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Parliamentary questions
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7 March 2019
E-001235-19
Question for written answer E-001235-19
to the Commission
Rule 130
Tom Vandenkendelaere (PPE)

 Subject:  Injection of fish with water before sale
 Answer in writing 

It is alleged that fish is often injected with water in order to increase its volume, whether or not it is subsequently frozen. This is said to occur in Asia with fish destined for the European market. This increases the volume/weight of the fish. Assuming that food from third countries entering the European Union is adequately monitored, questions can and should be asked about how consumers may or may not be misled in this way. The practice causes a piece of fish (frozen or otherwise) to appear much bigger than it really is after preparation.

1. Is the Commission aware of this practice of injecting fish with water, and is it authorised by law?

2. Will the Commission ask Member States to step up their monitoring of imports of products from third countries in order to ensure the best possible protection for consumers?

3. Is the Commission aware of similar practices (e.g. with chicken) in the European Union itself?

Original language of question: NL 
Last updated: 2 April 2019Legal notice