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Parliamentary questions
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4 January 2016
E-000015-16
Question for written answer E-000015-16
to the Commission
Rule 130
Stelios Kouloglou (GUE/NGL)

 Subject:  Continued failure by Member States to enforce compliance during live animal exports to third countries
 Answer in writing 

A judgment by the European Court of Justice in the ‘Zuchtvieh’ case rules that when animals are exported to countries outside the EU, Regulation 1/2005 continues to apply even after the animals have left the EU.

According to the ruling, Competent Authorities should make sure that they only approve exports that show how the regulation will be complied with throughout the journey. Currently Member States are not doing enough to factor in lack of compliance in third countries when approving exports. For example, cattle exported to Turkey are often delayed in customs at the border for several days. They are held on trucks in appalling conditions in high temperatures without proper access to water. The consignments are not given a 24-hour rest before leaving the EU despite exporters being aware of these risks. These delays put the consignments in serious breach of Regulation 1/2005 and cause immense suffering.

Will the Commission make an official recommendation to the Member States directing them on the application of the judgment, especially in cases where widespread failure to comply with Regulation 1/2005 is a known problem?

What additional measures does the Commission intend to take to ensure enforcement of the ECJ judgment?

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