Procedure : 2016/2529(RSP)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : B8-0161/2016

Texts tabled :

B8-0161/2016

Debates :

Votes :

PV 04/02/2016 - 8.10
CRE 04/02/2016 - 8.10
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P8_TA(2016)0051

MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION
PDF 310kWORD 103k
See also joint motion for a resolution RC-B8-0149/2016
27.1.2016
PE576.522v01-00
 
B8-0161/2016

to wind up the debate on the statement by the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy

pursuant to Rule 123(2) of the Rules of Procedure


on the systematic mass murder of religious minorities by ISIS (2016/2529(RSP))


Lars Adaktusson, Cristian Dan Preda, Elmar Brok, Andrej Plenković, Antonio Tajani, Michael Gahler, Mariya Gabriel, David McAllister, Michèle Alliot-Marie, Esther de Lange, Kinga Gál, Tunne Kelam, György Hölvényi, Teresa Jiménez-Becerril Barrio, Lorenzo Cesa, Roberta Metsola, Philippe Juvin, Adam Szejnfeld, Davor Ivo Stier, Therese Comodini Cachia, Barbara Matera on behalf of the PPE Group

European Parliament resolution on the systematic mass murder of religious minorities by ISIS (2016/2529(RSP))  
B8-0161/2016

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to its previous resolutions of 27 February 2014 on the situation in Iraq(1), of 18 September 2014 on the situation in Iraq and Syria, and the IS offensive, including the persecution of minorities(2), in particular paragraph 4 thereof, of 27 November 2014 on Iraq: kidnapping and mistreatment of women(3), of 12 February 2015 on the humanitarian crisis in Iraq and Syria, in particular in the IS context(4), and specifically paragraph 27 thereof, of 12 March 2015 on recent attacks and abductions by ISIS/Daesh in the Middle East, notably of Assyrians(5), in particular paragraph 2 thereof, of 12 March 2015 on the Annual Report on Human Rights and Democracy in the World 2013 and the European Union’s policy on the matter(6), in particular paragraphs 129 and 211 thereof, of 12 March 2015 on the EU’s priorities for the UN Human Rights Council in 2015(7), in particular paragraphs 66 and 67 thereof, of 30 April 2015 on the persecution of Christians around the world, in relation to the killing of students in Kenya by terror group Al-Shabaab(8), in particular paragraph 10 thereof, and of 30 April 2015 on the destruction of cultural sites perpetrated by ISIS/Daesh(9),

–  having regard to its resolution of 1 June 2006 on the situation of women in armed conflicts and their role in the reconstruction and democratic process in post-conflict countries(10),

–  having regard to its recommendation to the Council of 18 April 2013 on the UN principle of the ‘Responsibility to Protect’ (‘R2P’)(11),

–  having regard to the Council conclusions of 16 March 2015 on the EU Regional Strategy for Syria and Iraq as well as the ISIL/Daesh threat, of 20 October 2014 on the ISIL/Daesh crisis in Syria and Iraq, of 30 August 2014 on Iraq and Syria, of 14 April 2014 and 12 October 2015 on Syria, and of 15 August 2014 on Iraq,

–  having regard to Council Decision 2003/335/JHA of 8 May 2003 on the investigation and prosecution of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes(12),

–  having regard to the EU Guidelines on the promotion and protection of freedom of religion or belief, the EU Guidelines on promoting compliance with international humanitarian law, the EU Guidelines on violence against women and girls and combating all forms of discrimination against them, the Guidelines to EU Policy towards Third Countries on Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Punishment or Treatment, the EU Guidelines on children and armed conflict, the EU Guidelines on the promotion and protection of the rights of the child, and the EU Human Rights Guidelines on freedom of expression online and offline,

–  having regard to the EU Intervention in the UN Human Rights Council of 25 March 2015 (Interactive dialogue on Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights report on Iraq),

–  having regard to the statements by the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy (VP/HR) on Iraq and Syria, and to her answers to parliamentary questions on: ‘Genocide of Greek Orthodox Christians in Syria’ (E-004733/2015), issued on 1 June 2015; ‘Iraq – Christians martyred and robbed of their belongings’ (E-004152-15), issued on 30 June 2015; ‘Persecution and genocide of Christians’ (P-012721/2015), issued on 30 October 2015; ‘Abduction of Christians in Syria’ (E-004156-15) and ‘Safeguarding Christian communities in the Middle East’ (E-004001/15), answered jointly on 10 November 2015,

–  having regard to the statement on behalf of the European Union by Stavros Lambrinidis, the EU Special Representative for Human Rights, at the UN Security Council Open Debate on ‘The victims of attacks and abuses on ethnic or religious ground in the Middle East’, of 27 March 2015,

–  having regard to UN General Assembly Resolution 60/1 of 24 October 2005 on the UN World Summit Outcome (paragraphs 138 to 140), and to the Report of the UN Secretary‑General of 12 January 2009 entitled ‘Implementing the responsibility to protect’,

–  having regard to the statements by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Iraq, and on the Responsibility to Protect,

–  having regard to the briefing by the Special Representative of the UN Secretary‑General for Iraq, Ján Kubiš, to the UN Security Council of 11 November 2015,

–  having regard to the statement of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Navi Pillay, of 25 August 2014 on ‘Iraqi civilians suffering “horrific” widespread and systematic persecution’,

–  having regard to the statements of the Special Representative of the UN Secretary‑General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Zainab Hawa Bangura, of 15 July 2014 on ‘Iraq: Combatants must not use sexual violence for military or political gain’, and of 3 August 2015 and on the first anniversary of the Sinjar tragedy,

–  having regard to the joint statement by the Special Representative of the UN Secretary‑General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Zainab Hawa Bangura, and the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Iraq, Nickolay Mladenov, of 13 August 2014 entitled ‘Iraq: UN Officials Call for Immediate End to Sexual Violence Against Iraqi Minorities’,

–  having regard to the recent UN Security Council resolutions on Iraq and Syria, in particular Resolution 2249 (2015) condemning recent terrorists attacks by ISIS,

–  having regard to Resolution S-22/1 adopted by the UN Human Rights Council on ‘The human rights situation in Iraq in the light of abuses committed by the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant and associated groups’, of 3 September 2014,

–   having regard to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948,

–  having regard to the 1966 International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights,

–  having regard to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child of 1989, and its Optional Protocol on the involvement of children in armed conflict of 2000,

–  having regard to the UN Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination based on Religion and Belief of 1981,

–  having regard to the UN Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment of 1984,

–  having regard to the UN Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide of 9 December 1948,

–  having regard to the judgment of the International Court of Justice of 26 February 2007 on the Case concerning application of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (Bosnia and Herzegovina v Serbia and Montenegro), the judgment of 2 August 2001 issued by the Trial Chamber of the International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of Former Yugoslavia since 1991 (Prosecutor v Radislav Krstic), and the judgment of 19 April 2004 issued by its Appeals Chamber in the same case,

–  having regard to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, in particular Articles 5 to 8 thereof,

–  having regard to the Analysis Framework by the Office of the UN Special Adviser on the Prevention on Genocide (OSAPG),

–  having regard to the statement of 12 August 2014 on the situation in Iraq by the Special Adviser of the UN Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide and the Special Adviser of the UN Secretary-General on the Responsibility to Protect,

–  having regard to the UN Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) Reports on the Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict in Iraq, covering the period from 11 September to 10 December 2014 and the period from 11 December 2014 to 30 April 2015 respectively,

–  having regard to the Report of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on the human rights situation in Iraq in the light of abuses committed by the so‑called Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant and associated groups, of 27 March 2015, in particular paragraph 16 thereof on ‘Violations perpetrated by ISIL – Attacks against religious and ethnic groups’,

–  having regard to the Report of the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism, of 16 June 2015, in particular paragraph 11 thereof,

–  having regard to the Report of the Human Rights Council on its 28th session, of 8 July 2015, and to the views expressed by Iraqi delegation, in particular in paragraph 746 thereof,

–  having regard to the statement of 13 October 2015 on the escalation of incitement to violence in Syria on religious grounds by the Special Adviser of the UN Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide and the Special Adviser of the UN Secretary-General on the Responsibility to Protect,

–  having regard to the Report of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on ‘Technical assistance provided to assist in the promotion and protection of human rights in Iraq’, of 27 July 2015, in particular paragraph 18 thereof,

–  having regard to the Report of the UN Committee on Human Rights of 13 March 2015, prepared at the request of the Government of Iraq,

–  having regard to the Report of the Independent International Commission of Inquiry on the Syrian Arab Republic, presented in the Human Rights Council on 13 August 2015, in particular paragraphs 165 to 173 thereof,

–  having regard to the address given by Pope Francis in Santa Cruz de la Sierra (Bolivia) on 9 July 2015,

–  having regard to the Paris Action Plan of 8 September 2015,

–  having regard to Rule 123(2) of its Rules of Procedure,

A.  whereas, as recognised by the UN Secretary-General in his remarks to the General Assembly Informal Interactive Dialogue on ‘A Vital and Enduring Commitment: Implementing the Responsibility to Protect’, of 8 September 2015, the international community has failed too many vulnerable populations since the adoption of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P);

B.  whereas genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, wherever and whenever they happen, must not go unpunished, and whereas their effective prosecution must be ensured by taking measures at national level and enhancing international cooperation;

C.  whereas genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes are of concern to all EU Member States, which are determined to cooperate with a view to preventing such crimes and putting an end to the impunity of their perpetrators, in accordance with Council Common Position 2003/444/CFSP of 16 June 2003;

D.  whereas, according to the case law of the International Court of Justice, a ‘State’s obligation to prevent [genocide], and the corresponding duty to act, arise at the instant that the State learns of, or should normally have learned of, the existence of a serious risk that genocide will be committed’(13);

E.  whereas, as recognised by UN Security Council Resolution 2249 (2015), the violent extremist ideology of the so-called ‘ISIS/Daesh’, its terrorist acts, its continued gross systematic and widespread attacks directed against civilians, abuses of human rights and violations of international humanitarian law, including those perpetrated on religious or ethnic grounds, and its eradication of cultural heritage and trafficking of cultural property constitute a global and unprecedented threat to international peace and security;

F.  whereas Christians are the most vulnerable group in Iraq and Syria, and are permanently and systematically targeted by the so-called ‘ISIS/Daesh’, which intentionally pursues their destruction and cultural disappearance in the territories under its control; whereas Christians have been killed, slaughtered, beaten, subjected to extortion, abducted and tortured; whereas they have been enslaved (in particular women and girls, who have also been subjected to other forms of sexual violence) and forcibly converted to Islam, and have been victims of forced marriage and trafficking in human beings; whereas children have also been forcibly recruited; whereas Christian churches and religious and cultural sites have been vandalised;

G.  whereas Christians are the most persecuted religious group in the world, and whereas, data show that the number of Christians killed every year is more than 150 000, as recognised by Parliament in its resolution of 30 April 2015 on the persecution of Christians around the world; whereas Parliament’s Vice-President Antonio Tajani, who is responsible for its dialogue with churches and religious communities under Article 17 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, stated during the ad hoc high‑level meeting of 1 December 2015 on ‘The persecution of Christians in the world: A call for action’ that: ‘No religious community is as subject to hatred, violence and systematic aggression as the Christians’; whereas Parliament’s President, Martin Schulz, stated during the same meeting that the persecution of Christians is ‘undervalued’ and ‘hasn’t been properly addressed’;

H.  whereas extremism and ongoing persecution against Christians are emerging as a significant factor in the growing phenomenon of mass migration and internal displacement; whereas, as a result of the persecution of Christians in Syria and Iraq, their numbers have dropped dramatically: in Iraq from 1 400 000 in 2003 to about 300 000, and in Syria from 1.25 million in 2011 to as few as 500 000 today, according to data provided by the pontifical foundation Aid to the Church in Need (ACN) in its report ‘Persecuted and Forgotten? A Report on Christians oppressed for their Faith 2013-2015’ and other reliable public sources;

I.  whereas the international legal definition of genocide, according to Article II of the 1948 UN Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, includes ‘any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial or religious group, as such: (a) Killing members of the group; (b) Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group; (c) Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part; (d) Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group; and (e) Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group’; whereas Article III of that convention considers punishable not only genocide but also conspiracy to commit genocide, direct and public incitement to commit genocide, and complicity in genocide;

J.  whereas the judgment of 2 August 2001 issued by the Trial Chamber of the International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of Former Yugoslavia since 1991, in the case Prosecutor v Radislav Krstic concerning the Srebrenica genocide, stated that ‘simultaneous attacks on the cultural and religious property and symbols of the targeted group as well […] may legitimately be considered as evidence of an intent to physically destroy the group’ (paragraph 580);

K.  whereas the judgment of 19 April 2004 of the Appeals Chamber of the International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of Former Yugoslavia since 1991, in the case Prosecutor v Radislav Krstic concerning the Srebrenica genocide, stated that ‘the numeric size of the targeted part of the group is the necessary and important starting point, though not in all cases the ending point of the inquiry. The number of individuals targeted should be evaluated not only in absolute terms, but also in relation to the overall size of the entire group. In addition to the numeric size of the targeted portion, its prominence with n the group can be a useful consideration. If a specific part of the group is emblematic of the overall group, or is essential to its survival, that may support a finding that the part qualifies as substantial within the meaning of Article 4’;

L.  whereas the total Muslim population of Srebrenica prior to its capture in 1995 amounted to approximately 40 000 people, of whom 7 000 to 8 000 Muslim men were killed, an act which the International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of Former Yugoslavia since 1991 declared to be a genocide;

M.  whereas most of the eight categories of non-cumulative factors included in the Genocide Analysis Framework drafted by the Office of the UN Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide (OSAPG) are already present in the case of persecuted Christians in Syria and Iraq (discrimination and human rights violations; circumstances that affect the capacity to prevent genocide; presence of illegal arms and armed elements; motivation of leading actors in the state/region; acts which serve to encourage divisions between national, racial, ethnic and religious groups; circumstances that facilitate perpetration of genocide; genocidal acts; evidence of intent ‘to destroy in whole or in part’; and triggering factors);

N.  whereas the ongoing incipient genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes against Christians in Iraq started in earnest with killings of Christians in 2003, and whereas since then they have escalated in number and the targets have been expanded to include any Christian, on account of his or her religious background; whereas in most cases those responsible for the crimes have stated that they wanted Christians out of Iraq;

O.  whereas on 31 October 2010, 58 people, including 51 hostages and 2 priests, were killed after an attack on Our Lady of Salvation Syrian Catholic church in Baghdad; whereas a group affiliated to ‘Al-Qaeda, Islamic State for Iraq’ stated that Christians were a ‘legitimate target’; whereas weeks after that event a series of bombings and deadly attacks targeted Christian-majority areas of Baghdad;

P.  whereas 66 churches have been attacked or bombed in the systematic bombing campaign targeting Iraqi Christian churches in recent years (41 in Baghdad, 19 in Mosul, 5 in Kirkuk and 1 in Ramadi); whereas two convents, a monastery and a church orphanage have also been bombed;

Q.  whereas on the night of 6 August 2014 more than 150 000 Christians fled the advance of the so-called ‘ISIS/Daesh’ over Mosul, Qaraqosh and other villages in the Nineveh Plains, having been robbed of all their belongings, and whereas to date they remain displaced and in precarious conditions in northern Iraq;

R.  whereas on 15 July 2014 the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Zainab Hawa Bangura, has stated that in Iraq ‘there are also reports that ethnic and religious minorities have been targeted for physical assault, including sexual violence’; whereas on 3 August 2015, the first anniversary of the Sinjar tragedy, she stated that: ‘In the days that followed, amidst horrific killings, ISIL hunted down and caught hundreds of women and girls from ethnic and religion minorities, instituting a pattern of sexual violence, slavery, abduction and human trafficking that continues to this day; […] these appalling crimes of sexual violence in conflict, which may amount to war crimes, crimes against humanity and/or acts of genocide, will not be forgotten’;

S.  whereas on 13 August 2014 the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Zainab Hawa Bangura, and the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Iraq, Nickolay Mladenov, issued a joint statement confirming that some 1 500 Christian and Yazidi women may have been kidnapped by ISIL and subsequently forced into sexual slavery; whereas in that statement the two Special Representatives recognised ‘the explicit targeting of women and children and the barbaric acts the “Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant” has perpetrated on minorities in areas under its control’;

T.  whereas the Special Adviser of the UN Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide and the Special Adviser of the UN Secretary-General on the Responsibility to Protect, stated on 12 August 2014, in relation to Iraq, that ‘the reports we have received of acts committed by the “Islamic State” may also point to the risk of genocide’;

U.  whereas the report of the UN Committee on Human Rights of 13 March 2015, prepared at the request of the Government of Iraq, stated that ‘[e]thnic and religious groups targeted by ISIL include Yazidis, Christians, Turkmen, Sabea-Mandeans, Kaka’e, Kurds and Shi’a’ and that ‘[i]t is reasonable to conclude that some of the incidents [in Iraq in 2014-2015 . . .] may constitute genocide’;

V.  whereas the ‘Report on the Protection of Civilians in the Armed Conflict in Iraq: 1 May – 31 October 2015 on the situation in Iraq’ by the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and by the UN Assistance Mission for Iraq – Human Rights Office, published on 19 January 2016, states that: ‘The violence suffered by civilians in Iraq remains staggering. The so-called “Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant” (ISIL) continues to commit systematic and widespread violence and abuses of international human rights law and humanitarian law. These acts may, in some instances, amount to war crimes, crimes against humanity, and possibly genocide.’;

W.  whereas the so-called ‘ISIS/Daesh’ captured those who were unable to flee from Mosul and the Nineveh Plains, and whereas non-Muslim women and children were enslaved, with some being sold and others brutally killed and filmed by the perpetrators;

X.  whereas the so-called ‘ISIS/Daesh’ and extremist militias in Syria have intentionally and systematically targeted Christian churches and other buildings such as the St Francis Church in Aleppo, Syria, where grenades were thrown during mass on 25 October 2015;

Y.  whereas, after the kidnapping of its priests in May 2015, the fifth-century monastery of St Elian in Qaryatain, Syria, was bulldozed, and is but one of the many Christian buildings of strong cultural significance that have been destroyed by the so-called ‘ISIS/Daesh’;

Z.  whereas, after capturing Qaryatain (Syria), the so-called ‘ISIS/Daesh’ abducted 230 residents, most of them Christians;

AA.  whereas in February 2015 ‘ISIS/Daesh’ kidnapped more than 220 Assyrian Christians after overrunning several farming communities on the southern bank of the Khabur river in the north-eastern province of Hassakeh, and whereas to date only a few have been released, while the fate of the others remains unknown;

AB.  whereas on 2 April 2015 attackers in Garissa intentionally targeted non-Muslims and singled out Christians in order to brutally execute them; whereas Al-Shabaab has been openly and publicly claiming to wage a war against Christians in the region;

AC.  whereas the Report of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on the human rights situation in Iraq in the light of abuses committed by the so‑called Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant and associated groups, of 27 March 2015, states (in paragraph 16 on ‘Violations Perpetrated by ISIL – Attacks against religious and ethnic groups’) that some of ‘the acts of violence perpetrated against civilians because of their affiliation or perceived affiliation to an ethnic or religious group […] in the light of the information gathered overall […] may constitute genocide.’;

AD.  whereas, according to the Report on the Protection of Civilians in the Armed Conflict in Iraq (11 December 2014 – 30 April 2015) by the UN Assistance Mission for Iraq, ‘ISIL continues to commit systematic and widespread violations and abuses of international human rights law and international humanitarian law. In some instances, these may amount to war crimes, crimes against humanity, and possibly genocide.’;

AE.  whereas the Report of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on ‘Technical assistance provided to assist in the promotion and protection of human rights in Iraq’, of 27 July 2015, states that ‘UNAMI/OHCHR continued to receive numerous credible reports of gross violations and abuses of human rights and serious violations of international humanitarian law being perpetrated by ISIL against civilians in an apparent widespread or systematic manner. In some instances, these may amount to war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide.’ (paragraph 18);

AF.  whereas the report of 16 June 2015 by the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism states that ‘there is evidence that ISIL has committed serious violations of international law, including genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and serious violations of human rights law’ (paragraph 11);

AG.  whereas in the report of the Human Rights Council on its 28th session, of 8 July 2015, the Iraqi delegation affirmed that ‘Daesh committed barbaric crimes that could amount to genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes in the form of massacres and mass executions of prisoners and unarmed prisoner soldiers, clergies, children and women who rejected their ideology’;

AH.  whereas, according to the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) principles, when a state (or non-state actor) manifestly fails to protect its population or is in fact a perpetrator of such crimes, the international community has a responsibility to take collective action to protect populations, in accordance with the UN Charter;

AI.  whereas Parliament’s resolution of 12 March 2015 on recent attacks and abductions by ISIS/Daesh in the Middle East, notably of Assyrians stated that it: ‘Strongly condemns ISIS/Daesh and its egregious human rights abuses that amount to crimes against humanity and war crimes according to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC), and which could be called genocide’ (paragraph 2);

1.  Condemns in the strongest terms the so-called ‘ISIS/Daesh’ and its egregious human rights abuses and serious violations of international humanitarian law committed as part of its goal of intentionally exterminating Christians and any other indigenous religious and ethnic minorities from the areas under its control;

2.  Expresses its view that those who conspire in, plan, incite, commit or attempt to commit, are complicit in, or support atrocities and international crimes against Christians (Chaldeans/Assyrians/Syriacs, Melkites, Armenians) and other ethnic and religious minorities, including Yazidis, Turkmen, Shabak, Sabea-Mandeans, Kaka’e, and Kurds, and who intentionally target them specifically for ethnic or religious reasons, are committing, and are hereby declared to be committing and to be responsible for, ‘war crimes’, ‘crimes against humanity’ and ‘genocide’;

3.  Urges each of the Contracting Parties to the UN Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, signed at Paris on 9 December 1948, and to other relevant international agreements, to prevent war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide within their territory; urges Syria and Iraq to accept the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court;

4.  Urges each of the Contracting Parties to the UN Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, of 1948, and to other international agreements for the prevention and punishment of war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide, and in particular the competent authorities of countries – and their nationals – which are in any way supporting, cooperating or funding, or are complicit in, these crimes, to wholly fulfil their legal obligations under the convention and other international agreements;

5.  Urges the competent authorities of those countries which are in any way directly or indirectly supporting, cooperating or funding, or are complicit in, these war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide, to wholly fulfil their legal obligations under international law and to stop these unacceptable behaviours, which are causing enormous damage to the Iraqi and Syrian societies, and in particular to Christians and other religious minorities, and are seriously destabilising neighbouring countries and international peace and security;

6.  Urges all the countries of the international community to improve their legal and jurisdictional systems in order to prevent their nationals and citizens from travelling to join ‘ISIS/Daesh’ and participating in war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide against Christians and other religious minorities in Iraq and Syria, and to ensure that, in the event that they commit such crimes, they are criminally prosecuted as quickly as possible, including for online incitement to commit, and support for, these crimes;

7.  Urges every government and public authority, including the EU (in particular the European External Action Service) and its Member States, and international bodies and institutions, and their respective leaders and representatives, to name the atrocities being committed by the so-called ‘ISIS/Daesh’ against Christians and other indigenous religious minorities, including Yazidis, by their rightful terminology: ‘crimes against humanity’, ‘war crimes’ and ‘genocide’;

8.  Calls on the UN and its Secretary-General, Special Representatives, Special Rapporteurs and High Commissioner for Human Rights to name the atrocities being committed in these places against Christians and other religious minorities in Iraq and Syria by their rightful terminology: ‘war crimes’, ‘crimes against humanity’ and ‘genocide’;

9.  Recognises, supports and demands respect by all of the inalienable right of all religious and ethnic minorities, indigenous and others, living in Iraq and Syria to continue to live in their historical and traditional homelands in dignity, equality and safety, and to practise their religion fully and freely without any kind of coercion, violence or discrimination; believes that in order to stem the suffering and the mass exodus of Christians and other indigenous populations of the region, a clear and unequivocal statement by all regional political and religious leaders in support of their continued presence and full and equal rights as citizens of their home countries is imperative;

10.  Requests the international community, including the EU and its Member States, to ensure the necessary security conditions and prospects for Christians and members of other religious minorities who have been forced to leave their homeland or have been forcibly displaced, to make effective as soon as possible their right to return to their homeland, to preserve their homes, land, properties and belongings, as well as their churches and religious and cultural sites, and to be able to have a dignified life and future;

11.  Condemns and rejects any interpretation of the message of Islam which paves the way for a violent, cruel, totalitarian, oppressive and expansive ideology legitimising the extermination of Christian minorities; urges the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) and its organs, the Cooperation Council for the Arab States of the Gulf (the Gulf Cooperation Council, or GCC), and Muslim leaders to condemn wholeheartedly the atrocities being committed by the so-called ‘ISIS/Daesh’ against Christians and other indigenous religious minorities and to name them by their rightful terminology: ‘crimes against humanity’, ‘war crimes’ and ‘genocide’;

12.  Requests the UN Security Council, where other national or international mechanisms have already failed, to consider using Chapter VII of the UN Statute to set up safe havens where forcibly displaced Christians and other religious minorities can be protected by UN‑authorised forces;

13.  Requests the EU Humanitarian and Cooperation Aid units to cooperate fully in their work directly with the recognised leaders of Christian churches and communities and other targeted religious and ethnic minorities and not to exclude them from their plans or from the practical implementation and distribution of aid, with a view to better fulfilling their needs and those of the population in general; considers that an example of good practice may be observed in Erbil (Iraq), where, under the leadership of the Chaldean Catholic Archbishop Bashar Matti Warda, Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) formed a community offering school facilities (from pre-school to university education), and after one year opened small shops and businesses servicing the host community;

14.  Stresses that, according to the provisions of the aforementioned UN conventions and agreements, there must be no impunity for any of the perpetrators, including those who have conspired in, planned, incited, committed or attempted to commit any of these acts, and that those responsible should be referred to competent national or international tribunals, both existing tribunals and those which may be created specifically for this purpose;

15.  Rejects without reservation, and considers illegitimate, the announcement by the leader of the so-called ‘ISIS/Daesh’ that it has established a ‘caliphate’ in the areas it now controls; emphasises that the creation and expansion of the ‘Islamic caliphate’, and the activities of other violent extremist groups in the Middle East, are a direct threat to the security of the region and of European countries, and a clear violation of international human rights law and international humanitarian law;

16.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission, the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, the EU Special Representative for Human Rights, the governments and parliaments of the Member States, the Government and Parliament of Syria, the Government and Council of Representatives of Iraq, the Regional Government of Kurdistan, the institutions of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), the Cooperation Council for the Arab States of the Gulf (the Gulf Cooperation Council, or GCC), the UN Secretary-General, the UN General Assembly, the UN Security Council and the UN Human Rights Council.

(1)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2014)0011.

(2)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2014)0027.

(3)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2014)0066.

(4)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2015)0040.

(5)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2015)0071.

(6)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2015)0076.

(7)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2015)0079.

(8)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2015)0178.

(9)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2015)0179.

(10)

OJ C 298 E, 8.12.2006, p. 287.

(11)

Texts adopted, P7_TA(2013)0180.

(12)

OJ L 118, 14.5.2003, p. 12.

(13)

Judgment of 26 February 2007 in the Case concerning application of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (Bosnia and Herzegovina v Serbia and Montenegro), paragraph 431.

Legal notice