Procedure : 2019/2670(RSP)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : B8-0223/2019

Texts tabled :

B8-0223/2019

Debates :

Votes :

PV 28/03/2019 - 8.11
CRE 28/03/2019 - 8.11
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :


<Date>{25/03/2019}25.3.2019</Date>
<NoDocSe>B8‑0223/2019</NoDocSe>
PDF 137kWORD 47k

<TitreType>MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION</TitreType>

<TitreSuite>to wind up the debate on the statement by the Commission</TitreSuite>

<TitreRecueil>pursuant to Rule 123(2) of the Rules of Procedure</TitreRecueil>


<Titre>on recent developments in the ‘Dieselgate’ scandal</Titre>

<DocRef>(2019/2670(RSP))</DocRef>


<RepeatBlock-By><Depute>Daniel Dalton, Bolesław G. Piecha, Zdzisław Krasnodębski</Depute>

<Commission>{ECR}on behalf of the ECR Group</Commission>

</RepeatBlock-By>

See also joint motion for a resolution RC-B8-0223/2019

B8‑0223/2019

European Parliament resolution on recent developments in the ‘Dieselgate’ scandal

(2019/2670(RSP))

The European Parliament,

 having regard to Regulation (EU) 2018/858 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 30 May 2018 on the approval and market surveillance of motor vehicles and their trailers, and of systems, components and separate technical units intended for such vehicles, amending Regulations (EC) No 715/2007 and (EC) No 595/2009 and repealing Directive 2007/46/EC[1],

 having regard to Commission Regulation (EC) No 692/2008 of 18 July 2008 implementing and amending Regulation (EC) No 715/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council on type-approval of motor vehicles with respect to emissions from light passenger and commercial vehicles (Euro 5 and Euro 6) and on access to vehicle repair and maintenance information[2],

 having regard to the opinion delivered on 28 October 2015 by the Technical Committee for Motor Vehicles (TCMV) established by Article 40(1) of Directive 2007/46/EC,

 having regard to Commission Regulation (EU) 2016/427 of 10 March 2016 amending Regulation (EC) No 692/2008 as regards emissions from light passenger and commercial vehicles (Euro 6)[3],

 having regard to Commission Regulation (EU) 2016/646 of 20 April 2016 amending Regulation (EC) No 692/2008 as regards emissions from light passenger and commercial vehicles (Euro 6)[4],

 having regard to Commission Regulation (EU) 2017/1151 of 1 June 2017 supplementing Regulation (EC) No 715/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council on type-approval of motor vehicles with respect to emissions from light passenger and commercial vehicles (Euro 5 and Euro 6) and on access to vehicle repair and maintenance information, amending Directive 2007/46/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council, Commission Regulation (EC) No 692/2008 and Commission Regulation (EU) No 1230/2012 and repealing Commission Regulation (EC) No 692/2008[5],

 having regard to Regulation (EU) 2017/2394 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 December 2017 on cooperation between national authorities responsible for the enforcement of consumer protection laws and repealing Regulation (EC) No 2006/2004[6],

 having regard to the final report of the Committee of Inquiry into Emission Measurements in the Automotive Sector of 2 March 2017,

 having regard to its recommendation of 4 April 2017 to the Council and the Commission following the inquiry into emission measurements in the automotive sector[7],

 having regard to the European Court of Auditors’ briefing paper of 7 February 2019 on the EU’s response to the ‘Dieselgate’ scandal,

 having regard to Rule 123(2) of its Rules of Procedure,

1. Believes that Regulation (EU) 2018/858 constitutes a significant improvement in the legislative framework under which the ‘Dieselgate’ scandal occurred, making vehicles cleaner and more environmentally friendly, and restoring consumer confidence;

2. Notes that Regulation (EU) 2018/858, Regulation (EC) No 692/2008 and other related legislation introduce more robust and realistic testing methods for measuring pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides (NOx) and CO2 emissions; ensure greater quality and independence of vehicle testing; and enable improved surveillance of cars already in circulation;

3. Acknowledges, however, that the new rules under Regulation (EU) 2018/858 enter into force on 1 September 2020, and that many of the improvements to the quality, independence and oversight of vehicle type approval and testing authorities have therefore not yet come into effect;

4. Recalls that on 28 October 2015, Member States agreed that Real Driving Emissions (RDE) measurements of NOx would be compulsory for new car models from September 2017, and for all new vehicles from September 2019;

5. Recalls that on 1 June 2017, the Commission also introduced a stricter and more realistic laboratory test procedure, the Worldwide Harmonised Light-Duty Vehicles Test Procedure (WLTP), developed together with the UN Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), for measuring the CO2 emissions from and the fuel consumption of cars and vans, which became mandatory for all new car models from September 2017, and for all new cars from September 2018;

6. Points out that the EU’s regulatory regime is the first in the world to introduce the two aforementioned complementary tests, ensuring that cars sold in the EU deliver low emissions both in the laboratory and in on-road conditions and combatting fraudulent conduct in on-road vehicle emission tests;

7. Calls on the Commission to continue reducing NOx emissions from EU cars by reviewing the conformity factor, as provided for in the second RDE comitology package, annually and in line with technological developments, with a view to bringing it down to 1 as soon as possible;

8. Notes, however, that setting increasingly stringent limits on the presence of harmful airborne pollutants is not in itself an effective method for improving air quality, as demonstrated by the high number of infringement cases brought before the European Court of Justice; notes that an effective policy must include the implementation of long-term and integrated air quality improvement plans supported by adequate financial resources;

9. Observes with some concern that some Member States, or their local authorities, have introduced disproportionate measures, such as restrictions on older diesel vehicles, which result in day-to-day difficulties for owners of such vehicles, a devaluation of those vehicles and a significant uptake of older and high-polluting vehicles in lower-income countries;

10. Stresses that in order to improve air quality and public health, protect our environment and boost the EU’s competitiveness in a globalised world, a shift to cleaner and more efficient mobility in consultation with the automotive sector is required;

11. Calls on the Commission to continue to work together with Member States and other stakeholders to optimise emission regulations for vehicles in the future and accelerate the transition towards cleaner and more sustainable mobility;

12. Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission, and the governments and parliaments of the Member States.

 

[1] OJ L 151, 14.6.2018, p. 1.

[2] OJ L 199, 28.7.2008, p. 1.

[3] OJ L 82, 31.3.2016, p. 1.

[4] OJ L 109, 26.4.2016, p. 1.

[5] OJ L 175, 7.7.2017, p. 1.

[6] OJ L 345, 27.12.2017, p. 1.

[7] OJ C 298, 23.8.2018, p. 140.

Last updated: 28 March 2019Legal notice