Procedure : 2019/2028(BUD)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A9-0017/2019

Texts tabled :

A9-0017/2019

Debates :

PV 22/10/2019 - 14
CRE 22/10/2019 - 14

Votes :

Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P9_TA(2019)0038

<Date>{15/10/2019}15.10.2019</Date>
<NoDocSe>A9-0017/2019</NoDocSe> (<RefVer>Part 1</RefVer>)
PDF 441kWORD 217k

<TitreType>REPORT</TitreType>

<Titre>on the Council position on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020</Titre>

<DocRef>(11734/2019 – C9‑0119/2019 – 2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Part 1: Motion for a resolution


<Commission>{BUDG}Committee on Budgets</Commission>

Rapporteurs:  <Depute>Monika Hohlmeier (Section III – Commission)</Depute>

 <Depute>Eider Gardiazabal Rubial (other sections)</Depute>

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION
 OPINION OF THE Committee on Foreign Affairs
 OPINION OF THE Committee on Development
 OPINION OF THE Committee on Budgetary Control
 OPINION OF THE Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs
 OPINION OF THE Committee on Employment and Social Affairs
 OPINION OF THE Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety
 OPINION OF THE Committee on Industry, Research and Energy
 OPINION OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE INTERNAL MARKET AND CONSUMER PROTECTION
 OPINION OF THE Committee on Transport and Tourism
 OPINION OF THE Committee on Regional Development
 OPINION OF THE Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development
 OPINION OF THE Committee on Fisheries
 OPINION OF THE Committee on Culture and Education
 OPINION OF THE Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs
 OPINION OF THE Committee on Constitutional Affairs
 OPINION OF THE Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality
 LETTER OF THE Committee on International Trade
 INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE
 FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION

on the Council position on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020

(11734/2019 – C9‑0119/2019 – 2019/2028(BUD))

The European Parliament,

 having regard to Article 314 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

 having regard to Article 106a of the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community,

 having regard to Council Decision 2014/335/EU, Euratom of 26 May 2014 on the system of own resources of the European Union[1],

 having regard to Regulation (EU, Euratom) 2018/1046 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 July 2018 on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union, amending Regulations (EU) No 1296/2013, (EU) No 1301/2013, (EU) No 1303/2013, (EU) No 1304/2013, (EU) No 1309/2013, (EU) No 1316/2013, (EU) No 223/2014, (EU) No 283/2014 and Decision No 541/2014/EU and repealing Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012[2],

 having regard to Council Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1311/2013 of 2 December 2013 laying down the multiannual financial framework for the years 2014-2020[3] (the “MFF Regulation”),

 having regard to the Interinstitutional Agreement of 2 December 2013 between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management[4],

 having regard to its resolution of 14 March 2019 on general guidelines for the preparation of the 2020 budget, Section III – Commission[5],

 having regard to its resolution of 28 March 2019 on Parliament’s estimates of revenue and expenditure for the financial year 2020[6],

 having regard to the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020, which the Commission adopted on 5 July 2019 (COM(2019)0400) (the “DB”),

 having regard to the position on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020, which the Council adopted on 3 September 2019 and forwarded to Parliament on 13 September 2019 (11734/2019 – C9‑0119/2019),

 having regard to Article 2.1c of the Paris Agreement, ratified by the European Union on 5 October 2016,

 having regard to the Landscape review of the European Court of Auditors, entitled 'EU action on energy and climate change' (2017),

 having regard to the Commission communication 'A Clean Planet for all - A European strategic long-term vision for a prosperous, modern, competitive and climate neutral economy' (COM(2018)0773),

 having regard to Rule 94 of its Rules of Procedure,

 having regard to the opinions of the other committees concerned,

 having regard to the report of the Committee on Budgets (A9-0017/2019),

Section III

General overview

1. Recalls that, in its resolution of 14 March 2019 on general guidelines for the preparation of the 2020 budget, Parliament defined clear political priorities for the 2020 budget to be a bridge to the future Europe and provide European added value; reaffirms its strong commitment to those priorities and sets out the following position to ensure an appropriate level of financing to deliver on them;

2. Reiterates Parliament’s view that the 2020 budget should pave the way for the 2021-2027 Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) and provide a solid starting point for the launch of the new generation of Union programmes and policies; recalls, moreover, that 2020 is the last year of the current MFF and, therefore, the last chance for the Union to come closer to meeting the political commitments set for that period, including towards reaching the EU climate target and implementing the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and delivering on the European Pillar of Social Rights; stresses, in that context, that the Union budget must evaluate and integrate the full impact of Union policies on gender equality (gender budgeting), thus promoting gender mainstreaming and equal opportunities;

3. Takes note of Council’s position on the DB, cutting EUR 1,51 billion in commitment appropriations compared to the Commission’s proposal; considers that the Council’s cuts flatly contradict the Union’s priorities, are not justified by absorption capacity and are meant to revert all the specific increases requested and obtained by Parliament in previous budgetary years; decides therefore, as a general rule, to restore appropriations on all lines cut by the Council to the level of the DB, for both operational and administrative expenditure, and to take the DB as the starting point to build its position upon;

4. Strongly believes that it is imperative to tackle  the climate challenge and to protect the environment in a way that boosts employment, creates new jobs,  strengthens competitiveness, promotes sustainable development and ensures social prosperity; underlines the key role of new and emerging technologies in achieving that objective; stresses the need for the Union to lead by example and inspire other countries around the globe to invest further in climate-related expenditure; welcomes the powerful calls for action made by Union leaders at the recent UN climate change summit and the commitments made recently by several Member States to ramp up spending in areas such as energy efficiency, renewable energy and sustainable transport and energy infrastructure; believes that such declarations should be matched by concrete action by the Member States including when deliberating as Council;

5.  Recalls the Union’s obligations under the Paris Agreement and the Union’s commitment to reach a target of 20 % of climate-related Union expenditure for the period 2014-2020; notes that 21,0 % of the commitment appropriations proposed in the DB for 2020 are climate-related and that at least additional EUR 3,5 billion would have to be dedicated to climate-related expenditure in order to reach the 20 % target; regrets that, under the current MFF, the Union budget has limited means to address the climate challenge on its own and points to the much higher needs for investment in this area, estimated by the Commission in the range of EUR 175 to 290 billion a year;

6.  Underlines that the 2020 budget should prepare the Union for an even more ambitious target for climate and biodiversity mainstreaming in the 2021-2027 MFF, in order to meet the expectations of European citizens; demands a more transparent, stringent and comprehensive methodology, set up in line with internationally established methodologies, including reformed performance indicators for defining and tracking climate- and biodiversity-relevant expenditure; looks forward to the concrete proposal on the European Green Deal, as outlined in the political guidelines of the incoming Commission president-elect; recalls, in this context, its strong commitment to the reform of the Union own resources systems, including the introduction of a basket of new own resources that are better aligned with major Union policy priorities, including the fight against climate change;

7. Proposes, therefore, a 2020 budget that makes an important contribution to tackling environmental challenges and climate change and offsets as much as possible the existing backlog towards reaching the target of 20 % of climate-related Union expenditure for the period 2014-2020; proposes a significant reinforcement by more than EUR 2 billion above DB levels for budget lines across different Headings, and predominantly in Subheading 1a, which make a high contribution towards the climate-expenditure target; carefully targets those reinforcements towards lines that have an excellent implementation rate and the operational capacity to absorb the additional appropriations in 2020;

8. Emphasises that youth remains an overarching priority for the Union budget; highlights that despite the positive trends towards a decline in youth unemployment rates in the Union, the lack of future opportunities for young people is a real social emergency in certain parts of the Union, with significant disparities across the Member States and regions; decides therefore to reinforce the Youth Employment Initiative (YEI) above the level proposed by the Commission, also in order to ensure a smooth transition towards the European Social Fund Plus (ESF+) in the next MFF;

9. Reinforces the financial resources to meet future demand for Erasmus+, the primary programme for education and training, including vocational education and training, youth and sport in Europe; stresses that Erasmus+ is a key flagship programme of the Union that is widely known among its citizens and has delivered tangible results with a clear European added value; recalls its commitment to triple the funding for this programme in the MFF 2021-2027; emphasises the need to continue and further reinforce the DiscoverEU preparatory action, in view of its programmed integration in the 2021-2027 Erasmus+ programme; calls for special emphasis to be placed to mobility actions in adult education, particularly for the senior population in the Erasmus+ programme;

10. Proposes further targeted reinforcements to other budget lines related to Parliament’s priorities, in areas such as SMEs, digitalisation, artificial intelligence, cancer research, security and justice cooperation, customs, migration and external policy including development and humanitarian aid;

11. Endorses, as a general rule, the Commission's estimates of the budgetary needs of decentralised agencies; considers, therefore, that any cuts proposed by the Council would endanger the proper functioning of the agencies and would not allow them to fulfil their tasks; proposes targeted increases to the level of appropriations of agencies which will be dealing with additional tasks or which are confronted with increased workload due to emerging challenges;

12. Concludes that, for the purpose of adequately financing the pressing priorities expressed above, and considering the very tight or inexistent margins under certain Headings in 2020, the Flexibility Instrument and the Global Margin for Commitments need to be fully mobilised, the Contingency Margin needs to be mobilised, while part of it also remains available for the financing of unforeseen events that may occur in the course of next year; also recalls that flexibilities set out in the MFF Regulation will lapse at the end of that period;

13.  Stresses the need to fully re-use de-commitments for research as laid down in Article 15(3) of the Financial Regulation; strongly regrets that the Council rejects again the application of that legislative provision that the Commission proposed to partly activate in the DB; declares its intention to insist on its position that reflects both the letter and the spirit of the Financial Regulation; intends to resolve this issue in this year’s budgetary conciliation; proposes to fully reuse these de-commitments to reinforce the four budget lines of the Horizon 2020 programme with the highest level of climate-related research activity;

14. Sets the overall level of appropriations for the 2020 budget (all sections) at EUR 170 971 519 973 in commitment appropriations, representing an increase of EUR 2 699 813 994 compared to the DB; decides in addition to make available an amount of EUR 280 700 000 in commitment appropriations further to de-commitments under Article 15(3) of the Financial Regulation; sets the overall level of appropriations for the 2020 budget (all sections) at EUR 159 146 168 195 in payment appropriations;

Subheading 1a – Competitiveness for growth and jobs

15. Points out that Horizon 2020 provides very strong European added value and makes a vital contribution to the development of green technology and climate- and environment-friendly innovation, so as to lay the foundations for a decarbonised future and support the shift towards a more circular economy; stresses, moreover, the importance of the programme for other significant areas of European research such as digitalisation, artificial intelligence and cancer research; significantly increases, therefore, the allocation of Horizon 2020 over the level of the DB by EUR 737,8 million in commitment appropriations; furthermore, in accordance with Article 15(3) of the Financial Regulation, makes available the entire amount of EUR 280,7 million in commitment appropriations de-committed in 2018 as a result of non-implementation of research projects, for the budget lines of Horizon 2020 that are most relevant to climate-related research projects, and calls on the Commission to pay special attention to the fair geographical distribution of those funds;

16. Is convinced that the fight against cancer should be an absolute priority for the Union, and that significant efforts need to be stepped up in this direction; underlines the fact that cancer research is an important pillar in this process; adopts, therefore, an increase of financial resources to be earmarked for cancer research under the relevant budget lines of Horizon 2020 that also demonstrate a very high budgetary execution; stresses that research intensifies in this field without any delay, also in view of more substantial investments anticipated in the next MFF;

17. Recalls that Europe's position as a leading provider for information and communication technologies (ICT) depends on the resources for developing and testing new ICT technologies as well as providing assistance to start-ups and technology enterprises in order to augment market relevant capacity; in this regard reiterates the need to provide additional funding to European research facilities and SME businesses with a focus on developing and advancing technologies such as search engines, translation services and similar ground-breaking technologies;

18. Highlights the crucial role of the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) in fostering the strategic development of a high-performance trans-European network that is sustainable and interconnected across the areas of transport,with a special focus on the rail network including night trains, energy and ICT infrastructure and significantly contributes to the transition towards a climate-neutral society; proposes therefore to increase the funding for CEF-Transport and CEF- Energy by a total amount of EUR 545 million in commitment appropriations above DB levels;

19. Considers that it is also necessary to strengthen further important priorities in this Subheading; points in that regard to SMEs, which are an essential part of the Union economy and play a crucial role in delivering excellent quality investment and job creation in all Member States; adopts, in this context, an increase to the COSME programme, in order to further boost the programme’s potential in promoting entrepreneurship, including women’s entrepreneurship, improving the competitiveness and access to markets of Union enterprises, and calls for emphasis to be placed on the digital transformation of SMEs; recalls that the proposed allocation in the DB for COSME was even below what was foreseen in the financial programming and adopts an increase of EUR 50 million in commitment appropriations above DB levels;

20. Emphasises that Erasmus+ remains a highly valued and hugely popular programme, with a volume of applications that far exceeds the funding available, and that it helps foster a strong sense of shared European identity; adopts, therefore, an increase of EUR 123,4 million in commitment appropriations above DB levels, in order to fight the low success rates and allow for more people to benefit from this programme;

21.  Proposes targeted increases to the level of appropriations for the European Labour Authority (ELA), the European Union Aviation Safety Agency, the European Union Agency for Railways, the European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA), and to the level of appropriations and the staff for the European GNSS Agency, the Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications (BEREC) Office and the Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER);

22. Increases therefore the level of commitment appropriations for Subheading 1a by EUR 1 503 766 221 above the DB (excluding pilot projects and preparatory actions), to be financed by using the available margin and mobilising the special instruments; in addition, makes available to this Subheading an amount of EUR 280 700 000 in commitment appropriations further to de-commitments under Article 15(3) of the Financial Regulation;

Subheading 1b – Economic, social and territorial cohesion

23. Recalls that sustainable growth and well-targeted investment are the key to creation of quality jobs and increased prosperity for all and that it is therefore necessary to direct the structural funds and investments more effectively towards promoting inclusive growth, reducing inequalities and boosting upward social convergence;

24. Regrets that the level of youth unemployment, estimated at 14,2 % in April 2019, remains unacceptably high and remains particularly acute in some Member States and regions of the Union; underlines the importance of reinforcing the employability and entrepreneurial capacity of young people while tackling inequalities; is convinced that the fight against unemployment requires substantial financial efforts; is determined to ensure additional funding for the YEI programme in the last year of the current MFF; underlines the need to accelerate the implementation of that programme and to further improve its efficiency, so as to ensure that it brings more European added value to national employment policies; proposes therefore an increase of EUR 363,3 million above DB levels in commitment appropriations for the YEI;

25. Steps up funding for technical assistance, to address the complexity of project management procedures, from the preparation of applications to financial management and impact monitoring, which is a major obstacle to a better absorption of 'Structural Funds';

26. Increases the level of commitment appropriations for Subheading 1b by EUR 373 278 264 above the DB (excluding pilot projects and preparatory actions), to be financed by mobilising the special instruments;

Heading 2 – Sustainable growth: natural resources

27. Notes with concern that only 8,3 % of total commitments are related to reversing the decline in biodiversity again, which is the lowest ratio since 2015, despite the unprecedented and accelerating species extinction rate observed; calls for sufficient increases and traceable resources to be allocated to ensure the long-term and coherent protection of biodiversity across the Union; in line with the overall priority of tackling climate change, focuses substantial increases worth EUR 233 million in commitment appropriations on budget lines pertaining to the LIFE+ programme in Titles 7 and 34; expects the Commission to warrant the necessary absorption capacity for an effective use of those additional means and ensure a fairer geographical distribution of such environment-friendly funds as will be the case in the programmes of the next MFF;

28. Proposes necessary increases for selected budget lines, in particular for the financing of measures to address the impact of African swine fever in several Member States; notes a severe impact and a big number of outbreaks registered since the beginning of 2019, with tens of thousands of animals being culled; notes that third countries have invested in research for developing a vaccine against ASF and the Union should be investing in research and development of a vaccine, which would help eradicate the spread and occurrence of ASF in the shortest possible time;

29. Recalls that the level of appropriations of the European Agricultural Guarantee Fund (EAGF) will still need to be adjusted by taking into account of the assigned revenue expected to be available in 2020 as communicated in the Commission’s Amending Letter;

30.  Proposes a targeted increase to the level of appropriations and the staff for the European Environment Agency;

31. In summary, increases commitment appropriations by EUR 267,3 million in Heading 2 (excluding pilot projects and preparatory actions), to be financed using the available margin under the ceiling; stresses that there should be no further cuts to the agricultural budget, since the agricultural sector is frequently affected by crises that require a budgetary response;

Heading 3 - Security and Citizenship

32. Reinforces, against the background of an unrealistically low ceiling since the beginning of the current MFF, funding for Parliament’s priorities in the fields of internal security, migration, fundamental rights and respect for the rule of law and to promote non-discrimination and equality and fight gender-based violence; strongly objects to Council’s cuts to the Internal Security Fund (ISF) and Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund (AMIF) and rejects the Council’s proposal to move EUR 400 million in AMIF commitment appropriations into a reserve awaiting a break-through on the reform of the Dublin III Regulation[7] as this would prevent frontline Member States receiving support to manage the migratory pressure in a humane manner;

33. Underlines that it is of paramount importance to invest in adequate funding and staffing levels for all agencies operating in the fields of migration, security, border control and fundamental rights, in particular Europol, Eurojust, EPPO, Frontex and the Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA); stresses that EPPO must be equipped with the necessary means in order to be able to thoroughly investigate and prosecute cross-border criminal activities;

34. Calls on the Commission to urgently create a fund aimed at supporting search and rescue operations in order to guarantee a strong SAR presence in the Mediterranean;

35.  Reaffirms its willingness to use the Union budget as a tool for effectively combatting existing inequalities and promoting gender equality, in particular through increased resources for the Daphne-specific objective of the Rights, Equality and Citizenship programme and for human development under the Development Cooperation Instrument; emphasises the need for sufficient funding to fight gender-based violence and violence against refugee women and girls and other vulnerable groups such as LGBTQI+ people;

36. Proposes a 10 % increase in commitment appropriations for the MEDIA and Culture sub-programmes of the Creative Europe programme, in order to remedy their chronic underfunding and low application success rates; also increases appropriations for multimedia actions, which are crucial in tackling disinformation and promoting independent journalism;

37.  Also proposes a targeted increase to the Union contribution to the European Medicines Agency;

38. Reinforces therefore Heading 3 by EUR 121 799 746 in commitment appropriations above DB levels (excluding pilot projects and preparatory actions), to be financed by a further mobilisation of special instruments;

Heading 4 – Global Europe

39. Underlines the need for the Union budget to contribute more to climate change mitigation and adaptation measures as well as climate diplomacy in the countries covered by the Development Cooperation Instrument and the Union Civil Protection Mechanism; points out the possibility for the Union budget to provide financial assistance for disaster risk reduction and to mobilise innovative financial instruments, including the EU external investment plan, to support the preparation and the financing of climate-related development projects in Africa;

40. Proposes a substantial increase in funding for the Western Balkans countries under the Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance, especially in the areas of functioning democratic institutions, rule of law, good governance and public administration; underlines the importance of a meaningful financing in view of the numerous challenges that the Union together with Member States will need to face in the European Neighbourhood for supporting political reforms and to align with the acquis in the Western Balkans;

41. Recalls that, given the persisting security threats and the deterioration of the security environment at the Union’s Eastern borders as well as the challenging reforms Eastern European partners are confronted with, it is important to provide sufficient funding in support of crisis and conflict prevention, stability, democracy and confidence-building and to step up efforts to support poverty reduction and economic development in the region; further recalls that the countries of the Southern neighbourhood need additional financial support, since they are facing enormous pressure, including the conflicts in Syria and Libya, the rise of extremism and the related refugee and migrant movements;

42. Deems it necessary to increase appropriations for the Turkish Cypriot Community budget line for the purpose of contributing decisively to the continuation and intensification of the mission of the Committee on Missing Persons in Cyprus, the wellbeing of Maronites wishing to resettle and that of all enclaved persons as agreed in the 3rd Vienna Agreement, and of supporting the bicommunal Technical Committee on Cultural Heritage, thereby promoting trust and reconciliation between the two communities;

43. Stresses the responsibility of the Union to support the protection of the Arctic; underlines the importance of investing into a more coherent EU Arctic policy;

44. Calls for increased funding for projects focussed on supporting refugees from Venezuela who have fled to the neighbouring countries including Member State territories in the Caribbean;

45. Believes that given the serious and persistent effort of Turkey to compromise regional stability with aggressive behaviour against Member States, as well as its deficits in the areas of democracy, the rule of law and fundamental rights, it is justified to further reduce the allocations for Turkey under the Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance; decides therefore not to reverse Council’s cuts to the funding for Turkey, to reduce that funding by additional EUR 5 million, and to put EUR 100 million of the funding into reserve;

46. Deplores the limited role the Parliament has in the supervision and governance of the EUTF; considers it fundamental that the Parliament is able to monitor the activities of the Operational Committee and calls on the Commission to provide detailed information on the decisions taken in that Committee and ensure that the Parliament is represented at its meetings;

47. Reinforces Heading 4 overall by EUR 257 217 394 above DB (excluding pilot projects and preparatory actions), to be financed by further mobilisation of special instruments;

Heading 5 - Administration; Other Headings - administrative and research support expenditure

48. Restores DB levels for administrative expenditure lines, including administrative and research support expenditure in Headings 1 to 4; proposes an increase of EUR 5,5 million in commitment appropriations above the DB for a Conference on European Democracy/Future of Europe; points out that the Conference should be able to function with the necessary degree of autonomy and the involvement of the Parliament on equal footing with the other European institutions; underlines furthermore that the Conference should allow for the participation and engagement of a broad range of citizens including young people;

Pilot projects and preparatory actions (PP-PAs)

49. Recalls the importance of pilot projects and preparatory actions (PP-PAs) as tools for the formulation of political priorities and the introduction of new initiatives that have the potential to turn into standing Union activities and programmes; stresses, in this regard, for those paving the way for new programmes supported by the current Commission President and the Parliament such as the Just Transition Fund, that the Commission should pay particular attention to implement them in the form that would gather the widest support from the Parliament; having carried out a careful analysis of all the proposals submitted and taking fully into account the Commission's assessment of their respect of legal requirements and implementability, adopts a balanced package of PP-PAs that reflects Parliament’s political priorities; calls on the Commission to swiftly implement PP-PAs and provide feedback on their performance and results delivered on the ground;

Payments

50. Points to the unprecedented margin of EUR 20 067,6 million left under the payment ceiling in the DB, as a result of the very late take-off of the 2014-2020 programmes and a corresponding accumulation of unused payments, notably in Subheading 1b; stresses the necessity to prevent a substantial accumulation of payment claims in the beginning of the next MFF that may lead to another payment crisis in the Union budget, as was the case in the current period, and may prevent an orderly start of the next generation of programmes for 2021-2027;

51. Increases, therefore, payments for European Structural and Investment Funds by an overall EUR 3 billion based on the expectation that Member States will further accelerate the implementation of their operational programmes in the last year of the current MFF, and better adhere to their own forecasts; increases the provisioning of the EFSI guarantee fund by EUR 948 million in order to bring forward to 2020, in a budget-neutral manner, those annual instalments which were so far planned for the years 2021 to 2023, i.e. when the pressure on payments is expected to be higher; finally, reinforces payment appropriations on those lines where commitment appropriations are increased;

Other Sections

Section I – European Parliament

52. Restores the appropriations established in the estimates on the basis of a careful and responsible analysis of the needs of Parliament for 2020 and adopted by Plenary in its abovementioned resolution of 28 March 2019 with a large majority; is aware that Article 314 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union allows the Commission to adjust the draft estimates of the other Institutions; expresses nonetheless its surprise and deep concern at the Commission’s cuts in Parliament’s budget, which breaks the tradition of good cooperation between the two institutions.

53. Increases two lines above the DB, due to new elements impacting the transitional allowances for 2020 budget, which it was not possible to prevent, namely: the higher non re-election rate following the European elections (63 %, whilst an average of 50 % served as the calculation base) and the postponement of Brexit until 31 October 2019; increases also the line on European political foundations, since their work is crucial in promoting democracy and fighting fake news and disinformation;

54. In line with the estimates adopted by the Parliament:

-  asks the Bureau to work on a technical solution to allow Members to exercise their right to vote while benefitting from their maternity, paternity or long term sickness leave;

- reiterates its calls for a transparent decision-making process in the field of buildings policy; disagrees therefore, with the on-going practice of the year-end 'mopping-up transfer' to contribute to current building projects, which takes place systematically on the same chapters, titles and, often, exactly on the same budgetary lines; considers that the building policy should be financed in a transparent manner from budgetary lines dedicated to it;

-  recalls its request to the Bureau to take action for the full alignment of the allowances rates incurred in respect of duty travel between Parliament’s three places of work between officials, others servants and Accredited Parliamentary Assistants as from 1 January 2020;

-  reiterates its call on the Conference of Presidents and the Bureau to revise the implementing provisions governing the work of delegations and missions outside the European Union; underlines the fact that such a revision should consider the possibility for APAs, subject to certain conditions, to accompany Members on official Parliament delegations and missions;

-  asks the Secretary General to swiftly present the implementation rules to ensure the statutory rights of APAs in order to avoid discretional interpretation and the current inequalities that prevent from the full exercise of their work as stated under the Members’ and Assistants’ Statutes;

-  asks for the full implementation of the measures recommended in Parliament’s resolution of 26 October 2017 on combating sexual harassment and abuse in the European Union[8], namely the implementation of the anti-harassment training for all staff and Members, the external audit of the two existing anti-harassment committees as well as the re-structuring of the two existing committees into one independent committee, with doctors and lawyers as standing members; requests further support to cover the cost of additional staff that are competent to manage harassment cases within Parliament, bringing together in a dedicated service staff with expert medical, psychological, legal, and human resources management background and to cover the judicial and medical expenses of victims of harassment in accordance with Article 24 of the Staff Regulations;

-  reiterates its request to the Secretary General for detailed estimations and coast breakdown of the preparatory technical works in the SPAAK building in view of renovation, projected at EUR 12,4 million;

- reiterates its call on a greater use of videoconferences and other technologies in order to protect the environment and to save resources, in particular to reduce staff duty travel between the three places of works;

Other sections (Sections IV-X)

55.  Notes that, in the main, the DB reflects the estimates of the various institutions falling within the other sections of the budget and therefore matches, with some exceptions, their financial requirements; considers that the cuts proposed by the Council would therefore have a deleterious effect on the working of the institutions concerned and consequently on the vital contribution they make to the functioning of the Union; on that account, proposes to restore the levels of the DB in almost all cases, including with regard to the establishment plans of the European Data Protection Supervisor and the European External Action Service; in line with the gentlemen’s agreement, does not modify the Council’s reading concerning the Council and the European Council;

56. Considers that, in a limited number of cases and taking into account the institutions’ estimates, it is necessary to increase lines above the DB and to suggest additional posts; proposes therefore:

a) in relation to the Court of Justice and on account of its increasing workload, to restore the 11 posts proposed by the Court in its estimates (7 AD posts and 4 AST), which the Commission did not include in the  DB,  and to provide the necessary appropriations for remunerations and allowances;

b) in relation to the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, to increase the appropriations above the DB for a few lines, so as to maintain a level of appropriations similar to last year’s;

c) in relation to the European Ombudsman, to add two AD posts above the DB, combined with minor cuts to three budget lines, in order to balance the amounts restored to two other lines;

o

o o

57. Instructs its President to forward this resolution, together with the amendments to the draft general budget, to the Council, the Commission, the other institutions and bodies concerned and the national parliaments.


 

 

OPINION OF THE Committee on Foreign Affairs (1.10.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Michael Gahler</Depute>

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Foreign Affairs calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1. Notes with concern the decrease of over EUR 1 billion in commitment appropriations for Heading 4 (Global Europe), which would result in a budget for external action lower than during any of the three preceding years; believes that in the current international context, the EU in cooperation with its Member States needs to assume more, not less responsibility and that it must be endowed with the necessary financial resources in view of the numerous challenges in the European Neighbourhood and further afield; calls for the margin of over EUR 200 million in Heading 4 to be allocated, including for crisis response, conflict prevention, peace-building and crisis preparedness;

2. Believes that a further increase in funding for the Western Balkan countries under the Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA II), especially in the areas of functioning of democratic institutions, rule of law, good governance and public administration  is needed; notes that the Commission recommended opening accession negotiations with Albania and North Macedonia; stresses that it is important to keep that promise and start accession negotiations already in 2019; in this regard, disapproves of the proposed reduction of the funds dedicated to supporting political reforms and alignment with the acquis in the Western Balkans and asks for a substantial increase instead;

3. Notes that the allocations for Turkey remain at a reduced level and believes that this is justified by the serious and persistent deficits in the areas of democracy, the rule of law and fundamental rights in Turkey; calls on the Commission to closely monitor the situation and, if deemed necessary, to adjust financial support, while keeping bridges with the citizens of Turkey; welcomes the increased focus on support for civil society, notably in the area of democracy and the rule of law, and the continuing shift towards direct management and encourages the Commission to further expedite that rebalancing;

4.  Emphasises the need to prioritise the stability of the Eastern and Southern Neighbourhood of the EU; highlights in particular the need to support key countries, such as Ukraine, Moldova, Tunisia and Georgia, which have all shown significant progress that should be acknowledged and supported; recalls the importance of maintaining a high level of support and involvement of the EU for a stable European Neighbourhood, while taking into account the commitment of partner countries towards their comprehensive reform agenda, especially in the fields of democracy, rule of law and human rights; further recalls that given the persisting security threats and the deterioration in the security environment at the EU’s Eastern borders it is important to continue confidence building with the Eastern partners and provide sufficient funding to support stability and democracy building in the region, in particular as regards Ukraine and the persisting conflict situation created by Russia in Eastern Ukraine; supports a strengthened and more visible role for the EU’s Monitoring Mission in Georgia, in light of increased Russian aggression towards Georgia; underlines that in the case of Moldova, the EU should build on the political momentum and ensure a strong financial support in order for the necessary democratic, economic and social reforms to take place;

5. Calls for increased funding dedicated to counter disinformation campaigns threatening democratic processes in the Union's Neighbourhood;

6. Recalls that the countries in the Southern Neighbourhood are facing enormous pressure as a result of tumultuous developments in the region, including the conflicts in Syria and Libya, the rise of extremism and the related refugee and migrant movements, and believes that more efforts and funding for confidence building measures could be a way to address the current problems; calls for reversing the proposed budget cuts for the countries in the Southern Neighbourhood under the European Neighbourhood Instrument (ENI); reiterates that contributions from ENI to the Syria pledge and the EU Trust Fund for Africa must not come at the expense of the ENI core priorities and calls for these additional commitments to be fully offset by reinforcements;

7.  Welcomes the pledges made at the Brussels III Conference “Supporting the future of Syria and the Region” and highlights that beyond the allocated EUR 560 million, the EU must commit to a long and stable involvement in the region; underlines the efforts by organisations working on evidence gathering in Syria and calls for the evidence of war crimes and crimes against humanity committed by all sides to the conflict to be preserved as a fundamental priority;

8.  Calls for enhanced EU support for the viability of a two-state solution, the Palestinian Authority, civil society in both Israel and Palestine and the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA); notes with concern the recent allegations of abuse of power within the UNRWA leadership and expects a full and transparent investigation and external scrutiny into these matters; remains concerned by the continued destruction and confiscation of EU-funded humanitarian assistance in the West Bank;

9. Calls for the reinstatement of the mandate of the EU Special Representative for the Southern Mediterranean, leading EU engagement with the region and providing heightened EU visibility;

10.  Asks for more funding for the European Instrument for Democracy and Human Rights (EIDHR); reiterates its strong support to human rights defenders, in particular those most at risk, including through the Human Rights Defenders Mechanism (ProtectDefenders.eu);

11. Emphasises the need to support and protect the LGBTI+ community around the world; calls for the allocation of EU funds to support LGBTI+ communities in countries where their rights are threatened;

12.  Highlights the important role of the EU’s Electoral Observation Missions (EOMs) in strengthening democratic institutions and building public confidence in electoral processes, thus promoting stability and reinforcing other foreign policy objectives, including peace building; points to the importance of enhancing EOMs and of increasing their funding; notes that the proposed increase should especially aim at strengthening support to local civil-society based election observation organisations, with up to 25 % of the total EIDHR budget to be devoted to the funding of EOMs; encourages the Commission to foster more competition between service providers as a way to increase effectiveness and efficiency;

13.  Stresses the importance of a progressive framing of the EU’s common defence policy and the need to support further funding to ensure its implementation; reaffirms its strong support to the European Defence Industrial Development Programme (EDIDP) and welcomes the EUR 255 million allocated in the Draft Budget; recalls the important role the European Defence Fund (EDF) must play in future budgets, notably the next multiannual financial framework; calls on Member States to make increased use of these funding opportunities;

14. Reiterates its view that the funding of the administrative and operating expenditures of the European Defence Agency and of permanent structured cooperation from the Union budget is the only option under the Treaties;

15. Believes that more funds should be dedicated to civilian conflict prevention, mediation, and reconciliation efforts especially in the EU Southern and Eastern Neighbourhood;

16. Highlights the consequences that climate change will have on the EU´s external action; stresses the need to match the climate emergency with a substantial increase in the number of funds dedicated to climate objectives and climate diplomacy;

17. Stresses the responsibility of the EU to support the protection of the Arctic; underlines the importance of investing into a more coherent EU Arctic policy;

18. Stresses the critical need to eradicate sexual and gender-based violence, by addressing their widespread and systemic use as a weapon of war; calls for the use of EU funds to support victims of gender-based violence and the rights of women around the world to access safe and legal abortion;

19. Calls for increased funding for projects focussed on supporting refugees from Venezuela who have fled to the neighbouring countries including Member State territories in the Caribbean;

20. Is dismayed by the low percentage of women in middle management and senior management positions in the EEAS (25 % and 13 % respectively); calls on the Vice-President of the Commission/High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy to make a written commitment regarding the presence of women in management positions, including the target of 50 % women as Heads of Delegation by 2024;

21. Points to the fact that unforeseen crises require flexibility and room for manoeuvre in the budget and hence recalls the need to be prepared and capable of action in a swift and effective way if required;

22. Recalls that the current budget proposal is based on a budget with full contributions by the United Kingdom throughout 2020.

 


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

1.10.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

42

12

1

Members present for the final vote

Maria Arena, Petras Auštrevičius, Traian Băsescu, Phil Bennion, Lars Patrick Berg, Anna Bonfrisco, Reinhard Bütikofer, Fabio Massimo Castaldo, Włodzimierz Cimoszewicz, Tanja Fajon, Michael Gahler, Giorgos Georgiou, Nathan Gill, Raphaël Glucksmann, Klemen Grošelj, Bernard Guetta, Sandra Kalniete, Stelios Kouloglou, David Lega, Nathalie Loiseau, Antonio López-Istúriz White, Jaak Madison, Claudiu Manda, Thierry Mariani, David McAllister, Vangelis Meimarakis, Sven Mikser, Francisco José Millán Mon, Javier Nart, Demetris Papadakis, Tonino Picula, Giuliano Pisapia, Nacho Sánchez Amor, Isabel Santos, Sergei Stanishev, Hermann Tertsch, Idoia Villanueva Ruiz, Viola Von Cramon-Taubadel, Irina Von Wiese, Isabel Wiseler-Lima, Željana Zovko

Substitutes present for the final vote

Attila Ara-Kovács, Vladimír Bilčík, Loucas Fourlas, Neena Gill, Markéta Gregorová, Roman Haider, Sergey Lagodinsky, Hannah Neumann, Bert-Jan Ruissen, Tineke Strik, Mick Wallace

Substitutes under Rule 209(7) present for the final vote

Michael Bloss, Liudas Mažylis, Philippe Olivier

 


 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

42

+

ECR

Hermann Tertsch

NI

Fabio Massimo Castaldo

PPE

Traian Băsescu, Vladimír Bilčík, Loucas Fourlas, Michael Gahler, Sandra Kalniete, David Lega, Antonio López-Istúriz White, David McAllister, Liudas Mažylis, Vangelis Meimarakis, Francisco José Millán Mon, Isabel Wiseler-Lima, Željana Zovko

RENEW

Petras Auštrevičius, Phil Bennion, Klemen Grošelj, Bernard Guetta, Nathalie Loiseau, Javier Nart, Irina Von Wiese

S&D

Attila Ara-Kovács, Maria Arena, Włodzimierz Cimoszewicz, Tanja Fajon, Neena Gill, Raphaël Glucksmann, Claudiu Manda, Sven Mikser, Demetris Papadakis, Tonino Picula, Giuliano Pisapia, Nacho Sánchez Amor, Isabel Santos

VERTS/ALE

Michael Bloss, Reinhard Bütikofer, Markéta Gregorová, Sergey Lagodinsky, Hannah Neumann, Tineke Strik, Viola Von Cramon-Taubadel

 

12

-

ECR

Bert-Jan Ruissen

GUE/NGL

Giorgos Georgiou, Stelios Kouloglou, Idoia Villanueva Ruiz, Mick Wallace

ID

Lars Patrick Berg, Anna Bonfrisco, Roman Haider, Jaak Madison, Thierry Mariani, Philippe Olivier

NI

Nathan Gill

 

1

0

S&D

Sergei Stanishev

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention


 

 

OPINION OF THE Committee on Development (9.10.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020 </Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Charles Goerens</Depute>

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Development calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1. Underlines the need for the general budget of the European Union to adequately contribute to the delivery of the 2030 Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the objective of eradicating poverty as stipulated in Articles 3 and 21 of the Treaty on European Union and Article 208 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union; stresses that the SDGs must be a strategic priority and that its implementation has to cut across all internal and external policies of the European Union; recalls that, according to the United Nations, achieving the SDGs will require between USD 5 and 7 trillion per year (of which between 2.5 and 3 trillion in developing countries); stresses that in order to be a credible global actor, the European Union must take on a leading role in achieving the SDGs and step up its Policy Coherence for Development (PCD); stresses the importance of dialogue, inclusive local involvement and ownership, and for EU aid reaching the people; underlines that the SDGs are interlinked and indivisible, but highlights that SDG 3 on health, SDG 4 on education, SDG 5 on gender equality, SDG 13 on climate action, and SDG 16 on peace, justice and strong institutions must be more clearly reflected in the  general budget of the European Union for 2020;

2. Emphasises that the Union and its Member States must honour their collective commitment, reconfirmed in 2015, to raise their official development assistance (ODA) to 0,7 % of their GNI by 2030; calls on the Commission and the Member States to present binding timelines for progressive increases towards this level; recalls the Union’s collective commitment to provide the least developed countries with 0,20 % of GNI allocated to ODA; reiterates the commitment made by the Commission to dedicate at least 20 % of its total ODA to human development and social inclusion; highlights the need to promote and protect sexual and reproductive health and rights;

3. Reiterates its concerns as regards the use of development funds for non-development objectives and underlines that funding which does not fulfil ODA criteria must be sourced from other instruments than the Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI); underlines the importance of ensuring human rights standards in all cooperation under the DCI and insists that in order to successfully combat poverty in the long-term, the EU must address the causes of poverty and inequalities; reaffirms its support for the budgetisation of the European Development Fund and insists on sufficient parliamentary scrutiny over the European Union’s development funding;

4.  Calls for an approach that is based on results, the enforcement of reporting mechanisms, efficiency and the monitoring of funds earmarked for EU development aid;

5. Expresses serious concern at the way in which the European Union Emergency Trust Fund for Africa (EUTF) is being used; notes in particular that the priority awarded to funding migration and border management is often removed from the objectives of reducing poverty and tackling the root causes of migration, and that this can have adverse effects; considers it inappropriate, for example, to use that instrument to fund the Libyan Coast Guard without showing consideration for the very serious human rights violations being committed in Libya;

6. Underlines the rights-based approach in development and the principle of leaving no one behind; insists that Union policies and programmes must ensure human rights standards and help combatting the persisting global inequalities and discrimination based on factors such as income, ethnicity, sex, age, disabilities, religion or beliefs, sexual orientation and gender identity; stresses the need of support to non-discrimination and protection of human rights defenders;

7. Deplores the limited role the European Parliament has in the supervision and governance of the EUTF; considers it especially vital that Parliament be able to monitor the activities of the Operational Committee and calls on the Commission to provide detailed information on the decisions taken in that Committee and ensure that the European Parliament is represented at its meetings;

8. Insists on the need to advance SDG 5 on gender equality and calls for more concrete action in the Union’s external policy, including targeted actions and measures for gender equality; insists on the need to combat violence against women and girls and to promote access to sexual and reproductive health and rights;

9. Underlines SDG 16 and support for democracy, good governance and the rule of law; draws attention to the importance of supporting dialogue, inclusive local ownership, and for creating a supportive environment for citizen participation; underlines the importance of young people and women as key agents of change; stresses the importance of including women in peace-making and conflict resolution;

10. Stresses the importance of supporting civilians in conflict areas and re-building societies emerging from conflict situations; draws attention to the situation of groups of Kurdish, Yazidi, Christian and other ethnic and religious minorities in the Middle East; stresses the importance of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East being functional and receiving sufficient support in times of reduced support from other global actors;

11. Supports the Commission's intention to clarify the doctrine it will apply in the area of development cooperation with states that violate the principles of the European Union's external policy;

12. Takes the view that the 2020 development budget should more consistently reflect the EU's focus on countries that are the least developed in the areas of education and youth employment, of girls and women experiencing gender-based violence and of universal access to water;

13. Calls for the Commission to ensure that the funding of climate change adaptation activities and other climate related activities in third countries complement the funding of activities from development cooperation instruments; points out that climate change may affect the already vulnerable more severely and could lead to backtracking on the progress that has already been made in combatting poverty and hunger; is concerned that climate change may have multiplying negative effects leading to more humanitarian crises, e.g. through increasing conflicts and wars;

14. Stresses the importance of promoting the creation of more decent and green jobs in line with SDG 8; draws attention to the links between trade and development, calls for the Union to better support countries to participate in, and fully benefit from, international trade; stresses the importance of promoting dialogue between the social partners, in this respect, highlights initiatives like the Global Deal for Decent Work and Inclusive Growth; underlines the importance of ensuring labour rights in global value chains and of promoting decent work on the basis of the International Labour Organization’s labour standards;

15. Takes the view that action must be taken to tackle humanitarian crises, with a particular focus on prevention, resilience building and cooperation with stakeholders, so as to find a solution to the global funding shortage for humanitarian action; points out that cooperation should be stepped up between governments, civil society and the private sector; insists on a significant increase in the funding allocation for the humanitarian aid budget lines in order to be prepared for new disasters and catastrophes instead of only covering ongoing crises, while at the same time ensuring sufficient funding for more long-term development cooperation for strong, resilient and inclusive societies; points out that crises are not likely to decrease, and that they are becoming more protracted; stresses the importance of good linkages between humanitarian aid and development cooperation;

16. Stresses the importance of maintaining payment appropriations in the humanitarian aid chapter at least at the same level as commitment appropriations, in order to avoid delayed payments that may have substantial negative effects on people and on implementing partners;

17. Insists that the Union cannot backtrack as a force for multilateralism and global cooperation, and calls for a sufficient funding allocation for development cooperation and humanitarian aid within the new multiannual financial framework;

 


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

8.10.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

20

2

2

Members present for the final vote

Hildegard Bentele, Dominique Bilde, Udo Bullmann, Ryszard Czarnecki, Gianna Gancia, Mónica Silvana González, Pierrette Herzberger-Fofana, György Hölvényi, Martin Horwood, Rasa Juknevičienė, Pierfrancesco Majorino, Lukas Mandl, Louis Stedman-Bryce, Marc Tarabella, Tomas Tobé, Chrysoula Zacharopoulou, Bernard Zimniok

Substitutes present for the final vote

Manon Aubry, Stéphane Bijoux, Ellie Chowns, Ewa Kopacz, María Soraya Rodríguez Ramos, James Wells

Substitutes under Rule 209(7) present for the final vote

Sándor Rónai

 


 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

20

+

ECR

Ryszard Czarnecki

GUE/NGL

Manon Aubry

ID

Gianna Gancia

PPE

Hildegard Bentele, György Hölvényi, Rasa Juknevičienė, Ewa Kopacz, Lukas Mandl, Tomas Tobé

Renew

Stéphane Bijoux, Martin Horwood, María Soraya Rodríguez Ramos, Chrysoula Zacharopoulou

S&D

Udo Bullmann, Mónica Silvana González, Pierfrancesco Majorino, Sándor Rónai, Marc Tarabella

Verts/ALE

Ellie Chowns, Pierrette Herzberger‑Fofana

 

2

-

NI

Louis Stedman‑Bryce, James Wells

 

2

0

ID

Dominique Bilde, Bernhard Zimniok

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 


 

OPINION OF THE Committee on Budgetary Control (26.9.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020 </Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Corina Crețu</Depute>

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Budgetary Control calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

Financial management

1. Recalls that point (c) of Article 247(1) of the Financial Regulation sets out an obligation on the Commission to communicate, every 31 July, to the European Parliament and the Council, an integrated set of financial and accountability reports, including a long-term forecast of future inflows and outflows covering the next five years;

2. Insists that these reports analyse the impact of commitments to the size of payments’ backlog of a given Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF);

Programme statements of operational expenditures accompanying the budget

3. Welcomes the programme statements of operational expenditures accompanying the general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020 (budget for 2020) that, in accordance with point (h) of Article 41(3) of the Financial Regulation, provide information on each of the spending programmes;

4. Welcomes the fact that the 2020 Programme Statements refer to the achievement of cross-cutting policy objectives as the fight against climate change and biodiversity mainstreaming; appreciates that the Commission also presents the relevant spending programmes contributing to the achievement of the Europe 2020 priorities and highlights the most recent and relevant initiatives contributing to sustainable development goals in cooperation and development policy, although often in an indirect and non-quantifiable way;

5. Calls on the Committee on Budgets, in coordination with the sectoral committees of this Parliament, to promote a real culture of “result orientation” aimed at optimising the use of funds, analysing the reasons leading to low performance programmes and pushing for measures for improvement of absorption and performance;

Performance reporting

6. Recalls that the current performance framework of the programmes reported in the programme statements includes more than 700 indicators measuring the performance against more than 60 general and more than 220 specific objectives;

7. Wonders why the Commission uses two sets of objectives and indicators to measure the performance of financial management: on the one hand, the Commission’s Directors-General evaluate the achievement of the objectives defined in their management plan in the objectives and indicators in their annual activity reports, and, on the other, the Commission measures the performance of spending programmes via the programme statements of operational expenditure annexed to the draft budget; calls on the Commission to make its reporting based on a single set of objectives and indicators;

8. Regrets that the Commission did not explain in its performance reports how it used performance information in its decision-making process;

9. Calls on the Commission to:

(a) streamline performance reporting by:

 further reducing the number of objectives and indicators it uses for its various performance reports and focusing on those which best measure the performance of the Union budget;

 presenting financial information in a manner that makes it comparable with performance information so that the link between spending and performance is clear;

(b) indicate how performance information concerning the Union budget has been used in its decision-making process;

(c) develop data processing methods for the vast quantities of data created by performance reporting with the goal of giving a timely, fair and true picture on achievements; insists that performance reporting should be used to take corrective action when the objectives of programmes are not met;

(d) better balance performance reporting by clearly presenting information on the main challenges still to be achieved;

Timely absorption

10. Calls on the Commission to improve the accuracy of the payment forecast and to use the lessons learned from the previous programming period in order to deal with the accumulated backlog in payments and avoid its negative effect on the next MFF and to present the action plan on reducing the payments backlog during the 2021-2027 MFF;

11. Calls on the Commission to afford proper technical assistance to the national authorities of the Member States so that they can take up the amounts allocated;

12. Stresses the fact that the Union budget is not allowed to run on deficit and that the growing payments backlog in fact represents a financial debt;

Climate change

13. Points out that the European Union has committed to making 20% of its budget climate-related; calls on the Commission to develop research, development and innovation in order to achieve this 20% target;

Migration, Border Protection and Human Rights

14. Calls on the Commission, for management and reporting purposes, to establish a way of recording Union budgetary expenditure that will make it possible to report on all funding related to the refugee and migration issues, as well as for the future Union policy on management of migration flows and integration;

Horizon 2020

15. Points out that the Horizon 2020 Programme enjoys the political support of the Member States; notes that research is a form of direct investment into smart, sustainable and inclusive growth that fosters employment; considers that only by adopting an ambitious budget will the Union be able to develop scientific leadership to meet the challenges facing society in terms of employment, energy transition, digitalisation and medical and pharmaceutical research;

16. Recalls that there is an humanitarian element to every migration crisis which by necessity will usually involve emergency measures; invites the Commission to find quick ways to respond to the migration crisis and the humanitarian situations which lay behind;

17. Calls on the Commission to provide more resources for front-line Member States dealing with the migration and refugee crisis, in order to respond more effectively to that migration crisis;

18. Reiterates its call to have a separate budget line for the Daphne-specific objective, which is part of the Rights, Equality and Citizenship Programme, in order to show the commitment of the Union which is aimed at combating violence against women and girls; calls for increased resources in this budget line and to reverse the decrease of funds dedicated to Daphne objective during the 2014-2020 period; suggests that in the next MFF the budget for the new Justice, Rights and Values Fund which will include as well the Rights, Equality and Citizenship Programme to be increased; calls on an steady effort to raise the awareness of the grants included in the Daphne-specific objective along with measures to make its related administrative procedures more user friendly;

Security and Defence

19. Calls on the Commission to introduce a separate heading for Security and Defence, in order to grant a more transparent scrutiny;

20. Highlights the significant budgetary and organisational risk associated with major expansion of agencies such as that proposed under the 2021-27 MFF for Frontex. To manage this budgetary risk, urges the development, reporting and scrutiny of a detailed, phased expansion programme within the legal basis approved for the next MFF from which budgetary arrangements over the coming years will follow and be held to account.

Financial instruments and Trust funds

21. Insists along with the Court of Auditors on the need for more detailed reporting on financial instruments and calls on the Commission to present accurate and complete information on financial instruments under shared management after closure indicating amounts returned to the Union budget and those amounts remaining in Member States;

22. Points out that aid to third countries has increasingly used alternative financing models - such as trust funds and the Facility for Refugees in Turkey - which increases the complexity of existing financial structures;

23. Points out that pooling resources from the European Development Fund, the Union budget and other donors in trust funds should not have as consequence that money flagged for development and cooperation policy does not pursue its original objectives, such as the eradication of poverty and the promotion of fundamental rights;

24. Stresses that trust funds should be established only when their use is justified and the required action is not possible through other existing financing channels; further calls on the Commission, in line with the principle of budget unity, to consider putting an end to trust funds that are unable to attract contribution from other donors or that do not provide an added value when compared to ‘traditional’ Union external instruments;

25. Believes that the operation and accountability of Union Trust funds is best achieved by their being transparently managed as part of the General Budget of the Union.

EPPO

26. Insists that the European Public Prosecutor Office (EPPO) has to be adequately financed and staffed; points out that the EPPO has to be operational already as from November 2020; stresses the importance of having a clear division of tasks and good coordination between the EPPO and the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF);

27. Recalls the importance of the Youth Employment Initiative in promoting the participation and integration of young people into the labour market;

28. Notes that in the draft budget for 2020 the Union contribution amounts to a total of EUR 8 372 000;

29. Recalls the importance of granting adequate resources and staffing to OLAF, Europol and Eurojust, in order to ensure their ability to cooperate effectively with the EPPO and fulfil the common mission of protecting the financial interests of the Union. In this regard, expresses concerns about the decrease in staff reported by OLAF in its Annual Report 2018, while the workload of the Office has structurally increased.


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

25.9.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

24

2

1

Members present for the final vote

Matteo Adinolfi, Olivier Chastel, Caterina Chinnici, Lefteris Christoforou, Corina Crețu, Tamás Deutsch, Raffaele Fitto, Daniel Freund, Isabel García Muñoz, Cristian Ghinea, Michael Heaver, Monika Hohlmeier, Joachim Kuhs, Claudiu Manda, Tsvetelina Penkova, Markus Pieper, Sabrina Pignedoli, Petri Sarvamaa, Angelika Winzig, Lara Wolters, Tomáš Zdechovský

Substitutes present for the final vote

Katalin Cseh, Derk Jan Eppink, Mikuláš Peksa, Ramona Strugariu, Viola Von Cramon-Taubadel, Lucia Vuolo

 


 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

24

+

ID

NI

EPP

Renew

S&D

Verts/ALE

Matteo Adinolfi, Joachim Kuhs, Lucia Vuolo

Sabrina Pignedoli

Lefteris Christoforou, Tamás Deutsch, Monika Hohlmeier, Markus Pieper, Petri Sarvamaa, Angelika Winzig, Tomáš Zdechovský

Olivier Chastel, Katalin Cseh, Cristian Ghinea, Ramona Strugariu

Caterina Chinnici, Corina Crețu, Isabel García Muñoz, Claudiu Manda, Tsvetelina Penkova, Lara Wolters

Daniel Freund, Mikuláš Peksa, Viola Von Cramon-Taubadel

 

2

-

ECR

NI

Derk Jan Eppink

Michael Heaver

 

1

0

ECR

Raffaele Fitto

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION OF THE Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (6.9.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Siegfried Mureşan</Depute>

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

 

1. Calls for the 2020 budget to contribute to the fulfilment of the priorities outlined in the European Semester, namely to deliver high-quality private and public investment as for example in start-ups and SMEs and reforms that increase competitiveness as well as sustainable, inclusive and cohesive growth, while respecting the implementation of the Stability and Growth Pact and its flexibility provisions; recalls the importance of continuing to ensure macro-financial stability and sound public finances, implementation of balanced structural reforms, deepening and strengthening the Single Market, including the digital component, as well as the completion of the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU);

2. Considers that the EU budget should continue to support economic recovery in the European Union and provide sufficient resources to meet transnational challenges such as climate change and migration;

3. Emphasises the importance of ensuring sufficient resources for the coordination and surveillance of macroeconomic policies, financial crime, anti-money laundering and the adherence to the economic governance framework as well as transparent communication and outreach to EU citizens on the measures; recalls the need to constantly improve the quality and language choice of the information presented online, so that it reflects more closely citizens’ frequent questions;

4. Underlines the necessity to boost socially balanced, sustainable economic development and growth whilst taking into account climate change and sustainability while pursuing structural reforms to modernise European economies and facilitating access to finance for SMEs, including fulfilling budgetary priorities related thereto;

5. Further calls for the budget to contribute to fulfilling policy priorities in terms of the completion of the Capital Markets Union, including fostering an investment environment which will improve access to finance for market participants, particularly SMEs and start-ups;

6. Calls for adequate financial and human resources for the European Supervisory Authorities (ESAs) in view of their newly assigned tasks and powers deriving from the adoption of the revision of the Regulation establishing EASs 2017/0230(COD); underlines that the ESAs should continue to increase their efficiency including combating money laundering and the financing of terrorism and monitoring shadow banking activities without compromising on the quality of their work with a focus on continuous re-assessment of working methods and of effective and transparent use of human and financial resources; highlights the importance of promoting gender balance, particularly at management level in the ESAs; emphasises that in the interest of a prudent use of their budgets, the ESAs must continue at all times to stick to the tasks and to the mandate assigned to them by the European legislator with full consideration, among others, for the principles of proportionality and subsidiarity in their day-to-day activities; points out that the ESAs shall make sufficient provisions in order to be able to react quickly to the potential fallout from a hard Brexit;

7. Emphasises that funding to accounting entities and tax authorities should continue, in particular to support them in the fight against tax fraud and tax evasion and that those entities should be accountable to the European Parliament; therefore worries about the Council’s proposal to reduce staff expenditure in the European Directorate General dedicated to taxation, while the implementation of recently adopted legislation is to be monitored and while a new international tax reform is on-going at both G20 and Inclusive Framework levels, underlines the need for adequate funding for the European Commission’s proper assessment of anti-money laundering standards by Member States and third countries;

8. Underlines the importance of accountability and transparency from those bodies that receive funding.


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

4.9.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

39

12

2

Members present for the final vote

Gunnar Beck, Stefan Berger, Gilles Boyer, Cristian-Silviu Buşoi, Derk Jan Eppink, Engin Eroglu, Markus Ferber, Jonás Fernández, Frances Fitzgerald, José Manuel García-Margallo y Marfil, Luis Garicano, Sven Giegold, Neena Gill, José Gusmão, Enikő Győri, Eero Heinäluoma, Danuta Maria Hübner, Stasys Jakeliūnas, Herve Juvin, Othmar Karas, Billy Kelleher, Ondřej Kovařík, Georgios Kyrtsos, Aušra Maldeikienė, Costas Mavrides, Csaba Molnár, Luděk Niedermayer, Dimitrios Papadimoulis, Piernicola Pedicini, Lídia Pereira, Dragoş Pîslaru, Luisa Porritt, Jake Pugh, Evelyn Regner, Antonio Maria Rinaldi, Alfred Sant, Joachim Schuster, Pedro Silva Pereira, Ernest Urtasun, Inese Vaidere, Johan Van Overtveldt, Stéphanie Yon-Courtin, Marco Zanni

Substitutes present for the final vote

Gerolf Annemans, Manon Aubry, Carmen Avram, Niels Fuglsang, Eugen Jurzyca, Margarida Marques, Siegfried Mureşan, Ville Niinistö, Irene Tinagli

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Alice Kuhnke

 


 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

39

+

PPE

Stefan Berger, Cristian-Silviu Buşoi, Markus Ferber, Frances Fitzgerald, José Manuel García-Margallo y Marfil, Danuta Maria Hübner, Othmar Karas, Georgios Kyrtsos, Aušra Maldeikienė, Siegfried Mureşan, Luděk Niedermayer, Lídia Pereira, Inese Vaidere

RENEW

Gilles Boyer, Engin Eroglu, Luis Garicano, Billy Kelleher, Ondřej Kovařík, Dragoş Pîslaru, Luisa Porritt, Stéphanie Yon-Courtin

S&D

Carmen Avram, Jonás Fernández, Niels Fuglsang, Neena Gill, Eero Heinäluoma, Margarida Marques, Costas Mavrides, Csaba Molnár, Evelyn Regner, Alfred Sant, Joachim Schuster, Pedro Silva Pereira, Irene Tinagli

VERTS/ALE

Sven Giegold, Stasys Jakeliūnas, Alice Kuhnke, Ville Niinistö, Ernest Urtasun

 

12

-

ECR

Derk Jan Eppink, Eugen Jurzyca

GUE/NGL

Manon Aubry, José Gusmão, Dimitrios Papadimoulis

ID

Gerolf Annemans, Gunnar Beck, Herve Juvin, Antonio Maria Rinaldi, Marco Zanni

NI

Jake Pugh

PPE

Enikő Győri

 

2

0

ECR

Johan Van Overtveldt

NI

Piernicola Pedicini

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 


 

 

 

 

OPINION OF THE Committee on Employment and Social Affairs (27.9.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Lucia Ďuriš Nicholsonová</Depute>

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Employment and Social Affairs calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1. Recalls that effective and carefully considered social and employment policies need to take into account socio-economic, demographic and automation challenges as well as challenges posed by the Union’s commitment to decarbonisation, and that those policies should be accompanied by well-targeted investment strategies and should continue to be an important precondition for sustainable growth, which is the key factor leading to quality employment, reducing inequalities and boosting upward social convergence and cohesion;

2. Welcomes the policy developments in the area of employment and social affairs during the eighth legislature, but emphasises that the policy initiatives need proper, adequate and timely funding to become operational;

3. Highlights that the 2020 budget should contribute towards achieving the Europe 2020 targets in the social and employment area, which seem to be within reach as regards the employment rate target but remain far from being achieved as regards the target of reducing the number of people at risk of poverty or social exclusion, as, in particular, more and more working people are at risk of poverty;

4.  Emphasises also the need to progressively align the strategic orientation of Union policies and programmes with the Sustainable Development Goals and the social principles outlined by the European Pillar of Social Rights (EPSR), which should be fully integrated into the provisions of the Union funding programmes and the European Semester;

5.  Stresses, in this regard, the need for comprehensive policy reforms and integrated approaches that strengthen social inclusion and combat youth and long-term unemployment and the often neglected issue of employability of the elderly and of persons with disabilities;

6.  Underlines, against this background, the importance of adequate funding for the programmes and initiatives within the 2014-2020 Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) that seek to promote inclusive growth, fight unemployment, poverty and social exclusion, reduce inequalities and boost upward social convergence, and especially those aimed at the most disadvantaged in society;

7.  Stresses the need for these programmes and initiatives to receive an adequate level of funding in 2020 and until the entry into force of the next MFF programming phase;

8.  Rejects, therefore, reductions to the budgetary programming for lines 04 01 01, 04 01 02 01, 04 01 03, 04 03 02 01, 04 03 12, 04 03 13, 08 02 03 06 and 13 08 01;

9.  Recalls also that a proper balance between commitment and payment appropriations must be found in order to allow those programmes and initiatives to reach their full potential;

10. Stresses that workers' participation and inclusion in company matters have a significantly positive impact on their productivity, health and well-being, the quality of jobs and the level of wages; stresses, furthermore, that the budget lines supporting the social dialogue in the Union are of prime importance when it comes to strengthening the social partners’ involvement, for example in the European Semester and in the implementation of the EPSR; therefore calls for increased appropriations as regards industrial relations and social dialogue;

11. Emphasises the importance of budgetary accountability and prioritisation when delivering true value for money for Union citizens, including a stronger focus on evidence-based policymaking and special attention to social, regional and territorial disparities;

12.  Believes that the principle of European added value should be the cornerstone of all future expenditure; stresses that Union funding should, therefore, reflect a performance-based public budgeting model in which each budget line is accompanied by measurable objectives and outputs; underlines, in this respect, the importance of accountability and transparency for bodies that receive Union funding;

13. Recognises the crucial role of the European Social Fund (ESF), the Youth Employment Initiative (YEI), the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF), the Programme for Employment and Social Innovation (EaSI) and the Fund for European Aid to the Most Deprived (FEAD) and reiterates that those funds should create synergies to help reduce social divergences and inequalities to ensure that no targeted group is left behind in the process; warns that any reductions in the budget for those areas could create difficulties for those policies to be effective and to achieve their goals;

14.  Stresses, in this regard, that the realities of small Member States and remote regions (including the outermost regions as referred in Article 349 of the TFEU), must be taken into account; emphasises, in particular, that access to funds for the overseas countries and territories (which possess limited administrative resources and expertise due to their special status and size), must be improved; believes especially that the EGF must reflect the realities of the small labour markets and small Member States' markets, in particular with regard to applications involving SMEs, and when the redundancies and job displacements have a serious impact on the employment rates and on the local or regional economy;

15.  Highlights that the activities implemented under those funds and programmes  should always result in strategic measures with clearly defined objectives and targets and that efficient and effective spending is equally as important as the total budget ceilings; underlines in this respect the importance of a real culture of “result orientation” aimed at optimising the use of funds, analysing the reasons leading to low-performance programmes and pushing for measures for improvement;

16.  Acknowledges, in this respect, the efforts to make the procedures to claim the funds in the 2020 budget more transparent and accessible;

17. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to allow for the necessary flexibility in the implementation of the Union programmes for 2020, in particular the EGF, to cover the impact of the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the Union on workers and entities established in the Member States; welcomes, in this regard, the Commission proposal to amend the scope of the current EGF programme to enable support to workers displaced as a result of disruptions caused by a withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the Union;

18. Acknowledges the forthcoming merger, from 2021, of the current ESF, YEI, FEAD, EaSI and European Health Programme within the scope of the ESF+; reiterates its position to increase the ESF+ to EUR 120 457 000 000 in current prices under the MFF 2021-2027; calls on the Commission to present financial information and budgetary allocations in a manner that makes ESF+ figures and subheadings of those programmes comparable with the current envelopes; rejects the substantial decrease (by EUR 5 million) proposed by the Council of the PROGRESS axis of EaSI for 2020 and recommends that its budget be at least equal to that proposed by the Commission; stresses, in that regard, that all legislative and budgetary revisions should be based on evidence and on understanding of their impacts, should be in line with the better regulation agenda, should require quantifiable and comparable results evaluation rather than simple output measurements, and should be based on all related recommendations of the European Court of Auditors;

19. Underlines that, in the context of ongoing budgetary constraints, it will be critical to make the best use of the 2020 general budget, especially when it comes to policies capable of supporting sustainable economic growth and quality employment creation, such as future skills policies, vocational and educational training (VET), upskilling and reskilling policies and measures to support well-functioning labour markets and better adjustment to demographic change, particularly by improved integration of vulnerable and disadvantaged groups, such as the elderly and persons with disabilities, in the labour market and by the implementation of integration and poverty reduction measures; notes that the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs has proposed several pilot projects (PPs) and preparatory actions (PAs) targeted towards the socially excluded communities;

20. Strongly encourages all investments in the adoption of new technologies in all sectors of the economy and industrial production, with a particular attention given to specific programmes aimed at accelerating timely transition of the workforce and restricting the potentially harmful side effects of such a transition, such as structural unemployment, growing income inequality or regional and territorial disparities; notes in this respect the role of Union instruments in supporting companies and workers in their transition to a digital and greener economy;

21.  Reiterates the importance of VET in the age of digitalisation; calls on the Commission to explore further opportunities to support vocational education and training programmes, especially in the areas of software development and information technologies;

22. Highlights that despite the positive trends towards a decline in youth unemployment rates in the Union, the lack of future opportunities for young people is a real social emergency in certain parts of the Union - with significant disparities across the Member States and regions -  and that young people are still at a higher risk of poverty and social and economic exclusion; stresses that this requires innovative and focused solutions, which can be promptly implemented, in order to bring concrete improvements in the short term; expects therefore the Commission and Member States to make the fight against youth unemployment their priority, which should be reflected in the 2020 budget;

23.  Reiterates therefore the importance of the funds and other instruments that promote measures tackling inequalities and the employability of young people, namely the Youth Guarantee, the YEI, the ESF and Erasmus +;

24.   Stresses in particular the role of the YEI in tackling youth unemployment and takes note of the Commission proposal to increase YEI allocations in 2020 by EUR 116 million; considers, however, such a figure to be insufficient; calls therefore for an increase of YEI commitment appropriations by EUR 600 million;

25.  Welcomes also the commitment by Commission President-designate Ursula von der Leyen in her Political Guidelines to strengthen the Youth Guarantee by turning it into a permanent instrument with an increased budget and regular reporting;

26. Deplores the fact that more than a quarter of all children in the Union are at risk of poverty or social exclusion;

27.  Awaits the publication of the feasibility study on the Child Guarantee which should be a base for the implementation of further activities but calls on the Commission to fully take into consideration the proposals for implementation of the PAs on the Child Guarantee, adopted in the annual budgets for 2017, 2018 and 2019, and which have a level of funding which will allow the implementation of a proper experimental phase of the Child Guarantee in the next programming period 2021-2027;

28.  Welcomes, in that regard, the Commission President-designate Ursula von der Leyen's commitment in her Political Guidelines to create the European Child Guarantee in order to help ensure that every child in the Union at risk of poverty or social exclusion has access to the most basic set of rights like healthcare and education;

29.  Highlights the need to promote the social inclusion of vulnerable children and especially to remedy the situation of Roma children by, in particular, fostering their access to schools; notes that a PP would be an appropriate tool with which to address that issue;

30. Highlights the important contribution of the agencies in dealing with a wide range of employment, social issues and data collection; stresses that their tasks are developing and growing constantly and that they must therefore be given the necessary resources to fulfil their tasks and ensure the best possible results in support of Union legislative and policy objectives; therefore calls for a thorough assessment of the new tasks assigned to the agencies and of their overall performance, with a view to ensuring only appropriate and efficient budgetary allocations;

31.  Notes the creation of the European Labour Authority (ELA), which is expected to begin operating in 2019; highlights the need to ensure that sufficient financial resources are set aside for its establishment; insists that that funding cannot be accomplished by redeploying allocations from the other employment and social affairs agencies and budgetary lines and that the ELA, being a new body, requires fresh resources to run smoothly; stresses in particular that the establishment of ELA should not result in a reduction of resources and capabilities for EURES, which plays a pivotal role in facilitating labour mobility of Union citizens and offers services and partnerships for jobseekers and employers, Public Employment Services, the social partners and the local authorities; highlights therefore the need to maintain clear and separate budget lines for both ELA and EURES;

32. Reiterates that PPs and PAs, if carefully prepared, are very valuable tools to initiate new activities and policies in the fields of employment, in particular enhancing youth employment, and social inclusion and could be used for data and evidence collection in order to improve future Union employment policies; notes that several ideas of the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs have been implemented successfully in the past as PPs or PAs; calls on the budgetary authority to include in the budget 2020 the eight PPs and PAs proposed by the Committee, and pertaining to social inclusion of particularly vulnerable groups (Roma, especially Roma children, disadvantaged young people, low-income households, elderly people), to youth unemployment, to health and safety at work and to the minimum wage; encourages the full use of the margins available under each heading;

33. Notes that it is paramount for Parliament to be given regular updates on the various stages of the implementation of PPs and PAs by the Commission, including a proper evaluation of the results and their added value to the Union citizens; emphasises the importance of a transparent approach by the Commission when assessing PPs and PAs.

 


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

24.9.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

42

9

1

Members present for the final vote

Atidzhe Alieva-Veli, Abir Al-Sahlani, Gabriele Bischoff, Vilija Blinkevičiūtė, Jane Brophy, Sylvie Brunet, David Casa, Leila Chaibi, Estrella Durá Ferrandis, Lucia Ďuriš Nicholsonová, Rosa Estaràs Ferragut, Nicolaus Fest, Loucas Fourlas, Cindy Franssen, Chiara Gemma, Helmut Geuking, Elisabetta Gualmini, Alicia Homs Ginel, France Jamet, Radan Kanev, Stelios Kympouropoulos, Katrin Langensiepen, Elena Lizzi, Radka Maxová, Lefteris Nikolaou-Alavanos, Matthew Patten, Sandra Pereira, Kira Marie Peter-Hansen, Alexandra Louise Rosenfield Phillips, Dragoş Pîslaru, Manuel Pizarro, Dennis Radtke, Elżbieta Rafalska, Guido Reil, Daniela Rondinelli, Mounir Satouri, Monica Semedo, Beata Szydło, Eugen Tomac, Romana Tomc, Yana Toom, Nikolaj Villumsen, Marianne Vind, Maria Walsh, Tatjana Ždanoka, Tomáš Zdechovský

Substitutes present for the final vote

Alex Agius Saliba, José Gusmão, Jeroen Lenaers, Pierfrancesco Majorino, Anne Sander, Birgit Sippel

 

 


FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

42

+

ECR

Lucia Ďuriš Nicholsonová, Helmut Geuking, Elżbieta Rafalska, Beata Szydło

NI

Chiara Gemma, Daniela Rondinelli

PPE

David Casa, Rosa Estaràs Ferragut, Loucas Fourlas, Cindy Franssen, Radan Kanev, Stelios Kympouropoulos, Jeroen Lenaers, Dennis Radtke, Anne Sander, Eugen Tomac, Romana Tomc, Maria Walsh, Tomáš Zdechovský

RENEW

Abir Al‑Sahlani, Atidzhe Alieva‑Veli, Jane Brophy, Sylvie Brunet, Radka Maxová, Dragoş Pîslaru, Monica Semedo, Yana Toom

S&D

Alex Agius Saliba, Gabriele Bischoff, Vilija Blinkevičiūtė, Estrella Durá Ferrandis, Elisabetta Gualmini, Alicia Homs Ginel, Pierfrancesco Majorino, Manuel Pizarro, Birgit Sippel, Marianne Vind

VERTS/ALE

Katrin Langensiepen, Kira Marie Peter‑Hansen, Alexandra Louise Rosenfield Phillips, Mounir Satouri, Tatjana Ždanoka

 

9

-

GUE/NGL

Leila Chaibi, José Gusmão, Sandra Pereira, Nikolaj Villumsen

ID

Nicolaus Fest, France Jamet, Elena Lizzi, Guido Reil

NI

Lefteris Nikolaou‑Alavanos

 

1

0

NI

Matthew Patten

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION OF THE Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (5.9.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Pascal Canfin</Depute>

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1. Underlines that 21,0 % of the total commitments in the draft budget for 2020 (2020 DB) are climate-related; regrets that the Union budget trend would deliver only 19,7 % for the current multiannual financial framework (MFF) period while the objective agreed upon before 2014 said ‘‘at least 20 %’’ over the 2014-2020 period; highlights that, according to the Commission, an additional € 3,5 billion in climate-related spending will be needed in the 2020 budget  in order to reach the 20 % target; stresses that every effort should be made to ensure that the overall Union budget target will be reached by the end of 2020; reiterates its call to have more ambitious climate mainstreaming, to be set at 40 %, noting that Parliament urged for 30 % in its November 2018 resolution, improved climate action tracking methodology and proofing in the next MFF period, and to their alignment with the Paris Agreement and Union climate action goals; insists that the next MFF should rely on robust methodology, set up in line with internationally established methodologies, in order to track climate action funding and to avoid the risk of overestimation of climate action; believes that green budgeting of the next MFF is key to achieve our climate objectives;

2. Notes with concern that only 8,3 % of total commitments are related to reversing the decline in biodiversity again, which is the lowest ratio since 2015, despite the unprecedented and accelerating species extinction rate observed; calls for sufficient increases and traceable resources to be allocated to ensure the long-term and coherent protection of biodiversity across the Union; insists that the next MFF should rely on a robust methodology, set up in line with internationally established methodologies, in order to track biodiversity and avoid the risk of overestimation of action towards biodiversity;

3. Believes that in particular in the last year of the MFF an ambitious budget in climate action related programmes and for the protection of biodiversity is needed to build a bridge to the forthcoming MFF, which it is anticipated will have a slow start until all new programmes are fully operational;

4. Calls on the Union to commit sufficient funding to the full and efficient implementation of the future European Green Deal;

5. Stresses that furthermore, in the context of the Political Guidelines for the Next European Commission launched by the Commission President-elect, there is an absolute urgency to accelerate emissions reduction;

6. In line with the Agenda 2030 and the commitments acquired by the Union and its Member States within the General Assembly of the United Nations, underlines the need to ensure sufficient resources in the 2020 budget for the achievement of the sustainable development goals;

7. Notes the increase of EUR 21,5 million in commitments for LIFE (+3,9 %); is convinced that the LIFE budget 2020 is insufficient (€ 529,6 million); calls for significant increases for 2020 in order to be prepared and in line with Parliament’s demands to double the LIFE programme during the post-2020 MFF; deeply regrets that LIFE represents only 0,3 % of the 2020 DB;

8. Welcomes that the new rescEU programme will receive €156,2 million in order to help it better tackle earthquakes, wildfire, forest fires and other natural disasters; stresses the need for instruments such as the Civil Protection Mechanism and the Solidarity Fund to cover environmental catastrophes and valorise the damage to the environment;

9. Takes note of the proposed EUR 69,7 million in commitments (+2,0 %) and EUR 64,2 million in payments (+4,7 %) for health; regrets that this amount is only 0,04 % of the 2020 DB and 1,9 % of heading 3 (in commitments);

10. Underlines that adequate resources should be allocated in the budget to elaborate and implement the future European Plan to fight against cancer; stresses that this plan is essential to promote and improve prevention, research, access to innovation and reintegration;

11. Takes note of the proposed EUR 280,0 million in commitments (-3,3 %) and EUR 244,7 million in payments (2,3 %) for food and feed; regrets that this amount is only 0,17 %  of the 2020 DB and 7,5 % of heading 3 (in commitments);

12. Takes note of the proposed EUR 156,2 million in commitments (+4,4 %) and EUR 77,0 million in payments (-5,7 %) for the Union Civil Protection Mechanism, which is a cornerstone of Union solidarity;

13. Notes that permanent and temporary posts authorised under the 2020 DB remain unchanged compared to the 2019 budget for the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA), while those posts increase for the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) (+34, following revision of the general food law ), the European Environment Agency (EEA) (+1 ) and the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) (+2 ); highlights that, where appropriate, more financial and human resources must be allocated to those agencies in order to fulfil their mandate and execute their tasks, and in order to promote a science-based approach in the Union; underlines that better coordination between the agencies would optimise their work, as well as the use of public funds;

14. Calls on the Commission to swiftly implement pilot projects and preparatory actions (PP-PAs);

15. Points that PP-PAs should be aligned with climate goals and should receive substantial funding throughout their life cycle, so that they can achieve their full potential and prepare the ground for the adoption of future measures.


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

4.9.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

60

10

0

Members present for the final vote

Bartosz Arłukowicz, Margrete Auken, Simona Baldassarre, Marek Paweł Balt, Aurelia Beigneux, Monika Beňová, Malin Björk, Delara Burkhardt, Cristian-Silviu Buşoi, Pascal Canfin, Sara Cerdas, Mohammed Chahim, Nathalie Colin-Oesterlé, Miriam Dalli, Seb Dance, Esther de Lange, Marco Dreosto, Eleonora Evi, Agnès Evren, Fredrick Federley, Pietro Fiocchi, James Alexander Glancy, Andreas Glück, Catherine Griset, Jytte Guteland, Teuvo Hakkarainen, Pär Holmgren, Jan Huitema, Yannick Jadot, Petros Kokkalis, Athanasios Konstantinou, Ewa Kopacz, Joanna Kopcińska, Peter Liese, Sylvia Limmer, Javi López, César Luena, Liudas Mažylis, Anthea McIntyre, Aileen McLeod, Tilly Metz, Silvia Modig, Alessandra Moretti, Ljudmila Novak, Grace O’Sullivan, Rory Palmer, Jutta Paulus, Rovana Plumb, Jessica Polfjärd, Frédérique Ries, Sándor Rónai, Rob Rooken, Silvia Sardone, Christine Schneider, Günther Sidl, Nicolae Ştefănuță, Nils Torvalds, Edina Tóth, Véronique Trillet-Lenoir, Caroline Voaden, Alexandr Vondra, Mick Wallace, Michal Wiezik, Anna Zalewska

Substitutes present for the final vote

Michael Bloss, Christophe Hansen, Lídia Pereira, Susana Solís Pérez, Nikolaj Villumsen

 


 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

60

+

ECR

Pietro Fiocchi, Joanna Kopcińska, Alexandr Vondra, Anna Zalewska

GUE/NGL

Malin Björk, Petros Kokkalis, Silvia Modig, Nikolaj Villumsen, Mick Wallace

NI

Eleonora Evi, Athanasios Konstantinou

PPE

Bartosz Arłukowicz, Cristian-Silviu Buşoi, Nathalie Colin-Oesterlé, Agnès Evren, Christophe Hansen, Ewa Kopacz, Esther de Lange, Peter Liese, Liudas Mažylis, Ljudmila Novak, Lídia Pereira, Jessica Polfjärd, Christine Schneider, Edina Tóth, Michal Wiezik

RENEW

Pascal Canfin, Catherine Chabaud, Fredrick Federley, Andreas Glück, Jan Huitema, Frédérique Ries, Susana Solís Pérez, Nicolae Ştefănuță, Nils Torvalds, Véronique Trillet-Lenoir, Caroline Voaden

S&D

Marek Paweł Balt, Monika Beňová, Delara Burkhardt, Sara Cerdas, Mohammed Chahim, Miriam Dalli, Seb Dance, Jytte Guteland, Javi López, César Luena, Alessandra Moretti, Rory Palmer, Rovana Plumb, Sándor Rónai, Günther Sidl

VERTS/ALE

Margrete Auken, Michael Bloss, Pär Holmgren, Yannick Jadot, Aileen McLeod, Tilly Metz, Grace O'Sullivan, Jutta Paulus

 

10

-

ECR

Anthea McIntyre, Rob Rooken

ID

Simona Baldassarre, Aurelia Beigneux, Marco Dreosto, Catherine Griset, Teuvo Hakkarainen, Sylvia Limmer, Silvia Sardone

NI

James Alexander Glancy

 

0

0

 

 

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION OF THE Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (26.9.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute> Adina‑Ioana Vălean </Depute>

 

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Industry, Research and Energy calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1. Regrets that the budget proposed by the Commission is EUR 474,6 million below the ceiling for Heading 1a, even though relevant programmes are oversubscribed and could easily absorb additional funds; highlights the utmost importance of the programmes of Heading 1a for boosting the innovation-led economic growth and contributing to the transition towards a climate-neutral society in line with the Paris Agreement;

2. Underlines the importance of developing leadership in innovation and of incremental and disruptive research in advanced technologies to achieve the Union’s political goals, rejects therefore the cuts by Council of a total of EUR 747,4 million in Heading 1a, including EUR 424,9 million for the Common Strategic Framework for Research and Innovation, especially in relevant budget lines on strengthening research in future and emerging technologies, strengthening European research infrastructure, including e-infrastructures and leadership in information and communications technology, also including EUR 28 million for the ICT strand of the Connecting Europe Facility and EUR 20 million for COSME, which risk undermining the Union’s efforts to creating sustainable growth and high-quality jobs, as well as the Union’s efforts to reach the UN Sustainable Development Goals and to reach a net-zero greenhouse gas emission economy by 2050, while leaving no one behind;

3. Believes that, in particular during the final year of the MFF, an ambitious budget in Heading 1a is needed to build a bridge to the forthcoming MFF, under which all new programmes will take time to become fully operational, in order to ensure the full functionality of these programmes to be able to continue to contribute to achieving the Union’s political priorities;

4. Calls, therefore, for a level of commitment appropriations up to the ceiling for Heading 1a and furthermore for the use of all possible flexibility instruments available under the MFF Regulation and of the special provision on the re-use of decommitted funds for research projects laid down in the Financial Regulation to ensure the highest possible level of commitment appropriations for the 2020 budget;

5. Recalls the importance of research and innovation to address societal challenges and contribute to sustainable development, notes the oversubscription of various programmes such as Horizon 2020 and COSME, resulting in a lower success rate for applications in Horizon 2020 compared to the previous MFF period, which means that many more high-quality projects in the field of research and innovation could be funded when sufficient Union funding could be provided; stresses that this needs to be addressed by a more ambitious budget for 2020; and by enhancing complementarities with other Union Funds, financial instruments, national programmes and private investments; believes that Union research and innovation funding should especially support areas suffering from serious market failure and neglected societal challenges; believes, therefore, that decommitted funds should be made available again in accordance with Article 15(3) of the Financial Regulation; recalls its position that at least EUR 120 million in 2018 prices is needed for Horizon Europe in the next MFF;

6 Underlines that SMEs are an essential part of the Union economy as they provide a high number of jobs within the Union; sees the need to create an SME-friendly business environment, as well as to support SME clusters and networks; welcomes therefore the increase in the SME instrument; notes with concern the Council cuts on increased innovation for SMEs, which send a contradictory signal to Union businesses;

7. Underlines the importance of achieving the goals of the Digital Single Market to enhance the Union’s digitalisation and the digital inclusion of the Union economy, public sector and citizens; recognises in this respect the importance of initiatives such as WiFi4EU; deplores the proposed Council cuts for this initiative;

8 Underlines the need to reform the Union mobility sector in order to achieve sustainable, clean and competitive transport in the Union, to make the Union's car industry fit for the future and to achieve our climate goals; stresses, therefore, the need for sufficient funding for programmes supporting these goals like Horizon, CEF-Transport and the Fuel Cells and Hydrogen 2 (FCH 2) Joint Undertaking; is, therefore, concerned about the effect of the proposed Council cuts on achieving a Union transport system that is resource-efficient, environmentally friendly, safe and seamless;

9 Strongly regrets that the budget proposed by the Commission is, once again, far below that requested by ACER and that this risks jeopardising ACER’s functioning and its ability to perform its tasks on monitoring and market transparency, let alone the additional tasks conferred on it through recent legislation;

10 Reiterates that investments in research and innovation need to be stepped up with a view to improving access to knowledge, promoting social development and raising the quality of living standards.

11 Calls, with regard to all agencies within its remit (ACER, BEREC, ENISA and GSA), for a level of appropriations and staff as requested by those agencies; insists that financial and staff resources be increased in accordance with the expansion of tasks of the agencies concerned and in preparation of the implementation of new legislation, and with the need of planning future roles and responsibilities; notes that the GSA faces the emergence of new challenges related to security and other sensitive areas, where outsourcing is likely to reduce security and cost-efficiency, and to lead to a loss of expertise; it is, therefore, necessary to recruit and retain highly specialised experts;

12 Recalls the commitment made by Parliament, the Council and the Commission in a Joint Statement annexed to Regulation (EU) 2017/1953 of the European Parliament and of the Council[9] aiming to ensure overall funding for the promotion of internet connectivity in local communities of EUR 120 million over a three-year period in order for the initiative to become a true European success for the benefit of local communities and citizens; underlines, in that respect, that following two calls for applications, more than 23 000 municipalities from all across the Union registered to the WiFi4EU Portal, and that 6 200 municipalities have already been awarded with WiFi4EU vouchers, demonstrating the initiative’s success;

13. Calls for additional funds to accelerate the development and deployment of cleaner technologies, as well as additional funds to facilitate a just transition of coal and carbon intensive regions to help meet the commitments undertaken by the Union under the Paris Agreement, including through the continuation of exiting and launching new pilot projects and preparatory actions; reiterates the European Parliament’s proposal to establish the Just Transition Fund within the Multi-Annual Financial Framework 2021-2027 to address societal, socio-economic and environmental impacts on workers and communities adversely affected by the transition from coal and carbon dependence; stresses the need to continue supporting coal and carbon intensive regions in the Union, so that they are prepared to benefit from a new Just Energy Transition Fund;

14. Stresses that research and innovation are key drivers for sustainable development and recalls the commitment made by the Union and its Member States to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals; welcomes the Commission’s estimate that climate change spending will reach 21 % of the 2020 budget, recalls that these efforts need to be stepped up; regrets that the proposed budget for Horizon 2020 is highly unlikely to reach its set climate and sustainability spending targets and hence for the entire current MFF period; stresses its position that, following the Union’s commitment under the Paris Agreement, climate-related spending should be adequately increased; recalls in this context the adopted ‘energy efficiency first’ principle as well as the target for the Union to become number one in renewables;

15. Calls for additional appropriations for the Connecting Europe Facility, in particular its sustainable energy and ICT strands, to ensure the completion of the Energy Union and that isolated markets are connected and remaining bottlenecks are removed, as well as a future-resilient EU energy network.

16. Is deeply concerned about the ongoing uncertainty related to the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union; underlines that financial precautions are needed in case the UK does not contribute to the 2020 budget fully or in part, calls therefore on all other Member States to step in and fully compensate the UK contribution as all programmes are in their final phase and recipients of Union funds need certainty that the Union will honour its commitments.

17. Stresses that a failure by the Union to deliver on its legal and political commitments on payment appropriations would seriously harm its reliability and have a serious negative impact on trust in the ability of Union institutions to fulfil their roles; emphasises that this is enhanced by the fact that the Union approaches the end of the current MFF and that therefore the implementation of the multiannual programmes needs to be advanced quickly.


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

25.9.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

54

6

6

Members present for the final vote

François Alfonsi, Nicola Beer, François-Xavier Bellamy, Michael Bloss, Manuel Bompard, Paolo Borchia, Marc Botenga, Markus Buchheit, Klaus Buchner, Carlo Calenda, Andrea Caroppo, Maria Da Graça Carvalho, Katalin Cseh, Ciarán Cuffe, Josianne Cutajar, Pilar del Castillo Vera, Martina Dlabajová, Christian Ehler, Valter Flego, Niels Fuglsang, Jens Geier, Nicolás González Casares, Christophe Grudler, András Gyürk, Henrike Hahn, Robert Hajšel, Ivo Hristov, Ivars Ijabs, Eva Kaili, Seán Kelly, Łukasz Kohut, Andrius Kubilius, Miapetra Kumpula-Natri, Thierry Mariani, Marisa Matias, Eva Maydell, Joëlle Mélin, Iskra Mihaylova, Dan Nica, Ville Niinistö, Mauri Pekkarinen, Markus Pieper, Sara Skyttedal, Maria Spyraki, Jessica Stegrud, John David Edward Tennant, Grzegorz Tobiszowski, Patrizia Toia, Evžen Tošenovský, Isabella Tovaglieri, Adina-Ioana Vălean, Henna Virkkunen, Pernille Weiss, Carlos Zorrinho

Substitutes present for the final vote

Rasmus Andresen, Marco Dreosto, Giorgos Georgiou, Klemen Grošelj, Alicia Homs Ginel, Adam Jarubas, Janusz Lewandowski, Jutta Paulus, Dominique Riquet, Massimiliano Salini, Edina Tóth

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Hannes Heide

 

 


 

 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

54

+

ECR

Evžen Tošenovský

ID

Thierry Mariani, Joëlle Mélin

PPE

François-Xavier Bellamy, Maria Da Graça Carvalho, Pilar del Castillo Vera, Christian Ehler, András Gyürk, Adam Jarubas, Seán Kelly, Andrius Kubilius, Janusz Lewandowski, Eva Maydell, Markus Pieper, Massimiliano Salini, Sara Skyttedal, Maria Spyraki, Edina Tóth, Adina-Ioana Vălean, Henna Virkkunen, Pernille Weiss

RENEW

Nicola Beer, Katalin Cseh, Martina Dlabajová, Valter Flego, Klemen Grošelj, Christophe Grudler, Ivars Ijabs, Iskra Mihaylova, Mauri Pekkarinen, Dominique Riquet

S&D

Carlo Calenda, Josianne Cutajar, Niels Fuglsang, Jens Geier, Nicolás González Casares, Robert Hajšel, Hannes Heide, Alicia Homs Ginel, Ivo Hristov, Eva Kaili, Łukasz Kohut, Miapetra Kumpula-Natri, Dan Nica, Patrizia Toia, Carlos Zorrinho

VERTS/ALE

François Alfonsi, Rasmus Andresen, Michael Bloss, Klaus Buchner, Ciarán Cuffe, Henrike Hahn, Ville Niinistö, Jutta Paulus

 

6

-

ECR

Jessica Stegrud

ID

Paolo Borchia, Andrea Caroppo, Marco Dreosto, Isabella Tovaglieri

NI

John David Edward Tennant

 

6

0

ECR

Grzegorz Tobiszowski

GUE/NGL

Manuel Bompard, Marc Botenga, Giorgos Georgiou, Marisa Matias

ID

Markus Buchheit

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 


 

 

 

 

OPINION OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE INTERNAL MARKET AND CONSUMER PROTECTION (3.9.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Svenja Hahn</Depute>

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1. Notes that the responsibility of the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO) in the budget procedure covers budget lines in titles 2 (Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs), 14 (Taxation and customs union) and 33 (Justice and Consumers);

2. Stresses that the internal market remains one of the Union’s greatest and most tangible achievements, bringing benefits to businesses including micro- and small businesses, consumers and citizens across Europe; further deepening the Single Market, reducing the bureaucratic burdens that hamper the free movement of goods, capital, services and labour, and developing the Digital Single Market should be prioritised in the 2020 Budget for the continued competitiveness of Union business and the protection of consumers throughout the Union; in this context, stresses that it is important to systematically monitor advancements in the area to detect emerging issues and provide policy recommendations for the further development of the Digital Single Market;

3. Stresses the importance of internal market for services; calls on the Union to commit additional funding to the completion of the internal market for services and encourage the development of new and innovative services;

4. Calls for the 2020 budget to contribute to the fulfilment of the priorities outlined in the European Semester, specifically, to deliver high-quality investment and reforms that increase competitiveness and the productivity of businesses, including small and micro businesses, and to continue to deepen the Single Market and further develop the Digital Single Market;

5. Welcomes the fact that in its Draft Budget the Commission has allocated an appropriate budget to most of IMCO’s main priorities, including the internal market for goods and services, support to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), consumer protection and competitiveness, and invites the Council and the Parliament to agree these appropriations in the 2020 budget;

6. Welcomes the increase in appropriations for “operation and development of the internal market of goods and services” (budget line 02 03 01), for the purpose of market surveillance and the establishment of the EU Product Compliance Network, as well as for “improving access to finance for SMEs” (budget line 02 02 02), and for “support expenditure  for COSME” (budget line 02 01 04 01), as those three actions are crucial for boosting economic growth in the Union; strongly regrets the Council’s reduction in budget lines 02 03 01 and 02 02 02;

7. Highlights in this respect that SMEs are an essential part of the Union economy and play a crucial role in job creation throughout the Union and sees the need to create and further promote an SME-friendly business environment; underlines therefore that improving SMEs’ access to finance remains a key priority for IMCO in the 2020 Budget;

8. Stresses that the Programme for Competitiveness of Enterprises and small and medium-sized enterprises (COSME) is a crucial tool for encouraging entrepreneurial culture, supporting existing SMEs and ensuring competitiveness, sustainability and growth; calls in particular for a strengthening of the European Innovation Council’s Accelerator (SME instrument) as it provides decisive support for SMEs with radically new ideas and marketable innovative solutions; considers that the Union budget and access to finance backed by it, is a key tool in making start-ups, microenterprises and SMEs more competitive, more innovative, and fosters the spirit of enterprise in the Union;

9. Underlines the importance of a robust and efficiently implemented consumer policy that brings protection and predictability to consumers and combats unfair commercial practices both offline and online, and confidence to businesses to provide their goods and services across the internal market, and that ensures market compliance with, and enforcement of, EU and national law, while keeping the bureaucratic burden for SMEs to a minimum; stresses that consumer protection challenges remain, both in the digital and physical spheres, and therefore it is of utmost importance to increase the efforts of education and awareness-raising of consumers and citizens;

10. Welcomes the increase in payment appropriations for “Safeguarding consumers’ interest and improving their safety and information” (budget line 33 04 01), as improving consumer rights and promoting awareness of consumer rights is an important way of boosting consumer trust in the internal market and in the Union’s capacity to deliver tangible benefits;

11. Stresses the importance of appropriately financing the transition to a fully automated customs operation, in the interests of greater efficiency for European companies, of fair competition and of streamlined protection for consumers; to this end, it is essential to increase the funding of the Customs 2020 programme – which contains cooperation mechanisms that allow customs authorities and officers across the Union to exchange and share information and best practices –  and it is also essential to ensure funding for the acquisition and maintenance of up-to date, efficient equipment for Customs controls;

12. Recalls that the Commission and the Member States have already accumulated delays in the scheduled implementation of the Union Customs Code, and consequently strongly regrets the reduction in the budget appropriations for “supporting the functioning and modernisation of the customs union” (budget line 14 02 01), which could lead to further delays, undermine the enhancement of the efficiency of custom controls throughout the Union and hamper the functioning of the internal market; recalls that the full and uniform implementation of the Code is essential to better protect citizens and the financial interests of the Union, and that e-customs constitutes a priority policy for the better functioning of the internal market;

13. Recognises that 2020 is the last year in the current Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF), and therefore calls on the Commission to make full use, in the 2020 Budget, of the available MFF margins in the policy areas under IMCO’s responsibility;

14. Stresses the importance of the Commission fully complying with recommendations of the European Court of Auditors, in the interests of a more effective budget and better value for European citizens;

15. Calls on the Commission to finance all pilot projects and preparatory actions endorsed by IMCO.


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

3.9.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

38

6

0

Members present for the final vote

Alex Agius Saliba, Andrus Ansip, Pablo Arias Echeverría, Alessandra Basso, Adam Bielan, Hynek Blaško, Vlad-Marius Botoş, Markus Buchheit, Dita Charanzová, David Cormand, Petra De Sutter, Dinesh Dhamija, Carlo Fidanza, Alexandra Geese, Svenja Hahn, Virginie Joron, Eugen Jurzyca, Arba Kokalari, Marcel Kolaja, Andrey Kovatchev, Maria Manuel Leitão Marques, Morten Løkkegaard, Adriana Maldonado López, Antonius Manders, Beata Mazurek, Leszek Miller, Brian Monteith, Dan-Ştefan Motreanu, Kris Peeters, Anne-Sophie Pelletier, Christel Schaldemose, Andreas Schwab, Tomislav Sokol, Ivan Štefanec, Róża Thun und Hohenstein, Kim Van Sparrentak, Marion Walsmann, Marco Zullo

Substitutes present for the final vote

Clara Aguilera, Claudia Gamon, Lucy Elizabeth Harris, John Howarth

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Delara Burkhardt, Predrag Fred Matić

 


 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

38

+

ECR

Adam Bielan, Carlo Fidanza, Eugen Jurzyca, Beata Mazurek

GUE/NGL

Anne-Sophie Pelletier

NI

Marco Zullo

PPE

Pablo Arias Echeverría, Arba Kokalari, Andrey Kovatchev, Antonius Manders, Dan-Ştefan Motreanu, Kris Peeters, Andreas Schwab, Tomislav Sokol, Ivan Štefanec, Róża Thun und Hohenstein, Marion Walsmann

RENEW

Andrus Ansip, Vlad-Marius Botoş, Dita Charanzová, Dinesh Dhamija, Claudia Gamon, Svenja Hahn, Morten Løkkegaard

S&D

Alex Agius Saliba, Clara Aguilera, Delara Burkhardt, John Howarth, Maria Manuel Leitão Marques, Adriana Maldonado López, Predrag Fred Matić, Leszek Miller, Christel Schaldemose

VERTS/ALE

David Cormand, Petra De Sutter, Alexandra Geese, Marcel Kolaja, Kim Van Sparrentak

 

6

-

ID

Alessandra Basso, Hynek Blaško, Markus Buchheit, Virginie Joron

NI

Lucy Elizabeth Harris, Brian Monteith

 

0

0

 

 

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION OF THE Committee on Transport and Tourism (26.9.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Daniel Freund</Depute>

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Transport and Tourism calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1. Takes note of the draft budget proposed by the Commission in the field of transport; regrets the indiscriminate cuts demanded by the Council; insists on an ambitious budget for the EU transport sector, which takes into consideration emerging challenges and current political priorities related to the EU transport policy;

2. Believes the time is ripe for a more fundamental reshaping of EU transport financing with a view to establishing a net zero-emission transport sector by 2050 and guarantee full alignment with the Paris Agreement and the sustainable development goals; stresses that a high level of funding, result-oriented and efficient use of funds in the Horizon 2020 transport portfolio, programmes and joint undertakings delivering these objectives are of utmost importance; highlights the importance of projects and programmes in the fields of decarbonisation and digitalisation, requests an adequate funding and asks for their prioritisation; urges the Commission to promote digitalisation in logistics; believes that this reform must take full account of the needs of vulnerable social groups and regions in order for the transition to be fair and inclusive; stresses that funding must ensure improved transport connectivity and efficiency;

3. Insists that the EU transport policy is essential for economic, social and environmental sustainability and therefore priority should be given to the quality and sustainability of projects and their usefulness for citizens and businesses, rather than their quantity or size; stresses that the EU transport policy needs an adequate and sufficient funding in order to secure growth, jobs and competitiveness in Europe, including in the more remote geographical areas, more investments in research and innovation, social and territorial cohesion; underlines that transversality between policy, finance and administrative procedure shall be developed for the purpose of reaching efficiency gains in major infrastructure projects;

4. Highlights the crucial role that the EU transport policy and investment plays in promoting and enhancing territorial, social and economic cohesion in the EU, and in ensuring the territorial accessibility and interconnectivity of all regions of the EU, including remote regions, the outermost regions, islands, outlying regions, mountainous regions and border regions, as well as depopulated and sparsely populated areas;

5. Points out that public investments in road, rail, air and sea transport have a positive impact on the internal market and European economy, which must become a world leader;

6. Emphasises that the EU transport infrastructure policy must turn a stronger integrative focus on these three aspects:

- interconnectivity between the corridors and the comprehensive network and cross border connections must be a priority,

- intermodality should be a basis for decisions on projects, and

- interoperability must be a condition for co-financing transport projects;

7. Reiterates that the provisional agreement on the regulation setting up the InvestEU Programme[10] contains a general provision - applicable to all transport-related financing - ensuring that "Projects that are inconsistent with the achievement of the climate objectives shall not be eligible for support" and that financing and investment operations "shall be screened to determine if they have an environmental, climate or social impact and if so, shall be subject to climate, environmental and social sustainability proofing"; recalls that InvestEU Fund should support investments contributing to greater economic, territorial and social cohesion in the Union and that, in order to maximise the impact and the added value of EU financing support, it is appropriate to maximise “synergies across relevant Union programmes in areas such as transport, energy and digitalisation”;

8. Stresses that beyond its key role in implementing the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI) and InvestEU, it is vital that the revision of the European Investment Bank’s (EIB) transport policy due in 2020 paves the way for more fundamental overhaul of the Bank’s transport financing; recalls that the EIB has provided approximately EUR 140 billion in loans for transport projects in the 2007-2018 period, of which around 80% relate to road infrastructure[11]; calls on the EIB to report on all steps of its transport policy revision to Parliament in a timely manner;

9. Emphasises the crucial role of the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) in fostering the development of a high-performance trans-European network (TEN-T) that is sustainable and interconnected across the areas of transport, energy and digital services infrastructure; reiterates that the swift completion of the TEN-T will make a significant contribution to socio-economic and territorial cohesion in the EU, and to the promotion of the EU’s decarbonisation objectives; highlights that the CEF is vital for investment in sustainable long-term growth, innovation, cohesion, competitiveness and job creation in the EU;

10. Believes that the CEF spending in the field of transport can be improved by increasing further the share of funding for zero emission transport modes; recalls that the CEF is an extremely important and vital financial instrument in the transport sector and the short and long term planning of spending should take into consideration a result-oriented approach and seek for and EU added value, especially regarding the development and completion of the TEN-T core and comprehensive networks; welcomes the approach of the Commission to co-finance the re-establishment of regional cross-border rail connections that were dismantled or abandoned[12] and encourages the Members States, cross-border regions and the Commission to further intensify these bottom-up projects that contribute to reopening borders in the EU where they still exist; calls on the Commission to significantly increase the reserved amount within the CEF budget line for financing for the re-establishment of regional missing rail links that were dismantled or abandoned, bearing geographically disadvantaged areas in mind as a priority; calls on the Commission to take into account the still large divergences in terms of transport infrastructure across the EU; further electrification of railway infrastructure must be intensified and a quicker roll out of the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS) is required; the CEF budget should also take account of rail freight noise abatement measures in order to ensure a sustainable and efficient freight transport system; takes the view that the CEF should do more to integrate and promote maritime transport; calls for financing for CEF to be protected when funds available for transport are allocated;

11. Asks the Commission to present, till the end of 2019, an evaluation of the implementation of all contracted projects, including state of play and previsions regarding the completion of the projects and proposals to allow reaching a 100% level of spending, including relocating of funds;

12. Recalls that cohesion policy funding for transport infrastructure should aim at pursuing the Treaty-based objective of economic, social and territorial cohesion; stresses  that decentralised approaches are important and connectivity and accessibility of rural areas remains a challenge to be tackled as a matter of urgency; expresses concern that little attention is given to modal shift in the use of the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Cohesion Fund (CF); underlines the need for decarbonisation of EU funds also in relation to the transport sector; recommends to increase investment into cycling and walking; reiterates its longstanding demand about transparency of EU funding in the transport sector, in particular of shared management resources; calls on the Commission to make available in a comprehensive manner information on transport projects that have received funding from the ERDF and CF;

13. Asks the Commission to present, till the end of the year, an evaluation of the use of EU money part of CEF, CF and ERDF for transport projects, including the level of compliance with the transport strategies and ex ante conditionalities provided in the Partnership agreements;

14. Asks the Commission to present, till the end of 2019, an evaluation of the state of play of spending of the amounts allocated for financial instruments, previsions regarding the final level of absorption and proposals to be applied to obtain a 100% level, including redirection to other CEF budget lines;

15. Asks the Commission to present an evaluation of the use of amounts allocated for SESAR deployment, state of play, future actions and the contribution of the projects financed from these amounts to the SESAR deployment in the Member States;

16. Encourages the Commission to promote the revitalisation of comfortable European night trains as a possible and sustainable alternative to short-distance flights and long-distance car travelling; calls on the Commission to explore the options of possible combinations of the co-financing of the EuroVelo network with the comprehensive rail network;

17. Takes the view that maritime transport offers an alternative to the 'everything-by-road' approach considers that the provisions of Directive (EU) 2016/802 of the European Parliament and of the Council[13] setting limits on the sulphur content of marine fuels will enhance the sustainability of this form of transport and that there is still scope for further progress in decarbonising the sector; notes that Europe's ports are multimodal hubs and the gateway for more than 90% of the EU's goods imports; calls on the Commission to do more to promote and finance this mode of transport;

18. Emphasises that digitalisation can make transport in the EU more inclusive, innovative, interconnected and sustainable; reminds the Commission how important it is to draw up a new EU strategy, the priorities of which must be a just transition and retraining for people whose jobs become obsolete owing to the digitalisation of the transport sector;

19. In light of the still very high number of deaths and injuries caused by traffic accidents, and the new Directive on road infrastructure safety management with its provision ensuring that “Member States shall ensure that the needs of vulnerable road users are taken into account”, insists that the Commission and Member States further prioritise the financing of the transport safety of passengers in different means of transport and that they focus on the safety of vulnerable road users, such as pedestrians, persons with a disability, cyclists, and other micro-mobility users, as well as the modal shift towards safer and cleaner means of transport such as rail transport; calls on the Commission to provide the necessary technical and administrative assistance to Member States concerning the adequate maintenance measures of the existing roads in their respective comprehensive transport plans, in order to increase the quality and safety of roads;

20. Considers a stronger articulation of urban transport financing with Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans (SUMPS) to be essential to boost the urban mobility transformation; calls for those urban mobility plans to foster multi-modality among various sustainable modes of transport, with balanced socio-economic arrangements to ensure there is no discrimination against EU citizens;

21. Stresses that urban mobility arrangements must play their part in reducing the length of commutes (between work and home), ensuring interoperability, making public transport more attractive to populations and reducing the prevalence of private transport, thus furthering environmental and climatic sustainability and the development of society; considers that, given the diversity of public transport modes in EU metropolitan areas (some of them with dispersed transport systems and disorganised ticketing, which makes them more expensive to use), the 2020 budget should seek to focus on the problems arising from complex public transport ticketing and support the introduction of an action plan to implement a single multi-modal ticketing system;

22. Calls for a fully transparent funding landscape and more transparent project assessments, with particular attention paid to the participation of citizens, civil society and NGOs in transparent decision-making and monitoring the development of large projects that have a total investment volume of over EUR 1 billion; considers that funding should focus on goals that guarantee real added value for the Member States, especially at social and environmental level;

23. Recalls that public investment in infrastructure is particularly sensitive to corruption; stresses the importance of guaranteeing a transparent and competitive tendering process for large-scale transport infrastructure projects financed by the EU; insists that contracting authorities and bidders for these large-scale projects must enter into Integrity Pacts under which third parties monitor their compliance with commitments to best practice and transparency; recalls that the Member States have the primary responsibility for setting up a management system, which aims to ensure the effective and efficient delivery of investment projects, and urges the Commission to ensure the necessary administrative and technical support in order to facilitate their implementation; points out that it is also important for account to be taken in procurement procedures of the social conditions for workers; points out that today the entire transport sector is finding it hard to recruit staff, and that working conditions must be improved in order to address staffing issues;

24. Considers that cost-benefit analyses for transport projects must no longer be focussed on short-term economic analyses but on the comprehensive understanding of all short- and long-term external costs, guided by the recent study on externalities and cost internalisation commissioned by the Commission, which revealed that the overall size of transport external costs is estimated to be close to EUR 1 000 billion annually[14];

25. Calls on the Commission to have a more result-oriented approach, seek for an EU added-value and focus more on the political objectives while defining the criteria for selection of pilot projects and preparatory actions and recalls the importance of their proper implementation;

26. Reiterates the need for a strong European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) with the appropriate level of funding to ensure and lead globally the safety-security of EU citizens (e.g. challenges of new technologies, cyber-threats, GNSS jamming) as well as the environmental sustainability of the air transport sector by improving its environmental footprint (less noise and emissions, decarbonisation, circular economy), promoting environmental protection (mitigation measures), development of innovative and sustainable technologies (drones, electric and hybrid aircraft, sustainable aviation fuels), an eco-label programme and multimodal mobility (i.e. interconnection to/between railway and airport infrastructure);

27. Regrets that the broadened tasks of the EU transport-related agencies - EASA,  European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) and European Union Agency for Railways (ERA) - have not been taken into consideration for Budget 2020 while the increased need of financial and human resources should be taken into account, in order to ensure the full deployment of their tasks; recalls that, according to an opinion of the Court of Auditors, centralising the work of the ERA at one seat could reduce costs borne by the EU budget;

28. Highlights the importance of projects fostering the promotion of tourism, a sector that contributes significantly to Member States’ GDP and has economic impact on growth, competitiveness, employment and social development; regrets that the budget does not include tourism as an individual policy area and reiterates its call for a specific and dedicated funding under a separate budgetary line within the next multiannual financial framework to be devoted exclusively to tourism; points out that Member States face common challenges in the tourism sector, including crisis management, competition from third countries, sustainability of tourism activities, strengthening of local and isolated communities and transition to a zero-carbon economy and that common European policies therefore provide substantial added value.

 


 

ANNEX: LIST OF ENTITIES OR PERSONS
FROM WHOM THE RAPPORTEUR FOR THE OPINION HAS RECEIVED INPUT

 

 

 

 

Entity and/or person -

European Federation for Transport and Environment - 58744833263-19

 

 

Community of European Railway and Infrastructure Companies - 7574621118-27

 

 

 

 

 


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

24.9.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

35

6

3

Members present for the final vote

Andris Ameriks, José Ramón Bauzá Díaz, Izaskun Bilbao Barandica, Marco Campomenosi, Ciarán Cuffe, Johan Danielsson, Andor Deli, Anna Deparnay-Grunenberg, Ismail Ertug, Gheorghe Falcă, Giuseppe Ferrandino, Mario Furore, Isabel García Muñoz, Jens Gieseke, Kateřina Konečná, Elena Kountoura, Julie Lechanteux, Bogusław Liberadzki, Peter Lundgren, Benoît Lutgen, Marian-Jean Marinescu, Tilly Metz, Caroline Nagtegaal, Bill Newton Dunn, Jan-Christoph Oetjen, Philippe Olivier, Tomasz Piotr Poręba, Dominique Riquet, Sven Schulze, Vera Tax, Cristian Terheş, Barbara Thaler, István Ujhelyi, Petar Vitanov, Lucia Vuolo, Roberts Zīle, Kosma Złotowski

Substitutes present for the final vote

Paolo Borchia, Gina Dowding, Ilhan Kyuchyuk, Ljudmila Novak, Andrey Novakov, Anne-Sophie Pelletier, Catherine Rowett

 


 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

35

+

GUE/NGL

Kateřina Konečná, Elena Kountoura, Anne-Sophie Pelletier

NI

Mario Furore

PPE

Andor Deli, Gheorghe Falcă, Jens Gieseke, Benoît Lutgen, Marian-Jean Marinescu, Ljudmila Novak, Andrey Novakov, Sven Schulze, Barbara Thaler

RENEW

José Ramón Bauzá Díaz, Izaskun Bilbao Barandica, Ilhan Kyuchyuk, Caroline Nagtegaal, Bill Newton Dunn, Jan-Christoph Oetjen, Dominique Riquet

S&D

Andris Ameriks, Johan Danielsson, Ismail Ertug, Giuseppe Ferrandino, Isabel García Muñoz, Bogusław Liberadzki, Vera Tax, Cristian Terheş, István Ujhelyi, Petar Vitanov

VERTS/ALE

Ciarán Cuffe, Anna Deparnay-Grunenberg, Gina Dowding, Tilly Metz, Catherine Rowett

 

6

-

ECR

Peter Lundgren

ID

Paolo Borchia, Marco Campomenosi, Julie Lechanteux, Philippe Olivier, Lucia Vuolo

 

3

0

ECR

Tomasz Piotr Poręba, Roberts Zīle, Kosma Złotowski

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION OF THE Committee on Regional Development (7.10.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Younous Omarjee</Depute>

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Regional Development calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1. Recalls that cohesion is one of the Union objectives laid down in Article 3 of the Treaty on European Union, is defined in Article 174 TFEU and is a shared competence of the Union and Member States; underlines that cohesion policy is one of the most important Union policies and its main public investment policy, with a budget of EUR 351,8 billion for the 2014-2020 MFF, that is a third of the MFF, that it should continue to be so in the next MFF with no further cuts and that new Union initiatives must be matched with new and adequate financial resources and be dealt with under the co-decision procedure;

2. Underlines that cohesion policy is based on a policy of solidarity, pursuing its Treaty-posed objective of promoting and supporting the overall harmonious development of Member States and regions, promotes interregional cooperation, and aims to reduce economic, social and territorial disparities between and within Union regions, to ensure that no region is left behind, taking into account the demographic challenges; considers that it creates growth and jobs across the Union as well as delivering key Union objectives and priorities, including its climate and energy targets, as well as smart, sustainable and inclusive economic growth; notes that additionality can bring a balanced use of structural funds in combination with all available sources including financial instruments;

3. Welcomes that there are no more payment needs for the 2007-2013 and that the improved execution of payments and the increased project selection rate are proceeding at cruising speed and that the pace of project selection on the ground has finally caught up and further advanced with the levels of the previous programming period, standing at 83 % as of September 2019; notes, however, large disparities between the Member States related to this rate and calls on the Commission to further assist the Member States lagging behind in improving their results;

4. Notes the increase in commitment appropriations by 2,5% for Subheading 1b in the draft budget 2020 compared to the 2019 EU budget, while payment appropriations as a whole increased by 6,4%;

5. Calls on the Council and the Commission to consider the lessons of this programming period and avoid any further payment crises and future payment delays; draws its attention to the fact that delayed start of programs and implementation led to the crowding of payment requests;

6. Underlines that the outermost regions referred to in Article 349 TFEU benefit from specific measures, particularly in the context of the cohesion policy, with regard to the conditions for accessing much-needed and essential funds to promote sustainable development and therefore achieve the sustainable development goals, in view of their economic and social situation, the high structural impact of their geographical remoteness and their specific exposure to the effects associated with climate change;

7. Recalls that cohesion policy is one of the most important instruments addressing priorities outlined in the Commission’s draft budget for 2020; underlines the return of investment of cohesion policy as every 1 EUR invested leads to an outcome of 2,74 EUR in growth and jobs creation;

8. Reaffirms that, in order to achieve the cohesion policy objectives, regional, local, urban and other authorities must work together and establish a dialogue with civil society organisations, including universities, environmental organisations and groups which represent ethnic and religious diversity, age, people with disabilities, sexual orientation or gender identity;

9. Recalls that cohesion policy is a helpful tool to support the reception and integration of migrants and insists that 2020 EU budget should contribute to tackling the challenges linked to migration in a spirit of solidarity;

10. Calls for a reprogramming exercise for the Youth Employment Initiative, following the agreement in the 2019 budgetary procedure to significantly increase the level of commitment appropriations; insists on financing specific measures aimed at limiting the exodus of young people from less developed regions;

11. Is worried about the consequences of a possible no-deal Brexit and especially about potential negative impacts on cohesion policy and cross-border regions; stresses the importance of the negotiations on the next MFF and urges in that context that the budgetary repercussions of Brexit on cohesion policy be limited to the extent possible;

12. Reiterates the importance of strengthening administrative capacity of local and regional authorities, which is a key element for the correct preparation and implementation of projects on the ground;

13. Notes that the 2020 budgetary year is the last one of the current MFF period and therefore stresses the importance of preparation and smooth adaptation to the new financial period;

14. Expresses concern that the target of 20 % climate spending of the EU budget for the 2014-2020 MFF will not be reached and urges the Commission to significantly raise the percentage for climate spending for 2020; calls on the Member States and regions to take due account of the important contribution of cohesion policy for investment in climate protection and for reaching the Union’s climate spending target while strengthening the need to close the climate budget gap of EUR 3,5 billion and the need to avoid spending public money on fossil fuels in order to focus further on tackling climate change to achieve the Paris Agreement;

15. Considers that sufficient support should be given for actions with a special focus on health and environmental aspect, that could also derive from requirements related to the energy transition, such as decommissioning of nuclear power plants; recalls the need to decarbonize the 41 regions dependent on coal through re-skilling and up-skilling workers on the coal sector, and ensure a just transition to a sustainable economy through establishment of a Just Transition Fund allocating sufficient resources in the budget, to ensure a just and fair transition to zero-carbon economy by 2050;

16. Notes that, for transfers to the Connecting Europe Facility, 2020 will be the second year in which further pre-financing can be requested for actions begun in 2014, 2015 or 2016, and the last year for reallocation of unused resources;

17. Stresses that cohesion policy should not undergo any transfer that could jeopardize the structural and investment funds’ ability to deliver on their goals;

18. Notes that the Structural Reform Support Programme funding will be financed using the Global Margin for Commitments; warns that increases of funding should come at no expense to cohesion policy; recalls that new Union initiatives should be financed with new additional resources and not at the expense of long-standing Union policies; notes that cohesion policy and economic governance could have different objectives and that reforms should take territorial impacts in due consideration;

19. Regrets the decrease in Cohesion Fund appropriations compared to the previous programming period and notes the risks of widening development gaps in terms of basic infrastructure, in particular the transport infrastructure; calls for more flexible budgetary mechanisms to facilitate the reallocation of funding to additional investments in basic infrastructure, especially TEN-T infrastructure, as the driving force behind economic, social and territorial inclusion at Union level in those Member States whose development is clearly lagging behind;

20. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to ensure the transparent, fair and responsible use of Union resources.


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

2.10.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

38

0

1

Members present for the final vote

Mathilde Androuët, Pascal Arimont, Adrian-Dragoş Benea, Isabel Benjumea Benjumea, Tom Berendsen, Stéphane Bijoux, Franc Bogovič, Andrea Cozzolino, Corina Crețu, Rosa D’Amato, Tamás Deutsch, Francesca Donato, Jill Evans, Raffaele Fitto, Cristian Ghinea, Mircea-Gheorghe Hava, Krzysztof Hetman, Manolis Kefalogiannis, Ondřej Knotek, Constanze Krehl, Elżbieta Kruk, Naomi Long, Cristina Maestre Martín De Almagro, Pedro Marques, Martina Michels, Andżelika Anna Możdżanowska, Andrey Novakov, Younous Omarjee, Alessandro Panza, Tsvetelina Penkova, Caroline Roose, André Rougé, Susana Solís Pérez, Monika Vana, Julie Ward

Substitutes present for the final vote

Ciarán Cuffe, Barbara Ann Gibson, Tomislav Sokol, Maria Spyraki

 


 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

38

+

ECR

Raffaele Fitto, Elżbieta Kruk, Andżelika Anna Możdżanowska

GUE/NGL

Martina Michels, Younous Omarjee

ID

Mathilde Androuët, Francesca Donato, Alessandro Panza, André Rougé

NI

Rosa D'Amato

PPE

Pascal Arimont, Isabel Benjumea Benjumea, Tom Berendsen, Franc Bogovič, Mircea-Gheorghe Hava, Krzysztof Hetman, Manolis Kefalogiannis, Andrey Novakov, Tomislav Sokol, Maria Spyraki

RENEW

Stéphane Bijoux, Cristian Ghinea, Barbara Ann Gibson, Ondřej Knotek, Naomi Long, Susana Solís Pérez

S&D

Adrian-Dragoş Benea, Andrea Cozzolino, Corina Crețu, Constanze Krehl, Cristina Maestre Martín De Almagro, Pedro Marques, Tsvetelina Penkova, Julie Ward

VERTS/ALE

Ciarán Cuffe, Jill Evans, Caroline Roose, Monika Vana

 

0

-

 

 

 

1

0

PPE

Tamás Deutsch

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION OF THE Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development (6.9.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020 </Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Paolo De Castro</Depute>

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1. Takes note of the EUR 59 994,9 million in commitments and EUR 58 014,3 million in payments that the Commission proposes in the Draft Budget 2020 for Heading 2, of which European Agricultural Guarantee Fund appropriations are slightly increased to EUR 43 531,8 million in commitments (+0,8 %) and to EUR 43 501,7 million in payments (+0,9 %) compared to the Budget 2019; deeply regrets that the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) appropriations are reduced to EUR 14 708,7 million in commitments (-0,1 %) and EUR 13 141,2 million (-0,1 %) in payments compared to the Budget 2019, mostly due to a stagnation in the nominal term of the EAFRD as such and a strong decrease in Support Expenditures;

2. Insists that any revenue to the Union budget deriving from any assigned revenues or repayments of irregularities from agriculture in previous years should remain under Heading 2;

3. Insists that there should be no further cuts to the agricultural budget, especially given the fact that the agricultural sector is frequently affected by crises that require a budgetary response;

4. Notes that budgetary year 2020 is the last one of the current multiannual financial framework period and therefore stresses the importance of preparation and smooth adaptation to the new financial period, in which a fair standard for living of farmers must be ensured;

5. Is deeply concerned about the budgetary consequences of a “no-deal Brexit” and, since farmers need to plan their activity in advance, strongly opposes any unexpected cut in common agricultural policy (CAP) allocations in 2020 in case there is no agreement between the Union and the United Kingdom;

6. Underlines that the Union budget must be coherent with the objectives of the Paris Agreement under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, adopted in December 2015;

7. Rejects the reduction in appropriations proposed by the Commission for producer organisations in the fruit and vegetable sector (- EUR 14,6 million), which could have a negative impact on their growing contribution to rebalance the bargaining power in the food supply chain as the farmers will be directly affected; in this regard, considers that the Commission should ensure that the payments for this sector will not be reduced; regrets the absence of appropriations for the poultry meat sector and suggests allocating funds in the section 'Other measures for pigmeat, poultry, eggs, beekeeping, other animal products' to support the poultry sector as it suffers from unfair trade distortion with Ukraine;

8. Regrets the lack of compensation for the reduction of appropriations proposed by the Commission for fruit and vegetable producers in the Union, which is a sector facing a serious crisis, due to phytophagous or pathological agents such as the Tristeza virus for oranges, the Mal secco for lemons, Tuta absoluta for tomatoes and Xylella fastidiosa for olive trees; asks therefore that, despite the reductions in appropriations, a citrus funding plan be envisaged in order to support the costs of reconversion of the current citrus and olive groves with varieties of the same plants that are more resistant, allowing a real relaunch of the sector;

9. Welcomes the Commission proposal to allocate EUR 50 million to ‘Other measures for beef and veal’ in order to support the beef sector in Ireland in case of market difficulties linked to the United Kingdom’s potential withdrawal from the Union; stresses that the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the Union will also have a significant negative impact across several agricultural sectors in the Union; asks the Commission to propose a support plan based on a proper impact assessment, sector by sector and Member State by Member State, for all the Union agricultural sectors likely to be affected by the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the Union and extend that plan to affected Member States in accordance with their degree of exposure; considers that, in order to be effective, the plan must include structural measures aimed at strengthening the organisation of those sectors and promoting the diversification of trade flows;

10. Considers that the trade agreement between the Union and Mercosur will create additional stress for those agricultural sectors and asks therefore the Commission to set out in detail by the end of 2019 the content of the EUR 1 billion Union support plan announced on 28 June 2019, aimed at enabling sensitive agricultural sectors in the Union to cope with the potential negative impact of that trade agreement, in the event that it is ratified;

11. Highlights the budgetary inefficiency in supporting sensitive sectors whilst at the same time opening them up to further competition and risk of market instability, in particular through bilateral free trade agreements; notes in addition the long-term erosion of traditional own resources in the Union budget, caused in particular by the decrease in customs duties as a result of free trade agreements;

12. Takes note of the proposal of the Commission to assist farmers with a financial support package of up EUR 1 billion in the event of market disturbance from the Union’s trade agreement with Mercosur; insists that those funds should not be extracted from any existing agricultural budget line;

13. Is concerned by the current crisis in the sugar sector following the elimination of the quota system and by the recent announcement of eight factory closures in the Union; regrets the lack of funds allocated to support that sector; considers that, in the absence of intervention by the public authorities, private actors must be allowed to take private initiatives to regulate production on a voluntary basis; proposes in this context that the Commission assess in the light of the new production season the possibility of triggering budget-neutral measures, available under Article 222 of Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council[15] authorising farmers, their organisations and recognised interbranch organisations to enter into collective agreements in order to withdraw from the market, store or reduce their production in a concerted manner;

14. Welcomes the increased funding proposed by the Commission for promotion measures, which confirms the effectiveness of the improvements made by the last reform; considers that Commission should keep on reinforcing the promotion campaigns to open new markets for quality products as promotion measures are crucial to expanding the share of Union exports on markets across the world;

15. Regrets the absence of support to farmers for measures, in particular in the milk and dairy sector, which faces continuing market difficulties due to the Russian import ban on a range of Union agricultural products (‘the Russian embargo’);

16. Recalls that for the last five years Union agricultural sectors have been suffering from the effects of the Russian embargo; stresses that any additional effects on agricultural trade flows linked to the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the Union might cause further disturbance, and asks for additional appropriations for exceptional measures where needed;

17. Believes that the Union can make a vital contribution to the promotion of healthy eating habits, especially among children, and therefore considers it essential to make full use of the ceilings provided for in relation to the Union school schemes, as well as to develop additional schemes for sustainable consumption in the current Regulation; therefore calls on the Member States to strengthen their national programmes to ensure full utilisation of the maximum available allocations (EUR 250 million) by establishing less bureaucratic programmes;

18. Welcomes the increased support for research and innovation dedicated to the supply of safe and high quality food and food security; stresses that it is essential that funds earmarked for research in the agri-food sector, in particular from the Horizon 2020 budget, remain fully available as such in order to stimulate innovation and smart solutions, in particular through agroecological research, with a whole agroecosystem approach, in the agricultural and rural development sectors; underlines the importance of practical applicability of results at farm level and the role of agricultural extension services; highlights that research policy should maintain coherence with environmental, climate, biodiversity, health and welfare policy objectives, and incentivise and support initiatives tailored to the needs of smallholdings without economies of scale, so that they may benefit from new technologies; underlines the need to enhance the link between research and practice, by involving primary producers and disseminating knowledge and best practices;

19. Calls on the Commission to provide sufficient financial support for the further uptake of smart and innovative solutions in the agricultural sector, given their proven environmental benefits and need for greater agricultural efficiency; considers that precision farming and the use of digitisation should be further analysed and promoted;

20. Taking into account that the Union remains vulnerable to outbreaks of animal and plant diseases, deplores the 60 % reduction in the appropriations of the fund for emergency measures related to animal and plant health;

21. Notes with serious concern the severe impact of the spread of African swine fever (ASF) to several Member States and the great number of outbreaks registered since the beginning of 2019; is concerned that big pig holdings have been affected with tens of thousands of animals being culled; regrets therefore the lack of allocations for preventing and combating ASF, underlining that the Union budget for 2019 allocated EUR 28 million for that purpose; stresses that at least a similar allocation should be included in the Union budget for 2020; takes note that third countries have invested in research for developing a vaccine against ASF; is of the opinion that the Union should be investing in research and development of a vaccine, which would help eradicate the spread and occurrence of ASF in the shortest possible time;

22. Encourages Member States to increase support for establishing young farmers, in line with the objective of a better contribution to the generational renewal of farmers in the Union;

23. Highlights the importance of rural development commitments and spending for agri-environmental measures and the wider rural economy, particularly the importance of initiatives to target and support young farmers;

24. Welcomes the funding of new pilot projects which are essential for reflection on the future of the CAP, namely projects to develop a toolbox for integrated pest management for farmers, to promote 'Smart Villages' and to set up an operational programme in the livestock sector;

25. Asks for the maintenance of the appropriations for POSEI programmes at the maximum levels laid down in Union law, underlining the relevance of those programmes for the resilience of agricultural producers and highlights the fragile economic situation of the outermost regions, which are still strongly hit by the crisis.


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

4.9.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

39

5

1

Members present for the final vote

Mazaly Aguilar, Álvaro Amaro, Eric Andrieu, Attila Ara-Kovács, Carmen Avram, Adrian-Dragoş Benea, Benoît Biteau, Mara Bizzotto, Daniel Buda, Matt Carthy, Asger Christensen, Dacian Cioloș, Ivan David, Paolo De Castro, Jérémy Decerle, Diane Dodds, Herbert Dorfmann, Luke Ming Flanagan, Dino Giarrusso, Martin Häusling, Martin Hlaváček, Krzysztof Jurgiel, Jarosław Kalinowski, Elsi Katainen, Gilles Lebreton, Norbert Lins, Marlene Mortler, Ulrike Müller, Juozas Olekas, Sheila Ritchie, Bronis Ropė, Bert-Jan Ruissen, Anne Sander, Petri Sarvamaa, Annie Schreijer-Pierik, Veronika Vrecionová, Sarah Wiener, Juan Ignacio Zoido Álvarez

Substitutes present for the final vote

Atidzhe Alieva-Veli, Franc Bogovič, Lena Düpont, Estrella Dura Ferrandis, Ivo Hristov, Jan Huitema, Anthea McIntyre, Joëlle Mélin, Tilly Metz, Daniela Rondinelli, Christine Schneider, Marc Tarabella, Irène Tolleret

 


 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

39

+

ECR

Mazaly Aguilar, Krzysztof Jurgiel, Anthea McIntyre, Veronika Vrecionová

GUE/NGL

Matt Carthy, Luke Ming Flanagan

ID

Mara Bizzotto, Gilles Lebreton, Joëlle Mélin

NI

Diane Dodds, Dino Giarrusso

PPE

Álvaro Amaro, Franc Bogovič, Daniel Buda, Herbert Dorfmann, Lena Düpont, Jarosław Kalinowski, Norbert Lins, Marlene Mortler, Anne Sander, Petri Sarvamaa, Annie Schreijer‑Pierik, Juan Ignacio Zoido Álvarez

Renew

Asger Christensen, Dacian Cioloș, Jérémy Decerle, Martin Hlaváček, Elsi Katainen, Ulrike Müller, Sheila Ritchie

S&D

Eric Andrieu, Attila Ara‑Kovács, Carmen Avram, Adrian‑Dragoş Benea, Paolo De Castro, Estrella Dura Ferrandis, Ivo Hristov, Juozas Olekas, Marc Tarabella

 

5

-

Verts/ALE

Benoît Biteau, Martin Häusling, Tilly Metz, Bronis Ropė, Sarah Wiener

 

1

0

ID

Ivan David

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION OF THE Committee on Fisheries (5.9.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Chris Davies</Depute>

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Fisheries calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1. Recalls that appropriate financial measures are needed to guarantee a viable fisheries sector, points out that the objectives of the CFP can only be achieved if there is a sufficient budget; points out that that budget is concentrated in Section III and Title 11, ‘Maritime Affairs and Fisheries’; recalls that the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF)  and the compulsory contributions to regional fisheries management organisations and sustainable fisheries agreements make up most of the budget;

2. Stresses that a balance should be struck between environmental priorities and social and economic stability in order to achieve a sustainable blue economy, particularly for communities that depend on small-scale coastal fishing;

3. Emphasises that the core objectives of the CFP should balance the viability of a sector of strategic importance for the European Union with the need to preserve marine ecosystems by developing economically and environmentally sustainable fisheries;

4. Considers that important efforts have been made to increase sound scientific knowledge of marine biological resources. Although knowledge has improved, we are still far from optimum in order to provide for an appropriate assessment; considers that Union funds must therefore be increased for both international and Member States’ scientific research organisations in order to further improve the evaluation of stocks, and to increase marine knowledge, including by studying the impact of climate change and pollution on stocks; more broadly, considers that fishermen must be encouraged to contribute to marine knowledge and funding for on-board measuring instruments should be provided for that purpose;

5. Points out that more than half of the Union’s supply of fisheries products come from international waters and the exclusive economic zones of third countries; stresses that the promotion, by the EU, of sustainable fisheries in third countries’ waters is essential for the EU fleet and for the prosperity of EU and third countries’ coastal communities, for the conservation of the fishery resources and the marine environment, the development of local industries, the employment generated by fishing, processing and trade, and the contribution of fishing to food security; recalls the strategic importance of the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership Agreements and, more broadly, the external dimension of the CFP; considers that adequate and reliable budgetary provisions must be calculated in the annual budget for 2020 and that the current budget should not be cut in order to comply with the international fisheries agreement obligations and to ensure the Union's participation in regional fisheries management organisations;

6. Recalls that the EU is party to international agreements such as the Paris Agreement and the UN's Sustainable Development Goals – including Goal 14 on the conservation and sustainable use of the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development – and that it must keep to its commitments when developing its policies, including the common fisheries policy;

7. Recalls that one of the CFP objectives is to contribute to ensuring food security in the EU; recalls that a substantial share of fisheries products consumed in the EU are imported; stresses that aquaculture is becoming an important element in achieving that objective and reduces the EU's dependence on imports of fisheries products;

8. Highlights that special importance should be granted in the 2020 budget to the financial resources designated needed to support the fishing sector while the landing obligation schemes are implemented;

9. Reiterates the importance of coastal and small artisanal fleet; emphasises that sector represents nearly 75 % of all fishing vessels registered in the Union and nearly half of all employment in the fisheries sector meaning that it is an important factor not only economically, but also socially, in many coastal communities; notes that operators from small-scale coastal fisheries are dependent on healthy fish stocks for their main source of income;

10. Stresses the social and economic importance of fishing for local communities and for certain maritime regions that are particularly dependent on fishing, including coastal areas and islands; recalls that local fisheries are often penalised by additional costs and permanent natural drawbacks and should therefore be supported by additional resources;

11. Calls on the Commission and Member States to help communities that depend on fisheries to diversify their economies into other maritime activities such as tourism, marine conservation, data collection and research, and help them to add more value to their fishing activities by providing the necessary incentives for example;

12. Remarks that the adoption of the current multiannual plans and the implementation of new technical measures to contribute to achieving fishing at sustainable levels requires a robust control policy supported by adequate funds;

13. Recalls the vital importance of social and economic measures to accompany management decisions to curtail fishing activities, so as to maintain adequate levels of sustainability;

14. Points out that the European Fisheries Control Agency (EFCA) plays a fundamental role in coordinating and implementing the CFP and that funding should accordingly be maintained at current levels;

15. Highlights the problem of plastic marine litter; believes that additional efforts should be made and that adequate resources should be secured in order to ensure the implementation of the relevant rules on reducing the impact of plastic products at sea;

16. Draws attention to the current intention of the United Kingdom to leave the Union, which will have an impact on the implementation of the 2014-2020 EMFF; points out that “Brexit” would mean that the utmost importance needs to be given to the establishment of a new financial budgetary framework for the period 2021-2027; considers that a higher degree of additional flexibility of the Union budget is necessary to cope with such a situation; remarks that in no case shall Brexit lead to a decrease in funds with respect to the current EMFF (2014-2027); on the contrary, requests that the 2021-2027 budget should be increased so that operators are able to cope with the serious consequences of Brexit;

17. Highlights that, six years after the adoption of the current Fund, the level of implementation of the 2014-2020 EMFF is very low and that Commission and Member States must speed up the management and control processes and alleviate the administrative burdens to ensure appropriate and timely benefits to the sector;

18. Draws attention to the need to step up funding for the Advisory Councils, given their greater commitment under Article 18 of Regulation (EU) No 1380/2013 to regionalisation policies, which are figuring more prominently in the multiannual management plans, as well as in the new regulation on 'technical measures';

19. Recalls the role played fishermen as 'guardians of the sea' and calls on the Commission to earmark adequate funding for measures to promote a combination of fishing and environmental conservation activities such as collecting plastics at sea, taking water samples or having researchers on board, thereby further reducing the impact on stocks.

 


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Members present for the final vote

Clara Aguilera, Christian Allard, Pietro Bartolo, Izaskun Bilbao Barandica, Rosanna Conte, Richard Corbett, Rosa D’Amato, Chris Davies, Filip De Man, Diane Dodds, João Ferreira, Søren Gade, Niclas Herbst, France Jamet, Predrag Fred Matić, Francisco José Millán Mon, Nosheena Mobarik, Grace O’Sullivan, Annie Schreijer-Pierik, Ruža Tomašić, Peter van Dalen, Theodoros Zagorakis

Substitutes present for the final vote

Catherine Chabaud, Nicolás Gonzalez Casares, Ivo Hristov, Brian Monteith, June Alison Mummery, Manuel Pizarro, Caroline Roose, Raffaele Stancanelli, Maria Walsh

 


 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

25

+

ECR

Nosheena Mobarik, Ruža Tomašić

ID

Filip De Man, France Jamet

NI

Rosa D'Amato, Diane Dodds

PPE

Peter van Dalen, Niclas Herbst, Francisco José Millán Mon, Annie Schreijer-Pierik, Maria Walsh, Theodoros Zagorakis

RENEW

Izaskun Bilbao Barandica, Catherine Chabaud, Chris Davies, Søren Gade

S&D

Clara Aguilera, Pietro Bartolo, Richard Corbett, Nicolás Gonzalez Casares, Ivo Hristov, Predrag Fred Matić

VERTS/ALE

Christian Allard, Grace O'Sullivan, Caroline Roose

 

0

-

 

 

 

1

0

GUE/NGL

João Ferreira

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION OF THE Committee on Culture and Education (2.10.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020 </Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Petra Kammerevert</Depute>

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Culture and Education calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1. Recalls that the Erasmus+ programme is a strategic investment, primarily in Europe’s young generation, that supports education and training opportunities across Europe, helps increase social cohesion and the building of a European sense of belonging and, therefore, is a crucial investment in the future of the Union; highlights the fact that, while its budget is relatively small, constituting 1, 8% of the current MFF, Erasmus+ is one of the best known Union programmes; reaffirms that a substantial budget increase for Erasmus+ is of vital importance in order to align it better with the high demand for the programme, as demonstrated by the volume of applications received, which exceeds by far the available funding; calls, therefore, for an increase of 10 % in the funding over the draft budget for 2020 across all Erasmus+ budget lines in order to fight the low success rates and give more people the opportunity to benefit from the programme; reiterates Parliament’s support for a tripling of the budget for the Erasmus+ programme in the next multiannual financial framework (MFF) and its intention to stand up for that increase;

2. Strongly opposes the cuts proposed by the Council to the Creative Europe programme, which would further undermine its objective of supporting the Union’s cultural and creative sectors and thus fostering a European sense of belonging, social cohesion, jobs and growth; insists that funding levels should match the ambitions of the programme and recalls that the programme has been chronically underfunded; consequently, in opposition to the cuts, asks for the budget lines corresponding to the Creative Europe programme to be increased by 10 % over the draft budget for 2020 in order to boost the efforts to reinforce the creative and cultural sectors; reiterates Parliament’s support for a doubling of the budget of the Creative Europe programme in the next MFF and its intention to stand up for that increase; calls on the Commission to continue to support the multilingual offer of European quality cultural TV programming across Europe through the Creative Europe programme;

3. Acknowledges that the interinstitutional agreement on the funding of the European Solidarity Corps has been respected and an adequate budget for the functioning of the programme has been allocated; acknowledges that the volunteering strand of the programme has triggered great interests from participants and organisations; 

4. Emphasises the value of the Europe for Citizens programme in enhancing citizens’ understanding of the Union and fostering a sense of citizenship; therefore deplores the budget cuts proposed by the Council; asks to restore and reinforce the related budget lines in order to encourage civic engagement and democratic participation; stresses that the next Europe for Citizens programme needs proper funding in the next MFF covering the period 2021-2027, albeit under the framework of the Citizens, Equality, Rights and Values programme; considers that further strengthening should be devoted to European and global citizenship education in order to provide the information required to understand the institutional framework of the Union and to engage as active citizens in tackling world challenges and current international socio-political shifts;

5. Calls on the Commission to use the attention generated by the 2018 European Year of Cultural Heritage to build a coherent and sustainable long-term strategy on promoting and safeguarding cultural heritage in Europe, including through research, and to allocate the necessary funds for this purpose in 2020 and beyond; calls, in that regard, for dedicated funds to be made available through relevant MFF programmes;

6. Welcomes the fact that culture- and education-related projects and infrastructure are supported across a range of Union programmes and instruments, notably the ESI Funds, EFSI, and Horizon 2020; calls on the Commission once again to foster coherent synergies across Union programmes – such as Horizon 2020, the Connecting Europe Facility, Erasmus+, EaSI, Creative Europe and COSME, EFSI and ESI Funds – to enhance the support to projects in the fields of education, youth, and sport as well as in the cultural and creative sectors; insists that the synergies should not be interpreted as an endorsement by Parliament of any redeployments or budgetary cuts;

7. Considering that the Sport component of the Erasmus+ programme has been a successful endeavour, it calls on the Commission to also address the overseas territories of the Member States, in which more than five million European citizens are residing. In this regard, there is a need for realistic and adapted budget lines under the 2021-2027 MFF for the Sport chapter, including towards transnational meetings within the Erasmus+ Sport programme.

8. Calls on the Commission to improve its external communication and its outreach to citizens in order to tackle fake news and disinformation and to improve the information about Union activities; stresses the importance of multimedia actions in promoting a common European public sphere, as well as multilingualism; acknowledges that European societies need strong and independent journalism that provide them with information from a European perspective; urges the Commission, therefore, to secure and increase the draft budget for 2020 for multimedia actions; calls in that regard for a 5 % increase in the multimedia action budget line over the draft budget for 2020 to secure the crucial work of Euranet Plus for the remainder of the MFF; at the same time, urges the Commission to increase transparency and accountability in the use of the budget for multimedia actions, in particular by creating specific budgetary lines related to the different actions, as well as to conduct a full scale review of the budget used for multimedia actions;

9. Is alarmed by the conclusions of the Rapid case review of the European Court of Auditors on Euronews, which highlights that Euronews is now 85 % owned by private investors and only 15 % by Union and non-Union broadcasters and local public authorities, that Union financial support to Euronews lacks transparency and accountability, that monitoring and evaluation mechanisms are insufficiently robust and that Euronews is not accessible to most Union citizens; is particularly concerned by the finding that, following the 2018 revision of the Financial Regulation, which removed the reference to the notion of bodies pursuing a general Union interest, grants for Euronews are provided under points (c) and (f) of the first paragraph of Article 195 of the Financial Regulation (bodies with a de facto monopoly/specific technical competence) and not under Article 180 (actions intended to help achieve a Union policy objective/bodies forming part of or supporting a Union policy), thus implying that Euronews no longer pursues a general Union interest; in light of the foregoing considerations, urges the Commission to answer all the concerns raised by the Court of Auditors as part of its monitoring of the funds awarded to Euronews and to reassess its approach in cooperating with Euronews; furthermore, in the event that the framework contract with Euronews is extended beyond 2020, requests that the duration of the contract not exceed two years; moreover, encourages the Commission to consider new ways of providing independent and comprehensive information on Union affairs to European viewers, taking into consideration new technological developments and changes in consumer habits; calls therefore, on the Commission to invest in a diversified mix of information instruments which could include Euronews.

10. Points to the potential of Pilot Projects and Preparatory Actions (PPPAs); believes that the pre-assessment of PPPAs by the Commission leaves very limited time for opinion-giving committees in the European Parliament to address the ratings and comments; regrets, furthermore, that in some instances the ratings and comments provided by the Commission are not entirely objective, and appear to have been influenced by institutional or personal preferences; recalls that failure to enact a PPPA inside the Commission can never be a reason for a low assessment grade; calls therefore on the Commission to consider revising the procedure on pre-assessment in order to give the committee adequate time to address the Commission pre-assessment results; furthermore, invites the Commission to provide feedback on the implementation of the committee PPPAs with a focus on successful and unsuccessful projects.


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

1.10.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

25

4

1

Members present for the final vote

Asim Ademov, Isabella Adinolfi, Christine Anderson, Andrea Bocskor, Judith Bunting, Gianantonio Da Re, Laurence Farreng, Claire Fox, Romeo Franz, Catherine Griset, Irena Joveva, Petra Kammerevert, Niyazi Kizilyürek, Ryszard Antoni Legutko, Predrag Fred Matić, Dace Melbārde, Shaffaq Mohammed, Niklas Nienaß, Peter Pollák, Domènec Ruiz Devesa, Andrey Slabakov, Massimiliano Smeriglio, Michaela Šojdrová, Sabine Verheyen, Julie Ward, Salima Yenbou, Milan Zver

Substitutes present for the final vote

Isabel Benjumea Benjumea, Ibán García Del Blanco, Iuliu Winkler

 


 

 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

25

+

ECR

Ryszard Antoni Legutko, Dace Melbārde, Andrey Slabakov

GUE/NGL

Niyazi Kizilyürek

NI

Isabella Adinolfi

PPE

Asim Ademov, Isabel Benjumea Benjumea, Andrea Bocskor, Peter Pollák, Michaela Šojdrová, Sabine Verheyen, Iuliu Winkler, Milan Zver

RENEW

Judith Bunting, Laurence Farreng, Irena Joveva, Shaffaq Mohammed

S&D

Ibán García Del Blanco, Petra Kammerevert, Predrag Fred Matić, Massimiliano Smeriglio, Julie Ward

VERTS/ALE

Romeo Franz, Niklas Nienaß, Salima Yenbou

 

4

-

ID

Christine Anderson, Gianantonio Da Re, Catherine Griset

NI

Claire Fox

 

1

0

S&D

Domènec Ruiz Devesa

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION OF THE Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (9.9.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Gwendoline Delbos‑Corfield</Depute>

 

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1. Notes the overall reduction of AMIF commitment appropriations by 15,4 % (i.e. by EUR 172 million) compared to 2019; regrets the decrease of commitment appropriations aimed at strengthening and developing the CEAS and enhancing responsibility-sharing between Member States (i.e. by 29,5 %) compared to 2019; acknowledges, nevertheless, that the commitment appropriations remain well above the level established in the 2018 budget and realises that the decrease is, at least in part, linked to the fact the reform of the Dublin Regulation has been blocked because of political inertia in the Council; recalls the importance of ensuring high standards of asylum in the Union as well as providing adequate financial capacity to support the reception, sheltering and integration of asylum seekers and migrants in the Member States, effective return strategies, resettlement programmes, the efficiency of asylum application examinations, the enforcement of decisions regarding asylum applications, and to respond to emergency assistance needs of Member States hosting large numbers of asylum seekers and/or of first arrivals; notes that the AMIF budget does not include some financial reserves to finance the reformed Dublin legislation and the new Union resettlement schemes in case of adoption of that legislation during 2020; proposes to foresee an amount in the reserve for temporary arrangements for disembarkation in the Union and relocation of people rescued in the Mediterranean; suggests, in order to free financial resources, that the EU Trust Fund for Africa and the regional development protection programmes for North Africa that primarily support external policies of the Union are funded by Heading IV of the Union budget (Global Europe) instead of by the AMIF under Heading III (Security and Citizenship); recalls the need to ensure coherence between actions undertaken under Heading III and Heading IV;

2. Calls on the Commission to increase the number of budget lines under the AMIF to facilitate greater transparency regarding how the financial resources of the Fund are allocated to the different objectives of that Fund; calls, in particular, for the clear separation of expenditure on enhancing fair return strategies from expenditure on legal migration and promoting effective integration of third-country nationals;

3. Recalls the need to allocate an adequate amount of resources from the Union budget to reinforce the external dimension of migration and to guarantee an adequate protection of the Union's external borders;

4. Stresses the low amount foreseen for emergency assistance in the ISF (EUR 8,5 million); requests the Commission to carefully and more realistically re-evaluate this amount taking into account possible emergency assistance needs of Member States in the framework of the ISF, such as the management of security-related incidents;

5. Calls for higher funding for the Europe for Citizens programme, given the fundamental role that it plays in order to strengthen the European demos and its citizenship;

6. Notes the increases of commitment appropriations of JHA agencies such as EASO (41,5 %), EBCG (34,6 %), CEPOL (14 %), EMCDDA (7,7 %), FRA (5,4 %), Eurojust (5,2 %), and Europol (2,1 %) compared to the 2019 budget; welcomes the overall increase of the funds available through the Justice Programme; regrets however the decrease in commitments for the component Facilitating and supporting judicial cooperation in civil and criminal matters (i.e. by 23,6 %);

7. Notes that the budget of the EBCG has increased by 34,8 % (i.e. by EUR 108 million) in 2020 following the adoption of the EBCG new mandate, which is by far the largest increase among all JHA agencies; recalls that the Court of Auditors identified as part of the discharge of the 2017 budget that Member States overestimated the financial need of the EBCG in 2017; notes the objective of providing the EBCG with more human resources (10 000 border guards by 2027), and the fact that the number of deaths at sea keeps increasing in light of the absence of SAR assets in the Mediterranean; suggests that this boost in resources should also be used for rescuing lives at sea; calls on the Commission to urgently create a fund aimed at supporting search and rescue operations in order to guarantee a strong SAR presence in the Mediterranean; regrets the remarkable difference between the commitment appropriations assigned to EBCG (EUR 420 million) in 2020 and the amount accorded to EASO (EUR 133 million); calls for EASO to be transformed into a fully-fledged decentralised Union agency with a greatly enhanced mandate and considers that the budget and staffing of EASO should be increased to allow the Agency to properly perform the duties it has been entrusted; notes the reduction of ISF commitment appropriations by 6,1% (i.e. by EUR 32,6 million) compared to 2019; recalls the need to provide support in the field of police and judicial cooperation in criminal matters;

 8. Welcomes the increase of commitment appropriations of the EPPO (70,5 %); recalls the important role of the EPPO in investigating and prosecuting fraud involving Union funds and the need to provide sufficient financial resources so that it becomes fully operational before December 2020; asks the Commission to further study the financial needs for an expansion of the role of the EPPO to include cross-border terrorism in line with its Communication on 12 September 2018;

9. Regrets that the Commission did not follow the budgetary requests of Europol and Eurojust and proposed to reduce the funds in 2020 for Europol by EUR 33,5 million and Eurojust by EUR 3.7 million as compared to their financial objectives; underlines that such decrease might have an impact on the operational activities of both agencies; notes that Europol’s support has been crucial in joint investigations across the Union and has a key role in the fight against organised crime; supports the implementation of Europol’s Strategy 2020+, aiming at strengthening Europol’s operational support and analytical capabilities to the benefit of the Member States, and proposes new investments in important crime areas, such as the fight against drug trafficking and financial crime; notes that the decrease of the eu-LISA commitment appropriations by 18,7 % (i.e. by EUR 55 million) corresponds to the end of the development of the Entry-Exit System; reiterates the need to ensure adequate financial support, staffing and staff training for JHA agencies to effectively deliver the tasks assigned to them in full transparency and to fight against cross-border serious crime in full compliance with fundamental rights;

10. Welcomes the amount allocated to the EDPS (EUR 19 million); notes that more than 30 % of this amount are used to provide the secretariat for the EDPB; emphasises the need to ensure appropriate budgetary and staff resources for EDPS to carry out the additional tasks resulting from the implementation of the new Union data protection framework (GDPR) with full independence; stresses therefore that the allocated budget is the bare minimum;

11. Is concerned that the Commission’s draft budget for CEPOL (funding gap EUR 1,5 million) does not allow CEPOL to sufficiently cover the demand from Member States regarding education and training for the law enforcement communities in the Union and its neighbourhood; regrets that CEPOL does not get sufficient funding to address new challenges in light of the new information systems such as SIS II, and that it cannot deliver training to law enforcement officials in fields such as corruption and excise fraud, while the EU Strategic Training Needs Assessment has identified these as necessary for law enforcement at Union level; instead, it had to refuse 54 valid and legitimate training requests of Member States in the field of law enforcement leadership, illegal immigration, hate crime, and money laundering because of budgetary restraints; argues that the budgetary request of CEPOL (EUR 12 million) for 2020 is needed to be able to meet the increasing demand of Member States, particularly in the field of cybercrime and digitalisation; points out that trust, networks and information exchange between law enforcement communities across borders could be further improved by adding a new one-month component to the current CEPOL Exchange Programme and offering study visits to Europol and exchange programmes between operational officers from Member States and Europol staff; that this would require, however, appropriate additional financial and human resources for CEPOL;

12. Notes the increasing recruitment of “temporary agents” as compared to “contract agents” in the Union agencies; considers that the sensitivity of information accessible to staff of agencies in the JHA field requires a strict policy of confidentiality, in particular with regard to staff recruitment and management;

13. Encourages the Commission to strengthen support for investigative journalism, including cross-border investigative journalism, and media freedom through dedicated funds, which contributes, among other areas, to revealing and combatting crime, as well as raising awareness among Union citizens;

14. Recalls its support to fight against discriminatory practices, gender-based violence, hate crimes as well as for the full enjoyment of rights, equality and justice programmes; stresses the significant role played by appropriations spent for non-discrimination instruments, and equality support programmes to enforce minorities’ rights, with a special focus on the rights of women, elderly persons, persons with disabilities and LGBTQI+ persons;

15. Calls on the Commission, the Council and Member States to implement gender budgeting in all public expenditure, especially when planning, negotiating, implementing and revaluating the next multiannual financial framework (MFF); the commitment to safeguard the promotion and protection of gender equality, women’s and girls’ rights in the 2020 budgetary procedure is crucial; gender budgeting should therefore be integrated in all budget lines and follow: 1) the promotion of accountability and transparency in fiscal planning; 2) the increase of gender responsive participation in the budget process; and 3) the advancement of gender equality and women’s rights;

16. Calls for sustainable and adequate funding to be benchmarked for actions provided for an effective implementation of the Istanbul Convention and the Victims' Rights Directive, as key pieces of legislation on fighting violence against women and domestic violence as well as providing an adequate support to victims, creating a comprehensive legal framework and approach to combat gender-based violence, raising awareness campaigns and building a proper state infrastructure in order to combat such violence;

17. Deplores the fact that there has been no noticeable progress in terms of following up on the Union's high level political and legal commitments to gender equality and gender mainstreaming in the budgetary process and spending decisions since 2015, also identified by the fact that in the mid-term review of the 2014-2020 MFF nor in the Commission’s proposal for the 2021-2027 gender equality has been taken into consideration.

 


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

5.9.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

46

10

4

Members present for the final vote

Malik Azmani, Katarina Barley, Pernando Barrena Arza, Pietro Bartolo, Vladimír Bilčík, Vasile Blaga, Saskia Bricmont, Jorge Buxadé Villalba, Damien Carême, Caterina Chinnici, Clare Daly, Anna Júlia Donáth, Lena Düpont, Cornelia Ernst, Sylvie Guillaume, Balázs Hidvéghi, Antony Hook, Evin Incir, Sophia in ‘t Veld, Marina Kaljurand, Fabienne Keller, Peter Kofod, Moritz Körner, Alice Kuhnke, Jeroen Lenaers, Juan Fernando López Aguilar, Magid Magid, Roberta Metsola, Claude Moraes, Nadine Morano, Javier Moreno Sánchez, Maite Pagazaurtundúa, Kostas Papadakis, Nicola Procaccini, Paulo Rangel, Terry Reintke, Ralf Seekatz, Michal Šimečka, Birgit Sippel, Sylwia Spurek, Tineke Strik, Ramona Strugariu, Annalisa Tardino, Dragoş Tudorache, Milan Uhrík, Tom Vandendriessche, Bettina Vollath, Jadwiga Wiśniewska, Javier Zarzalejos

Substitutes present for the final vote

Bartosz Arłukowicz, Gwendoline Delbos-Corfield, Claire Fox, Raphaël Glucksmann, Lívia Járóka, Kris Peeters, Anne-Sophie Pelletier, Sabrina Pignedoli, Loránt Vincze, Maria Walsh, Juan Ignacio Zoido Álvarez

 


 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

46

+

NI

Sabrina Pignedoli

PPE

Bartosz Arłukowicz, Vladimír Bilčík, Vasile Blaga, Lena Düpont, Balázs Hidvéghi, Lívia Járóka, Jeroen Lenaers, Roberta Metsola, Kris Peeters, Paulo Rangel, Ralf Seekatz, Loránt Vincze, Maria Walsh, Javier Zarzalejos, Juan Ignacio Zoido Álvarez

RENEW

Malik Azmani, Anna Júlia Donáth, Antony Hook, Sophia in 't Veld, Fabienne Keller, Moritz Körner, Maite Pagazaurtundúa, Michal Šimečka, Ramona Strugariu, Dragoş Tudorache

S&D

Katarina Barley, Pietro Bartolo, Caterina Chinnici, Raphaël Glucksmann, Sylvie Guillaume, Evin Incir, Marina Kaljurand, Juan Fernando López Aguilar, Claude Moraes, Javier Moreno Sánchez, Birgit Sippel, Sylwia Spurek, Bettina Vollath

VERTS/ALE

Saskia Bricmont, Damien Carême, Gwendoline Delbos-Corfield, Alice Kuhnke, Magid Magid, Terry Reintke, Tineke Strik

 

10

-

GUE/NGL

Pernando Barrena Arza, Clare Daly, Cornelia Ernst, Anne-Sophie Pelletier

ID

Peter Kofod, Annalisa Tardino, Tom Vandendriessche

NI

Claire Fox, Kostas Papadakis, Milan Uhrík

 

4

0

ECR

Jorge Buxadé Villalba, Nicola Procaccini, Jadwiga Wiśniewska

PPE

Nadine Morano

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION OF THE Committee on Constitutional Affairs (4.9.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020 </Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Antonio Tajani</Depute>

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Constitutional Affairs calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1. Welcomes the proposed increase in funding for communication actions by 1,9% in commitment appropriations and 2,2% in payment appropriations, as compared to the 2019 budget. Communication with citizens should be fostered in order to ensure a broad public debate and citizens’ involvement in the discussion on the future of Europe; recalls the benefits demonstrated by similar citizen consultation events already held in EU Member States;

2. Welcomes therefore the proposed increase of funding of Communication of the Commission Representations’, Citizens’ Dialogue and ‘Partnership’ actions by 8,8% in commitment appropriations and 7,9% in payment appropriations; regrets however the Council’s position to reduce funding for communication activities;

3. Emphasises the need to continue efforts to fight fake news and disinformation with proper levels of financing for these activities, while ensuring adequate interinstitutional cooperation;

4. Welcomes the proposed increases of 3,1% in commitment appropriations, but regrets the decrease of 3,8% in payment appropriations for the ‘Europe for Citizens’ programme (budget line: 18 04 01 01); condemns the Council for its position to reduce by 4,4% the commitments appropriations for that aim considering that this programme is of key institutional importance for fostering a democratic Union; welcomes the 5,3% increase in commitment appropriations and 21,3% in payment appropriations for the “Rights, Equality and Citizenship” programme (budget line: 33 02 01) but regrets the Council position to reduce by 3,5% the commitment appropriations; welcomes the fact that a dedicated amount is allocated for the budgetary line of the European Citizens Initiative (ECI);

5. Underlines the need to provide the Joint Transparency Register Secretariat with sufficient and adequate administrative and financial means in order to fulfil its tasks, as it plays a key role in ensuring fair and transparent activities of interest representatives;

6. Calls on the Commission to make the necessary proposals to fund the proposed Conference on the Future of Europe; points out that the Conference should be able to function with the necessary degree of autonomy and the involvement of the European Parliament on equal footing with the other European institutions; underlines furthermore that the Conference should allow for the participation and engagement of a broad range of citizens including young people;

7. Considers that the EU needs to build more knowledge and trust among citizens in the EU budget and its added value, by providing budgetary analysis for every new programme and new task in terms of savings made at national level and added value generated at the EU level; believes that by doing so, we can win the support of the EU citizens and Member States, change the mind-set regarding the EU budget contributions and contribute to furthering the European project.

 


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

3.9.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

21

3

0

Members present for the final vote

Martina Anderson, Gerolf Annemans, Catherine Bearder, Gabriele Bischoff, Damian Boeselager, Richard Corbett, Pascal Durand, Daniel Freund, Charles Goerens, Maria Grapini, Brice Hortefeux, Laura Huhtasaari, Giuliano Pisapia, Paulo Rangel, Antonio Maria Rinaldi, Domènec Ruiz Devesa, Antonio Tajani, László Trócsányi, Guy Verhofstadt, Loránt Vincze

Substitutes present for the final vote

Vladimír Bilčík, Gwendoline Delbos-Corfield, Othmar Karas, Miapetra Kumpula-Natri

 


 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

21

+

GUE/NGL

Martina Anderson

PPE

Vladimír Bilčík, Brice Hortefeux, Othmar Karas, Paulo Rangel, Antonio Tajani, László Trócsányi, Loránt Vincze

RENEW

Catherine Bearder, Pascal Durand, Charles Goerens, Guy Verhofstadt

S&D

Gabriele Bischoff, Richard Corbett, Maria Grapini, Miapetra Kumpula Natri, Giuliano Pisapia, Domènec Ruiz Devesa

VERTS/ALE

Damian Boeselager, Gwendoline Delbos-Corfield, Daniel Freund

 

3

-

ID

Gerolf Annemans, Laura Huhtasaari, Antonio Maria Rinaldi

 

0

0

 

 

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 


 

 

 

OPINION OF THE Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality (2.10.2019)

<CommissionInt>for the Committee on Budgets</CommissionInt>


<Titre>on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2028(BUD))</DocRef>

Rapporteur for opinion: <Depute>Frances Fitzgerald</Depute>

 

 

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality calls on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

A. whereas the Union is founded on, inter alia, the value of equality between men and women, and Article 8 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union provides that, in all its activities, the Union shall aim to eliminate inequalities, and to promote equality, between men and women, and therefore requires that gender equality be incorporated into all policies and addressed at all levels of the budgetary process via gender mainstreaming and gender budgeting; whereas ensuring coherence between their internal budgetary and discharge procedures and their external actions in the field of promotion of gender equality is essential to the credibility of Parliament and the other Union institutions;

B. whereas budgets are not gender-neutral and thus need to be established with the clear objective of anti-discrimination and the goal of benefitting both genders equally; 

C. whereas the Union has committed to implementing the Sustainable Development Goals, including Goal 5 on Gender Equality;

D. whereas Parliament has repeatedly called for sufficient funding of the Rights, Equality and Citizenship Programme (REC Programme) and for the Daphne-specific objective of that programme to keep as high a profile as possible; whereas Parliament has called for the continuation of all actions relating to combating violence against women by means of an independent budget allocation dedicated to that goal also in the Rights and Values programme for the multiannual financial framework (MFF) 2021-2027;

E. whereas women remain under-represented in the labour market, as well as in public and political life, and devote a disproportionately greater amount of time than men to unpaid housework and care;

F. whereas the proposal for the draft general budget for the European Union for 2020 seeks to continue supporting strategic investment and sustainable growth in order to improve economic cohesion and create jobs, in particular for young people, older persons and persons with disabilities; whereas, in this regard, it is important also to focus on increasing the participation of women, including LGBTI women, in the labour market by, among other measures, investing in infrastructures and public services to support work life balance and increasing their potential in all sectors of economy, including the digitalised economy, information and communication technologies (ICT) and science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) , as well as in leadership positions, and on reducing the gender employment and pay gap;

G. whereas digitalisation has a substantial impact on the labour market, including by creating new job opportunities and more flexible working conditions such as teleworking, which could serve as a tool for better reconciliation of professional and domestic duties for both women and men;

H. whereas gender equality is a core objective of the Union, yet remains severely underfunded. In 2019 the European Institute for Gender Equality found that just 1 % of the Union’s Structural and Investment Funds have been set aside for the promotion of gender equality within the 2020 Union budget. Yet gender inequality and discrimination carry an enormous economic cost to both women and society. The World Bank estimates that around EUR 145 trillion is lost in human capital wealth as a result of gender pay inequality. In England and Wales alone, domestic violence costs approximately 33 billion dollars per year, according to UN Women in 2016;

1. Reaffirms its strong request to promote equality between women and men, by supporting gender equality mainstreaming and gender budgeting at all levels within the budgetary procedure, including when finalising the negotiations of the next MFF, and to use budgetary expenditure as an effective tool for combatting existing inequalities and promoting gender equality, including LGBTI women and men; recalls that gender budgeting is a methodology that must be applied to all Union budget lines; recalls the importance of an increase in resources for gender equality in order to achieve substantial progress and the need for better channelling and monitoring of Union funding in this regard, in particular in the case of Member States that violate the rule of law and experience a backlash in women’s rights;

2. Stresses that gender budgeting must become an integral part of the budgetary procedure in all budget lines, and not only in programmes in which the gender impact is most obvious, so that budgetary expenditure becomes an effective tool for promoting gender equality;

3. Recalls that gender budgeting is one dimension of a broader gender mainstreaming strategy and points out the importance of implementing gender mainstreaming in all the stages of the policy cycle;

4. Recalls that one of the requirements to implement gender budgeting is to foresee independent budget lines for targeted actions linked to gender equality goals; reiterates its requests, therefore, to also assign an independent budget line to the objective in the REC Programme dedicated to promote gender equality and to advance gender mainstreaming;

5. Regrets the tendency of the last years to cut Union funds which combat all forms of violence against women and girls and reaffirms its request to increase resources for the Daphne-specific objective of the current REC Programme and that such an increase is maintained in the Rights and Values programme; calls to ensure that adequate funding is made available for actions aimed at combating both violence against women and girls, including female genital mutilation (FGM), and trafficking in human beings, particularly for the purpose of sexual exploitation, in the framework of the effective implementation of the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence; calls on the Commission to support programmes and measures specifically tackling harassment, including sexual harassment;

6. Calls on Member States to ratify without delay the Istanbul Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence, with particular regard to the Convention’s role in the protection of women and girls from violence and the resultant economic impact on victims and societies; calls on relevant Union funds to be utilised in assistance to preparations for, or continued efforts towards, implementation of the Istanbul Convention in Member States;

7. Stresses the need to continue all actions focused on preventing and combating all forms of violence against women in the framework of the programme that will replace the REC Programme in the next MFF period, with an independent budget allocation for combating gender-based violence against women and specific attention to combat trafficking in human beings and sexual exploitation as well as honour culture and honour-related violence;

8. Stresses the need for specific funding to support the most vulnerable women and girls in our society, in particular women with disabilities, women refugees and victims of trafficking and abuses; supports in this regard increasing both commitment and payment appropriations of the two strands of the REC Programme;

9. Stresses the need to reinforce budgetary allocations that support women’s access to sexual and reproductive health and rights, both within and outside the Union, as this access is increasingly at risk;

10. Calls for the Union to support women´s rights organisations and activists and their work as well as to increase their representation in European decision-making processes;

11. Reaffirms its request for increased resources under the Union Structural Funds to uphold women’s economic and social rights, especially through measures to increase women’s participation in the labour market and investment in high-quality public care services;

12. Stresses the importance to use the European Structural and Investment Funds, namely the European Regfuibak Development Fund (ERDF) and the European Social Fund (ESF), to promote women’s employment, including by financing high-quality, affordable care facilities;

13. Calls for budgetary allocations to support women’s entrepreneurship and women’s economic independence and to ensure and encourage access for women to specialised professional training, affordable loans and equity finance through Union programmes and funds, such as COSME, Horizon 2020 and the ESF Fund in order to maximise women’s participation in the labour market particularly single mothers, care-takers and women returning to the job market after a long break in order to increase their employability; with regard to those funds, which should be sufficiently resourced, calls for, supporting the promotion of gender equality through education and health care and the increased integration of a gender perspective and the objective of achieving gender equality through each programme;

14. Notes with concern the low number of female students studying ICT-related subjects and reiterates the need to restore the budget proposed by the Commission in that area; adds that, with a view to closing the digital gender divide, there needs to be adequate funding to improve education, to support female entrepreneurs in the digital sector and to increase awareness-raising campaigns;

15. Stresses the need to close the digital divide between women and men, which leads to significant disparities in the labour market, by earmarking resources for education and training, as well as support for self-employed women;

16. Stresses the need to earmark resources to encourage women's interest in the digital economy and sectors such as ICT and STEM, and to support them in this context;

17. Stresses the importance of adequate earmarking of funding for the Youth Employment Initiative (YEI) in order to combat particularly high rates of youth unemployment; calls for equal participation of girls and young women in the measures covered by that initiative to be ensured and that special attention is paid to quality offers of training and employment for them, particularly in the digitalised economy, ICT and STEM sectors where women are significantly underrepresented both in terms of education and training as well as employment, leading to a digital gap between women and men; takes the view that measures as the YEI should contribute not only to helping young people join the labour force, but also to promote quality employment; affirms that special attention should also be paid to funding of quality training on issues such as sexism, sexual harassment, mobbing and hate speech, with encouraged equal participation of girls, young women, as well as boys and young men.

18. Recalls that a very significant number of refugees and asylum seekers entering the Union are women and children; highlights that gender mainstreaming is also among the founding principles of the Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund (AMIF) and reiterates its call for the gender dimension to also be taken into account in migration and asylum policies by allocating specific funds dedicated to prevent gender-based violence and ensuring access to health and reproductive health and rights;

19. Stresses that it is essential to ensure an adequate budget for human development to achieve the Agenda 2030 and SDGs, including SDG5; recalls the Union’s commitment to invest 20 % of the official development assistance in human development and calls for appropriate allocations on human development to support measures and projects aimed at eradicating female and child poverty; better integration into the labour market; eliminating wage inequalities between men and women; combating violence against women, children and young people; and to improve access to and provision of health care, including sexual and reproductive health and rights, education, gender equality and social protection under the Global Public Goods and Challenges programme;

20. Calls for the budget to tackle FGM to continue to be allocated throughout external action programmes, including the Development Cooperation Instrument;

21. Stresses that in the past decade, with the outbreak of the economic and financial crisis, economic, social, labour market and gender inequalities within and between Member States have been aggravated; recalls the important role of the European Institute for Gender Equality in raising awareness of the extent and the causes of gender inequality in the Union and calls for the Institute’s budget, staff establishment plan and independence to be adequately resourced which will ensure the smooth running of the Institute and to implement ambitious projects; also calls for greater resources for the budget line 'promoting non-discrimination and equality';

22. Notes that the European Institute for Gender Equality found in 2019 that gender mainstreaming is “treated as a theme that has little impact on the actual content of funding programmes”; calls therefore for robust and comprehensive measures to improve gender mainstreaming efforts, including a renewed focus on the promotion of accountability and transparency in fiscal planning and an increase in gender response participation in the budget process;

23. Recommends in particular increasing funding to promote the protection of maternity, parenthood and early childhood through the appropriate programmes; calls, to that end, for maternal and child health to be given special importance in the EU's 2020 budget; further recommends that funds be guaranteed for the defence, promotion and support of breastfeeding, thereby contributing to efforts to achieve the World Health Organisation's target of having 50% of babies worldwide exclusively breastfed for the first six months of their lives by 2025, which would require, among other measures, ensuring maternity and paternity leave is long enough and sufficiently well remunerated;

24. Calls for budgetary allocations to target the specific needs of different groups of women facing a diverse range of economic challenges, including but not limited to: period poverty among young girls, economic deprivation of single female pensioners and the gender pensions gap, unpaid caring duties and time poverty among mothers and female carers, and socio-economic exclusion and employment discrimination against BAME women;


 

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

30.9.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

19

5

1

Members present for the final vote

Christine Anderson, Annika Bruna, Belinda De Lucy, Frances Fitzgerald, Jackie Jones, Sandra Pereira, Pina Picierno, Samira Rafaela, Elżbieta Rafalska, Evelyn Regner, María Soraya Rodríguez Ramos, Christine Schneider, Elissavet Vozemberg-Vrionidi

Substitutes present for the final vote

Isabella Adinolfi, Lena Düpont, Lina Gálvez Muñoz, Marina Kaljurand, Elena Kountoura, Alessandra Moretti, Alexandra Louise Rosenfield Phillips, Pernille Weiss

Substitutes under Rule 209(7) present for the final vote

Mazaly Aguilar, Enikő Győri, Pär Holmgren, Kathleen Van Brempt

 


 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

19

+

PPE

Lena Düpont, Frances Fitzgerald, Christine Schneider, Pernille Weiss, Elissavet Vozemberg‑Vrionidi

S&D

Lina Gálvez Muñoz, Jackie Jones, Marina Kaljurand, Alessandra Moretti, Pina Picierno, Evelyn Regner, Kathleen Van Brempt

RE

Samira Rafaela, María Soraya Rodríguez Ramos

GREENS/EFA

Pär Holmgren, Alexandra Louise Rosenfield Phillip

GUE/NGL

Elena Kountoura, Sandra Pereira

NI

Isabella Adinolfi

 

5

-

ID

Christine Anderson, Annika Bruna

ECR

Mazaly Aguilar, Elżbieta Rafalska

NI

Belinda De Lucy

 

1

0

PPE

Enikő Győri

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

 

 


LETTER OF THE Committee on International Trade

Mr Johan Van Overtveldt

Chair

Committee on Budgets

BRUSSELS

Subject: <Titre>Opinion on the General budget of the European Union for the financial year 2020 - all sections</Titre> <DocRef>COM(2019)0400 – C9‑0000/2019 – 2019/2028(BUD) </DocRef>

Dear Mr Chair,

Under the procedure referred to above, the Committee on International Trade has decided to submit an opinion to your committee. At its meeting of 24 September 2019, the committee decided to send the opinion in the form of a letter.

At that meeting, the Committee on International Trade considered the matter and it decided to call on the Committee on Budgets, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution.

 

Yours sincerely,

Bernd Lange

SUGGESTIONS

1. Notes that the Union’s ambitious trade agenda requires sufficient resources for implementation; emphasises therefore that DG Trade should receive adequate funding to ensure the speedy negotiation and conclusion of trade agreements and proper follow-up to the implementation of concluded trade agreements and trade legislation, while also ensuring sufficient funding to enable the new Chief Trade Enforcer to perform the new function effectively; supports that DG TRADE receives the necessary budget allocation to implement the regulation on the screening of foreign direct investment from its entry into force in October 2020;

 

2. Points out that while primarily promoting mutually beneficial economic growth and sustainable development, inter alia by securing better market access and the creation of international rules on investment, trade policy is a core tool for union foreign policy that can help advance the EU’s values internationally, particularly respect for human rights, gender equality, climate protection, the rule of law, and the implementation of international labour standards and can help ensure the achievement of the SDGs on a global scale, while stimulating our trade partners to put social rights and sustainability at the heart of their economic policies; urges therefore that sufficient funding be provided to ensure adequate monitoring, interim and ex post assessments, with gender disaggregated data, as well as for the enforcement of commitments made by third countries;

 

3. Emphasises that the acceptance of the EU’s trade policy requires active engagement with its stakeholders and civil society; stresses therefore that more resources should be provided for outreach about trade policy, citizens’ dialogues, helpdesks and assistance for SMEs and consumers as well as domestic advisory groups, the main vehicles for achieving the effective participation of civil society in the enforcement and monitoring of trade sustainability chapters of trade agreements, which are an essential part of the trade architecture;

 

4. Asks that full use be made of available funds to support the internationalisation of SMEs, with a focus on those Member States currently lacking behind, and allow for their participation in trade policy decision-making;

 

5. Underlines the vital role played by parliaments in discussions about global trade policy; notes that the Parliamentary Conference of the WTO is a valuable tool in this context which requires adequate funding to live up to its potential; emphasises therefore that, just as in 2019, sufficient resources should be made available to enable the EP’s participation in the forum and to provide adequate infrastructure for the conference’s activities.

 

 

 

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

Date adopted

14.10.2019

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

26

8

0

Members present for the final vote

Rasmus Andresen, Clotilde Armand, Anna Bonfrisco, Jonathan Bullock, Olivier Chastel, Lefteris Christoforou, David Cormand, José Manuel Fernandes, Eider Gardiazabal Rubial, Valentino Grant, Valerie Hayer, Monika Hohlmeier, John Howarth, Moritz Körner, Joachim Kuhs, Zbigniew Kuźmiuk, Ioannis Lagos, Hélène Laporte, Pierre Larrouturou, Janusz Lewandowski, Margarida Marques, Jan Olbrycht, Henrik Overgaard Nielsen, Karlo Ressler, Nils Torvalds, Nils Ušakovs

Substitutes present for the final vote

Eero Heinäluoma, Fabienne Keller, Aušra Maldeikienė, Jake Pugh

Substitutes under Rule 209(7) present for the final vote

Agnes Jongerius, Anne-Sophie Pelletier, Viola Von Cramon-Taubadel, Javier Zarzalejos

 

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

26

+

ECR

Zbigniew Kuźmiuk

NI

Ioannis Lagos

PPE

Lefteris Christoforou, José Manuel Fernandes, Monika Hohlmeier, Janusz Lewandowski, Ausra Maldeikiene, Jan Olbrycht, Karlo Ressler, Javier Zarzalejos

RENEW

Clotilde Armand, Olivier Chastel, Valerie Hayer, Fabienne Keller, Moritz Körner, Nils Torvalds

S&D

Eider Gardiazabal Rubial, Eero Heinäluoma, John Howarth, Agnes Jongerius, Pierre Larrouturou, Margarida Marques, Nils Ušakovs

VERTS/ALES

Rasmus Andresen, David Cormand, Viola Von Cramon-Taubadel

 

8

-

GUE/NGL

Anne-Sophie Pelletier

ID

Anna Bonfrisco, Valentino Grant, Joachim Kuhs, Hélène Laporte

NI

Jonathan Bullock, Henrik Overgaard Nielsen, Jake Pugh

 

0

0

 

 

 

Key to symbols:

+ : in favour

- : against

0 : abstention

 

[1]  OJ L 168, 7.6.2014, p. 105.

[2]  OJ L 193, 30.7.2018, p. 1.

[3]  OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 884.

[4]  OJ C 373, 20.12.2013, p. 1.

[5]  Texts adopted of that date, P8_TA(2019)0210.

[6]  Texts adopted of that date, P8_TA(2019)0326.

[7] Regulation (EU) No 604/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2013 establishing the criteria and mechanisms for determining the Member State responsible for examining an application for international protection lodged in one of the Member States by a third-country national or a stateless person (OJ L 180, 29.6.2013, p. 31).

[8] Texts adopted, P8_TA(2017)0417.

[9]  Regulation (EU) 2017/1953 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2017 amending Regulations (EU) No 1316/2013 and (EU) No 283/2014 as regards the promotion of internet connectivity in local communities (OJ L 286, 1.11.2017, p. 1).

[10] European Parliament legislative resolution of 18 April 2019 on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing the InvestEU Programme (COM(2018)0439 – C8-0257/2018 – 2018/0229(COD)).

[11] European Court of Auditors - Audit preview “Roads connecting European regions” p.9 - https://www.eca.europa.eu/Lists/ECADocuments/AP19_08/AP_CONNECTING_ROADS_EN.pdf

[12] Comprehensive analysis of the existing cross-border rail transport connections and missing links on the internal EU borders (https://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/sources/docgener/studies/pdf/cb_rail_connections_en.pdf)

[13] Directive (EU) 2016/802 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 May 2016 relating to a reduction in the sulphur content of certain liquid fuels (OJ L 132, 21.5.2016, p. 58).

[14] Study on Sustainable Transport Infrastructure Charging and Internalisation of Transport Externalities (https://ec.europa.eu/transport/themes/sustainable-transport/internalisation-transport-external-costs_en).

[15] Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 December 2013 establishing a common organisation of the markets in agricultural products and repealing Council Regulations (EEC) No 922/72, (EEC) No 234/79, (EC) No 1037/2001 and (EC) No 1234/2007 (OJ L 347 20.12.2013, p. 671).

Last updated: 15 October 2019Legal notice