Go back to the Europarl portal

Choisissez la langue de votre document :

  • bg - български
  • es - español
  • cs - čeština
  • da - dansk
  • de - Deutsch
  • et - eesti keel
  • el - ελληνικά
  • en - English (Selected)
  • fr - français
  • ga - Gaeilge
  • hr - hrvatski
  • it - italiano
  • lv - latviešu valoda
  • lt - lietuvių kalba
  • hu - magyar
  • mt - Malti
  • nl - Nederlands
  • pl - polski
  • pt - português
  • ro - română
  • sk - slovenčina
  • sl - slovenščina
  • fi - suomi
  • sv - svenska
Parliamentary questions
PDF 40kWORD 18k
18 April 2019
E-002005-19
Question for written answer E-002005-19
to the Commission
Rule 130
Nicola Caputo (S&D)

 Subject:  Vitamin D and diabetes
 Answer in writing 

A research team from the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) has conducted tests on around 700 women aged between 35 and 74 which showed there to be a link between vitamin D and control of blood sugar levels.

Vitamin D would appear to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, since it can promote insulin — the hormone which regulates glucose levels — sensitivity and contribute to the survival of beta pancreatic cells.

After creating beta cells from embryonic stem cells, the researchers tested the effect on these of various compounds, and managed to identify one — iBRD9 — which, in association with the administration of vitamin D, potentiates vitamin D receptor activity and thus protects beta cells.

In view of the above, can the Commission indicate:
1. What research findings it has on this matter;
2. Whether it will instigate further in-depth research to establish the precise correlation between the vitamin and the condition?
Original language of question: IT 
Last updated: 3 May 2019Legal notice