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Parliamentary questions
PDF 102kWORD 18k
13 June 2018
E-003204-18
Question for written answer E-003204-18
to the Commission
Rule 130
Tokia Saïfi (PPE) , Franck Proust (PPE) , Nathalie Griesbeck (ALDE) , Massimiliano Salini (PPE) , José Inácio Faria (PPE)

 Subject:  Commercial reciprocity for the European jewellery sector
 Answer in writing 

The European jewellery sector is one of the flagships of Europe’s creative industries. Largely based on small and medium-sized enterprises, it generates EUR 30 billion in sales annually.

There are, however, considerable impediments to its great export potential as it has been estimated that custom duties and non-tariff barriers prevent European jewels gaining access to over 60% of potential consumers worldwide. China, for example, imposes a 20% customs duty on gold items, plus a 20% luxury tax in addition to many non-tariff barriers which differ depending on the province (engraving of the weight of stones inside rings, etc.). European customs duties on Chinese jewels, on the other hand, only amount to 2.5%.

As this example illustrates, there is generally a clear problem regarding the reciprocity of market access with many of our partners, including OECD member countries.

Does the Commission plan to include the jewellery sector systematically in trade negotiations?

What are the Commission’s intentions regarding establishing better trade reciprocity for the European jewellery sector?

Do all these non-tariff trade barriers comply with WTO rules?

Last updated: 28 June 2018Legal notice