aligned their summer-time schemes with that of the EU.

Much academic research has been invested in examining the benefits and inconveniences of DST. It appears that summer time benefits the internal market (notably the transport sector) and outdoor leisure activities, and it also generates marginal savings in energy consumption. The impact on other economic sectors remains hence unclear.

One has to admit that the available scientific evidence base and state of knowledge with regard to possible positive or negative implications of DST is still very limited and rather fragmentary.

Health research, however, associates DST with disruption to the human biorhythm ('circadian rhythm'). Scientific findings suggest that the effect on human biorhythm may be more severe than previously thought. Scientific facts are available only to a very limited extent.

The system of bi-annual clock changes has been increasingly questioned by citizens and by the European Parliament. However, no EU government has called for a change to the current DST provisions. Third countries like Russia or more recently Turkey have abolished DST with transition periods of five years and longer.

In its resolution of 8 February 2018(1), the European Parliament asked the Commission to carry out an assessment of summertime arrangements as provided for in Directive 2000/84/EC and, where appropriate, to submit a proposal for revision.

The European Commission has not carried out an impact assessment, but a public consultation, which generated around 4.6 million replies, the largest amount of responses ever received in any Commission consultation, of which 84% were in favour of discontinuing the bi-annual clock changes, while 16% wanted to keep them.

Against this background, this opinion seeks to support the idea that the arrangements for bi-annual clock changes should be terminated under certain conditions.

The main challenge of the removal of the bi-annual clock change is to avoid any major disruption to the internal market caused by the divergences between Member States in this area and the lack of competences to coordinate standard times on European level.

The draftsman is aware of the fact that the EU can put an end to bi-annual clock changes but has no competence to impose a standard time across the EU.

Beyond considerations on the effects, repeal of the Summer-Time Directive would not automatically abolish summer time across the EU. It would just end EU-wide harmonisation and bring the issue of summer time back into the competence of the Member States. Member States would be free to decide about their individual time regimes: they might opt to retain summer time (at the current or a modified DST schedule) or to end summer time. Abolishing summer time would in the first place result in year-round standard time ('winter time'), which by definition entails darker evenings in spring and summer.

To obtain year-round summer time Member States would technically need to change time zones. However, uncoordinated national time arrangements would likely have negative repercussions on the internal market.

In any case, a patchwork of time zones due to the different preference of the Member States to keep either winter or summer time as standard time must be avoided, as this would make the internal market more divergent.

It would make cross-border trade, transport, communication and travel more complicated within the internal market and with third countries having a major impact on the slot system of the aviation industry used to coordinate flights at the busiest airports around the globe. The time change could be used for competing third country airlines to drive European airlines out of the market in order to gain a greater market share outside the EU.

In the remit of legal feasibility, the draftsman therefore proposes to link the entry into force to a prior consensual agreement between all EU member states to a coordination mechanism for a new standard time. It would be best to keep the three existing time zones intact. The draftsman sees the co-decision procedure for this piece of legislation as the instrument to find that agreement among Member States. The Member State in charge of the Presidency of the Council shall coordinate this process.

AMENDMENTS

The Committee on Industry, Research and Energy calls on the Committee on Transport and Tourism, as the committee responsible, to take into account the following amendments:

Amendment    1

Proposal for a directive

Recital 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(2)  In its resolution of 8 February 2018, the European Parliament called on the Commission to conduct an assessment of the summer-time arrangements provided by Directive 2000/84/EC and, if necessary, to come up with a proposal for its revision. That resolution also confirmed that it is essential to maintain a harmonised approach to time arrangements throughout the Union.

(2)  Against the background of several petitions from citizens, parliamentary questions and a public hearing on the matter, the European Parliament, in its resolution of 8 February 2018, the European Parliament called on the Commission to conduct a thorough assessment of the summer-time arrangements provided by Directive 2000/84/EC and, if necessary, to come up with a proposal for its revision. That resolution also stressed the importance of maintaining a harmonised approach to time arrangements throughout the Union and a unified EU time regime.

Amendment    2

Proposal for a directive

Recital 3

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(3)  The Commission has examined available evidence, which points to the importance of having harmonised Union rules in this area to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market and avoid, inter alia, disruptions to the scheduling of transport operations and the functioning of information and communication systems, higher costs to cross-border trade, or lower productivity for goods and services. Evidence is not conclusive as to whether the benefits of summer-time arrangements outweigh the inconveniences linked to a biannual change of time.

(3)  The Commission has examined available evidence, which points to the importance of having harmonised Union rules in this area to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market, create predictability and long-term certainty and avoid, inter alia, disruptions to the scheduling of transport operations, the energy sector and the functioning of information and communication systems, higher costs to cross-border trade, or lower productivity for goods and services. The transition towards a new hour system should be facilitated through ICT testing for an effective implementation, without additional costs for businesses and citizens. Furthermore, while scientific evidence is not yet fully conclusive, recent scientific studies have pointed out the possible negative effects on human health linked to a biannual change of time. Accordingly to the recent studies on human health: it has been also pointed out that biannual time change has several negative effects and adapting is not as easy as thought.

Amendment    3

Proposal for a directive

Recital 3 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(3a)  The public debate on summer-time arrangements is not new and since the introduction of the summer-time several initiatives were meant to discontinue the practice. Some Member States held national consultations and a majority of businesses and stakeholders have supported a discontinuation of the practice. The consultation initiated by the European Commission has led to the same conclusion.

Justification

The introduction of a time change had its adversaries in the beginning, but the current proposal follows a series of studies and consultations that bring arguments into the ideological debate. To that end, it is proper to mention the previous debates and the process that led to the current proposal.

Amendment    4

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(4)  A lively public debate is taking place on summer-time arrangements and some Member States have already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such arrangements. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to continue safeguarding the proper functioning of the internal market and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area. Therefore, it is appropriate to put an end in a coordinated way to summer-time arrangements.

(4)  A lively public debate, such as the 4,6 million replies from citizens in the public consultation held by the Commission where a majority is against the current system with the seasonal time change, is taking place on summer-time arrangements. This has not yet been accompanied by a scientifically substantiated impact assessment that is not limited to the analysis of existing material on the matter. Some Member States have also already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such arrangements. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to continue safeguarding the proper functioning of the internal market as well as cross-border activities of the citizens and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area. Therefore, it is essential, in the context of the codecision procedure for this Directive, that summer-time arrangements should only be brought to an end, if the Member States have first reached agreement on a coordination mechanism. The relevant Council Presidency will have a leading role to play in establishing this coordination mechanism. This mechanism should take account of the three existing time zones in the EU when the standard time is set up by each Member State. Where a Member State makes such a change, and without prejudice to its right to decide on its standard time, it will make best efforts to ensure that the time difference between it and neighbouring Member States does not exceed one hour. An impact assessment may be carried out by the European Commission on the impact of the planned change of standard time and its impact to neighbouring Member States and the internal market.

Amendment    5

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4a)  In order to avoid negative consequences for functioning of the internal market as well as difficulties in cross-border activities for the EU citizens it is essential to ensure a continuation of a geographic logic in distribution of time zones in the Union. Therefore, ending summer-time arrangements should be preceded by a coordination process concluded by the Member States. The process, while respecting a sovereign right of every Member State to decide on its standard time and taking into account different needs of populations in the Member States, which currently span three time zones, will help Member States, in particular neighbouring countries, to achieve in a consensual manner a common position on the standard time that each Member State will choose to apply in future.

Amendment    6

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 b (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4b)  Recent scientific evidence suggest a link between the bi-annual clock change and negative health issues, such as cardiovascular diseases, linked to chronobiology through the internal chronodisruption.

Amendment    7

Proposal for a directive

Recital 5

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(5)  This Directive should not prejudice the right of each Member State to decide on the standard time or times for the territories under its jurisdiction and falling under the territorial scope of the Treaties, and on further changes thereto. However, in order to ensure that the application of summer-time arrangements by some Member States only does not disrupt the functioning of the internal market, Member States should refrain from changing the standard time in any given territory under their jurisdiction for reasons related to seasonal changes, be such change presented as a change of time zone. Moreover, in order to minimise disruptions, inter alia, to transport, communications and other concerned sectors, they should notify the Commission in due time of their intention to change their standard time and subsequently apply the notified changes. The Commission should, on the basis of that notification, inform all other Member States so that they can take all necessary measures. It should also inform the general public and stakeholders by publishing this information.

(5)  This Directive should not prejudice the right of each Member State to decide on the standard time or times for the territories under its jurisdiction and falling under the territorial scope of the Treaties, and on further changes thereto. However, in order to ensure that the application of summer-time arrangements by some Member States only does not disrupt the functioning of the internal market and ensure a coordinated approach, Member States should refrain from changing the standard time in any given territory under their jurisdiction for reasons related to seasonal changes, be such change presented as a change of time zone, which are present in Europe. Moreover, in order to minimise disruptions, inter alia, to the internal market, the EU energy networks, transport, and in particular aviation, with its established slot system for take- offs and landings, communications and other concerned sectors, they should notify the Commission and all the Member States in due time of their intention to change their standard time and subsequently apply the notified changes. The Commission should, on the basis of that notification, inform all other Member States so that they can take all necessary measures to counter the cross-border impact caused by time zone differences between neighbouring countries. It should also inform the general public and stakeholders by publishing this information.

Amendment    8

Proposal for a directive

Recital 5 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(5a)  Member States should take their decision without jeopardising the competitiveness with regards to third country companies of the European transport industries particularly sensitive to time changes, such as European airlines and airports.

Amendment    9

Proposal for a directive

Recital 6 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(6a)  The decision on which standard time to apply in each Member State requires being preceded by consultations and studies which would take into account citizens’ preferences, geographical variations, regional differences, standard working arrangements and other factors relevant for the particular Member State. Therefore, Member States should have sufficient time to analyse the impact of the proposal and to choose the solution best serving its populations, while taking into account the well-functioning of the internal market.

Amendment    10

Proposal for a directive

Recital 7

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(7)  This Directive should apply from 1 April 2019, so that the last summer-time period subject to the rules of Directive 2000/84/EC should start, in every Member State, at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 31 March 2019. Member States that, after that summer-time period, intend to adopt a standard time corresponding to the time applied during the winter season in accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC should change their standard time at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 27 October 2019, so that similar and lasting changes occurring in different Member States take place simultaneously. It is desirable that Member States take the decisions on the standard time that each of them will apply as from 2019 in a concerted manner.

(7)  This Directive should apply from 1 April 2020, so that the last summer-time period subject to the rules of Directive 2000/84/EC should start, in every Member State, at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 29 March 2020. Member States that, after that summer-time period, intend to adopt a standard time corresponding to the time applied during the winter season in accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC should change their standard time at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 25th of October 2020, so that similar and lasting changes occurring in different Member States take place simultaneously. It is a prerequisite for the implementation of this scheme that Member States take the decisions on the standard time that each of them will apply as from 2020 in a concerted and a consensual manner, encouraging Member States to remain in their current time zone. A network of national contact points on time arrangement might be set up. It is important to avoid possible complications that could occur when Member States are implementing this directive. It is therefore necessary to leave them sufficient time and ensure a harmonized and well-coordinated approach.

Amendment    11

Proposal for a directive

Recital 8

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(8)  Implementation of this Directive should be monitored. The results of this monitoring should be presented by the Commission in a report to the European Parliament and to the Council. That report should be based on the information that is made available to the Commission by the Member States in a timely fashion to allow for the report to be presented at the specified time.

(8)  Implementation of this Directive should be monitored and shall be covered by the coordination mechanism agreed in advance among the Member States as part of this codecision procedure. The results of this monitoring should be presented by the Commission in a report to the European Parliament and to the Council. That report should be based on the information that is made available to the Commission by the Member States in a timely fashion to allow for the report to be presented at the specified time.

Amendment    12

Proposal for a directive

Article 1 – paragraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2.  Notwithstanding paragraph 1, Member States may still apply a seasonal change of their standard time or times in 2019, provided that they do so at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 27 October 2019. The Member States shall notify this decision in accordance with Article 2.

2.  Notwithstanding paragraph 1, Member States may still apply a seasonal change of their standard time or times in 2020, provided that they do so at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 25th of October 2020. The Member States shall notify this decision in accordance with Article 2.

Amendment    13

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1.  Without prejudice to Article 1, if a Member State decides to change its standard time or times in any territory under its jurisdiction, it shall notify the Commission at least 6 months before the change takes effect. Where a Member State has made such a notification and has not withdrawn it at least 6 months before the date of the envisaged change, the Member State shall apply this change.

1.  Without prejudice to Article 1, if a Member State decides to change its standard time or times in any territory under its jurisdiction, it shall notify the Commission at least 12 months before the change takes effect. Where a Member State has made such a notification and has not withdrawn it at least 12 months before the date of the envisaged change, the Member State shall apply this change.

Amendment    14

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 – paragraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2.  Within 1 month of the notification, the Commission shall inform the other Member States thereof and publish that information in the Official Journal of the European Union.

2.  Within 1 month of the notification, the Commission shall inform the other Member States and the general public thereof and publish that information in the Official Journal of the European Union.

Amendment    15

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 – paragraph 2 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

2 a.  In order to have a coordinated approach when implementing paragraphs 1 and 2 of this article, the Council shall establish a coordination mechanism.

Amendment    16

Proposal for a directive

Article 3 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1.  The Commission shall report to the European Parliament and to the Council on the implementation of this Directive by 31 December 2024 at the latest.

1.  The Commission shall report to the European Parliament and to the Council on the implementation of this Directive by 31 December 2025 at the latest.

Amendment    17

Proposal for a directive

Article 3 – paragraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2.  Member States shall provide the Commission with the relevant information by 30 April 2024 at the latest.

2.  Member States shall provide the Commission with the relevant information by 30 April 2025 at the latest.

Amendment    18

Proposal for a directive

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States shall adopt and publish, by 1 April 2019 at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive. They shall forthwith communicate to the Commission the text of those provisions.

Member States shall adopt and publish, by 1 April 2020 at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive. They shall forthwith communicate to the Commission the text of those provisions.

Amendment    19

Proposal for a directive

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

They shall apply those provisions from 1 April 2019.

They shall apply those provisions from 1 April 2020.

Amendment    20

Proposal for a directive

Article 5 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Directive 2000/84/EC is repealed with effect from 1 April 2019.

Directive 2000/84/EC is repealed with effect from 1 April 2020.

PROCEDURE – COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Title

Discontinuing seasonal changes of time

References

COM(2018)0639 – C8-0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD)

Committee responsible

       Date announced in plenary

TRAN

13.9.2018

 

 

 

Opinion by

       Date announced in plenary

ITRE

13.9.2018

Rapporteur

       Date appointed

Sven Schulze

25.10.2018

Discussed in committee

23.1.2019

 

 

 

Date adopted

19.2.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

48

7

2

Members present for the final vote

Zigmantas Balčytis, Bendt Bendtsen, Xabier Benito Ziluaga, Cristian-Silviu Buşoi, Reinhard Bütikofer, Jerzy Buzek, Angelo Ciocca, Jakop Dalunde, Pilar del Castillo Vera, Christian Ehler, Fredrick Federley, Ashley Fox, Adam Gierek, Theresa Griffin, András Gyürk, Hans-Olaf Henkel, Seán Kelly, Jeppe Kofod, Peter Kouroumbashev, Zdzisław Krasnodębski, Christelle Lechevalier, Janusz Lewandowski, Aleksejs Loskutovs, Edouard Martin, Tilly Metz, Angelika Mlinar, Csaba Molnár, Dan Nica, Angelika Niebler, Morten Helveg Petersen, Miroslav Poche, Carolina Punset, Paul Rübig, Massimiliano Salini, Algirdas Saudargas, Neoklis Sylikiotis, Evžen Tošenovský, Kathleen Van Brempt, Martina Werner, Lieve Wierinck, Hermann Winkler, Anna Záborská, Flavio Zanonato, Carlos Zorrinho

Substitutes present for the final vote

Pilar Ayuso, Michał Boni, Rosa D’Amato, Benedek Jávor, Olle Ludvigsson, Marian-Jean Marinescu, Clare Moody, Markus Pieper, Dominique Riquet, Davor Škrlec, Anneleen Van Bossuyt

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Eleonora Evi, Luigi Morgano

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

48

+

ALDE

Fredrick Federley, Angelika Mlinar, Morten Helveg Petersen, Carolina Punset, Lieve Wierinck

ECR

Zdzisław Krasnodębski, Evžen Tošenovský, Anneleen Van Bossuyt

ENF

Christelle Lechevalier

PPE

Pilar Ayuso, Bendt Bendtsen, Michał Boni, Cristian-Silviu Buşoi, Jerzy Buzek, Pilar del Castillo Vera, Christian Ehler, András Gyürk, Seán Kelly, Janusz Lewandowski, Aleksejs Loskutovs, Marian-Jean Marinescu, Angelika Niebler, Markus Pieper, Paul Rübig, Massimiliano Salini, Algirdas Saudargas, Hermann Winkler, Anna Záborská

S&D

Zigmantas Balčytis, Adam Gierek, Theresa Griffin, Jeppe Kofod, Peter Kouroumbashev, Olle Ludvigsson, Csaba Molnár, Clare Moody, Luigi Morgano, Dan Nica, Miroslav Poche, Kathleen Van Brempt, Martina Werner, Flavio Zanonato, Carlos Zorrinho

VERTS/ALE

Reinhard Bütikofer, Jakop Dalunde, Benedek Jávor, Tilly Metz, Davor Škrlec

7

-

ALDE

Dominique Riquet

ECR

Ashley Fox, Hans-Olaf Henkel

EFDD

Rosa D'Amato, Eleonora Evi

ENF

Angelo Ciocca

S&D

Edouard Martin

2

0

GUE/NGL

Xabier Benito Ziluaga, Neoklis Sylikiotis

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention

(1)

European Parliament resolution of 8 February 2018 on time change arrangements (2017/2968(RSP)) P8_TA(2018)0043


OPINION of the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (21.2.2019)

for the Committee on Transport and Tourism

on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on discontinuing seasonal changes of time and repealing Directive 2000/84/EC

(COM(2018)0639 – C8‑0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD))

Rapporteur for opinion: Igor Šoltes

SHORT JUSTIFICATION

The rapporteur welcomes the proposal by the European Commission to discontinue bi-annual change of clock in line with the views expressed by the European Parliament in its resolution of February 2018 and citizens.

Numerous studies and reports have been published demonstrating the negative consequences of bi-annual change of clock for many aspects of our society, from health risks and problems caused by the disturbance of circadian rhythms, to increased accident rates in the days following the change, increased administrative burden and costs for many economic sectors.

The European Commission held a public consultation during the summer 2018 gathering 4.6 million replies, among which 99.8% replies were from citizens. The remaining 0.2% replies came from stakeholders or businesses. Outcome of this consultation were in favour of discontinuing bi-annual clock change by 84%. The current proposal is therefore in line with the views expressed by citizens while stressing at the same time the need for a coherent and harmonised approach to safeguard the functioning of the internal market.

The territories of the Member States of the EU are grouped into three different time- zones, i.e. GMT, GMT+1 and GMT+2. Several factors need therefore to be taken into consideration when deciding on the permanent time such as geographical aspects and natural time-zones and their effects in terms of health due to the availability of the daylight.

Although Member States remain competent for deciding on their standard time, the Rapporteur considers it necessary to maintain a harmonised approach for time-arrangements to safeguard the proper functioning of the internal market and avoid major disruptions that would cause a “patchwork quilt” if Member States opt to create multiple 60-minute time changes across the bloc.

A coordinated approach implies an appropriate timeline that will enable Member States to assess accurately the effects of permanently going for GMT + 1 and GMT+ 2 given the number of areas to be taken into consideration, such as effects on the economy in terms of cross-border trade, communications and transports, but also effects on human health, road safety or the environment.

Therefore, it is proposed to delay the date of application by one year to give sufficient time for Member States to coordinate their approach and involve properly the relevant stakeholders and citizens via the organisation of public consultations.

Proper coordination should be ensured via the establishment of a network composed of representatives from each Member State and the Commission that would act as mediation in case the envisaged change of time by one Member State would raise concerns from other Member States and affect the proper functioning of the internal market.

Evaluation of the implementation of this Directive should be carried out after four years of application instead of the five years proposed by the Commission.

AMENDMENTS

The Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection calls on the Committee on Transport and Tourism, as the committee responsible, to take into account the following amendments:

Amendment    1

Proposal for a directive

Recital 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(1)  Member States chose in the past to introduce summer-time arrangements at national level. It was, therefore, important for the functioning of the internal market that a common date and time for the beginning and end of the summer-time period be fixed throughout the Union. In accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council21, all Member States currently apply summer-time arrangements from the last Sunday in March until the last Sunday in October of the same year.

(1)  Member States chose in the past to introduce summer-time arrangements at national level. It was, therefore, important for the functioning of the internal market that a common date and time for the beginning and end of the summer-time period be fixed throughout the Union to coordinate the changing of clocks in Member States. In accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council21, all Member States currently apply biannual seasonal changes of time. Standard time is switched to summer-time on the last Sunday in March until the last Sunday in October of the same year.

__________________

__________________

21 Directive 2000/84/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on summer-time arrangements (OJ L 31, 2.2.2001, p. 21).

21 Directive 2000/84/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on summer-time arrangements (OJ L 31, 2.2.2001, p. 21).

Amendment    2

Proposal for a directive

Recital 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(2)  In its resolution of 8 February 2018, the European Parliament called on the Commission to conduct an assessment of the summer-time arrangements provided by Directive 2000/84/EC and, if necessary, to come up with a proposal for its revision. That resolution also confirmed that it is essential to maintain a harmonised approach to time arrangements throughout the Union.

(2)  In its resolution of 8 February 2018, the European Parliament called on the Commission to conduct an assessment of biannual seasonal changes of time provided by Directive 2000/84/EC and, if necessary, to come up with a proposal for its revision. That resolution also confirmed that it is essential to maintain a harmonised approach to time arrangements throughout the Union while highlighting that numerous scientific studies have indicated the existence of negative effects of biannual seasonal changes to time.

Amendment    3

Proposal for a directive

Recital 3

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(3)  The Commission has examined available evidence, which points to the importance of having harmonised Union rules in this area to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market and avoid, inter alia, disruptions to the scheduling of transport operations and the functioning of information and communication systems, higher costs to cross-border trade, or lower productivity for goods and services. Evidence is not conclusive as to whether the benefits of summer-time arrangements outweigh the inconveniences linked to a biannual change of time.

(3)  The Commission has examined available evidence, which points to the importance of having harmonised Union rules in this area to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market, long-termism and predictability, so as avoid, inter alia, disruptions to the scheduling of transport operations and the functioning of information and communication systems, higher costs to cross-border trade, or lower productivity for goods and services. Evidence is not conclusive as to whether the benefits of summer-time arrangements outweigh the inconveniences linked to a biannual change of time.

Amendment    4

Proposal for a directive

Recital 3 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(3a)  Numerous studies have however pointed out that the benefits of seasonal change of time, such as energy savings, have been overestimated, while negative consequences in various areas, such as impact on human health and biorhythm (‘circadian rhythm’) or on the ability to concentrate for example, have been underestimated.

Amendment    5

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(4)  A lively public debate is taking place on summer-time arrangements and some Member States have already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such arrangements. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to continue safeguarding the proper functioning of the internal market and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area. Therefore, it is appropriate to put an end in a coordinated way to summer-time arrangements.

(4)  A lively public debate, with a certain number of citizens’ initiatives highlighting their concerns about biannual seasonal changes to time, is taking place and some Member States have already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such arrangements. The same willingness to end the bi-annual seasonal changes to time has been expressed by 4.6 million citizens, representing 84% of respondents, in a public consultation organised by the Commission in summer 2018. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to safeguard the proper functioning of the internal market and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area. Therefore, it is appropriate to put an end in a coordinated and harmonised way to biannual seasonal time changes.

Amendment    6

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4a)  Territories of the Member States are grouped over three different time zones or standard times, i.e. GMT, GMT +1 and GMT +2. The large north-south extension of the European Union means that daylight effects of time vary across the Union. It is therefore important that Member States take into consideration the geographical aspects of time, i.e. natural timezones and geographical position, before changing their timezones. Member States are encouraged to consult citizens and relevant stakeholders before deciding to change their timezones.

Amendment    7

Proposal for a directive

Recital 5

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(5)  This Directive should not prejudice the right of each Member State to decide on the standard time or times for the territories under its jurisdiction and falling under the territorial scope of the Treaties, and on further changes thereto. However, in order to ensure that the application of summer-time arrangements by some Member States only does not disrupt the functioning of the internal market, Member States should refrain from changing the standard time in any given territory under their jurisdiction for reasons related to seasonal changes, be such change presented as a change of time zone. Moreover, in order to minimise disruptions, inter alia, to transport, communications and other concerned sectors, they should notify the Commission in due time of their intention to change their standard time and subsequently apply the notified changes. The Commission should, on the basis of that notification, inform all other Member States so that they can take all necessary measures. It should also inform the general public and stakeholders by publishing this information.

(5)  This Directive should not prejudice the right of each Member State to decide on the standard time or times for the territories under its jurisdiction and falling under the territorial scope of the Treaties, and on further changes thereto. However, in order to avoid any significant disruptions on the functioning of the internal market, Member States should refrain from changing the standard time in any given territory under their jurisdiction for reasons related to seasonal changes, be such change presented as a change of time zone. Moreover, in order to minimise disruptions, inter alia, to transport, communications and other concerned sectors, Member States that intends to change their standard time should notify the Commission and all other Member States no later than 9 months before the envisaged change takes effect and subsequently apply the notified changes The Commission should on the basis of that notification assess the impact on the functioning of the internal market of the envisaged change of time. It should also inform the general public and stakeholders by publishing this information.

Amendment    8

Proposal for a directive

Recital 5 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(5a)  For the purpose of ensuring a harmonised implementation of this Directive, Member States should coordinate in advance their decision on the envisaged standard times via the establishment of a coordination mechanism in order to avoid that Member States opt for different standard times within a timezone. The coordination mechanism should consist of a representative of the Commission and a designated representative for each Member State. The Commission should facilitate the coordination and should provide assessment on the effects that the notified decision would have on the proper functioning of the internal market. The decision to apply or not the envisaged time change remains within the competence of the Member States after having consulted and coordinated it with other Member States.

Amendment    9

Proposal for a directive

Recital 6

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(6)  Therefore, it is necessary to put an end to the harmonisation of the period covered by summer-time arrangements as laid down in Directive 2000/84/EC and to introduce common rules preventing Member States from applying different seasonal time arrangements by changing their standard time more than once during the year and establishing the obligation to notify envisaged changes of the standard time. This Directive aims at contributing in a determined manner to the smooth functioning of the internal market and should, consequently, be based on Article 114 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, as interpreted in accordance with the consistent case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Union.

(6)  Therefore, it is necessary to repeal Directive 2000/84/EC concerning summer-time arrangements and to introduce common rules preventing Member States from applying different seasonal time arrangements and establishing the obligation to notify and assess the impact of envisaged changes of the standard time. The Commission and other Member States should then assess the impact of the envisaged change on the functioning of the internal market so as to avoid significant disruptions. This Directive aims thus at contributing in a determined manner to the smooth functioning of the internal market and should, consequently, be based on Article 114 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, as interpreted in accordance with the consistent case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Union.

Amendment    10

Proposal for a directive

Recital 7

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(7)  This Directive should apply from 1 April 2019, so that the last summer-time period subject to the rules of Directive 2000/84/EC should start, in every Member State, at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 31 March 2019. Member States that, after that summer-time period, intend to adopt a standard time corresponding to the time applied during the winter season in accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC should change their standard time at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 27 October 2019, so that similar and lasting changes occurring in different Member States take place simultaneously. It is desirable that Member States take the decisions on the standard time that each of them will apply as from 2019 in a concerted manner.

(7)  It is important to avoid that Member States opt for different standard times. It is therefore necessary to leave them sufficient time to adopt a harmonised and well-coordinated approach. This Directive should apply from 30 March 2020, so that the last summer-time period subject to the rules of Directive 2000/84/EC should start, in every Member State, at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 29 March 2020. Member States that, after that summer-time period, intend to adopt a standard time corresponding to the time applied during the winter season in accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC should change their standard time at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 25 October 2020, so that similar and lasting changes occurring in different Member States take place simultaneously. It is desirable that Member States take the decisions on the standard time that each of them will apply as from 2020 in a concerted manner.

Amendment    11

Proposal for a directive

Article 1 – paragraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2.  Notwithstanding paragraph 1, Member States may still apply a seasonal change of their standard time or times in 2019, provided that they do so at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 27 October 2019. The Member States shall notify this decision in accordance with Article 2.

2.  Notwithstanding paragraph 1, Member States may still apply a seasonal change of their standard time or times in 2020, provided that they do so at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 25 October 2020. Member States shall notify their decision to apply or not to apply this last seasonal change of their standard time or times 6 months before the change takes effect.

Amendment    12

Proposal for a directive

Article 1 – paragraph 2 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

2a.  The Commission shall publish that information in the Official Journal of the European Union without delay and shall, within 1 month of receiving a notification, convene a meeting within the framework of the coordination mechanism as referred to in Article 2a.

Amendment    13

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1.  Without prejudice to Article 1, if a Member State decides to change its standard time or times in any territory under its jurisdiction, it shall notify the Commission at least 6 months before the change takes effect. Where a Member State has made such a notification and has not withdrawn it at least 6 months before the date of the envisaged change, the Member State shall apply this change.

1.  Without prejudice to Article 1, if a Member State decides to change its standard time or times in any territory under its jurisdiction, it shall notify the Commission and the other Member States of its decision to change its standard time or times in any territory under its jurisdiction at least 9 months before the change takes effect.

Amendment    14

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 – paragraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2.  Within 1 month of the notification, the Commission shall inform the other Member States thereof and publish that information in the Official Journal of the European Union.

2.  The Commission shall publish that information in the Official Journal of the European Union without delay and shall, within 1 month of receiving a notification, convene a meeting within the framework of the coordination mechanism as referred to in Article 2a.

Amendment    15

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

Article 2a

 

1.  This Directive sets up a coordination mechanism with the aim to ensure a harmonised approach to time arrangements throughout the Union and to strengthen the cooperation between the Member States and the Commission in assessing the impact on the functioning of the internal market of any decision to change standard time or times.

 

2.  The coordination mechanism, referred to in paragraph 1, shall consist of a representative for each Member State and a representative of the Commission.

 

3.  Where a Member State notifies the Commission of its decision pursuant to Article 1(2) or pursuant to Article 2(1), the Commission shall convene Member States to assess and discuss the potential impact of the envisaged change on the functioning of the internal market, in order to avoid significant disruptions.

 

4.  Where on the basis of the assessment, referred to in paragraph 3, the Commission considers that the envisaged change will affect significantly the proper functioning of the internal market, it shall inform the notifying Member State thereof.

 

5.  No later than 4 months before the date of the envisaged change, the notifying Member State shall decide whether to repeal its decision or to maintain it. Where the notifying Member State decides to maintain its decision, it shall provide an explanation that will address the negative impact of the change on the internal market.

Amendment    16

Proposal for a directive

Article 3 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1.  The Commission shall report to the European Parliament and to the Council on the implementation of this Directive by 31 December 2024 at the latest.

1.  The Commission shall report to the European Parliament and to the Council on the implementation of this Directive by [4 years after the date of application of this Directive] at the latest.

Amendment    17

Proposal for a directive

Article 3 – paragraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2.  Member States shall provide the Commission with the relevant information by 30 April 2024 at the latest.

2.  Member States shall provide the Commission with the relevant information by [3 years after the date of application of this Directive], at the latest.

Amendment    18

Proposal for a directive

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1.   Member States shall adopt and publish, by 1 April 2019 at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive. They shall forthwith communicate to the Commission the text of those provisions.

1.  Member States shall adopt and publish, by 30 March 2020 at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive. They shall forthwith communicate to the Commission the text of those provisions.

Amendment    19

Proposal for a directive

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

They shall apply those provisions from 1 April 2019.

They shall apply those provisions from 30 March 2020.

Amendment    20

Proposal for a directive

Article 5 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Directive 2000/84/EC is repealed with effect from 1 April 2019.

Directive 2000/84/EC is repealed with effect from 30 March 2020.

PROCEDURE – COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Title

Discontinuing seasonal changes of time

References

COM(2018)0639 – C8-0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD)

Committee responsible

       Date announced in plenary

TRAN

13.9.2018

 

 

 

Opinion by

       Date announced in plenary

IMCO

13.9.2018

Rapporteur

       Date appointed

Igor Šoltes

10.10.2018

Discussed in committee

6.12.2018

29.1.2019

 

 

Date adopted

21.2.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

23

9

1

Members present for the final vote

John Stuart Agnew, Lucy Anderson, Pascal Arimont, Carlos Coelho, Lara Comi, Anna Maria Corazza Bildt, Daniel Dalton, Nicola Danti, Pascal Durand, Evelyne Gebhardt, Robert Jarosław Iwaszkiewicz, Liisa Jaakonsaari, Philippe Juvin, Nosheena Mobarik, Jiří Pospíšil, Virginie Rozière, Christel Schaldemose, Andreas Schwab, Olga Sehnalová, Jasenko Selimovic, Igor Šoltes, Róża Gräfin von Thun und Hohenstein, Mylène Troszczynski, Anneleen Van Bossuyt, Marco Zullo

Substitutes present for the final vote

Birgit Collin-Langen, Edward Czesak, Nadja Hirsch, Othmar Karas, Adam Szejnfeld, Marc Tarabella, Matthijs van Miltenburg

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Georg Mayer

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

23

+

ALDE

Nadja Hirsch, Jasenko Selimovic

ECR

Edward Czesak, Anneleen Van Bossuyt

EFDD

Robert Jarosław Iwaszkiewicz

ENF

Georg Mayer, Mylène Troszczynski

PPE

Pascal Arimont, Birgit Collin-Langen, Lara Comi, Philippe Juvin, Othmar Karas, Jiří Pospíšil, Andreas Schwab, Adam Szejnfeld, Róża Gräfin von Thun und Hohenstein

S&D

Lucy Anderson, Evelyne Gebhardt, Liisa Jaakonsaari, Christel Schaldemose, Olga Sehnalová

VERTS/ALE

Pascal Durand, Igor Šoltes

9

-

ALDE

Matthijs van Miltenburg

ECR

Daniel Dalton, Nosheena Mobarik

EFDD

Marco Zullo

ENF

John Stuart Agnew

PPE

Anna Maria Corazza Bildt

S&D

Nicola Danti, Virginie Rozière, Marc Tarabella

1

0

PPE

Carlos Coelho

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention


OPINION of the Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development (20.2.2019)

for the Committee on Transport and Tourism

on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on discontinuing seasonal changes of time

(COM(2018)639 – C8‑0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD))

Rapporteur for opinion: Ulrike Müller

SHORT JUSTIFICATION

In its resolution of 8 February 2018, the European Parliament called the European Commission to conduct an assessment on summer time arrangements and, if necessary, come up with a proposal for its revision.

Subsequently, the European Commission held a public consultation during the 2018 summer. The consultation showed a great support from the citizens to abolish the bi-annual change of clock.

The rapporteur underlines the will of the Parliament to listen to this clear demand from the European citizens. Therefore, the rapporteur supports the Commission proposal that was presented on 12 September 2018 to discontinue seasonal change of time.

Discontinuing seasonal change has several important implications. These implications concern the health of citizens because of the impact on biorhythm, but also the health of animals. The implications are also great regarding EU-harmonisation. The territories of the Member states stretch over three different time zones (GMT 0, +1 and +2) and any unprepared or non-coordinated approach could disturb the workings of single market. The competence to choose a standard time for its territory remains indeed in the hands of the Member states. Consequently, there is a high risk of fragmentation concerning the different time zones, as neighbouring countries could opt to switch to different time.

The rapporteur has also taken into account that the Austrian presidency did not make it a priority and that the Transports ministers remain divided on the issue when it was discussed during their meeting in October and June 2018 and December 2017.

Considering these limitations to the discontinuation of the summertime directive, the rapporteur proposes the following approach:

Coordination is crucial to ensure the functioning of the single market, for having a different time has implications on numerous of economic sectors and on the movements of citizens. This is especially true since the previous directive on time change was adopted when there were still only 15 member states. For these reasons, the rapporteur considers that an entry into force on 1 April 2019 is too early and needs to be postponed to 2020 in order to allow member states to prepare for the change, but also to coordinate.

Notwithstanding the Member states competence to set, the rapporteur proposes to return to the wintertime as the standard time. As a year round summertime would technically represent a change of time zone, all countries opting for wintertime as standard time would ease the process of discontinuing time change and prevent the fragmentation between member states.

Similarly, another way to ease the process is the coordination of Member states by groups of neighbouring countries and especially in line with the time zones (GMT 0, +1 and +2) to preserve the current state of play.

AMENDMENTS

The Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development calls on the Committee on Transport and Tourism, as the committee responsible, to take into account the following amendments:

Amendment    1

Proposal for a directive

Recital 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(2)  In its resolution of 8 February 2018, the European Parliament called on the Commission to conduct an assessment of the summer-time arrangements provided by Directive 2000/84/EC and, if necessary, to come up with a proposal for its revision. That resolution also confirmed that it is essential to maintain a harmonised approach to time arrangements throughout the Union.

(2)  In its resolution of 8 February 2018, the European Parliament called on the Commission to conduct an assessment of the summer-time arrangements provided by Directive 2000/84/EC together with the Member States and, if necessary, to come up with a proposal for its revision. That resolution also confirmed that it is essential to maintain a harmonised approach to time arrangements throughout the Union.

Amendment    2

Proposal for a directive

Recital 3

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(3)  The Commission has examined available evidence, which points to the importance of having harmonised Union rules in this area to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market and avoid, inter alia, disruptions to the scheduling of transport operations and the functioning of information and communication systems, higher costs to cross-border trade, or lower productivity for goods and services. Evidence is not conclusive as to whether the benefits of summer-time arrangements outweigh the inconveniences linked to a biannual change of time.

(3)  The Commission has examined available evidence, which points to the importance of having harmonised Union rules in this area to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market, create legal certainty and long-term dependability and avoid, inter alia, disruptions to the scheduling and performance of passenger and goods transport operations and the functioning of information and communication systems, higher costs to cross-border trade, or lower productivity for goods and services and effects on agricultural productivity. Evidence shows that the benefits of summer-time arrangements do not outweigh the inconveniences linked to a biannual change of time.

Amendment    3

Proposal for a directive

Recital 3 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(3 a)  In this context the situation of livestock farmers can serve as an example where the summer-time arrangements had been initially deemed incompatible with agricultural working practices, notably regarding the already very early start of the working day under standard time. Also, the bi-annual transition to summer-time was thought to make it harder to get the produce or animals out to the markets. And finally, due to cows following their natural milking rhythm, a reduction of milk yields was assumed. However, modern agricultural equipment and practices have revolutionised farming in a way that makes most of these concerns no longer appear relevant while concerns regarding the biorhythm of animals as well as farmers' working conditions still prevail.

Amendment    4

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(4)  A lively public debate is taking place on summer-time arrangements and some Member States have already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such arrangements. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to continue safeguarding the proper functioning of the internal market and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area. Therefore, it is appropriate to put an end in a coordinated way to summer-time arrangements.

(4)  A lively public debate is taking place on summer-time arrangements thanks to the active participation of national action groups in many Member States, and some Member States have already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such arrangements. During the discussions held, specialists from various fields, including human and veterinary medicine, agriculture, education and tourism, assessed the adverse effects of the yearly changing of the clocks. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to continue safeguarding the proper functioning of the internal market and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area. Therefore, it is appropriate to put an end in a coordinated way to summer-time arrangements.

Amendment    5

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4 a)  A number of citizens' initiatives have highlighted citizens' concerns about the biannual clock change and Member States should be given the time and opportunity to carry out their own public consultations and impact assessments in order to better understand the implications of discontinuing season time changes in all regions.

Amendment    6

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 b (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4 b)  In order to ensure a harmonised implementation of this Directive, Member States shall consult each other and coordinate any time zone changes in order to avoid impractical time zones and burdensome disruptions to the internal market.

Amendment    7

Proposal for a directive

Recital 5

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(5)  This Directive should not prejudice the right of each Member State to decide on the standard time or times for the territories under its jurisdiction and falling under the territorial scope of the Treaties, and on further changes thereto. However, in order to ensure that the application of summer-time arrangements by some Member States only does not disrupt the functioning of the internal market, Member States should refrain from changing the standard time in any given territory under their jurisdiction for reasons related to seasonal changes, be such change presented as a change of time zone. Moreover, in order to minimise disruptions, inter alia, to transport, communications and other concerned sectors, they should notify the Commission in due time of their intention to change their standard time and subsequently apply the notified changes. The Commission should, on the basis of that notification, inform all other Member States so that they can take all necessary measures. It should also inform the general public and stakeholders by publishing this information.

(5)  This Directive should not prejudice the right of each Member State to decide on the standard time or times for the territories under its jurisdiction and falling under the territorial scope of the Treaties, and on further changes thereto. However, in order to ensure that the application of summer-time arrangements by some Member States only does not disrupt the functioning of the internal market, Member States should refrain from changing the standard time in any given territory under their jurisdiction for reasons related to seasonal changes, be such change presented as a change of time zone. Moreover, in order to minimise disruptions, inter alia, to transport, communications, the agricultural sector and other concerned sectors, they should notify the Commission in due time of their intention to change their standard time and subsequently apply the notified changes. The Commission should, on the basis of that notification, inform all other Member States so that they can take all necessary measures. It should also inform the general public and stakeholders by publishing this information.

Amendment    8

Proposal for a directive

Recital 7

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(7)  This Directive should apply from 1 April 2019, so that the last summer-time period subject to the rules of Directive 2000/84/EC should start, in every Member State, at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 31 March 2019. Member States that, after that summer-time period, intend to adopt a standard time corresponding to the time applied during the winter season in accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC should change their standard time at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 27 October 2019, so that similar and lasting changes occurring in different Member States take place simultaneously. It is desirable that Member States take the decisions on the standard time that each of them will apply as from 2019 in a concerted manner.

(7)  This Directive should apply from 1 April 2020, so that the last summer-time period subject to the rules of Directive 2000/84/EC should start, in every Member State, at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 29 March 2020. Member States that, after that summer-time period, intend to adopt a standard time corresponding to the time applied during the winter season in accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC should change their standard time at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 31 October2020, so that similar and lasting changes occurring in different Member States take place simultaneously in a well-coordinated manner. It is desirable that Member States take the decisions on the standard time that each of them will apply as from 2020 in a concerted manner.

Amendment    9

Proposal for a directive

Article 1 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1.  Member States shall not apply seasonal changes to their standard time or times.

1.  Member States shall not apply seasonal changes to their standard time or times. They shall jointly choose either permanent standard time or permanent summer time to apply across the Union.

Justification

The aim is to avoid a patchwork of times between EU countries. A common choice at EU level would be good for the single market and citizens’ everyday lives.

Amendment    10

Proposal for a directive

Article 1 – paragraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2.  Notwithstanding paragraph 1, Member States may still apply a seasonal change of their standard time or times in 2019, provided that they do so at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 27 October 2019. The Member States shall notify this decision in accordance with Article 2.

2.  Notwithstanding paragraph 1, Member States may still apply a seasonal change of their standard time or times in 2020, provided that they do so at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 31 October 2020. The Member States shall notify this decision in accordance with Article 2.

Amendment    11

Proposal for a directive

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States shall adopt and publish, by 1 April 2019 at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive. They shall forthwith communicate to the Commission the text of those provisions.

Member States shall adopt and publish, by 1 April 2020 at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive. They shall forthwith communicate to the Commission the text of those provisions.

Amendment    12

Proposal for a directive

Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

They shall apply those provisions from 1 April 2019.

They shall apply those provisions from 1 April 2020.

Amendment    13

Proposal for a directive

Article 5 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Directive 2000/84/EC is repealed with effect from 1 April 2019.

Directive 2000/84/EC is repealed with effect from 1 April 2020.

PROCEDURE – COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Title

Discontinuing seasonal changes of time

References

COM(2018)0639 – C8-0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD)

Committee responsible

       Date announced in plenary

TRAN

13.9.2018

 

 

 

Opinion by

       Date announced in plenary

AGRI

13.9.2018

Rapporteur

       Date appointed

Ulrike Müller

9.10.2018

Date adopted

19.2.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

25

9

3

Members present for the final vote

Clara Eugenia Aguilera García, Eric Andrieu, José Bové, Daniel Buda, Matt Carthy, Jacques Colombier, Michel Dantin, Albert Deß, Jørn Dohrmann, Herbert Dorfmann, Norbert Erdős, Luke Ming Flanagan, Karine Gloanec Maurin, Beata Gosiewska, Martin Häusling, Esther Herranz García, Jan Huitema, Ivan Jakovčić, Norbert Lins, Philippe Loiseau, Mairead McGuinness, James Nicholson, Maria Noichl, Marijana Petir, Laurenţiu Rebega, Jens Rohde, Bronis Ropė, Maria Lidia Senra Rodríguez, Ricardo Serrão Santos, Czesław Adam Siekierski, Tibor Szanyi, Maria Gabriela Zoană, Marco Zullo

Substitutes present for the final vote

Franc Bogovič, Angélique Delahaye, Karin Kadenbach, Elsi Katainen, Thomas Waitz

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

25

+

ALDE

Ivan Jakovčić, Elsi Katainen

ECR

Jørn Dohrmann

ENF

Jacques Colombier, Philippe Loiseau

GUE/NGL

Maria Lidia Senra Rodríguez

PPE

Franc Bogovič, Daniel Buda, Angélique Delahaye, Albert Deß, Herbert Dorfmann, Norbert Erdős, Esther Herranz García, Norbert Lins, Marijana Petir, Czesław Adam Siekierski

S&D

Eric Andrieu, Karine Gloanec Maurin, Karin Kadenbach, Maria Noichl, Tibor Szanyi, Maria Gabriela Zoană

VERTS/ALE

José Bové, Martin Häusling, Bronis Ropė

9

-

ALDE

Jan Huitema, Jens Rohde

ECR

James Nicholson

EFDD

Marco Zullo

GUE/NGL

Matt Carthy, Luke Ming Flanagan

PPE

Michel Dantin

S&D

Clara Eugenia Aguilera García, Ricardo Serrão Santos

3

0

ECR

Beata Gosiewska, Laurenţiu Rebega

PPE

Mairead McGuinness

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention


OPINION of the Committee on Legal Affairs (21.2.2019)

for the Committee on Transport and Tourism

on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council discontinuing seasonal changes of time and repealing Directive 2000/84/EC

(COM(2018)0639 – C8‑0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD))

Rapporteur for opinion: Pavel Svoboda

SHORT JUSTIFICATION

Your rapporteur welcomes the Commission’s proposal to put an end to seasonal time changes in a harmonised manner in all Member States, thereby taking Parliament up on its numerous calls for such measures over the last several years.

The practice of bi-annual clock changes, which has been prescribed by Union legislation for close to 40 years, has recently been met with much opposition by citizens and civil society.

It is important to underline that such seasonal changes of time affect not only the functioning of the internal market but also raise multiple public health concerns, not least related to the protection of specific minority groups which are disproportionately affected by the disruption of the circadian cycle. Studies have furthermore shown that the number of accidents and heart attacks increase during the days following a clock change.

While it is clear that action is needed at Union level in order to harmonise the end of seasonal time changes, rules in the form of a directly applicable Regulation which would prescribe the use of either standard time or summer time in all Member States would be needlessly over-reaching and would not take into account different needs and conditions in different parts of the EU. The Member States should therefore be free to make their own choice. They should however be given more time before the Directive starts to apply in order to prepare for the change, which should be implemented in a concerted and coordinated manner.

Your rapporteur regrets that the Commission did not conduct any proper impact assessment and did not hold a full 12 weeks long public and stakeholder consultation before it presented the proposal to update Directive 2000/84/EC. It must be underlined that in the Interinstitutional Agreement on Better Law-Making, the institutions have committed to the understanding that impact assessments and consultations constitute essential tools for improving the quality of Union legislation.

This rapporteur nevertheless fully agrees with the rapporteur in the lead committee that this directive should be adopted as soon as possible, and preferably before the end of the current legislature in order to ensure legal certainty and to allow Member States to well prepare for the upcoming changes.

AMENDMENTS

The Committee on Legal Affairs calls on the Committee on Transport and Tourism, as the committee responsible, to take into account the following amendments:

Amendment    1

Proposal for a directive

Citation 4 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

Having regard to the results of the online consultation conducted by the European Commission between 4 July 2018 - 16 August 2018

Amendment    2

Proposal for a directive

Recital 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(2)  In its resolution of 8 February 2018, the European Parliament called on the Commission to conduct an assessment of the summer-time arrangements provided by Directive 2000/84/EC and, if necessary, to come up with a proposal for its revision. That resolution also confirmed that it is essential to maintain a harmonised approach to time arrangements throughout the Union.

(2)  Against the background of several petitions and numerous initiatives from citizens, parliamentary questions and a public hearing on the matter, the European Parliament, in its resolution of 8 February 2018, called on the Commission to conduct an assessment of the summer-time arrangements provided by Directive 2000/84/EC and, if necessary, to come up with a proposal for its revision. That resolution also confirmed that it is essential to maintain a harmonised approach to time arrangements throughout the Union.

Amendment    3

Proposal for a directive

Recital 3

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(3)  The Commission has examined available evidence, which points to the importance of having harmonised Union rules in this area to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market and avoid, inter alia, disruptions to the scheduling of transport operations and the functioning of information and communication systems, higher costs to cross-border trade, or lower productivity for goods and services. Evidence is not conclusive as to whether the benefits of summer-time arrangements outweigh the inconveniences linked to a biannual change of time.

(3)  Harmonised Union rules must ensure the proper functioning of the internal market with a long term focus and predictability, and avoid, inter alia, disruptions to the scheduling of transport operations and the functioning of information and communication systems, higher costs to cross-border trade, or lower productivity for goods and services, which are issues with a significant impact both on the proper functioning of the internal market, business activity and the lives of citizens. Evidence is not conclusive that there are no significant benefits from the biannual change of time, although numerous scientific studies, including the European Parliamentary Research Service study of October 2017 on EU summer-time arrangements under Directive 2000/84/EC, indicate the existence of negative effects on human health, in particular for certain groups such as children and the elderly, and suggest a link with cardiovascular diseases through the internal chronodisruption. From an economic perspective, bi-annual change implies additional costs and administrative burdens for many sectors.

Amendment    4

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(4)  A lively public debate is taking place on summer-time arrangements and some Member States have already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such arrangements. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to continue safeguarding the proper functioning of the internal market and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area. Therefore, it is appropriate to put an end in a coordinated way to summer-time arrangements.

(4)  A public consultation on summer-time arrangements held by the Commission in July-August 2018 received 4.6 million responses, which is the largest number ever received in any Commission consultation, and indicated that it is the citizens preference to stop bi-annual clock changes. Also, some Member States have already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such arrangements. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to continue safeguarding the proper functioning of the internal market and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area. Therefore, it is appropriate to put an end in a coordinated way to summer-time arrangements.

Amendment    5

Proposal for a directive

Recital 5

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(5)  This Directive should not prejudice the right of each Member State to decide on the standard time or times for the territories under its jurisdiction and falling under the territorial scope of the Treaties, and on further changes thereto. However, in order to ensure that the application of summer-time arrangements by some Member States only does not disrupt the functioning of the internal market, Member States should refrain from changing the standard time in any given territory under their jurisdiction for reasons related to seasonal changes, be such change presented as a change of time zone. Moreover, in order to minimise disruptions, inter alia, to transport, communications and other concerned sectors, they should notify the Commission in due time of their intention to change their standard time and subsequently apply the notified changes. The Commission should, on the basis of that notification, inform all other Member States so that they can take all necessary measures. It should also inform the general public and stakeholders by publishing this information.

(5)  This Directive should not prejudice the right of each Member State, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity, to decide on the standard time or times for the territories under its jurisdiction and falling under the territorial scope of the Treaties, and on further changes thereto. In in order to minimise disruptions to the functioning of the internal market relating to, inter alia, to transport, communications and other concerned sectors, and to allow for coordination, they should notify the Commission by 1 April 2020 of their intention to change their standard time. The Commission should, on the basis of that notification, inform all other Member States, the general public and stakeholders by publishing this information in an appropriate and timely manner. It should also assess the impact on the functioning of the internal market of the envisaged changes of standard time and conduct an expert analysis on the subject, taking into account nature, health and social aspects as well as geographical differences among Member States.

Amendment    6

Proposal for a directive

Recital 5 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(5a)  For the purpose of ensuring a harmonised implementation of this directive, Member States should coordinate in advance their decision on the envisaged standard times. The Commission should therefore establish a coordination mechanism with the aim to ensure a harmonised and coordinated approach to time arrangements throughout the Union. The coordination mechanism should consist of one designated representative of each Member State and one representative of the Commission.

Amendment    7

Proposal for a directive

Recital 6

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(6)  Therefore, it is necessary to put an end to the harmonisation of the period covered by summer-time arrangements as laid down in Directive 2000/84/EC and to introduce common rules preventing Member States from applying different seasonal time arrangements by changing their standard time more than once during the year and establishing the obligation to notify envisaged changes of the standard time. This Directive aims at contributing in a determined manner to the smooth functioning of the internal market and should, consequently, be based on Article 114 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, as interpreted in accordance with the consistent case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Union.

(6)  Therefore, it is necessary to put an end to the harmonisation of the period covered by summer-time arrangements as laid down in Directive 2000/84/EC and to introduce common rules preventing Member States from applying different seasonal time arrangements. This Directive aims at contributing in a determined manner to the smooth functioning of the internal market and should, consequently, be based on Article 114 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, as interpreted in accordance with the consistent case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Union.

Amendment    8

Proposal for a directive

Recital 6 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(6a)  A time change unrelated to seasonal shifts will lead to transition costs, especially with regard to IT systems in transport and other sectors. In order to reduce significantly the costs of transition, a reasonable preparation period is needed for implementation of this Directive.

Amendment    9

Proposal for a directive

Recital 7

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(7)  This Directive should apply from 1 April 2019, so that the last summer-time period subject to the rules of Directive 2000/84/EC should start, in every Member State, at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 31 March 2019. Member States that, after that summer-time period, intend to adopt a standard time corresponding to the time applied during the winter season in accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC should change their standard time at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 27 October 2019, so that similar and lasting changes occurring in different Member States take place simultaneously. It is desirable that Member States take the decisions on the standard time that each of them will apply as from 2019 in a concerted manner.

(7)  In order to ensure a concerted and coordinated harmonisation of standard time in accordance with the aim of this Directive, the power to adopt acts in accordance with Article 290 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union should be delegated to the Commission in respect of postponing the date of application of this Directive in when time arrangements would have the potential to seriously disrupt the proper functioning of the internal market. It is of particular importance that the Commission carry out appropriate consultations during its preparatory work, including at expert level, and that those consultations be conducted in accordance with the principles laid down in the Interinstitutional Agreement on Better Law-Making of 13 April 2016. In particular, to ensure equal participation in the preparation of delegated acts, the European Parliament and the Council receive all documents at the same time as Member States' experts, and their experts systematically have access to meetings of Commission expert groups dealing with the preparation of delegated acts.

 

 

Amendment    10

Proposal for a directive

Recital 7 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(7a)  Member States should coordinate among themselves the standard times for which they opt, which should be as fully harmonised between Member States as possible in order to avoid excessively different time zones in the EU, so as to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market and make it predictable for the citizens, consumers and sectors concerned.

Amendment    11

Proposal for a directive

Recital 8

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(8)  Implementation of this Directive should be monitored. The results of this monitoring should be presented by the Commission in a report to the European Parliament and to the Council. That report should be based on the information that is made available to the Commission by the Member States in a timely fashion to allow for the report to be presented at the specified time.

(8)  Implementation of this Directive should be monitored. The results of this monitoring should be presented by the Commission in a sufficiently substantiated report to the European Parliament and to the Council. That report should be based on the information that is made available to the Commission by the Member States in a timely fashion to allow for the report to be presented at the specified time.

Amendment    12

Proposal for a directive

Article 1 – paragraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2.  Notwithstanding paragraph 1, Member States may still apply a seasonal change of their standard time or times in 2019, provided that they do so at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 27 October 2019. The Member States shall notify this decision in accordance with Article 2.

2.  Notwithstanding paragraph 1, Member States may still apply a seasonal change of their standard time. The Member States shall notify this decision in accordance with Article 2.

Amendment    13

Proposal for a directive

Article 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1.  Without prejudice to Article 1, if a Member State decides to change its standard time or times in any territory under its jurisdiction, it shall notify the Commission at least 6 months before the change takes effect. Where a Member State has made such a notification and has not withdrawn it at least 6 months before the date of the envisaged change, the Member State shall apply this change.

1.  The Commission shall establish a coordination mechanism with the aim to ensure a harmonised and coordinated approach to time arrangements throughout the Union. The coordination mechanism shall consist of one representative for each Member State and one representative of the Commission.

2.  Within 1 month of the notification, the Commission shall inform the other Member States thereof and publish that information in the Official Journal of the European Union.

2.  Member States shall notify to the Commission of their intentions according to Article 1 by 1 April 2020. Without delay, the coordination mechanism shall discuss and assess the potential impact of the envisaged change on the functioning of the internal market, in order to avoid significant disruptions.

 

3.  Where on the basis of the assessment referred to in paragraph 2, the Commission considers that an envisaged change will significantly disrupt the functioning of the internal market, it shall inform the Member State in question.

 

4.  By 31 October 2020 at the latest, the Member States shall decide whether to maintain its intention or not. It shall provide a detailed explanation how it will address the negative impact of the change on the functioning of the internal market.

Amendment    14

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

Article 2a

 

1.  The Commission, in close cooperation with the coordination mechanism referred to in Article 2, shall closely monitor the foreseen time arrangements throughout the Union.

 

2.  The Commission is empowered to adopt delegated acts in accordance with Article 2b in order to postpone the date of application of this Directive, by no more than 12 months, where it determines that the foreseen time arrangements, as notified by the Member States, have the potential to seriously disrupt the functioning of the internal market.

 

3.  Where imperative grounds of urgency so require, the procedure provided for in Article 2c shall apply to delegated acts adopted pursuant to this Article.

Amendment    15

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 b (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

Article 2b

 

1.  The power to adopt delegated acts is conferred on the Commission subject to the conditions laid down in this Article.

 

2.  The power to adopt delegated acts referred to in Article 2a shall be conferred on the Commission for a period of [TBD] years from the [date of entry into force of the Directive].

 

3.  The delegation of power referred to in Article 2a may be revoked at any time by the European Parliament or by the Council. A decision to revoke shall put an end to the delegation of the power specified in that decision. It shall take effect the day following the publication of the decision in the Official Journal of the European Union or at a later date specified therein. It shall not affect the validity of any delegated acts already in force.

 

4.  Before adopting a delegated act, the Commission shall consult experts designated by each Member State in accordance with the principles laid down in the Interinstitutional Agreement on Better Law-Making of 13 April 2016.

 

5.  As soon as it adopts a delegated act, the Commission shall notify it simultaneously to the European Parliament and to the Council.

 

6.  A delegated act adopted pursuant to Article 2a shall enter into force only if no objection has been expressed either by the European Parliament or by the Council within a period of [TBD] months of notification of that act to the European Parliament and the Council or if, before the expiry of that period, the European Parliament and the Council have both informed the Commission that they will not object. That period shall be extended by [TBD] months at the initiative of the European Parliament or of the Council.

Amendment    16

Proposal for a directive

Article 2 c (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

Article 2c

 

1.  Delegated acts adopted under this Article shall enter into force without delay and shall apply as long as no objection is expressed in accordance with paragraph 2. The notification of a delegated act to the European Parliament and to the Council shall state the reasons for the use of the urgency procedure. 

 

2.  Either the European Parliament or the Council may object to a delegated act in accordance with the procedure referred to in Article 2b. In such a case, the Commission shall repeal the act immediately following the notification of the decision to object by the European Parliament or by the Council.

Amendment    17

Proposal for a directive

Article 3 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1.  The Commission shall report to the European Parliament and to the Council on the implementation of this Directive by 31 December 2024 at the latest.

1.  The Commission shall report to the European Parliament and to the Council on the implementation of this Directive by 31 December 2025 at the latest. In this implementation report, a special emphasis shall be put on the effects on human health. 

Amendment    18

Proposal for a directive

Article 3 – paragraph 1 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

1a.  The Commission shall conduct a comprehensive impact assessment and a cost / benefit analysis regarding the discontinuing seasonal changes of time in the EU.

Amendment    19

Proposal for a directive

Article 3 – paragraph 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

2.  Member States shall provide the Commission with the relevant information by 30 April 2024 at the latest.

2.  Member States shall provide the Commission with the relevant information by 30 April five years after the adoption of this Directive at the latest.

Amendment    20

Proposal for a directive

Article 4 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Member States shall adopt and publish, by 1 April 2019 at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive. They shall forthwith communicate to the Commission the text of those provisions.

Member States shall adopt and publish, by 2020 at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive. They shall forthwith communicate to the Commission the text of those provisions.

Amendment    21

Proposal for a directive

Article 5 – paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Directive 2000/84/EC is repealed with effect from 1 April 2019.

Directive 2000/84/EC is repealed with effect from 2020.

PROCEDURE – COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Title

Discontinuing seasonal changes of time

References

COM(2018)0639 – C8-0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD)

Committee responsible

       Date announced in plenary

TRAN

13.9.2018

 

 

 

Opinion by

       Date announced in plenary

JURI

13.9.2018

Rapporteur

       Date appointed

Pavel Svoboda

24.9.2018

Discussed in committee

23.1.2019

 

 

 

Date adopted

19.2.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

21

1

0

Members present for the final vote

Max Andersson, Joëlle Bergeron, Jean-Marie Cavada, Kostas Chrysogonos, Mady Delvaux, Rosa Estaràs Ferragut, Enrico Gasbarra, Sajjad Karim, Sylvia-Yvonne Kaufmann, Gilles Lebreton, António Marinho e Pinto, Emil Radev, Evelyn Regner, Pavel Svoboda, Axel Voss, Francis Zammit Dimech, Tadeusz Zwiefka

Substitutes present for the final vote

Pascal Durand, Angelika Niebler, Tiemo Wölken, Kosma Złotowski

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Ingeborg Gräßle, Joëlle Mélin

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

21

+

ALDE

Jean-Marie Cavada, António Marinho e Pinto

ECR

Sajjad Karim, Kosma Złotowski

EFDD

Joëlle Bergeron

ENF

Gilles Lebreton, Joëlle Mélin

PPE

Rosa Estaràs Ferragut, Ingeborg Gräßle, Emil Radev, Pavel Svoboda, Axel Voss, Francis Zammit Dimech, Tadeusz Zwiefka

S&D

Mady Delvaux, Enrico Gasbarra, Sylvia-Yvonne Kaufmann, Evelyn Regner, Tiemo Wölken

VERTS/ALE

Max Andersson, Pascal Durand

1

-

GUE/NGL

Kostas Chrysogonos

0

0

 

 

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention


OPINION of the Committee on Petitions (20.2.2019)

for the Committee on Transport and Tourism

on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on discontinuing seasonal changes of time and repealing Directive 2000/84/EC

(COM(2018)0639 – C8‑0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD))

Rapporteur for opinion: Cecilia Wikström

SHORT JUSTIFICATION

The proposal aims at ending seasonal changes of time amongst EU Member States. EU legislation on summertime arrangements was first introduced in 1980 with the objective of unifying existing national summertime practices and schedules. Since 2001, EU summertime arrangements have been governed by Directive 2000/84/EC setting out the obligation on all Member States to switch to summertime on the last Sunday of March and to switch back to their standard time ("winter-time") on the last Sunday of October.

The system of bi-annual clock changes has been increasingly questioned, by citizens, by the European Parliament, and by a growing number of Member States.

In its resolution of 8 February 2018(1), the European Parliament asked the Commission to carry out an assessment of summertime arrangements as provided for in Directive 2000/84/EC and, where appropriate, to submit a proposal for revision. The European Commission has also carried out a public consultation, which generated around 4.6 million replies, the largest amount of responses ever received in any Commission consultation, of which 84% were in favour of discontinuing the bi-annual clock changes, while 16% wanted to keep them.

Furthermore, summertime arrangements are a recurring topic in the work of the Committee on Petitions (PETI), which has received more than 100 subject-related petitions over the years. Almost all petitioners advocate the abolition of bi-annual clock changes, arguing primarily on the basis of health concerns and its margin effects on energy savings. Some petitioners maintain that the clock change has a particularly negative impact on vulnerable groups, such as children and the elderly. PETI has discussed daylight saving time (DST) related petitions in its committee meetings, in July 2015 and November 2017.

As stated in the European Parliamentary Research Service study of October 2017 on EU summertime arrangements under Directive 2000/84/EC, the existence of negative effects on human health caused by these changes should be taken into consideration to put an end to EU bi-annual clock changes. As a clear example of the importance of the discussion of the effect of DST on the body clock, the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm, explaining the human internal, biological clock and how our wellbeing is affected by a mismatch between our external environment and internal biological clock. That is to say, chronobiological research findings suggest that the effect on human biorhythm may be more severe than previously thought. Moreover, on the basis of paragraph 8 of article 114 TFEU, on the approximation of laws, “When a Member State raises a specific problem on public health in a field which has been the subject of prior harmonisation measures, it shall bring it to the attention of the Commission which shall immediately examine whether to propose appropriate measures to the Council”.

Against this background, the draft opinion seeks to support the idea that the arrangements for bi-annual clock changes should be terminated in a coordinated manner in order to avoid any potentially adverse health effects and taking into account that the alleged energy savings are not achieved.

The draft opinion suggests that a removal of the bi-annual clock change should be done in a way to avoid any major disruption to the internal market caused by the divergences between Member States in this area. The rapporteur argues that the original Commission proposal, which gives the Member States the opportunity to decide unilaterally on their preferences of standard time, could create a situation where a patchwork of time zones appears between the Member States, making the internal market more divergent. It would make cross-border trade, transport, communication and travel more complicated within the internal market. To ensure harmonisation, the rapporteur therefore proposes the abolition of bi-annual clock changes, as almost all petitioners have advocated.

AMENDMENTS

The Committee on Petitions calls on the Committee on Transport and Tourism, as the committee responsible, to take into account the following amendments:

Amendment    1

Proposal for a directive

Recital 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(2)  In its resolution of 8 February 2018, the European Parliament called on the Commission to conduct an assessment of the summer-time arrangements provided by Directive 2000/84/EC and, if necessary, to come up with a proposal for its revision. That resolution also confirmed that it is essential to maintain a harmonised approach to time arrangements throughout the Union.

(2)  In its resolution of 8 February 2018, building on petitions and demands received from the citizens, by the Committee on Petitions, the European Parliament called on the Commission to conduct an assessment of the summer-time arrangements provided by Directive 2000/84/EC and, if necessary, to come up with a proposal for its revision. That resolution also confirmed that it is essential to maintain a harmonised and co-ordinated approach to time arrangements throughout the Union.

Amendment    2

Proposal for a directive

Recital 3

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(3)  The Commission has examined available evidence, which points to the importance of having harmonised Union rules in this area to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market and avoid, inter alia, disruptions to the scheduling of transport operations and the functioning of information and communication systems, higher costs to cross-border trade, or lower productivity for goods and services. Evidence is not conclusive as to whether the benefits of summer-time arrangements outweigh the inconveniences linked to a biannual change of time.

(3)  The Commission has examined available evidence, which points to the importance of having harmonised Union rules in this area to ensure the proper functioning of the internal market and avoid, inter alia, disruptions to the scheduling of transport operations and the functioning of information and communication systems, higher costs to cross-border trade, or lower productivity for goods and services.

Amendment    3

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(4)  A lively public debate is taking place on summer-time arrangements and some Member States have already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such arrangements. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to continue safeguarding the proper functioning of the internal market and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area. Therefore, it is appropriate to put an end in a coordinated way to summer-time arrangements.

(4)  A lively public debate is taking place on summer-time arrangements, as seen by the citizens' response through the petitions lodged calling for an end to the bi-annual change in time, and the public consultation on EU summertime arrangements, which generated the largest amount of responses ever received in any Commission consultation. Some Member States have already expressed their preference to discontinue the application of such arrangements. In the light of these developments, it is necessary to continue safeguarding the proper functioning of the internal market and to avoid any significant disruptions thereto caused by divergences between Member States in this area, which could impact both the economic and political integration of the Union. Many citizens have advocated putting an end to seasonal clock changes, primarily based on health concerns. In the petitions received by the European Parliament, citizens maintain that the clock change has a particularly negative impact on vulnerable groups, such as children and the elderly. Furthermore, several studies have shown, that negative consequences exist related to the bi-annual change of time in various areas, such as health issues with effects on the circadian rhythm ; road safety whereas an increase in the accident rate in the days following the change in time has been observed; and, administrative burdens and additional costs for many sectors within the economy. Therefore, it is crucial to have a harmonized approach that is well-coordinated to put an end to the bi-annual changes of time.

Amendment    4

Proposal for a directive

Recital 4 a (new)

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

 

(4 a)  It is crucial to take into consideration the large north-south extension of the European Union meaning that daylight effects of time vary across the European Union. As such we must consider the geographical aspects of time, while retaining the existing time zones.

Amendment    5

Proposal for a directive

Recital 5

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(5)  This Directive should not prejudice the right of each Member State to decide on the standard time or times for the territories under its jurisdiction and falling under the territorial scope of the Treaties, and on further changes thereto. However, in order to ensure that the application of summer-time arrangements by some Member States only does not disrupt the functioning of the internal market, Member States should refrain from changing the standard time in any given territory under their jurisdiction for reasons related to seasonal changes, be such change presented as a change of time zone. Moreover, in order to minimise disruptions, inter alia, to transport, communications and other concerned sectors, they should notify the Commission in due time of their intention to change their standard time and subsequently apply the notified changes. The Commission should, on the basis of that notification, inform all other Member States so that they can take all necessary measures. It should also inform the general public and stakeholders by publishing this information.

deleted

Amendment    6

Proposal for a directive

Recital 6

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(6)  Therefore, it is necessary to put an end to the harmonisation of the period covered by summer-time arrangements as laid down in Directive 2000/84/EC and to introduce common rules preventing Member States from applying different seasonal time arrangements by changing their standard time more than once during the year and establishing the obligation to notify envisaged changes of the standard time. This Directive aims at contributing in a determined manner to the smooth functioning of the internal market and should, consequently, be based on Article 114 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, as interpreted in accordance with the consistent case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Union.

(6)  Therefore, it is necessary to put an end to the harmonisation of the period covered by summer-time arrangements as laid down in Directive 2000/84/EC and to introduce common rules preventing Member States from applying different seasonal time arrangements by changing their standard time more than once during the year and establishing the obligation to notify envisaged changes of the standard time. For the smooth functioning of the internal market, it is essential that while the existing time zones are retained, all Member States should apply the same time arrangement, in order to avoid a patchwork of time arrangements within the internal market. This Directive aims at contributing in a determined manner to the smooth functioning of the internal market and should, consequently, be based on Article 114 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, as interpreted in accordance with the consistent case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Union.

 

Amendment    7

Proposal for a directive

Recital 7

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

(7)  This Directive should apply from 1 April 2019, so that the last summer-time period subject to the rules of Directive 2000/84/EC should start, in every Member State, at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 31 March 2019. Member States that, after that summer-time period, intend to adopt a standard time corresponding to the time applied during the winter season in accordance with Directive 2000/84/EC should change their standard time at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 27 October 2019, so that similar and lasting changes occurring in different Member States take place simultaneously. It is desirable that Member States take the decisions on the standard time that each of them will apply as from 2019 in a concerted manner.

(7)  This Directive should enter into force and be applied on the eighteenth month following that of its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union, giving sufficient time for the society and economical actors to adapt to the new situation. For the smooth functioning of the internal market, it is crucial to avoid a patchwork of time arrangements within the internal market. The Member States should therefore agree on a harmonised time arrangement of standard times in the EU.

Amendment    8

Proposal for a directive

Article 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1. Member States shall not apply seasonal changes to their standard time or times.

 

2. Notwithstanding paragraph 1, Member States may still apply a seasonal change of their standard time or times in 2019, provided that they do so at 1.00 a.m., Coordinated Universal Time, on 27 October 2019. The Member States shall notify this decision in accordance with Article 2.

1. From [xx] Member States shall not apply any bi-annual change to time.

 

2. Deleted

Amendment    9

Proposal for a directive

Article 2

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1. Without prejudice to Article 1, if a Member State decides to change its standard time or times in any territory under its jurisdiction, it shall notify the Commission at least 6 months before the change takes effect. Where a Member State has made such a notification and has not withdrawn it at least 6 months before the date of the envisaged change, the Member State shall apply this change.

 

2. Within 1 month of the notification, the Commission shall inform the other Member States thereof and publish that information in the Official Journal of the European Union.

1. In accordance with Article 1, Member States shall apply a harmonised and coordinated time arrangement to the standard times of the Union.

 

2. Deleted

Amendment    10

Proposal for a directive

Article 4 paragraph 1

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

1. Member States shall adopt and publish, by 1 April 2019 at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive. They shall forthwith communicate to the Commission the text of those provisions.

They shall apply those provisions from 1 April 2019.

When Member States adopt those provisions, they shall contain a reference to this Directive or be accompanied by such a reference on the occasion of their official publication. Member States shall determine how such reference is to be made.

1. Member States shall adopt and publish, by [date of application of the Directive] at the latest, the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive. They shall forthwith communicate to the Commission the text of those provisions.

They shall apply those provisions according to Article 1 of this Directive.

When Member States adopt those provisions, they shall contain a reference to this Directive or be accompanied by such a reference on the occasion of their official publication. Member States shall determine how such reference is to be made.

Amendment    11

Proposal for a directive

Article 5

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

Directive 2000/84/EC is repealed with effect from 1 April 2019.

Directive 2000/84/EC is repealed with effect from the entering into force of the Directive on discontinuing seasonal changes of time.

Amendment    12

Proposal for a directive

Article 6

Text proposed by the Commission

Amendment

This Directive shall enter into force on the twentieth day following that of its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union.

This Directive shall enter into force and be applied on the eighteenth month following that of its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union.

PROCEDURE – COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Title

Discontinuing seasonal changes of time

References

COM(2018)0639 – C8-0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD)

Committee responsible

       Date announced in plenary

TRAN

13.9.2018

 

 

 

Opinion by

       Date announced in plenary

PETI

25.10.2018

Rapporteur

       Date appointed

Cecilia Wikström

24.9.2018

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

14

+

ALDE

Beatriz Becerra Basterrechea, Ilhan Kyuchyuk

PPE

Pál Csáky, Svetoslav Hristov Malinov, Lukas Mandl, Roberta Metsola, László Tőkés, Jarosław Wałęsa, Rainer Wieland

S&D

Soledad Cabezón Ruiz, Jude Kirton-Darling, Marlene Mizzi, Gabriele Preuß

VERTS/ALE

Igor Šoltes

4

-

ECR

Notis Marias

S&D

Virginie Rozière

VERTS/ALE

Margrete Auken, Ana Miranda

1

0

GUE/NGL

Takis Hadjigeorgiou

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention

(1)

European Parliament resolution of 8 February 2018 on time change arrangements (2017/2968(RSP)) P8_TA(2018)0043


PROCEDURE – COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

Title

Discontinuing seasonal changes of time

References

COM(2018)0639 – C8-0408/2018 – 2018/0332(COD)

Date submitted to Parliament

12.9.2018

 

 

 

Committee responsible

       Date announced in plenary

TRAN

13.9.2018

 

 

 

Committees asked for opinions

       Date announced in plenary

ENVI

13.9.2018

ITRE

13.9.2018

IMCO

13.9.2018

AGRI

13.9.2018

 

JURI

13.9.2018

PETI

25.10.2018

 

 

Rapporteurs

       Date appointed

Marita Ulvskog

25.10.2018

 

 

 

Discussed in committee

20.2.2019

 

 

 

Date adopted

4.3.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

23

11

0

Members present for the final vote

Marie-Christine Arnautu, Inés Ayala Sender, Georges Bach, Izaskun Bilbao Barandica, Deirdre Clune, Michael Cramer, Andor Deli, Isabella De Monte, Ismail Ertug, Dieter-Lebrecht Koch, Innocenzo Leontini, Peter Lundgren, Gesine Meissner, Cláudia Monteiro de Aguiar, Gabriele Preuß, Dominique Riquet, Massimiliano Salini, Claudia Schmidt, Keith Taylor, István Ujhelyi, Marita Ulvskog, Peter van Dalen, Wim van de Camp

Substitutes present for the final vote

Francisco Assis, Matt Carthy, Jakop Dalunde, Michael Gahler, Karoline Graswander-Hainz, Pavel Svoboda, Matthijs van Miltenburg, Henna Virkkunen

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Eleonora Evi, Olle Ludvigsson, Ricardo Serrão Santos

Date tabled

7.3.2019


FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

23

+

ALDE

Izaskun Bilbao Barandica, Gesine Meissner

ECR

Peter Lundgren

ENF

Marie-Christine Arnautu

PPE

Georges Bach, Wim van de Camp, Deirdre Clune, Andor Deli, Michael Gahler, Dieter-Lebrecht Koch, Claudia Schmidt, Pavel Svoboda, Henna Virkkunen

S&D

Inés Ayala Sender, Ismail Ertug, Karoline Graswander-Hainz, Olle Ludvigsson, Gabriele Preuß, István Ujhelyi, Marita Ulvskog

VERTS/ALE

Michael Cramer, Jakop Dalunde, Keith Taylor

11

-

ALDE

Matthijs van Miltenburg, Dominique Riquet

ECR

Peter van Dalen, Innocenzo Leontini

EFDD

Eleonora Evi

GUE/NGL

Matt Carthy

PPE

Cláudia Monteiro de Aguiar, Massimiliano Salini

S&D

Francisco Assis, Isabella De Monte, Ricardo Serrão Santos

0

0

 

 

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention

Last updated: 13 March 2019Legal notice