Index 
Texts adopted
Wednesday, 25 October 2017 - StrasbourgFinal edition
Non-objection to a delegated act: product oversight and governance requirements for insurance undertakings and insurance distributors
 Non-objection to a delegated act: information requirements and conduct of business rules applicable to the distribution of insurance-based investment products
 Non-objection to a delegated act: regulatory technical standards on indirect clearing arrangements (supplementing Regulation (EU) No 600/2014)
 Non-objection to a delegated act: regulatory technical standards on indirect clearing arrangements (amending Delegated Regulation (EU) No 149/2013)
 General budget of the European Union for 2018 - all sections
 Discharge 2015: EU general budget - European Council and Council
 Protection of workers from the risks related to exposure to carcinogens or mutagens at work ***I
 Establishing an Entry/Exit System (EES) to register entry and exit data of third country nationals crossing the EU external borders ***I
 Amendment of the Schengen Borders Code as regards the Use of the Entry/Exit System ***I
 Fundamental rights aspects in Roma integration in the EU: fighting anti-Gypsyism

Non-objection to a delegated act: product oversight and governance requirements for insurance undertakings and insurance distributors
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European Parliament decision to raise no objections to the Commission delegated regulation of 21 September 2017 supplementing Directive (EU) 2016/97 of the European Parliament and of the Council with regard to product oversight and governance requirements for insurance undertakings and insurance distributors (C(2017)06218 – 2017/2854(DEA))
P8_TA(2017)0404B8-0572/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission delegated regulation (C(2017)06218),

–  having regard to the letter from the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs to the Chair of the Conference of Committee Chairs of 16 October 2017,

–  having regard to Article 290 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to Directive (EU) 2016/97 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 January 2016 on insurance distribution(1), and in particular Article 25(2) and Article 39(5) thereof,

–  having regard to the recommendation for a decision by the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs,

–  having regard to Rule 105(6) of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the fact that no objections have been raised within the period laid down in the third and fourth indents of Rule 105(6) of its Rules of Procedure, which expired on 24 October 2017,

A.  whereas the delegated regulation should apply from 23 February 2018, the application date of Directive (EU) 2016/97, and full use of the three-month scrutiny period available to Parliament would not allow sufficient time for industry to implement the necessary technical and organisational changes;

B.  whereas swift publication of the delegated regulation in the Official Journal would allow timely implementation of and legal certainty concerning the provisions applicable to product oversight and governance;

C.  whereas Parliament considers that the deadline for transposition of Directive (EU) 2016/97 should remain 23 February 2018, but asks the Commission to adopt a legislative proposal setting the application date at 1 October 2018;

1.  Declares that it has no objections to the delegated regulation;

2.  Instructs its President to forward this decision to the Council and the Commission.

(1) OJ L 26, 2.2.2016, p. 19.


Non-objection to a delegated act: information requirements and conduct of business rules applicable to the distribution of insurance-based investment products
PDF 240kWORD 42k
European Parliament decision to raise no objections to the Commission delegated regulation of 21 September 2017 supplementing Directive (EU) 2016/97 of the European Parliament and of the Council with regard to information requirements and conduct of business rules applicable to the distribution of insurance-based investment products (C(2017)06229 – (2017/2855(DEA))
P8_TA(2017)0405B8-0575/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission delegated regulation (C(2017)06229)),

–  having regard to the letter from the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs to the Chair of the Conference of Committee Chairs of 16 October 2017,

–  having regard to Article 290 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to Directive (EU) 2016/97 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 January 2016 on insurance distribution(1), and in particular Article 28(4), Article 29(4), Article 30(6) and Article 39(5) thereof,

–  having regard to the recommendation for a decision by the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs,

–  having regard to Rule 105(6) of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the fact that no objections have been raised within the period laid down in the third and fourth indents of Rule 105(6) of its Rules of Procedure, which expired on 24 October 2017,

A.  whereas the delegated regulation should apply from 23 February 2018, the application date of Directive (EU) 2016/97, and full use of the three-month scrutiny period available to Parliament would not allow sufficient time for industry to implement the necessary technical and organisational changes;

B.  whereas swift publication of the delegated regulation in the Official Journal would allow timely implementation of and legal certainty concerning the provisions applicable to insurance-based investment products;

C.  whereas Parliament considers that the deadline for transposition of Directive (EU) 2016/97 should remain 23 February 2018, but asks the Commission to adopt a legislative proposal setting the application date at 1 October 2018;

1.  Declares that it has no objections to the delegated regulation;

2.  Instructs its President to forward this decision to the Council and the Commission.

(1) OJ L 26, 2.2.2016, p. 19.


Non-objection to a delegated act: regulatory technical standards on indirect clearing arrangements (supplementing Regulation (EU) No 600/2014)
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European Parliament decision to raise no objections to the Commission delegated regulation of 22 September 2017 supplementing Regulation (EU) No 600/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council with regard to regulatory technical standards on indirect clearing arrangements (C(2017)06268 – (2017/2860(DEA))
P8_TA(2017)0406B8-0574/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission delegated regulation (C(2017)06268),

–  having regard to the Commission’s letter of 28 September 2017 asking Parliament to declare that it will raise no objections to the delegated regulation,

–  having regard to the letter from the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs to the Chair of the Conference of Committee Chairs of 16 October 2017,

–  having regard to Article 290 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) No 600/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 May 2014 on markets in financial instruments and amending Regulation (EU) No 648/2012(1), and in particular Article 30(2) thereof,

–  having regard to Article 13 and Article 10(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1095/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 November 2010 establishing a European Supervisory Authority (European Securities and Markets Authority), amending Decision No 716/2009/EC and repealing Commission Decision 2009/77/EC(2),

–  having regard to the draft regulatory technical standards on ‘indirect clearing arrangements under EMIR and MiFIR’ submitted by ESMA on 26 May 2016 pursuant to Article 30(2) of Regulation (EU) No 600/2014,

–  having regard to the recommendation for a decision by the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs,

–  having regard to Rule 105(6) of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the fact that no objections have been raised within the period laid down in the third and fourth indents of Rule 105(6) of its Rules of Procedure, which expired on 24 October 2017,

A.  whereas the Commission only endorsed the draft regulatory technical standard (RTS) 16 months after having received it from the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) on 26 May 2016; whereas it did not formally consult ESMA over this period concerning its amendments to this draft RTS and did not inform the co-legislators or the industry of the reasons for delay in endorsement beyond the three months laid down in Regulation (EU) No 1095/2010; whereas the fact that the Commission overran the deadline for adopting the draft RTS by more than a year without informing the co-legislators is unacceptable;

B.  whereas Parliament considers that the RTS adopted is not ‘the same’ as the draft RTS submitted by ESMA due to the Commission’s amendments and considers that it has three months to object to the RTS (‘scrutiny period’); whereas this three-month scrutiny period is confirmed by the Commission in its letter of 28 September 2017;

C.  whereas the delegated regulation should apply from 3 January 2018, the application date of Directive 2014/65/EU (‘MiFID II’) and Regulation (EU) No 600/2014 (‘MiFIR’), and full use of the three-month scrutiny period available to Parliament would no longer allow sufficient time for industry to implement the changes;

D.  whereas swift publication of the delegated regulation in the Official Journal would allow timely implementation and legal certainty concerning the provisions applicable to indirect clearing;

1.  Declares that it has no objections to the delegated regulation;

2.  Instructs its President to forward this decision to the Council and the Commission.

(1) OJ L 173, 12.6.2014, p. 84.
(2) OJ L 331, 15.12.2010, p. 84.


Non-objection to a delegated act: regulatory technical standards on indirect clearing arrangements (amending Delegated Regulation (EU) No 149/2013)
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European Parliament decision to raise no objections to the Commission delegated regulation of 22 September 2017 amending Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) No 149/2013 with regard to regulatory technical standards on indirect clearing arrangements (C(2017)06270 – (2017/2859(DEA))
P8_TA(2017)0407B8-0573/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission delegated regulation (C(2017)06270),

–  having regard to the Commission’s letter of 28 September 2017 asking Parliament to declare that it will raise no objections to the delegated regulation,

–  having regard to the letter from the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs to the Chair of the Conference of Committee Chairs of 16 October 2017,

–  having regard to Article 290 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) No 648/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 4 July 2012 on OTC derivatives, central counterparties and trade repositories(1), and in particular Article 4(4) thereof,

–  having regard to Article 13 and Article 10(1) of Regulation (EU) No 1095/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 November 2010 establishing a European Supervisory Authority (European Securities and Markets Authority), amending Decision No 716/2009/EC and repealing Commission Decision 2009/77/EC(2),

–  having regard to the draft regulatory technical standards on ‘indirect clearing arrangements under EMIR and MiFIR’ submitted by ESMA on 26 May 2016 pursuant to Article 4(4) of Regulation (EU) No 648/2012,

–  having regard to the recommendation for a decision by the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs,

–  having regard to Rule 105(6) of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the fact that no objections have been raised within the period laid down in the third and fourth indents of Rule 105(6) of its Rules of Procedure, which expired on 24 October 2017,

A.  whereas the Commission only endorsed the draft regulatory technical standard (RTS) 16 months after having received it from the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) on 26 May 2016; whereas it did not formally consult ESMA over this period concerning its amendments to this draft RTS and did not inform the co-legislators or the industry of the reasons for delay in endorsement beyond the three months laid down in Regulation (EU) No 1095/2010; whereas the fact that the Commission overran the deadline for adopting the draft RTS by more than a year without informing the co-legislators is unacceptable;

B.  whereas Parliament considers that the RTS adopted is not ‘the same’ as the draft RTS submitted by ESMA due to the Commission’s amendments and considers that it has three months to object to the RTS (‘scrutiny period’); whereas this three-month scrutiny period is confirmed by the Commission in its letter of 28 September 2017;

C.  whereas the delegated regulation should apply from 3 January 2018, the application date of Directive 2014/65/EU (‘MiFID II’) and Regulation (EU) No 600/2014 (‘MiFIR’), and full use of the three-month scrutiny period available to Parliament would no longer allow sufficient time for industry to implement the changes;

D.  whereas swift publication of the delegated regulation in the Official Journal would allow timely implementation and legal certainty concerning the provisions applicable to indirect clearing;

1.  Declares that it has no objections to the delegated regulation;

2.  Instructs its President to forward this decision to the Council and the Commission.

(1) OJ L 201, 27.7.2012, p. 1.
(2) OJ L 331, 15.12.2010, p. 84.


General budget of the European Union for 2018 - all sections
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European Parliament resolution of 25 October 2017 on the Council position on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2018 (11815/2017 – C8-0313/2017 – 2017/2044(BUD))
P8_TA(2017)0408A8-0299/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to Article 314 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to Article 106a of the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community,

–  having regard to Council Decision 2014/335/EU, Euratom of 26 May 2014 on the system of own resources of the European Union(1),

–  having regard to Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union and repealing Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002(2),

–  having regard to Council Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1311/2013 of 2 December 2013 laying down the multiannual financial framework for the years 2014-2020(3) (MFF Regulation),

–  having regard to the Interinstitutional Agreement of 2 December 2013 between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management(4) (IIA of 2 December 2013),

–  having regard to its resolution of 15 March 2017 on general guidelines for the preparation of the budget(5),

–  having regard to its resolution of 5 April 2017 on Parliament’s estimates of revenue and expenditure for the financial year 2018(6),

–  having regard to the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2018, which the Commission adopted on 29 June 2017 (COM(2017)0400),

–  having regard to the position on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2018, which the Council adopted on 4 September 2017 and forwarded to Parliament on 13 September 2017 (11815/2017 – C8‑0313/2017),

–  having regard to its resolution of 5 July 2017 on the mandate for the trilogue on the 2018 draft budget(7),

–  having regard to Rule 88 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Budgets and the opinions of the other committees concerned (A8-0299/2017),

Section III

General overview

1.  Stresses that Parliament's reading of the 2018 Budget fully reflects the political priorities adopted by an overwhelming majority in its abovementioned resolutions of 15 March 2017 and of 5 July 2017; recalls that sustainable growth, jobs, in particular youth employment, security and climate change are at the core of those priorities;

2.  Highlights that the Union continues to face numerous challenges and is convinced that, while maintaining budget discipline, the necessary financial resources must be deployed from the Union budget, in order to meet the political priorities and allow the Union to deliver concrete answers and to effectively respond to those challenges; underlines that Union spending should be based on the principle of European added value and should respect the principle of subsidiarity;

3.  Reaffirms its commitment to financing Union policies that enhance jobs and growth in all its regions through investment in research, education, infrastructure, SMEs and employment, in particular youth employment; fails to understand how the Union can achieve progress in those fields considering the cuts proposed by the Council under subheading 1a; decides instead to additionally reinforce research and innovation programmes that have a very high implementation rate and which, due to oversubscription, are faced with a particularly low success rate for applications;

4.  Remains committed to the pledges made by Parliament during the negotiations on the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI), namely to minimise the impact of EFSI-related cuts on Horizon 2020 and the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) in the framework of the annual budgetary procedure; proposes, therefore, to offset those cuts by restoring the original annual profile of those two programmes, in order to allow them to fully accomplish the objectives agreed during the adoption of the relevant legislation;

5.  Expresses its political support for the establishment of the European Solidarity Corps (ESC) and welcomes the legislative proposal put forward in this regard by the Commission; considers, however, that, pending a decision on the financing of the ESC and the adoption of the relevant regulation under the ordinary legislative procedure, no financial provision should be entered for this purpose in the 2018 Budget; decides, therefore, that relevant appropriations and redeployments, entered by the Commission in the Draft Budget 2018 (DB), should be for the moment reversed, as the decision on the 2018 Budget should not prejudge in any way the outcome of the legislative negotiations; remains fully committed to integrate the decision on ESC financing in next year’s budget immediately via an amending budget, in case the negotiations on the relevant regulation are not concluded before the end of the 2018 budgetary procedure;

6.  Is concerned by the fact that youth unemployment remains at unprecedented levels and is convinced that, in order not to jeopardise the future of an entire generation of young Europeans, additional actions need to be undertaken; decides therefore to reinforce the Youth Employment Initiative (YEI) beyond the level proposed by the Commission for 2018; stresses that such reinforcement should be considered as additional to the overall allocation that was politically endorsed for YEI in the context of the MFF mid-term revision, and not as a mere frontloading of that allocation in the 2018 Budget;

7.  Recalls that cohesion policy plays a primary role in achieving economic and social convergence in the Union, and thus in ensuring development and growth; stresses that in 2018, cohesion policy programmes are expected to catch-up and reach cruising speed; emphasises Parliament’s commitment to ensuring adequate appropriations for those programmes that represent one of the core policies of the Union; is however preoccupied by the unacceptable delays in the implementation of operational programmes at national level; calls on Member States to ensure that the designation of managing, auditing and certifying authorities is concluded and that implementation is accelerated; furthermore calls on the Commission to go further with the simplification of the related procedures;

8.  Is highly concerned at the rise of instability and uncertainty both within and outside the Union; insists on the need for a renewed focus on the Union’s approach to cohesion, integration, peace, sustainable development and human rights; calls upon the Commission and the Member States to connect and boost efforts towards further sustaining peace and conflict prevention; recalls the worldwide inspiration brought by the Good Friday Agreement while acknowledging the unprecedented challenges and pressures in the aftermath of the United Kingdom 2016 Referendum; calls upon the Commission and Member States to enhance their support for reconciliation to secure peace and stability in Ireland;

9.  Believes that, while at present the peak of the migratory and refugee crisis seems to have decreased, the Union must stand ready to respond to any future unforeseen event in this area and pursue a more proactive approach in the field of migration; therefore urges the Commission to continuously monitor the adequacy of allocations under Heading 3 and make full use of all available instruments under the current MFF to respond in a timely manner to any unforeseen event that might require additional funding; recalls that, while the Union managed to put in place some mechanisms helping to cope with this situation, still over one hundred thousand refugees and migrants have arrived to Europe by sea so far in 2017 according to the UNHCR; decides therefore to reinforce in a limited manner the Asylum Migration and Integration Fund and the Internal Security Fund, as well as the agencies with responsibilities in the field of asylum, such as the European Asylum Support Office (EASO), which need to be provided with adequate financial and human resources; notes, once again, that the Heading 3 ceiling is vastly insufficient to provide for appropriate funding for the internal dimension of the migration and refugee crisis as well as other priority programmes, such as culture and citizenship programmes;

10.  Underlines that Heading 3 has been largely mobilised in recent years to address the migratory and refugee crisis and that such actions should continue for as long as needed; notes however that the funding provided so far is insufficient; decides for this reason to reinforce agencies in the field of Justice and Home Affairs which, due to increased workload and additional tasks, have been facing shortage of staff and funding in the past years;

11.  Underlines that, in light of recent security concerns across the Union, funding under Heading 3 should also have regard to measures which will lead to enhancing the security of Union citizens;

12.  Reiterates that an essential part of the solution to the migratory and refugee crisis as well as to the security concerns of Union citizens lie in addressing the root causes of migration and devoting sufficient financial means to external instruments that aim at tackling issues such as poverty, lack of employment, education and economic opportunities, instability, conflict and climate change which is one of the underlying causes behind increasing migration flows; is of the opinion that the Union should make an optimal use of financial means under Heading 4 which proved to be insufficient to equally address all external challenges, considering that the resources are clearly insufficient and should be increased in a more organic way;

13.  Regrets that, while preparing its position, Parliament has not been sufficiently informed about the budgetary impact of a possible political decision to extend the Facility for Refugees in Turkey (FRT); reiterates its longstanding position that new initiatives shall not be financed to the detriment of existing EU external projects; calls therefore on the Commission, in the event of the prolongation of the FRT, to propose its financing through fresh means and involve more local NGOs in its implementation; notes that the Heading 4 ceiling is vastly insufficient to provide a sustainable and effective response to the current external challenges, including the migration and refugee ones;

14.  Recalls that the Union budget must support the fulfilment of the objectives of the Paris Agreement and the Union’s own long-term climate goals by achieving the target of 20 % climate spending in the 2014-2020 MFF; regrets that the Commission has failed to put forward concrete and realistic proposals to achieve these goals; therefore proposes increases above the level of the DB for climate-related actions; notes however that these increases are not sufficient and calls on the Commission to present all the necessary proposals to reach the goals in the forthcoming draft budgets; notes, in this context, that 8,2 % of total commitment appropriations proposed in the DB are related to biodiversity protection; highlights that an annual increase of 0,1 % stands in contrast to the worrying and accelerating decline in species and habitats;

15.  Appreciates that the new approach of 'Budget Focused on Results' has for the first time been integrated into the internal budgetary preparation of the Commission in order to review the expenditure based on experience achieved so far and identify possible adjustments;

16.  Restores the cuts proposed by Council to the DB; fails to understand the reasoning behind the proposed cuts, for example those to Horizon 2020 and CEF, two programmes already affected by redeployments to EFSI, as well as those to external policies; contests, in any event, Council’s declared intention to target budget lines with a low execution rate or absorption capacity, as this is not substantiated by the actual implementation figures and ignores the varying implementation patterns of certain programmes;

17.  Concludes that, for the purpose of adequately financing all pressing needs, and considering the very tight MFF margins in 2018, all means available in the MFF Regulation in terms of flexibility will need to be deployed; expects that the Council will share this approach and that an agreement will easily be reached in conciliation, allowing the Union to rise to the occasion and effectively respond to the challenges ahead; underlines that the deviation each budgetary year from the original programming under the current MFF advocates in favour of an upward adjustment of the ceilings in the MFF post-2020;

18.  Sets the overall level of appropriations for 2018 at EUR 162 597 930 901 in commitment appropriations and EUR 146 712 004 932 in payment appropriations;

Subheading 1a – Competitiveness for growth and jobs

19.  Rejects Council’s unjustified EUR 750 million cuts to subheading 1a, which alone represent almost two thirds of the overall Council cuts in commitments in MFF headings; notes that such cuts contradict Council’s own stated political priorities;

20.  Insists that in order to achieve sustainable growth and job creation in the Union, boosting investments in research, innovation, education, infrastructure and MSMEs is key; warns that such cuts proposed by the Council would jeopardise programmes with real European added value and a direct impact on job and growth creation, such as Horizon 2020 or CEF; points out, in particular, that sufficient funding for Horizon 2020 is essential to allow for the development of research and innovation, leadership in digitalisation and for the support of SMEs in Europe; recalls that this programme has demonstrated a strong European added-value with 83 % of Horizon 2020-funded projects that would not have gone ahead without Union-level support; reiterates the importance of the CEF funding instrument for the completion of the TEN-T network and for achieving a Single European Transport Area; consequently decides to reverse all cuts made by the Council and, furthermore, to fully restore the original profile of the Horizon 2020 and CEF lines that were cut for the provisioning of the EFSI Guarantee Fund;

21.  Stresses, in addition, the need to strengthen both the education and training and the youth strands of Erasmus+, as part of strategic investment in European youth;

22.  Stresses that sufficient financial support for microenterprises, entrepreneurs and SMEs should be the key priority for the Union as these are the main source of job creation across Europe; emphasises that securing good access to finance is essential for keeping SMEs competitive and for helping them to overcome challenges related to access to the internal market as well as to the global market;

23.  Decides, therefore, to further reinforce beyond the DB and the pre-EFSI and pre-ESC profiles those programmes that are key to boosting growth and jobs and that reflect widely agreed Union priorities, namely Erasmus+, Horizon 2020 (Marie Curie, European Research Council, SME Instrument), COSME, and EaSI (Progress and Eures); calls on the Commission to provide sufficient funding for budget lines related to WIFI4EU and to keep its investment commitment between 2017 and 2020;

24.  Welcomes the inclusion of the Special Annual Events budget line in the 2018 Budget, which will allow the development of a sense of European belonging among citizens; notes that the scope of the Special Annual Event should demonstrably serve the added value to the European citizens across the Member States;

25.  Stresses the importance of stimulating cooperative defence research in Europe for addressing key capability shortfalls at a time when international developments and uncertainties increasingly require Europe to step up its efforts on defence; supports the increased allocation for the Preparatory Action on defence research; calls for a defence research programme with a dedicated budget within the next Multiannual Financial Framework; reiterates, nevertheless, its longstanding position that new initiatives shall be financed through fresh appropriations and not to the detriment of existing Union programmes; underlines, furthermore, the need to improve the competitiveness and innovation in the European defence industry;

26.  Is of the opinion that increased resources should be allocated in the framework of the 2018 Budget in order to conduct a comprehensive and unbiased assessment of the risk posed by third countries in terms of their strategic deficiencies in the area of anti-money laundering and countering terrorist financing, based on criteria defined in Article 9 of Directive (EU) 2015/849(8), and to establish a list of 'high-risk' jurisdictions;

27.  Calls on the Commission to ensure an adequate level of allocations enabling the European Union Reference Laboratory for alternatives to animal testing (EURL ECVAM) to effectively perform its duties and tasks listed in Annex VII to Directive 2010/63/EU(9), with particular reference to coordinating and promoting the development and use of alternatives to animal testing including in the areas of basic and applied research and regulatory testing;

28.  As a result, increases the level of commitment appropriations for subheading 1a above the DB by EUR 143,9 million (excluding pre-EFSI and pre-ESC restoration, pilot projects and preparatory actions), to be financed within the margin available as well as a further mobilisation of the Global Margin for Commitments;

Subheading 1b – Economic, social and territorial cohesion

29.  Disapproves of Council's proposed cuts of EUR 240 million in payments under subheading 1b, including on support lines and reverses them, pending updated forecasts from the Commission;

30.  Notes with increasing concern that the unacceptable delays in the implementation of the European Structural and Investment Funds have undermined their effectiveness and put pressure on the managing authorities and beneficiaries; reiterates once again the risk that the current delays can have on the accumulation of unpaid bills in the second half of this MFF and at the beginning of the next one; reiterates strongly its call on the Member States to seek advice and assistance from the Commission in order to address the delays in the designation of the managing, certifying and auditing authorities; is further alarmed by the downsize trend and the lack of accuracy of the Member States' estimates;

31.  Recalls that youth unemployment rates remain unacceptably high in the Union; emphasises that, in order to address this issue, it is of importance to ensure proper funding of the Youth Guarantee schemes through the Youth Employment Initiative (YEI) and the ESF; welcomes the agreement on the need to provide fresh funding for the YEI, and the inclusion of the corresponding appropriations in the DB 2018; considers nevertheless that, given the challenges and risks posed by youth unemployment, the YEI should benefit from increased appropriations and therefore decides to bring the YEI to EUR 600 million in commitments in 2018; moreover, considers that professional training actions, towards the youth and in particular the apprenticeship should be eligible for financing under the cohesion policy;

32.  Welcomes the new EUR 142,8 million financial envelope which has been created to facilitate the implementation of the Structural Reform Support Programme between 2017-2020;

Heading 2 – Sustainable growth: natural resources

33.  Recalls that the Commission’s proposal to increase appropriations to finance the European Agricultural Guarantee Fund (EAGF) needs are largely due to a significantly lower amount of assigned revenue being expected to be available in 2018; notes the Council’s cuts of EUR 275 million, but considers that the Commission’s Amending Letter should remain the basis for any reliable revision of EAGF appropriations and restores the DB levels accordingly, pending an examination of this Amending Letter in conciliation;

34.  Stresses that storage programmes have proved effective in times of crisis and that a reduction in the financial resources earmarked in the planning process would be counter-productive;

35.  Underlines that part of the solution to address youth unemployment lies in adequately supporting young people in rural areas; proposes therefore an increase of EUR 50 million above the level of the DB for payments for young farmers; emphasises the need to use the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund and other Union funding schemes to facilitate young people’s access to jobs in the fishing industry;

36.  Decides, in line with its Europe 2020 targets and with its international commitments to tackle climate change, to propose an increase of EUR 21,2 million above the level of the DB for climate-related actions; reiterates that both the European Court of Auditors (ECA) as well as ECOFIN ascertained that the Union budget is not in line with its climate targets;

37.  Recalls that taxpayers’ money should not be used to support the rearing or breeding of bulls for fighting activities; believes that breeding or rearing for those purposes should not be eligible for basic payments and asks that the Commission submit a proposal in order to amend the current legislation on this issue;

38.  Increases therefore commitment appropriations by EUR 78,1 million, thus leaving a margin of EUR 619,7 million below the ceiling for commitments in Heading 2 once pilot projects and preparatory actions have been deducted;

39.  Emphasises, with regret, that disasters generally affect those who have less means to protect themselves, whether they be individuals or States; considers that the response to natural or man-made disasters should be as rapid as possible so that damage is minimal and people and property can be saved; calls attention to the need for an additional increase in funds, particularly in the budget lines linked to disaster prevention and preparedness within the Union, taking into account, in particular, fires in Spain and Portugal (resulting in tragic loss of human life), which have a dramatic and substantial impact on people;

40.  Draws attention to the threat factors weighing on numerous forest ecosystems, such as, among others, the spread of invasive alien species, pests (such as pine nematode and others) and forest fires; considers that sufficient financial resources should be addressed through community support programmes and measures to the evaluation of ecological and plant health of forests and their rehabilitation, including reforestation; notes that such resources are particularly important and urgent to some Member States, namely Portugal and Spain following previous successive fires throughout the national territory;

Heading 3 - Security and Citizenship

41.  Emphasises that for Parliament, tackling migration and security must remain top Union priorities and reiterates its conviction that the Heading 3 ceiling has proven vastly insufficient to fund adequately the internal dimension of those challenges;

42.  Notes that, while the number of migrant crossings on the Central and Eastern Mediterranean routes into the Union fell in the first nine months of 2017, pressure on the Western Mediterranean route remains; notes that more than one hundred thousand migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in the first nine months of 2017, with over 75 % arriving in Italy and the remainder divided between Greece, Cyprus and Spain; is of the opinion that increased funding is needed to fully cover the needs of the Union in the field of migration, notably through the Asylum, Migration and Integration Fund to support Members States in improving integration measures and practices for those in need of international protection, especially unaccompanied minors, and, where necessary, carrying out return operations for those not entitled to protection while fully respecting the principle of non-refoulement; in this context also insists that the EASO shall be equipped with adequate financial and human resources to allow the agency to fulfil its assigned tasks;

43.  Is in favour of the creation of a new budget line for a Search and Rescue Fund to support Member States in their obligations under international maritime law; asks the Commission to present a legislative proposal to set up such an EU Search and Rescue Fund;

44.  Is convinced that, in order to effectively tackle security concerns of Union citizens, the budget of the Internal Security Fund needs additional funds to equip the Member States better in the fight against terrorism, cross-border organised crime, radicalisation and cybercrime; underlines, in particular, that sufficient resources must be provided for reinforcing security infrastructures and boosting information-sharing between law enforcement agencies and national authorities, including through improving the interoperability of information systems while guaranteeing at the same time respect for individual rights and liberties;

45.  Highlights the crucial role played by the Union agencies in the area of justice and home affairs in addressing pressing concerns of Union citizens; decides therefore to increase budgetary appropriations and staffing of the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol), including the creation of 7 staff posts for the new operating unit called Europol operating unit for missing children, as well as to reinforce the European Union’s Judicial Cooperation Unit (Eurojust), EASO and the European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Training (CEPOL); reiterates the contribution of these agencies to enhancing cooperation between Member States in the field;

46.  Asks the Commission, in the light of the actual progress made in ongoing interinstitutional negotiations, to provide updated information on the financial implications in 2018 of pending legislative proposals as part of the European Agenda on Migration, in particular the reform of the Dublin system, the Entry/Exit System, the European Travel Information and Authorisation System and EASO, so that it can be taken into account in the conciliation phase;

47.  Regrets Council’s arbitrary cuts of more than EUR 30 million in commitment appropriations to numerous programmes in the areas of culture, citizenship, justice, public health, consumer rights and civil protection, in disregard of these programmes’ excellent implementation rates and despite already insufficient levels of financing that leave many high-quality projects unfunded; restores all lines to the level of the DB and proposes additional increases to relevant lines;

48.  Reiterates its conviction that it is time to boost funding for important Union programmes in the areas of culture and citizenship, in particular Creative Europe and Europe for Citizens, which have a key role in supporting cultural and creative industries, as well as participatory citizenship, especially in view of the European elections in 2019; reiterates that all institutions must honour the political agreement found on the 2018 funding for the European Year of Cultural Heritage by providing sufficient appropriations for it through Creative Europe’s Culture sub-programme, in the absence of a separate budget line for the Year; calls on the Commission to review initiatives under the ‘multimedia actions’ budget line to ensure that the budget effectively supports high-quality independent coverage of Union affairs;

49.  Is in favour of increased transparency of and visibility for the Daphne objective of the Rights, Equality and Citizenship programme, as a key Union tool in combatting all forms of violence against children, young people, women, LGBTI people and other at-risk groups; supports setting up a European monitoring centre on gender-based violence within the European Institute for Gender Equality;

50.  Reinforces Heading 3 by EUR 108,8 million in commitment appropriations above the DB, excluding pilot projects and preparatory actions, and proposes to finance these reinforcements by a further mobilisation of the Flexibility Instrument;

Heading 4 – Global Europe

51.  Stresses once again that the Union’s external action is faced with ever growing funding needs which greatly exceed the current size of Heading 4; considers that the mobilisation of the Union budget to respond to the migration challenge will continue to require dynamic responses in the coming years; stresses that an ad hoc one-year increase, such as that in 2017, cannot be considered sufficient in view of the complex challenges that the Union is facing and the urgent need for stronger Union external presence in today’s global world;

52.  Is of the opinion that priority should be given to the Union’s immediate neighbours and to measures aimed at tackling the main issues they are facing, namely the migratory and refugee crisis and corresponding humanitarian challenges in the Southern Neighbourhood, and the Russian aggression in the Eastern Neighbourhood; believes that stability and prosperity of the Union Neighbourhood are beneficial to both the concerned regions and to the Union as a whole; reiterates its call to increase support to the Middle East Peace Process, the Palestinian Authority and UNRWA to cope with growing needs, in order to achieve the Union’s stated objective of promoting development and stability in the region and support the resilience of Palestinians; reiterates that supporting countries which are implementing association agreements with the Union is pivotal to facilitating political and economic reforms, but stresses that such support should apply as long as those countries meet the eligibility criteria, especially as regards the rule of law and enforcing democratic institutions; therefore decides to increase resources for the European Neighbourhood Instrument (ENI), for the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA) and for Macro-Financial Assistance (MFA);

53.  Stresses the importance of the role that Europe plays at global level in eradicating poverty and ensuring development of the most deprived regions, in line with the UN Sustainable Development Goals; therefore, allocates additional financial resources to the Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI) and Humanitarian Aid; recalls that, since a significant proportion of migrants crossing the Mediterranean Sea are coming from Sub-Saharan Africa, Union support in this region is key to tackling the root causes of migration;

54.  Opposes the drastic reductions in financial contributions from the external financing instruments (ENI, IPA, PI and DCI) to Erasmus+, despite the fact that youth exchange programs are one of the most successful long-term investments into cultural diplomacy and mutual understanding, and decides therefore to increase these contributions;

55.  In view of the worrying deterioration of the situation as regards democracy, rule of law and human rights, decides to decrease the support for political reforms in Turkey; decides to put part of the remaining appropriations in reserve to be released when Turkey makes measurable improvements in the fields of rule of law, democracy, human rights and press freedom, with the aim of redirecting these funds to civil society actors for implementing measures supportive of these objectives;

56.  Is of the opinion that in order to adequately tackle disinformation campaigns, and to promote an objective image of the Union outside its borders, additional financial means are needed; calls therefore to step up funding to counter disinformation campaigns and cyberattacks; decides therefore to increase resources for strategic communication actions to be carried out in the Neighbourhood as well as in the Western Balkans; recalls the importance of investing in the visibility of the Union's external action in order to strengthen the impact of funding in that field and enhance Union public diplomacy in line with the ambitions of the Global Strategy;

57.  Deems it necessary to increase appropriations for the Turkish Cypriot Community budget line for the purpose of contributing decisively to the continuation and intensification of the mission of the Committee on Missing Persons in Cyprus, the wellbeing of Maronites wishing to resettle and that of all enclaved persons as agreed in the 3rd Vienna Agreement, and of supporting the bicommunal Technical Committee on Cultural Heritage, thus promoting trust and reconciliation between the two communities;

58.  Stresses that the trend by the Commission to resort to satellite budgetary mechanisms such as trust funds and other similar instruments has not always proven to be a success; is concerned that the establishment of financial instruments outside the Union budget could threaten its unity and circumvent the budgetary procedure and at the same time undermine the transparent management of the budget and hamper the right of the Parliament to exercise effective scrutiny of expenditures; considers, therefore, that external instruments which emerged in recent years must be incorporated into the Union budget, with Parliament having full scrutiny over the implementation of these instruments; notes that by end of September 2017 a total of EUR 795,4 million has been committed for EU Trust Funds in the 2017 Budget; asks the Commission to present to the European Parliament and the Council the amount it intends to commit in 2018 to the Trust Funds; reiterates its concern that Member State contributions to these Trust Funds tend to lag behind their pledges; takes note of the ECA Special Report 11/2017 on the Bekou EU Trust Fund for the Central African Republic; is concerned about the deficiencies identified by the ECA, such as the lack of assessment for overall needs and the dysfunctional coordination mechanisms with other donors; expresses its intention to assess the added value of EU Trust Funds as an instrument of Union external policy;

59.  Recalls that in accordance with Article 24 of the MFF Regulation, all expenditures and revenues of the Union and Euratom shall be entered in the general budget of the Union in accordance with Article 7 of the Financial Regulation; calls on the Commission to preserve the unity of the budget and to consider it as a guiding principle when introducing new initiatives;

60.  Stresses the importance of election observation missions in strengthening democratic institutions and building public confidence in electoral processes, which in return promote peace-building and stability; emphasises the need to ensure sufficient financial resources for that objective;

61.  Points out that DCI funding shall not be redeployed in order to finance the new Capacity Building for Security and Development (CBSD) initiative under the IcSP; deplores the DB proposal to redeploy EUR 7,5 million from the DCI to the CBSD and stresses the urgent need to find alternative solutions to fill this gap;

62.  Reiterates its request that the budget line for EU Special Representatives be transferred, in a budget-neutral manner, from the CFSP budget to the administrative budget of the EEAS in order to further consolidate the Union's diplomatic activities;

63.  As a result, decides to reverse almost all of the Council’s cuts and to reinforce Heading 4 by EUR 299,7 million above the DB in commitment appropriations (excluding pilot projects and preparatory actions, the transfer of EUSRs and adopted cuts);

Heading 5 - Administration; Other headings - administrative and research support expenditure

64.  Considers that Council’s cuts do not reflect the real needs and thus jeopardise the already significantly rationalised administrative expenditure; restores therefore the DB for all Commission administrative expenditure, including administrative and research support expenditure in Headings 1 to 4;

65.  Decides, in line with the conclusion of the "Joint Opinion of the Legal Services of the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on three aspects of the relationship between OLAF and its Supervisory Committee" of 12 September 2016, to hold 10 % of appropriations of the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) until the Supervisory Committee is granted access to OLAF cases files, while slightly reinforcing its budget, in line with increased responsibilities;

66.  Takes note that, at the beginning of 2017, OLAF investigated a severe case of customs fraud in the UK which was caused by undervaluation of imported products and which has created a loss of income of almost EUR 2 billion for the Union budget in the period 2013-2016; is concerned that that fraud has not been stopped to date and that losses to the Union budget are still ongoing; asks the Commission to take into account the slow reaction of the UK administration to its recommendations in this regard when negotiating Brexit; asks those Member States that objected to the Union legal framework for customs infringements and sanctions to reconsider their position in order to allow for a speedy solution of this problem;

Decentralised Agencies

67.  Endorses, as a general rule, the Commission's estimates of the budgetary needs of agencies; considers, therefore, that any further cuts proposed by the Council would endanger the proper functioning of the agencies and would not allow them to fulfil the tasks they have been assigned; considers that the new posts adopted in its position are needed to fulfil additional tasks due to new policy developments and new legislation; reiterates its commitment to safeguard resources and where necessary provide additional resources as to ensure the proper functioning of the agencies;

68.  In the context of the challenges the Union is still facing in terms of migration and security, and bearing in mind the necessity for a coordinated European response, decides to reinforce the appropriations for the Europol, Eurojust, CEPOL, EASO and the European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA);

69.  Recalls the importance for the Union focusing on competitiveness for growth and jobs; recalls the strategic priority for the Union of fully developing and implementing its Galileo and EGNOS projects for which the European GNSS Agency (GSA) is partially responsible; recalls the GSA has a resourcing gap for cyber security and public regulated service and decides, therefore, to increases its level of appropriations;

70.  Considers that additional appropriation and staff are needed for the Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER) to fulfil its expanded mission related to the implementation of the electricity and gas network codes and guidelines and its monitoring;

71.  Recalls in particular that the European Environment Agency (EEA) helps the Union to make informed decisions about improving the environment, integrating environmental considerations into economic policies and moving towards sustainability, and that, in the context of the 2030 Union climate and energy policy, the Commission has proposed new work for EEA on the Governance of the Energy Union, without any corresponding increase in the establishment table;

72.  Stresses that while the budgetary resources and the number of posts for the European Border and Coast Guard seem adequate for the time being, the future needs of the agency in terms of operational resources and staff will have to be closely monitored;

73.  Welcomes the inclusion of adequate resources provided for in the 2018 budget to support the European Supervisory Authorities (ESAs); underlines that the role of the ESAs is essential in fostering the consistent application of Union law and better coordination between national authorities, and in ensuring financial stability, better integrated financial markets and consumer protection and supervisory convergence; emphasises that in the interest of a prudent use of their budgets, the ESAs must stick to the tasks and to the mandate assigned to them by the Union legislator;

74.  Reiterates that, as agreed in the IIA of 2 December 2013, 2018 is the last year of implementation of the 5 % staff reduction and redeployment pool approach to the staffing of agencies; reiterates its opposition to any continuation of a global approach on agency resources after 2018; reaffirms its openness to achieving efficiency gains between agencies through increased administrative cooperation or even mergers where appropriate and through pooling certain functions with either the Commission or another agency; welcomes in this regard the initiative to further coordinate agencies activities via establishing the Network of EU Agencies’ Permanent Secretariat (now called the Shared Support Office) and supports the allocation of an additional establishment plan post to the European Food Safety Agency whose costs will be mutualised from the Union Agencies’ existing budgets and seconded to that office;

Pilot projects and preparatory actions (PP-PAs)

75.  Having carried out a careful analysis of the pilot projects and preparatory actions submitted as regards the rate of success of the on-going ones, excluding initiatives already covered by existing legal bases and taking fully into account the Commission's assessment of the projects' implementability, decides to adopt a compromise package made up of a limited number of PP-PAs, in view also of the limited margins available and the ceilings for PP-PAs;

76.  Stresses therefore the efforts made by the Parliament in this regard and asks the Commission to show good will in the implementation of the adopted PP-PAs at the end of the budgetary procedure, regardless of its implementability assessment, as for any decision of the European Parliament and the Council;

Special instruments

77.  Recalls the usefulness of special instruments to provide flexibility over and beyond the extremely tight ceilings of the current MFF and welcomes the improvements brought about by the mid-term revision of the MFF Regulation; calls for an extensive use of the Flexibility Instrument, the Global Margin for Commitments and the Contingency Margin in order to finance the wide range of new challenges and additional responsibilities that the Union budget is facing;

78.  Calls for an increase in the Emergency Aid Reserve (EAR) and the EU Solidarity Fund (EUSF) in light of the most recent and tragic disasters, namely the fires and extreme drought in Portugal and Spain;

79.  Recalls also the significance of the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF), the EAR and the EUSF; supports the Commission’s intention to provide for a quicker mobilisation of the EUSF by putting most of its annual amount in a reserve in the Union budget, on top of the amount already budgeted for advances; regrets the Council’s cut in that respect and restores partially the DB level, with the exception of the amount which has been frontloaded to 2017 via Amending Budget No 4/2017 and the mobilisation of the EUSF for Italy; calls for the extension of the scope of the EUSF to provide assistance to victims of acts of terrorism and their families;

Payments

80.  Is concerned about the current under-execution trend in payments throughout the Union budget, not only in subheading 1b, but also in Headings 3 and 4, despite the need to answer the surge of new challenges and the setting-up of flexible funding mechanisms; recalls that for the past two years the payment level of the Union budget was considerably decreased, coupled with a high level of budget surplus; expresses, therefore, its concern that the DB still leaves an unprecedented margin of EUR 10 billion below the payment ceiling, which reflects a low execution trend that may lead to an acute payment pressure at the end of the current MFF;

81.  Insists on the necessity to restore the DB in payments on all lines cut by the Council and reinforces payment appropriations in targeted manner, mostly on those lines which are amended in commitment appropriations;

Other Sections

82.  Regrets the repeated Council practice of increasing the standard flat rate abatement for the Union institutions; believes this to have a particularly distorting effect on the budgets of institutions with historically accurate abatement rates; considers that this approach does not constitute a targeted reduction nor sound financial management; restores therefore the abatement rate at the level of the DB;

Section I – European Parliament

83.  Maintains the overall level of its budget for 2018, as adopted in its abovementioned resolution of 5 April 2017, at EUR 1 953 483 373; incorporates budgetary-neutral technical adjustments to reflect updated information which was not available earlier this year;

84.  Notes that the level of estimates for 2018 corresponds to 18,88 %, which is lower than that achieved in 2017 (19,25 %) and the lowest part of Heading 5 in the past fifteen years; insists nevertheless that the drive for the lowest expenditure possible for the European Parliament should not come at the cost of a reduced capacity for Parliament's ordinary legislative work;

85.  Reiterates Parliament’s priorities for the forthcoming financial year, namely, consolidating the security measures already taken and improving Parliament’s resilience to cyber-attacks, improving the transparency of the Parliament’s own internal budgetary procedure, and focusing the Parliament’s budget on its core functions of legislating, acting as one arm of the budgetary authority, representing citizens and scrutinising the work of other institutions;

86.  Welcomes the creation of the Parliament's Bureau Working group on the general expenditure allowance; recalls the expectations of greater transparency regarding the general expenditure allowance and a need to work on a definition of more precise rules regarding the accountability of the expenditure authorised under this allowance, without generating additional costs to Parliament;

87.  Calls on the Bureau to make the following concrete changes concerning the general expenditure allowance:

   the general expenditure allowance should be handled in all cases in a separate bank account;
   all receipts pertaining to the general expenditure allowance should be kept by Members;
   the unspent share of the general expenditure allowance should be returned at the end of the mandate;

88.  Reduces the establishment plan of its General Secretariat for 2018 by 60 posts (1 % staff reduction target), in accordance with the agreement of 14 November 2015 reached with the Council on the general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2016; recalls that the 35 posts granted to Parliament in 2016 related to new activities reinforcing security and, as such were exempted from the staff reduction target, as confirmed at the adoption of the Amending Budget No 3/2016 and the 2017 general budget(10); calls on the Commission to adjust its monitoring tables accordingly in order to provide to the European Parliament and the Council with accurate information at all steps of the procedure;

89.  Welcomes the exchange of views on Parliament’s building policy held on 11 July 2017 between the Committee on Budgets, the Secretary General and the Vice-Presidents responsible for Parliament’s building policy; considers that this dialogue ought to be a continuous process, particularly in the light of upcoming Bureau discussions on the refurbishment of the Paul Henri-Spaak building;

90.  Reiterates Parliament’s position as expressed in its abovementioned resolution of 5 April 2017 that there is further room for improvement on the control mechanisms related to European political parties and political foundations; notes in this regard the Commission’s proposal to amend Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1141/2014(11) and welcomes any effort to improve the accountability and transparency of spending;

91.  Recalls the 2014 ECA analysis which estimated the costs of the geographic dispersion of the Parliament to be EUR 114 million per year; furthermore, notes the finding from its resolution of 20 November 2013 on the location of the seats of the European Union’s Institutions(12) that 78 % of all missions by Parliament statutory staff arise as a direct result of the Parliament's geographic dispersion; emphasises that the report also estimates the environmental impact of the geographic dispersion to be between 11 000 to 19 000 tonnes of CO2 emissions; reiterates the negative public perception caused by this dispersion and calls therefore for a roadmap to a single seat and a reduction in the relevant budget lines;

Section IV - Court of Justice

92.  Restores the DB on all budget items cut by the Council which are essential to the functioning of the Court and restores the estimates for two budget items in order to enhance the Court’s ability to deal with increasingly high translation demands;

93.  Expresses its disbelief at the unilateral statement of the Council and the related appendix on the 5 % staff reduction in the Council’s position on the 2018 draft budget according to which the Court still needs to reduce its establishment plan by 19 posts; underlines that those 19 posts correspond to the 12 and 7 posts duly granted by Parliament and the Council in the 2015 and 2016 budgetary procedures respectively to address additional needs and insists therefore that those 19 posts should not be given back, the Court having already duly achieved its 5 % staff reduction requirement by suppressing 98 posts during the period 2013-2017;

Section V - Court of Auditors

94.  Restores the DB on all items cut by Council, in order to implement the work programme of the Court of Auditors and deliver the planned Audit Reports;

95.  Places a reserve on the item “Limited consultations, studies and surveys” pending the outcome of the ongoing negotiations on the revision of the Financial Regulation, and the revision entering into force in 2018;

Section VI - European Economic and Social Committee

96.  Restores the DB on all items cut by the Council;

97.  Increases two lines above the DB in relation to the work of Domestic Advisory Groups in trade agreements;

Section VII - Committee of the Regions

98.  Restores the DB on all items cut by the Council;

99.  Increases a number of lines above the DB in line with the Committee of the Region’s own estimates;

Section VIII - European Ombudsman

100.  Welcomes the work done by the Ombudsman in finding efficiency savings in her own budget when compared with the previous year;

Section IX - European Data Protection Supervisor

101.  Questions why the Council would reduce the budget of the European Data Protection Supervisor given the additional tasks conferred upon the institution by Parliament and the Council; restores therefore all the budget lines cut by Council to enable the European Data Protection Supervisor to fulfil his obligations and commitments;

Section X- European External Action Service

102.  Restores all lines cut by the Council;

103.  Creates a Strategic Communication Capacity budget item in line with the European Council conclusions of March 2015 and to equip the EEAS with adequate staff and tools to face the challenge of disinformation from third states and non-state actors;

104.  Decides furthermore to transfer EU Special Representatives from the CFSP chapter to the EEAS budget to strengthen the coherence of the Union's external action;

105.  Provides an additional amount above the EEAS estimates for trainees in Union Delegations, in response to the findings of the European Ombudsman’s inquiry into unpaid traineeships(13);

o
o   o

106.  Takes note of the unilateral statement of France and Luxembourg annexed to the Council's position on the draft budget for 2018, as adopted on 4 September 2017; recalls that representatives of the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission agreed on the pragmatic calendar for the conduct of the budgetary procedure, including the dates for the conciliation period, at the spring budgetary trilogue on 27 March 2017; recalls that the General Affairs Council approved that pragmatic calendar at its meeting of 25 April 2017, in full knowledge of the Parliament's calendar of part-sessions for 2017; notes, therefore, that the budgetary procedure is proceeding in conformity with the pragmatic calendar agreed between the three institutions;

107.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution, together with the amendments to the draft general budget, to the Council, the Commission, the other institutions and bodies concerned and the national parliaments.

(1) OJ L 168, 7.6.2014, p. 105.
(2) OJ L 298, 26.10.2012, p. 1.
(3) OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 884.
(4) OJ C 373, 20.12.2013, p. 1.
(5) Texts adopted of that date, P8_TA(2017)0085.
(6) Texts adopted of that date, P8_TA(2017)0114.
(7) Texts adopted of that date, P8_TA(2017)0302.
(8) Directive (EU) 2015/849 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 May 2015 on the prevention of the use of the financial system for the purposes of money laundering or terrorist financing, amending Regulation (EU) No 648/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council, and repealing Directive 2005/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council and Commission Directive 2006/70/EC (OJ L 141, 5.6.2015, p. 73).
(9) Directive 2010/63/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 September 2010 on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes (OJ L 276, 20.10.2010, p. 33).
(10) Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0401 / P8_TA(2016)0411.
(11) COM(2017)0481.
(12) OJ C 436, 24.11.2016, p. 2.
(13) European Ombudsman, 454.2014/PMC.


Discharge 2015: EU general budget - European Council and Council
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Decision
Resolution
1. European Parliament decision of 25 October 2017 on discharge in respect of the implementation of the general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2015, Section II – European Council and Council (2016/2153(DEC))
P8_TA(2017)0409A8-0291/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2015(1),

–  having regard to the consolidated annual accounts of the European Union for the financial year 2015 (COM(2016)0475 – C8‑0271/2016)(2),

–  having regard to the Court of Auditors’ annual report on the implementation of the budget concerning the financial year 2015, together with the institutions’ replies(3),

–  having regard to the statement of assurance(4) as to the reliability of the accounts and the legality and regularity of the underlying transactions provided by the Court of Auditors for the financial year 2015, pursuant to Article 287 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to its decision of 27 April 2017(5) postponing the discharge decision for the financial year 2015, and the accompanying resolution,

–  having regard to Article 314(10) and Articles 317, 318 and 319 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union and repealing Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002(6), and in particular Articles 55, 99, 164, 165 and 166 thereof,

–  having regard to Rule 94 of and Annex IV to its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the second report of the Committee on Budgetary Control (A8-0291/2017),

1.  Refuses to grant the Secretary-General of the Council discharge in respect of the implementation of the budget of the European Council and of the Council for the financial year 2015;

2.  Sets out its observations in the resolution below;

3.  Instructs its President to forward this decision and the resolution forming an integral part of it to the European Council, the Council, the Commission and the Court of Auditors, the European Ombudsman, the European Data Protection Supervisor and the European External Action Service, and to arrange for their publication in the Official Journal of the European Union (L series).

2. European Parliament resolution of 25 October 2017 with observations forming an integral part of the decision on discharge in respect of the implementation of the general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2015, Section II – European Council and Council (2016/2153(DEC))

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to its decision on discharge in respect of the implementation of the general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2015, Section II – European Council and Council,

–  having regard to Rule 94 of and Annex IV to its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the second report of the Committee on Budgetary Control (A8-0291/2017),

A.  whereas all Union institutions ought to be transparent and fully accountable to the citizens of the Union for the funds entrusted to them as Union institutions;

B.  whereas the combined effect of an open and transparent Union administration and the need to protect the Union’s financial interests require an open and transparent discharge procedure whereby every Union institution is accountable for the budget which it executes,

C.  whereas the European Council and the Council, as Union institutions, should be democratically accountable towards the citizens of the Union as far as they are beneficiaries of the general budget of the European Union;

1.  Recalls the Parliament's role specified in the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and in Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 (the Financial Regulation) in respect of the budget discharge;

2.  Points out that under Article 335 TFEU, "[…] the Union shall be represented by each of the institutions, by virtue of their administrative autonomy, in matters relating to their respective operation" and that accordingly, taking into account Article 55 of the Financial Regulation, the institutions are individually responsible for the implementation of their budgets;

3.  Notes the role of Parliament and of other institutions within the discharge procedure, as governed by the provisions of the Financial Regulation, in particular Articles 162 to 166 thereof;

4.  Notes that under Rule 94 of Parliament's Rules of Procedure, "the provisions governing the procedure for granting discharge to the Commission in accordance with Article 319 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, in respect of the implementation of the budget, shall also apply to the procedure for granting discharge to: [...] the persons responsible for the implementation of the budgets of other institutions and bodies of the European Union such as the Council […]";

5.  Regrets that the Council continues to be silent in relation to the remarks made by Parliament in its discharge resolution of 27 April 2017(7) on the trend from previous years;

6.  Notes with satisfaction that for the first time the Council provided the Parliament the 2015 annual activity reports of the Directorate General for Administration, of the Legal Service and of the Directorate General for Communication and Document Management; notes that the remaining directorates do not have authorising officers by delegation that implement Section II – European Council and Council – of the general budget of the European Union;

7.  Notes that, in March 2017, the coordinators of Parliament’s Committee on Budgetary Control decided to establish a working group, represented by all the political groups, to draft a proposal on the Council discharge exercise procedure; stresses that that proposal has now been approved by the Committee on Budgetary Control and sent to the Conference of Presidents, which is the body responsible for Parliament’s interinstitutional relations;

Pending issues

8.  Regrets that the budget of the European Council and the budget of Council have not yet been separated, as recommended by Parliament in several of its recent discharge resolutions;

9.  Notes that the information on the Council’s building policy provided on its website does not include details about the costs incurred in relation to the Council’s buildings; is aware that occasionally information is exchanged between the building departments of Parliament and the Council; proposes that that exchange becomes regular and that detailed information be given to Parliament in the Council’s annual financial report;

10.  Reiterates its call for progress reports on building projects and a detailed breakdown of the costs incurred to date; calls for information on the costs related to the delayed completion of the Europa building;

11.  Notes that new ethics guidelines for the Council were published in 2015 and are to be followed up by awareness-raising activities on ethics and integrity; regrets that the Council’s whistleblowing rules continue to be publicly unavailable;

12.  Welcomes the improvements made by the Council with regard to corporate policies, particularly transparency; regrets, however, that the Council has not yet joined the Union transparency register;

13.  Urges the Council to develop detailed anti-corruption guidelines and independent policies within its structures;

14.  Regrets the difficulties repeatedly encountered in the discharge procedures to date, which were due to a lack of cooperation from the Council; points out that Parliament refused to grant discharge to the Secretary-General of the Council in relation to the financial years 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 for the reasons set out in its resolutions of 10 May 2011(8), 25 October 2011(9), 10 May 2012(10), 23 October 2012(11), 17 April 2013(12), 9 October 2013(13), 3 April 2014(14), 23 October 2014(15), 29 April 2015(16), 27 October 2015(17), 28 April 2016(18) and 27 October 2016(19), and postponed its decision on granting the Secretary-General of the Council discharge in relation to the financial year 2015 for the reasons set out in its resolution of 27 April 2017;

15.  Notes that failure to grant discharge has not led to consequences of any kind; considers that the situation should nevertheless be resolved as rapidly as possible, principally in the interests of the citizens of the Union;

16.  Insists that an effective budgetary control exercise requires the cooperation of Parliament and the Council, as set out in Parliament’s resolution of 27 April 2017; confirms that Parliament is unable to make an informed decision on granting discharge;

17.  Reminds the Council of the Commission's view, expressed in January 2014, that all institutions should be fully part of the follow-up process to the observations made by Parliament in the discharge exercise and that all institutions should cooperate to ensure the smooth functioning of the discharge procedure;

18.  Notes that the Commission has stated that it will not oversee the implementation of the budget of the other institutions and that giving a response to questions addressed to another institution would infringe the autonomy of that institution to implement its own section of the budget;

19.  Regrets that the Council continues to fail to provide answers to Parliament's questions;

20.  Insists that the Council’s expenditure must be scrutinised in the same way as that of other institutions and that the fundamental elements of such scrutiny have been laid down in Parliament’s discharge resolutions of the past years;

21.  Emphasises Parliament's prerogative to grant discharge pursuant to Articles 316, 317 and 319 TFEU, in line with current interpretation and practice, namely to grant discharge of each heading of the budget individually in order to maintain transparency and democratic accountability towards Union taxpayers;

22.  Considers that the lack of cooperation of the European Council and the Council with the discharge authority is a negative sign to the citizens of the Union.

(1) OJ L 69, 13.3.2015.
(2) OJ C 380, 14.10.2016, p. 1.
(3) OJ C 375, 13.10.2016, p. 1.
(4) OJ C 380, 14.10.2016, p. 147.
(5) Texts adopted of that date, P8_TA(2017)0147.
(6) OJ L 298, 26.10.2012, p. 1.
(7) Texts adopted of that date, P8_TA(2017)0147.
(8) OJ L 250, 27.9.2011, p. 25.
(9) OJ L 313, 26.11.2011, p. 13.
(10) OJ L 286, 17.10.2012, p. 23.
(11) OJ L 350, 20.12.2012, p. 71.
(12) OJ L 308, 16.11.2013, p. 22.
(13) OJ L 328, 7.12.2013, p. 97.
(14) OJ L 266, 5.9.2014, p. 26.
(15) OJ L 334, 21.11.2014, p. 95.
(16) OJ L 255, 30.9.2015, p. 22.
(17) OJ L 314, 1.12.2015, p. 49.
(18) OJ L 246, 14.9.2016, p. 21.
(19) OJ L 333, 8.12.2016, p. 51.


Protection of workers from the risks related to exposure to carcinogens or mutagens at work ***I
PDF 241kWORD 49k
Resolution
Text
European Parliament legislative resolution of 25 October 2017 on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Directive 2004/37/EC on the protection of workers from the risks related to exposure to carcinogens or mutagens at work (COM(2016)0248 – C8-0181/2016 – 2016/0130(COD))
P8_TA(2017)0410A8-0064/2017

(Ordinary legislative procedure: first reading)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to Parliament and the Council (COM(2016)0248),

–  having regard to Article 294(2) and Article 153(2) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Commission submitted the proposal to Parliament (C8‑0181/2016),

–  having regard to the opinion of the Committee on Legal Affairs on the proposed legal basis,

–  having regard to Article 294(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to the opinion the European Economic and Social Committee of 21 September 2016(1),

–  after consulting the Committee of the Regions,

–  having regard to the provisional agreement approved by the committee responsible under Rule 69f(4) of its Rules of Procedure and the undertaking given by the Council representative by letter of 11 July 2017 to approve Parliament’s position, in accordance with Article 294(4) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to Rules 59 and 39 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs(A8-0064/2017),

1.  Adopts its position at first reading hereinafter set out;

2.  Calls on the Commission to refer the matter to Parliament again if it replaces, substantially amends or intends to substantially amend its proposal;

3.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the national parliaments.

Position of the European Parliament adopted at first reading on 25 October 2017 with a view to the adoption of Directive (EU) 2017/… of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Directive 2004/37/EC on the protection of workers from the risks related to exposure to carcinogens or mutagens at work

(As an agreement was reached between Parliament and Council, Parliament's position corresponds to the final legislative act, Directive (EU) 2017/2398.)

(1) OJ C 487, 28.12.2016, p. 113.


Establishing an Entry/Exit System (EES) to register entry and exit data of third country nationals crossing the EU external borders ***I
PDF 243kWORD 51k
Resolution
Text
European Parliament legislative resolution of 25 October 2017 on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing an Entry/Exit System (EES) to register entry and exit data and refusal of entry data of third country nationals crossing the external borders of the Member States of the European Union and determining the conditions for access to the EES for law enforcement purposes and amending Regulation (EC) No 767/2008 and Regulation (EU) No 1077/2011 (COM(2016)0194 – C8-0135/2016 – 2016/0106(COD))
P8_TA(2017)0411A8-0057/2017

(Ordinary legislative procedure: first reading)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to Parliament and the Council (COM(2016)0194),

–  having regard to Article 294(2), Article 77(2)(b) and (d), Article 87(2)(a) and Article 88(2)(a) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Commission submitted the proposal to Parliament (C8-0135/2016),

–  having regard to the opinion of the Committee on Legal Affairs on the proposed legal basis,

–  having regard to Article 294(3), Article 77(2)(b) and (d) and Article 87(2)(a) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to the opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee of 21 September 2016(1),

–  after consulting the Committee of the Regions,

–  having regard to the provisional agreement approved by the committee responsible under Rule 69f(4) of its Rules of Procedure and the undertaking given by the Council representative by letter of 12 July 2017 to approve Parliament’s position, in accordance with Article 294(4) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to Rule 59 and 39 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs and the opinion of the Committee on Budgets (A8-0057/2017),

1.  Adopts its position at first reading hereinafter set out;

2.  Calls on the Commission to refer the matter to Parliament again if it replaces, substantially amends or intends to substantially amend its proposal;

3.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the national parliaments.

Position of the European Parliament adopted at first reading on 25 October 2017 with a view to the adoption of Regulation (EU) 2017/… of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing an Entry/Exit System (EES) to register entry and exit data and refusal of entry data of third-country nationals crossing the external borders of the Member States and determining the conditions for access to the EES for law enforcement purposes, and amending the Convention implementing the Schengen Agreement and Regulations (EC) No 767/2008 and (EU) No 1077/2011

(As an agreement was reached between Parliament and Council, Parliament's position corresponds to the final legislative act, Regulation (EU) 2017/2226.)

(1) OJ C 487, 28.12.2016, p. 66.


Amendment of the Schengen Borders Code as regards the Use of the Entry/Exit System ***I
PDF 241kWORD 42k
Resolution
Text
European Parliament legislative resolution of 25 October 2017 on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Regulation (EU) 2016/399 as regards the use of the Entry/Exit System (COM(2016)0196 – C8-0134/2016 – 2016/0105(COD))
P8_TA(2017)0412A8-0059/2017

(Ordinary legislative procedure: first reading)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to Parliament and the Council (COM(2016)0196),

–  having regard to Article 294(2) and Article 77(2)(b) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Commission submitted the proposal to Parliament (C8‑0134/2016),

–  having regard to Article 294(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to the opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee of 21 September 2016(1),

–  after consulting the Committee of the Regions,

–  having regard to the provisional agreement approved by the committee responsible under Rule 69f(4) of its Rules of Procedure and the undertaking given by the Council representative by letter of 12 July 2017 to approve Parliament’s position, in accordance with Article 294(4) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to Rule 59 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (A8-0059/2017),

1.  Adopts its position at first reading hereinafter set out;

2.  Calls on the Commission to refer the matter to Parliament again if it replaces, substantially amends or intends to substantially amend its proposal;

3.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the national parliaments.

Position of the European Parliament adopted at first reading on 25 October 2017 with a view to the adoption of Regulation (EU) 2017/… of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Regulation (EU) 2016/399 as regards the use of the Entry/Exit System

(As an agreement was reached between Parliament and Council, Parliament's position corresponds to the final legislative act, Regulation (EU) 2017/2225.)

(1) OJ C 487, 28.12.2016, p. 66.


Fundamental rights aspects in Roma integration in the EU: fighting anti-Gypsyism
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European Parliament resolution of 25 October 2017 on fundamental rights aspects in Roma integration in the EU: fighting anti-Gypsyism (2017/2038(INI))
P8_TA(2017)0413A8-0294/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU),

–  having regard to the preamble to the TEU, in particular the second and fourth to seventh indents thereof,

–  having regard to, inter alia, Article 2, Article 3(3), second indent, and Article 6 of the TEU,

–  having regard to, inter alia, Article 10 and Article 19(1) of the TFEU,

–  having regard to the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union of 7 December 2000 (‘the Charter’), which was proclaimed on 12 December 2007 in Strasbourg and entered into force with the Treaty of Lisbon in December 2009,

–  having regard to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the UN General Assembly in 1948,

–  having regard to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, adopted in New York on 20 November 1989, in particular, its Article 3,

–  having regard to UN Resolution A/70/L.1 adopted by the General Assembly on 25 September 2015 entitled ‘Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development’,

–  having regard to UN Resolution A/RES/60/7 adopted by the General Assembly on 1 November 2005 on the Holocaust Remembrance,

–  having regard to the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms,

–  having regard to the Council of Europe Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities,

–  having regard to the Declaration of the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe on the Rise of Anti-Gypsyism and racist violence against Roma in Europe, adopted on 1 February 2012,

–  having regard to General Policy Recommendation No 13 of the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI) on combating anti-Gypsyism and discrimination against Roma,

–  having regard to the Charter of European political parties for a non-racist society, adopted by the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe at its 32nd Session in March 2017,

–  having regard to the Council of Europe Parliamentary Assembly Resolution 1985 (2014) – The situation and rights of national minorities in Europe, and Resolution 2153 (2017) – Promoting the inclusion of Roma and Travellers,

–  having regard to the statement by the Secretary General of the Council of Europe, Thorbjørn Jagland, of 11 April 2017 on 10 goals for the next 10 years,

–  having regard to the ILO Convention concerning Discrimination in Respect of Employment and Occupation, 1958 (No 111),

–  having regard to Council Directive 2000/43/EC of 29 June 2000 implementing the principle of equal treatment between persons irrespective of racial or ethnic origin(1),

–  having regard to Council Directive 2000/78/EC of 27 November 2000 establishing a general framework for equal treatment in employment and occupation(2),

–  having regard to Directive 2012/29/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 establishing minimum standards on the rights, support and protection of victims of crime, and replacing Council Framework Decision 2001/220/JHA(3),

–  having regard to Regulation (EC) No 883/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 29 April 2004 on the coordination of social security systems(4),

–  having regard to Council Framework Decision 2008/913/JHA of 28 November 2008 on combating certain forms and expressions of racism and xenophobia by means of criminal law(5),

–  having regard to the Council recommendation of 9 December 2013 on effective Roma integration measures in the Member States and to the Council conclusions of 8 December 2016 on Accelerating the process of Roma integration and of 13 October 2016 on the European Court of Auditors Special Report No 14/2016,

–  having regard to the Council conclusions of 15 June 2011 on early childhood education and care,

–  having regard to the Commission Communications on Roma integration (COM(2010)0133, COM(2012)0226, COM(2013)0454, COM(2015)0299, COM(2016)0424), including the Communication on an EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies up to 2020 (COM(2011)0173),

–  having regard to the Commission Communication on the Youth Guarantee and Youth Employment Initiative three years on (COM(2016)0646),

–  having regard to Commission Recommendation 2013/112/EU of 20 February 2013 on Investing in children: breaking the cycle of disadvantage,

–  having regard to its previous resolutions on Roma(6),

–  having regard to its resolution of 15 April 2015 on the occasion of International Roma Day – anti-Gypsyism in Europe and EU recognition of the memorial day of the Roma genocide during World War II(7),

–  having regard to its resolution of 13 December 2016 on the situation of fundamental rights in the European Union in 2015(8), in particular paragraphs 117-122 on Roma rights,

–  having regard to the Fundamental Rights Report 2016 by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights,

–  having regard to the Fundamental Rights Agency’s EU-MIDIS I and II surveys and various other surveys and reports on Roma,

–  having regard to the Court of Auditors’ Special Report No 14/2016 on EU policy initiatives and financial support for Roma integration: significant progress made over the last decade, but additional efforts needed on the ground,

–  having regard to the Eurobarometer survey ‘Discrimination in the EU in 2015’,

–  having regard to the reports and recommendations of the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), among other things, its action plan on improving the situation of Roma and Sinti within the OSCE area,

–  having regard to the reports and recommendations of watchdog and civil society organisations, primarily those of the European Roma Rights Centre, Fundación Secretariado Gitano, OSF, ERGO, and Amnesty International,

–  having regard to the reference paper on Anti-Gypsyism of the Alliance against Anti-Gypsyism,

–  having regard to the report of the Centre for European Policy Studies on Combating Institutional Anti-Gypsyism: Responses and promising practices in the EU and selected Member States,

–  having regard to the newly established European Roma Institute for Arts and Culture (ERIAC) in Berlin, which aims to establish the artistic and cultural presence of Europe’s 12 million Roma people, enabling their self-expression and, through this, contributing to the fight against anti-Gypsyism,

–  having regard to Rule 52 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs and the opinion of the Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality (A8-0294/2017),

A.  whereas Roma are still being deprived of their human rights in Europe;

B.  whereas Roma are part of Europe’s culture and values and they have contributed to the cultural richness, diversity, economy and common history of the EU;

C.  whereas ‘anti-Gypsyism is a specific form of racism, an ideology founded on racial superiority, a form of dehumanisation and institutional racism nurtured by historical discrimination, which is expressed, among others, by violence, hate speech, exploitation, stigmatisation and the most blatant kind of discrimination’(9);

D.  whereas, despite efforts at national, European and international level, persistent and structural anti-Gypsyism(10) can be detected at all levels of European society throughout all of Europe on a daily basis, manifesting itself, e.g. in individual and institutional neglect, discrimination, inequality, disempowerment, belittling, othering and scapegoating, stigmatisation, hate speech, and making them into victims of violence, extreme poverty and profound social exclusion; whereas anti-Gypsyism is on the rise and political parties gain in popularity by expressing flagrantly anti-Roma sentiments;

E.  whereas different forms of anti-Gypsyism can be identified in the work and workings of public authorities and institutions in almost all spheres and at all levels in the Member States, manifesting itself most commonly in the failure to provide Roma with equal access or any access to public utilities and services, their denial of equal rights and equal treatment, the omission of Roma people from policy-making and knowledge-production processes, their underrepresentation in official bodies at all levels of society, the creation of discriminative programmes and the misuse of funding opportunities for improving the lives of Roma;

F.  whereas inadvertent anti-Gypsyism can even be observed in the workings of the EU institutions, as numerous EU programmes and funds that could have a positive impact on the living conditions and life prospects of Roma do not reach them, or they symbolically designate the Roma as one of their beneficiaries, but do not take into account their realities and the discrimination they face;

G.  whereas anti-Gypsyism, however unconscious it might be, can be revealed in the EU acquis, which often fails to take into consideration the realities and challenges of Roma, who, due to their having been subject to multiple discrimination for centuries, are unable to enjoy the same rights and opportunities, and the same level of protection provided by the EU acquis to other EU citizens;

H.  whereas there is a persistent paternalistic treatment of Roma detectable both in language and actions in our society, only stressing the need for Roma ‘inclusion’ or ‘integration’, when, in fact, what is needed is a fundamental shift in approach; whereas their access to and full enjoyment of their fundamental rights and citizenship in our society needs to be ensured;

I.  whereas Roma are continually referred to as a vulnerable people, when, in fact, depriving Roma of their inalienable human rights and denying them equal treatment and access to welfare, services, information, justice, education, healthcare, employment, etc. suggest that it is the structures established and maintained by those in power that are discriminatory, that render Roma vulnerable; whereas this demonstrates that the relevant authorities have ignored their human rights responsibilities;

Belonging and participating

1.  Stresses that in order to fight against the subconscious societal consensus to exclude Roma, to combat their discrimination and social exclusion, and in order to tear down stereotypes created and reinforced through popular literature, the media, the arts and language through centuries, it is essential to educate mainstream societies about the diversity of Roma, their history, culture, and the forms, extent and severity of the anti-Gypsyism that they face in their everyday lives; calls on Member States, in this context, to take full responsibility for their Roma citizens and launch long-term awareness-raising and intersectional sensitisation campaigns;

2.  Considers active and meaningful social, economic, political and cultural participation by Roma as key to tackling anti-Gypsyism effectively and creating much-needed mutual trust for the benefit of the whole of society; notes the joint responsibility of the Commission and the Member States in this regard; calls, therefore, on the Commission and the Member States to design strategies featuring both proactive and reactive measures on the basis of real, systematic consultations with Roma representatives and NGOs, and to involve them in the running, monitoring and evaluation of mainstream programmes and projects launched at all levels, including at the local level; calls on the Commission and the Member States to promote the establishment of independent Roma civil organisations and public institutions and the empowerment of a young, progressive Roma leadership;

Reconciling and building trust

3.  Urges the Commission, for the sake of creating essential mutual trust, to set up a truth and reconciliation commission at EU level (either within existing structures or as a separate body) to acknowledge the persecution, exclusion and disownment of Roma throughout the centuries, to document these in an official white paper and to engage with European Parliament and Roma experts in carrying out these tasks;

4.  Calls on Member States to create (either within existing structures or as a separate body) national truth and reconciliation commissions in order to acknowledge the persecution, exclusion and disownment of Roma through the centuries while involving members of parliament, government officials, lawyers, Roma representatives, NGOs and grassroots organisations, to document these issues in an official white paper, and encourages Member States to make the history of Roma part of the curricula in schools;

5.  Calls on the Member States to commemorate the victims of the Roma Holocaust, to mark 2 August as Roma Holocaust Memorial Day, and to grant appropriate, immediate restitution to living Holocaust survivors through a simplified procedure, accompanied by an awareness-raising campaign; calls on the Commission and the Member States to include Roma victims in their commemorations held on 27 January each year to mark Holocaust Remembrance Day and to organise voluntary training courses for civil servants on the Roma Holocaust;

Carrying out performance checks

6.  Expresses its concern that, while several targeted programmes are being implemented in the Member States, most mainstream programmes, including those covered by Structural Funds, fail to reach out to the most disadvantaged, in particular the Roma; calls, therefore, on the Court of Auditors to check the performance of EU programmes, such as the EU’s employment and education programmes, e.g. Erasmus+ and the Youth Employment Initiative (YEI), in a more thorough manner and on a regular basis;

7.  Calls on the Commission to:

   assess EU programmes and funding opportunities to determine if they meet the requirement of non-discrimination and participation, and where necessary, to take corrective measures without delay,
   apply a robust, quality-focused and long-term monitoring and financial accountancy scheme to check the performance of Member States when using EU programmes,
   actively involve the Roma addressees of the projects in their monitoring and evaluation process in an effective and transparent manner,
   ensure that the existing complaint mechanism is made more accessible and transparent for residents, NGOs and authorities to enable them to report discriminatory EU funds and programmes,
   suspend funding in cases of misuse of EU funds,
   reform ESIF so that they provide financial support for the fight against anti-Gypsyism in a more proactive way, and,
   extend the Europe for Citizens and the Rights, Equality and Citizenship funding programmes recognising the important role of civil society watchdog organisations and other relevant stakeholders in monitoring anti-Gypsyism and ensuring respect for fundamental rights;

8.  Calls on the Commission and the Member States to:

   ensure that the relevant interventions financed by the EU with possible implications for the Roma community are inclusive and fight segregation,
   ensure that segregation practices are clearly described and explicitly excluded from funding,
   improve funding opportunities in order to ensure that the education and employment opportunities created provide a real and sustainable way out of long-term unemployment, which is necessary in order to live with dignity,
   ensure that all available resources are used effectively, and,
   increase the absorption rate of EU funds in line with the priorities established in the National Roma Integration Strategies;

9.  Calls on the Member States to increase coordination among local and national authorities to eliminate administrative and political obstacles, and effectively use the EU funds to improve the situation of Roma people, in particular children;

10.  Recalls the 2013 Council Recommendation stating that the promotion of social inclusion, and combating poverty and discrimination, including, inter alia, the socio-economic integration of marginalised communities such as Roma, should be facilitated by the allocation of at least 20 % of the total ESF resources in each Member State to investment in people;

Securing equal rights and fighting anti-Gypsyism through training

11.  Recalls that minority rights and the prohibition of discrimination form an integral part of fundamental rights, and, as such, fall within the scope of the EU values to be respected in accordance with Article 2 TEU; recalls that action can be taken by the EU if there is a clear risk of a serious breach by a Member State of those values in accordance with Article 7 TEU;

12.  Calls on the Member States, based on the alarming reports from NGOs and watchdog organisations:

   to implement and enforce Directive 2000/43/EC in order to effectively prevent and eliminate all forms of discrimination against Roma, and to ensure that national, regional and local administrative regulations are not discriminatory and do not result in segregation practices,
   to implement and enforce Framework Decision 2008/913/JHA as it provides the means for a successful fight against anti-Gypsyist rhetoric and violence against Roma;

13.  Calls on the Commission to provide assistance to Member States for transposing and implementing the equal treatment directives and to continue launching infringement proceedings against all Member States, without exception, that breach or fail to transpose or implement equal treatment directives, such as the Racial Equality Directive (2000/43/EC), the Free Movement and Residence Directive (2004/38/EC)(11), the Victims’ Rights Directive (2012/29/EU), the Framework Decision (2008/913/JHA) on racism and xenophobia, the Audiovisual Media Services Directive (2010/13/EU)(12), and the Council Directive on equal treatment between men and women (2004/113/EC)(13) and that on equal treatment in employment and occupation (2000/78/EC);

14.  Calls on the Commission and the Council to break the deadlock and re-launch negotiations on the Anti-discrimination Directive;

15.  Condemns certain Member States’ denial of inequality of their Roma nationals, their lack of political will to remedy their failure in securing Roma people’s access to and enjoyment of their fundamental rights, and their blaming them for their social exclusion caused by structural racism;

16.  Calls on Member States to:

   clearly condemn and sanction the denial of the Roma Holocaust, hate speech and scapegoating by politicians and public officials at all levels and in all types of media, as they directly reinforce anti-Gypsyism in society,
   take further measures to prevent, condemn and counter anti-Roma hate speech, also by using cultural dialogue;

17.  Urges the Commission and Member States to intensify their work with NGOs to deliver best practice training on countering prejudice as well as on the effective countering of hate speech campaigns through the mapping of NGO partners’ specific needs and demands in this respect; calls on the Commission to launch a call for civil society to monitor and report hate speech, hate crime and Holocaust denial in the Member States;

18.  Calls on its President to condemn and sanction MEPs who use defamatory, racist or xenophobic language or such behaviour in Parliament;

19.  Deplores the violation of the right of Roma to free movement; calls on the Member States to acknowledge that the fundamental principles of the EU must apply to all citizens, and that the Free Movement Directive does not allow collective expulsions and any kind of racial profiling; calls on the Member States of origin to take their responsibility to combat poverty and exclusion of all their citizens, and on the Member States of arrival to increase cooperation across borders to combat discrimination and exploitation and prevent exclusion continuing in the country of arrival;

20.  Calls on the Member States to tackle the bias against Roma refugees and asylum seekers in the context of migration; recalls that Member States receive asylum seekers from the Western Balkan countries that, in numerical terms, consist of many Roma from Serbia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and that this may be correlated to the particular factors affecting the Roma community there; calls for the inclusion of a specific chapter on persecution as a result of anti-Gypsyism in the country of origin information concerning the relevant countries;

21.  Is deeply concerned by the number of stateless Roma people in Europe, resulting in the complete denial of their access to social, educational and health care services and pushing them to the very margins of society; calls on Member States to end statelessness and ensure the enjoyment of fundamental human rights for all;

22.  Calls on the Member States to carry out birth registration without discrimination and to ensure the identification of all their citizens in order to avoid Roma people being denied access to all the essential basic services; calls on Member States to take immediate corrective measures to stop discriminatory birth registration, and, through their local authorities, to take active steps in order to ensure that every child is registered; calls on the Commission to assess and monitor the situation in Member States, share best practices on the identification and protection of people whose citizenship has not been recognised and have no access to identity documents, and to launch awareness‑raising campaigns on the importance of birth registration;

23.  Is deeply concerned by the unequal access of Roma to health information, services and care, the severe lack of health insurance cards among them, and their racial abuse; calls on the Member States to take effective measures to remove any barriers to accessing the health care system; asks the Member States, where necessary, to secure funding for healthcare mediator programmes for Roma, increase healthcare awareness and improve access to vaccination and preventive health care in Roma communities;

24.  Is alarmed by the discrimination against Roma women, who are often placed in segregated, sub-standard maternity wards, and face physical abuse, neglect, under- and mistreatment by medical staff when attempting to access sexual and reproductive healthcare services, and who often do not access mobile health screenings; urges the Member States to set up a monitoring and corrective mechanism to this end immediately, and to ensure that medical personnel who violate ethics are held accountable; calls on the Commission and the Member States to enhance efforts to foster sustainable and comprehensive capacity-building for Roma women, to create specialised structures such as clearing points in order to provide tailored health information material, and to provide the necessary support for community-health initiatives;

25.  Calls on the Member States to give priority to children while implementing the EU framework for National Roma strategies, in particular by providing access to health care, dignified living conditions and access to education for Roma children; stresses that combating illiteracy among Roma children is key to the better integration and inclusion of Roma people, enabling the next generations to improve their access to employment;

26.  Urges Member States to condemn forced sterilisation, and to provide compensation to Roma women having been subject to systemic and state-supported sterilisation accompanied by a public apology to the victims of this crime against humanity;

27.  Is deeply alarmed by the phenomenon of unlawful removal of Roma children from their parents; calls on Member States to investigate such cases without delay, and take appropriate measures in order to prevent them;

28.  Condemns Member States’ failure to secure Roma people’s equal access to justice and their equality before the law taking shape:

   in the failure or the unacceptably slow procedures of ensuring justice for the victims of hate crimes, especially those perpetrated by police officers,
   in the disproportionate criminalisation of Roma,
   in over-policing (ethnic profiling, excessive stop-and-search procedures, uncalled-for raids on Roma settlements, arbitrary seizure and destruction of property, excessive use of force during arrests, assaults, threats, humiliating treatment, physical abuse, and the denial of rights during police interrogation and custody),
   and in under-policing of crimes committed against Roma, providing little or no assistance, protection (such as in cases of trafficking and for victims of domestic violence) or investigation in cases of crimes reported by Roma;

29.  Calls on Member States to:

   guarantee that all citizens are equal before the law and ensure that everyone has equal access to justice and procedural rights,
   provide mandatory, human-rights based and service-oriented, in-service training to law enforcement officers and officials in the judicial system at all levels,
   investigate and prosecute hate crimes and provide best practices for identifying and investigating hate crimes, including those motivated specifically by anti-Gypsyism,
   set up anti-hate crime units with knowledge of anti-Gypsyism in police forces,
   encourage appropriate policing and, in cases of police misconduct, to apply sanctions,
   recruit dispute resolution professionals to work with police,
   encourage the active recruitment of Roma as members of the police force,
   ensure that victim support programmes address the specific needs of Roma and that assistance is provided to them when reporting crimes and filing complaints,
   continue and to extend the geographic scope of JUSTROM, a joint Commission-Council of Europe programme on Roma women’s access to justice,
   fully implement the EU anti-trafficking directive and step up their police and judicial cooperation to combat trafficking, and,
   fully implement Directive 2011/93/EU(14) to prevent and combat child sexual abuse and exploitation and to protect victims;

30.  Calls on the European Police College (CEPOL) to continue the provision of training courses in the field of fundamental rights and the related intersectional sensitisation of the police force;

31.  Is deeply concerned about widespread discrimination against Roma in the field of housing characterised by a discriminatory rental and property ownership market and social housing system, forced evictions and demolitions of the homes of Roma without the provision of adequate alternative housing, the placement of Roma in segregated camps and emergency shelters cut off from basic services, the erection of walls around Roma settlements, and the failure of public authorities to secure Roma people’s full access to daily potable tap water and to sewage systems;

32.  Calls on Member States to take effective measures to ensure equal treatment of Roma in access to housing, and to make full use of EU funds to improve the housing situation of Roma, in particular by promoting desegregation, eliminating any spatial segregation, by promoting community-led local development and integrated territorial investment supported by ESIF and also through a consistent policy on public housing; urges the Member States to ensure access to public utilities, such as water, electricity and gas, and infrastructure for housing in compliance with national legal requirements;

33.  Calls on the Commission to recognise its competence in the context of racially motivated forced evictions; calls on the Member States to ensure that forced evictions are in full compliance with Union law as well as with other international human rights obligations, such as those arising from the European Convention on Human Rights; calls, furthermore, for an increase in the number and availability of desegregation experts in the Member States most concerned in order to support authorities in ensuring that European structural and investment funds effectively promote desegregation, and calls for the European Social Fund and the European Regional Development Fund (ESF-ERDF) to be earmarked for spatial desegregation measures;

34.  Welcomes pro-active initiatives that seek to improve the housing situation of Roma in cities; acknowledges the initiative of Eurocities that collects evidence through a mapping exercise exploring the characteristics of Roma communities living in cities, the challenges they face and the cities’ responses to these;

35.  Deplores continuing school segregation, including the overrepresentation of Roma children in ‘special schools’, Roma-only schools, separate classes, ‘container schools’, etc.; calls on Member States to draw up and take specific school desegregation and other effective measures to ensure equal treatment and full access for Roma children to high quality and mainstream education, and to ensure that all Roma children complete at least compulsory education; highlights, in this regard, the importance of exploring the reasons for early school drop-out, in particular the role of anti-Gypsyism in this phenomenon; encourages, furthermore, the Member States to explore new ways of closing the existing educational gap through adult learning, vocational education and training, and informal and non-formal learning; insists that this should be done while paying attention also to intersectional discrimination, with the involvement of Roma experts and school mediators, and ensuring adequate resources for such measures;

36.  Considers the discrimination of Roma in the field of employment, most often characterised by long-term unemployment, zero-hour contracts, precarious employment conditions lacking medical and social insurance or pensions, labour market barriers (which exist even for Roma with tertiary education) and the lack of re-training possibilities, alarming and unacceptable; urges, therefore, the Member States to take effective measures to ensure the equal treatment of Roma in access to the labour market and to employment opportunities, and to dismantle direct and indirect barriers, including discrimination;

37.  Calls for the Member States to engage with the private sector to support training, employment and business opportunities for Roma, especially in growing technology sectors; calls on the Member States to ambitiously explore how new technologies can assist and contribute to the social and economic inclusion of Roma and to the fight against anti-Gypsyism; highlights the importance of regional development for sustainable job creation in the least developed regions;

38.  Calls on the Member States to promote policies that have proven to have a significant positive impact, such as vocational and on-the-job training, individual counselling services, self-employment, social entrepreneurship and first work experience programmes, in order to foster Roma participation in the labour market and to prevent the intergenerational transmission of poverty in Roma communities;

39.  Condemns multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination of Roma, which are often hidden or covert; stresses that policies targeting one ground of discrimination should pay attention to the situation of specific groups that are likely to be victims of multiple discrimination; urges the Commission and Member States to pay special attention to improving educational attainment, participation, access to employment, housing, healthcare and to the prevention of discrimination in case of Roma facing multiple and intersectional discrimination, and to include specific programmes for them in the EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies after 2020;

40.  Notes with concern that Roma women are exposed to multiple and intersectional discrimination for being women, and for belonging to the Roma ethnic minority group and thus find themselves in a disadvantaged position when it comes to participating in society at all levels and to accessing basic services and resources; highlights that discrimination is even more acute for Roma women and girls without identity papers; emphasises that improving the situation of Roma women and girls requires specific and targeted non-discriminatory policies which enable equal access to employment and education, including life-long learning, and which ensure quality housing – a key to improving their living conditions and combating poverty and exclusion;

41.  Calls on the Member States to ensure that a specific chapter on women’s rights and gender equality is included in their National Roma Integration Strategies (NRISs), and that gender mainstreaming measures aimed at promoting women’s rights and the gender equality perspective are applied in each section thereof, in particular in the allocation of funds, in line with the Council conclusions on an EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies which ‘demand a gender perspective to be applied in all policies and actions for advancing Roma inclusion’; calls on Member State governments and local authorities to involve Roma women in the preparation, implementation, evaluation and monitoring of the NRISs; emphasises the need for gender-disaggregated data to be systematically collected and regularly analysed, and calls on the Commission and the Member States to assess whether policies are achieving the desired improvements for Roma women and girls, and to take action if there is a lack of progress; calls on the Commission to support the promotion of gender equality in the implementation of all aspects of the Europe 2020 strategy in line with the Strategy for equality between women and men 2010-2015;

42.  Calls on the Member States to pay heed to the particular challenges faced by Roma women and girls in relation to early and forced marriages and attacks on their physical integrity, and encourages the Member States to promote and support the collection and dissemination of data on legal and other measures taken at national level to prevent and combat violence perpetrated against Roma women and girls;

43.  Encourages businesses and local authorities to create training schemes and work opportunities for Roma women;

44.  Calls on governments to encourage and support the effective participation of Roma women in public and political life;

45.  Regards equality bodies as vital for informing Roma about their rights, assisting them in exercising their rights and reporting on discrimination; calls on the Commission and the Member States to establish standards to secure adequate powers and resources for equality bodies to monitor and act on cases of anti-Gypsyism; calls on the Member States to support the work and institutional capacity of equality bodies for the promotion of equal treatment by granting them adequate resources so that they can provide effective legal and judicial assistance and to bolster their work with Roma legal advisers to ease the reporting of abuses;

46.  Is concerned about the low level of participation of Roma people as interlocutors with or seated representatives of local, regional and national governments and the failure of governments to guarantee their exercise of full citizenship; recognises the crucial role of civil society in this respect; calls for broader cooperation among the national and local authorities concerned, the EU, the Council of Europe and NGOs; encourages EU and Member States’ institutions and political parties to actively promote the political participation and empowerment of Roma and their recruitment into public administrations; calls for Roma empowerment programmes, including those aimed at increasing and ensuring the long-term participation of Roma from an intersectional perspective as representatives of local, regional and national governments; calls for the Commission and the Member States to take action to ensure that Roma women’s participation in policy and decision-making is enhanced;

47.  Calls on Member States to provide mandatory, practical and intersectional fundamental rights and non-discrimination-related training courses for all public officials, who are duty bearers and key to the correct implementation of EU and Member State legislation, in order to equip them with the necessary knowledge and skills to be able to serve all citizens from a human rights-based approach;

48.  Calls on Member States, given the power of the media in influencing the perception of ethnic minorities by the public to:

   provide obligatory training to those working in public broadcasting and the media to raise their awareness about the challenges and discrimination faced by Roma, and about harmful stereotypes,
   promote the recruitment of Roma in public media, and,
   promote the representation of Roma on public media boards;

49.  Encourages, in order to successfully stop the perpetuation of anti-Gypsyism, Member States to include mandatory human rights, democratic citizenship and political literacy training courses in their school curricula at all levels in order to end Roma people’s identity insecurity, strengthen their self-confidence and ability to exercise and demand their equal rights;

50.  Is deeply concerned by cuts in the public sector, which have dramatically affected the activities of both the state and state-funded NGOs to promote equality for Roma people and limited the reach of these projects; stresses that the state and its institutions have a fundamental role in promoting equality, which cannot be substituted;

National Roma Integration Strategies

51.  Notes with concern that the efforts and financial means which have been invested, and the numerous European and national programmes and funds which have addressed the Roma community have not contributed significantly to the improvement of their living conditions and have not advanced Roma integration, in particular at the local level; calls, therefore, on the Member States, in order to fight against Roma people’s marginalisation, discrimination and exclusion, and with a view to advancing the process of Roma integration and combating anti-Gypsyism:

   to be ambitious in setting up their National Roma Integration Strategies, to carry out more research into successful local practices and programmes with the active involvement of Roma in order to reveal their situation, the realities and challenges faced, and to pay special attention to anti-Gypsyism and its consequences with the aim of developing an improved, comprehensive and holistic approach to the issue, thereby addressing not only the social and economic aspect, but also combating racism, while working on mutual trust,
   to fully implement their National Roma Integration Strategies,
   to evaluate their effectiveness and update them regularly, define clear actions, tailor-made measures and set measurable goals and milestones,
   to work closely with every stakeholder, including regional and local entities, academia, the private sector, grassroots organisations and NGOs, and actively involve Roma,
   to further develop data collection, field work‑based, financial and quality-oriented monitoring and reporting methodologies as they support effective evidence-based policies, can contribute to improving the effectiveness of strategies, actions and measures taken, and to identifying why the programmes and strategies do not deliver the long-awaited results,
   to empower their national Roma Contact Points by ensuring that they have an adequate mandate, the necessary resources and suitable working conditions in order to carry out their coordination tasks;

Putting anti-Gypsyism at the forefront of an improved post-2020 strategy

52.  Welcomes the efforts made, and the wide range of useful mechanisms and funds developed by the Commission to foster the social and economic inclusion of Roma and the fact that it launched an EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies by 2020, calling on Member States to adopt national strategies;

53.  Calls on the Commission to:

   upscale the EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies after 2020, building on the findings and recommendations of the Court of Auditors, the Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA), NGOs, watchdog organisations and all relevant stakeholders, to have an improved, updated and even more comprehensive approach,
   place anti-Gypsyism in the focus of the post-2020 EU Framework in addition to social inclusion, and to introduce anti-discrimination indicators in the fields of education, employment, housing health, etc., as anti-Gypsyism undermines the successful implementation of National Roma Integration Strategies,
   treat anti-Gypsyism as a horizontal issue, and to develop – in partnership with Member States, the FRA and NGOs – an inventory of practical steps for Member States to combat anti-Gypsyism,
   complete the Roma Task Force of the relevant Commission services by setting up a Commissioner-level project team on Roma issues, bringing together all the relevant Commissioners working in the field of equal rights and non-discrimination, citizenship, social rights, employment, education and culture, health, housing, and their external dimension, in order to safeguard the creation of non-discriminatory and complementary EU funds and programmes,
   to strengthen and complement the work of the Non-discrimination and Roma Coordination Unit of the Commission by reinforcing the team, allocating adequate resources and employing further staff in order to have sufficient capacities to fight anti-Gypsyism, raise awareness of the Roma Holocaust and to promote Holocaust remembrance;

54.  Calls for the EU institutions to mainstream Roma rights in the context of external relations; insists strongly on the need to fight anti-Gypsyism and promote Roma rights in the candidate countries and potential candidate countries;

55.  Calls on the Commission and Member States to apply and actively disseminate the working definition of anti-Gypsyism by the ECRI in order to provide clear guidance to state authorities;

56.  Calls on all political groups in Parliament and political parties in the Member States to respect the revised charter of European political parties for a non-racist society, and asks them to regularly renew their commitment and to condemn and sanction hate speech;

57.  Calls on the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights to prepare a study on anti-Gypsyism in the EU and candidate countries, to focus on anti-Gypsyism during their work on Roma issues and to monitor it in all relevant fields;

o
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58.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission, the governments and parliaments of the Member States and the candidate countries, the Council of Europe and the United Nations.

(1) OJ L 180, 19.7.2000, p. 22.
(2) OJ L 303, 2.12.2000, p. 16.
(3) OJ L 315, 14.11.2012, p. 57.
(4) OJ L 166, 30.4.2004, p. 1.
(5) OJ L 328, 6.12.2008, p. 55.
(6) OJ C 4 E, 7.1.2011, p. 7; OJ C 308 E, 20.10.2011, p. 73; OJ C 199 E, 7.7.2012, p. 112; OJ C 468, 15.12.2016, p. 36; OJ C 468, 15.12.2016, p. 157.
(7) OJ C 328, 6.9.2016, p. 4.
(8) Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0485.
(9) ECRI’s General Policy Recommendation No 13 on Combating Anti-Gypsyism and Discrimination against Roma.
(10) Anti-Gypsyism is sometimes spelt differently, and in the various Member States it is sometimes referred to by a slightly different term, such as Antiziganismus.
(11) OJ L 158, 30.4.2004, p. 77.
(12) OJ L 95, 15.4.2010, p. 1.
(13) OJ L 373, 21.12.2004, p. 37.
(14) OJ L 335, 17.12.2011, p. 1.

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