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Parliamentary questions
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1 August 2019
E-001971/2019(ASW)
Answer given by President Juncker on behalf of the European Commission
Question reference: E-001971/2019

The fact that the rules for computing periods laid down in Union legislation may be different from rules for computing periods laid down in national law is not contrary to Union law, but the consequence of the respect the Union must have for the national legal orders.

The element that matters, in the cases where the Member States are required by Union law to provide in their legislation for a period the precise length of which is determined by Union law, is that the period laid down in national law corresponds effectively in its end-result, i.e. as interpreted in accordance with national rules to the period laid down in the relevant provision of Union law and interpreted in accordance with Council Regulation 1182/71(1).

(1)Regulation (EEC, Euratom) No 1182/71 of the Council of 3 June 1971 determining the rules applicable to periods, dates and time limits (OJ L 124, 8.6.1971, p. 1-2).

Last updated: 5 August 2019Legal notice