Index 
Texts adopted
Thursday, 30 November 2017 - BrusselsFinal edition
Mobilisation of the Contingency Margin in 2017
 Draft amending Budget No 6/2017: Reduction of payment and commitment appropriations in line with updated forecasts of expenditure and update of revenue (own resources and fines)
 Mobilisation of the European Union Solidarity Fund to provide for the payment of advances in the general budget 2018
 Mobilisation of the Flexibility Instrument to finance immediate budgetary measures to address the on-going challenges of migration, refugee inflows and security threats
 Mobilisation of the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund: application EGF/2017/003 GR/Attica retail
 Mobilisation of the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund: application EGF/2017/005 FI/Retail
 2018 budgetary procedure
 Request for waiver of the immunity of Ana Gomes
 Changes to the resources for economic, social and territorial cohesion and to the resources for the investment for growth and jobs goal and for the European territorial cooperation goal ***I
 EU-Egypt Agreement for scientific and technological cooperation: participation of Egypt in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) ***
 EU-Algeria Agreement for scientific and technological cooperation: participation of Algeria in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) ***
 EU-Jordan Agreement for scientific and technological cooperation: participation of Jordan in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) ***
 Accession of Chile, Iceland and Bahamas to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction *
 Accession of Panama, Uruguay, Colombia and El Salvador to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction *
 Accession of San Marino to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction *
 Accession of Georgia and South Africa to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction *
 Transitional arrangements for mitigating the impact of the introduction of IFRS 9 ***I
 Instrument contributing to stability and peace ***I
 Ranking of unsecured debt instruments in insolvency hierarchy ***I
 Value added tax obligations for supplies of services and distance sales of goods *
 Administrative cooperation and combating fraud in the field of value added tax *
 Situation in Yemen
 Implementation of the European Disability Strategy

Mobilisation of the Contingency Margin in 2017
PDF 248kWORD 44k
Resolution
Annex
European Parliament resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Decision (EU) 2017/344 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 December 2016 on the mobilisation of the Contingency Margin in 2017 (COM(2017)0900 – C8-0408/2017 – 2017/2265(BUD))
P8_TA(2017)0452A8-0372/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to the European Parliament and the Council (COM(2017)0900 – C8‑0408/2017),

–  having regard to Council Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1311/2013 of 2 December 2013 laying down the multiannual financial framework for the years 2014-2020(1), and in particular Article 13 thereof,

–  having regard to the Interinstitutional Agreement of 2 December 2013 between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management(2), and in particular point 14 thereof,

–  having regard to the joint text approved by the Conciliation Committee on 18 November 2017 (A8-0359/2017) in the context of the conciliation on the 2018 draft general budget,

–  having regard to Decision (EU) 2017/344 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 December 2016 on the mobilisation of the Contingency Margin in 2017(3),

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Budgets (A8-0372/2017),

A.  whereas the European Parliament and the Council mobilised the Contingency Margin in 2017 in the amount of EUR 1 906,1 million above the commitment ceilings of Heading 3 (Security and Citizenship) and heading 4 (Global Europe);

B.  whereas, within this amount, the European Parliament and the Council decided to offset EUR 575,0 million against the unallocated margin under Heading 2 (Sustainable Growth: Natural Resources) in 2017 as well as EUR 507,3 million, EUR 570,0 million and EUR 253,9 million against the unallocated margins under Heading 5 (Administration) in 2017, 2018 and 2019 respectively;

C.  whereas the Conciliation Committee convened for the adoption of the 2018 budget subsequently agreed to adjust the abovementioned offsetting of the Contingency Margin in order to decrease by EUR 252,0 million the amount offset in Heading 5 in 2018 and introduce a corresponding offset in Heading 5 in 2020;

1.  Takes note of the Commission’s proposal, as part of the agreement on the 2018 budget, to revise the offsetting of the contingency margin mobilised in 2017 in order to increase the overall commitments margin available in 2018; regrets the excessive focus of some Member States on the available margins below the MFF ceilings, often disregarding the flexibilities offered by the special instruments;

2.  Underlines that, even without a revised offsetting, the overall commitments margin in the agreed 2018 budget would already stand at EUR 1 348,3 million whereas more than EUR 900 million are still available under the Flexibility Instrument and the Global Margin for Commitments (GMC); points out that a further EUR 1,2 billion should become available under the GMC and the Flexibility Instrument in the course of 2018;

3.  Takes note that such a revision of the offsetting, while not essential, releases EUR 252 million of additional margin in 2018 instead of 2020, thereby providing additional flexibility at an earlier stage under this MFF;

4.  Regrets that the European Parliament and the Council have to resort to splitting the concerned offsetting under Heading 5 between 2018 and 2020 in order to provide the EU budget with the flexibility needed in 2018; expresses concern over the consequent reduction in the margin of Heading 5 that this manoeuvre will bring in 2020; points out that the adoption of such an off-limit approach is a clear signal that the EU budget is not being furnished with the indispensable resources for carrying out the policies and programmes of the Union;

5.  Approves the decision annexed to this resolution;

6.  Instructs its President to sign the decision with the President of the Council and arrange for its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union;

7.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution, including its annex, to the Council and the Commission.

ANNEX

DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

amending Decision (EU) 2017/344 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 December 2016 on the mobilisation of the Contingency Margin in 2017

(The text of this annex is not reproduced here since it corresponds to the final act, Decision (EU) 2018/9.)

(1) OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 884.
(2) OJ C 373, 20.12.2013, p. 1.
(3) OJ L 50, 28.2.2017, p. 57–58.


Draft amending Budget No 6/2017: Reduction of payment and commitment appropriations in line with updated forecasts of expenditure and update of revenue (own resources and fines)
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European Parliament resolution of 30 November 2017 on the Council position on Draft amending budget No 6/2017 of the European Union for the financial year 2017: Reduction of payment and commitment appropriations in line with updated forecasts of expenditure and update of revenue (own resources and fines) (14275/2017 – C8-0417/2017 – 2017/2217(BUD))
P8_TA(2017)0453A8-0379/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to Article 314 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to Article 106a of the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community,

–  having regard to Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union and repealing Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002(1), and in particular Article 41 thereof,

–  having regard to the general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2017, as definitively adopted on 1 December 2016(2),

–  having regard to Council Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1311/2013 of 2 December 2013 laying down the multiannual financial framework for the years 2014-2020(3),

–  having regard to the Interinstitutional Agreement of 2 December 2013 between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management(4),

–  having regard to Draft amending budget No 6/2017, which the Commission adopted on 9 October 2017 (COM(2017)0597),

–  having regard to the position on Draft amending budget No 6/2017 which the Council adopted on 27 November 2017 and forwarded to Parliament on the same day (14275/2017 - C8-0417/2017),

–  having regard to Rules 88 and 91 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Budgets (A8-0379/2017),

A.  whereas Draft amending budget No 6/2017 aims to update both the expenditure and the revenue sides of the budget to take account of the latest developments;

B.  whereas, on the expenditure side, Draft amending budget No 6/2017 decreases the level of payment appropriations by EUR 7 719,7 million, mostly in budget lines under heading 1b (Economic, social and territorial cohesion) and, to a lesser extent, under headings 2 (Sustainable growth – natural resources), 3 (Security and Citizenship) and 4 (Global Europe) and in the European Union Solidarity Fund (EUSF), and therefore reduces national contributions accordingly;

C.  whereas Draft amending budget No 6/2017 decreases the level of commitment appropriations by EUR 15,33 million under heading 2 and releases EUR 46 million of commitment appropriations in the EUSF;

D.  whereas, on the revenue side, Draft amending budget No 6/2017 also includes adjustments linked to the revision of the forecasts of Traditional Own Resources (i.e. customs duties and sugar sector levies), value-added tax (VAT) and gross national income (GNI) bases, and the budgeting of the 2013 and 2016 UK corrections and their financing;

E.  whereas Draft amending budget No 6/2017 takes account of a total amount of EUR 3 209,7 million in fines which has become definitive and exceeds the level initially planned for the 2017 budget, and assigns the difference between the latter and the former (amounting up to EUR 2 209,7 million) to the reduction of own resources contributions from Member States to the Union budget;

F.  whereas Draft amending budget No 6/2017 results in a reflow to national budgets of EUR 9 829,6 million additional to the reflow of EUR 6 405 million already confirmed in light of Amending budget 2/2017;

1.  Expresses serious concerns over the payment surplus of EUR 7 719,7 million; is particularly astonished by the situation of European Structural and Investment (ESI) Funds in sub-heading 1b, where Member States, in their July submission, revised downwards their forecasts for payment claims by EUR 5,9 billion due to continued delays in the implementation of the programmes, thereby preventing many potential projects and beneficiaries from Union support; also deplores that the Member States failed to launch their national programmes for the Asylum and Integration Fund (AMIF) and the Internal Security Fund (ISF) at the expected pace and to properly implement the schemes for the relocation of refugees, resulting in a EUR 287,6 million cut in heading 3;

2.  Takes note of the Commission’s analysis of the causes of under-implementation in sub-heading 1b, such as the focus on absorbing the 2007-2013 envelopes, the late adoption of the legal bases, the lengthy designation of national authorities, the changes brought in by the new legal framework, and the reduced incentives due to the N+3 de-commitment rule; is worried by the fact that, according to the Commission’s latest payments forecasts, under-implementation is to continue in the years to come and will result in an additional EUR 31 billion in payments spilling over into the next multiannual financial framework (MFF); takes note of the fact that not all Member States have the same difficulties in implementation; urges in particular those Member States with a very high level of under-implementation to take the necessary measures to properly implement the jointly agreed Union programmes, with the assistance of the Commission;

3.  Regrets the delays in the disbursement of Union funds in pre-accession and neighbouring countries, which result in a significant reduction in payments (EUR -702,2 million) at a time when they would be most needed; acknowledges the unpredictable environment in which the Union is sometimes called upon to operate; invites the Commission to take the necessary measures, including via increased policy dialogue and technical assistance, in order to prevent such delays;

4.  By contrast, notes with satisfaction that Union programmes under sub-heading 1a (Competitiveness for growth and jobs) are generally well implemented, as witnessed by this Draft amending budget and the recent adoption of the Global Transfer where sub-heading 1a absorbs a significant part of the under-execution in payments in other headings; stresses that this proves the Council wrong in its constant approach to reduce this sub-heading’s appropriations on the grounds of an alleged lack of absorption capacity;

5.  Deplores again that amounts recovered from the under-implementation of Union programmes and from fines under the Union’s competition policy are destined to reduce Member States’ GNI contributions instead of being used for the funding of Union priorities; highlights that Draft amending budget No 6/2017 generates a reflow of GNI contributions of EUR 9 829,6 million to Member States on top of the reflow of EUR 6 405 million already approved in Amending budget 2/2017; draws attention to the fact that the disagreement between the two arms of the budgetary authority as regards spending of the 2018 Union budget, after Parliament’s reading and at the beginning of the conciliation period, amounted to merely EUR 3 619,8 million in commitment appropriations and EUR 2 182,4 million in payment appropriations;

6.  Approves the Council position on Draft amending budget No 6/2017;

7.  Instructs its President to declare that Amending budget No 6/2017 has been definitively adopted and arrange for its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union;

8.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission, the Court of Auditors and the national parliaments.

(1) OJ L 298, 26.10.2012, p. 1.
(2) OJ L 51, 28.2.2017.
(3) OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 884.
(4) OJ C 373, 20.12.2013, p. 1.


Mobilisation of the European Union Solidarity Fund to provide for the payment of advances in the general budget 2018
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Resolution
Annex
European Parliament resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council on the mobilisation of the European Union Solidarity Fund to provide for the payment of advances in the general budget of the Union for 2018 (COM(2017)0270 – C8-0161/2017 – 2017/2076(BUD))
P8_TA(2017)0454A8-0371/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to the European Parliament and the Council (COM(2017)0270 – C8‑0161/2017),

–  having regard to Council Regulation (EC) No 2012/2002 of 11 November 2002 establishing the European Union Solidarity Fund(1),

–  having regard to Council Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1311/2013 of 2 December 2013 laying down the multiannual financial framework for the years 2014-2020(2), and in particular Article 10 thereof,

–  having regard to the Interinstitutional Agreement of 2 December 2013 between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management(3), and in particular point 11 thereof,

–  having regard to the results of the trilogue of 17 November 2017,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Budgets (A8-0371/2017),

A.  whereas, in line with Regulation (EU) No 661/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council(4), an amount of EUR 50 000 000 is made available for the payment of advances through appropriations in the general budget of the Union;

1.  Approves the decision annexed to this resolution;

2.  Instructs its President to sign the decision with the President of the Council and arrange for its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union;

3.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution, including its annex, to the Council and the Commission.

ANNEX

DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

on the mobilisation of the European Union Solidarity Fund to provide for the payment of advances in the general budget of the Union for 2018

(The text of this annex is not reproduced here since it corresponds to the final act, Decision (EU) 2018/508.)

(1) OJ L 311, 14.11.2002, p. 3.
(2) OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 884.
(3) OJ C 373, 20.12.2013, p. 1.
(4) Regulation (EU) No 661/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 May 2014 amending Council Regulation (EC) No 2012/2002 establishing the European Union Solidarity Fund (OJ L 189, 27.6.2014, p. 143).


Mobilisation of the Flexibility Instrument to finance immediate budgetary measures to address the on-going challenges of migration, refugee inflows and security threats
PDF 248kWORD 44k
Resolution
Annex
European Parliament resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council on the mobilisation of the Flexibility Instrument to finance immediate budgetary measures to address the on-going challenges of migration, refugee inflows and security threats (COM(2017)0271 – C8-0163/2017 – 2017/2077(BUD))
P8_TA(2017)0455A8-0370/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to the European Parliament and the Council (COM(2017)0271 – C8‑0163/2017),

–  having regard to Council Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1311/2013 of 2 December 2013 laying down the multiannual financial framework for the years 2014-2020(1) (MFF Regulation), and in particular Article 11 thereof,

–  having regard to the Interinstitutional Agreement of 2 December 2013 between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management(2), and in particular point 12 thereof,

–  having regard to the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2018, which the Commission adopted on 29 June 2017 (COM(2017)0400), as amended by Letter of amendment No 1/2018 (COM(2017)0615),

–  having regard to the position on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2018, which the Council adopted on 4 September 2017 and forwarded to Parliament on 13 September 2017 (11815/2017 – C8‑0313/2017),

–  having regard to its position of 25 October 2017 on the 2018 draft general budget(3),

–  having regard to the joint text approved by the Conciliation Committee on 18 November 2017 (14587/17 – C8-0416/2017),

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Budgets (A8-0370/2017),

A.  whereas after having examined all possibilities for re-allocating commitment appropriations under heading 3 (Security and Citizenship), it appears necessary to mobilise the Flexibility Instrument for commitment appropriations;

B.  whereas the Commission had proposed to mobilise the Flexibility Instrument to supplement the financing in the general budget of the Union for the financial year 2018 beyond the ceiling of heading 3 by the amount of EUR 817,1 million to finance measures in the field of migration, refugee inflows and security threats;

C.  whereas the Conciliation Committee convened for the 2018 budget agreed on a further mobilisation of EUR 20,2 million as a result of reinforcements in heading 3;

1.  Notes that the 2018 ceilings for heading 3 do not allow for an adequate financing of urgent measures in the field of migration, refugee inflows and security threats;

2.  Agrees therefore with the mobilisation of the Flexibility Instrument for an amount of EUR 837,2 million in commitment appropriations;

3.  Agrees furthermore to the proposed allocation of the corresponding payment appropriations of EUR 464 million in 2018, EUR 212,7 million in 2019, EUR 126,4 million in 2020 and EUR 34,2 million in 2021;

4.  Reiterates that the mobilisation of this instrument, as provided for in Article 11 of the MFF Regulation, shows, once more, the crucial need for the Union budget to be more flexible;

5.  Reiterates its long-standing view that the payments stemming from commitments previously mobilised through the Flexibility Instrument can only be counted over and above the MFF ceilings;

6.  Approves the decision annexed to this resolution;

7.  Instructs its President to sign the decision with the President of the Council and arrange for its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union;

8.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution, including its annex, to the Council and the Commission.

ANNEX

DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

on the mobilisation of the Flexibility Instrument to finance immediate budgetary measures to address the on-going challenges of migration, refugee inflows and security threats

(The text of this annex is not reproduced here since it corresponds to the final act, Decision (EU) 2018/8.)

(1) OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 884.
(2) OJ C 373, 20.12.2013, p. 1.
(3) Texts adopted, P8_TA(2017)0408


Mobilisation of the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund: application EGF/2017/003 GR/Attica retail
PDF 260kWORD 48k
Resolution
Annex
European Parliament resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council on the mobilisation of the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (application from Greece – EGF/2017/003 GR/Attica retail) (COM(2017)0613 – C8-0360/2017 – 2017/2229(BUD))
P8_TA(2017)0456A8-0367/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to the European Parliament and the Council (COM(2017)0613 – C8-0360/2017),

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) No 1309/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 December 2013 on the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (2014-2020) and repealing Regulation (EC) No 1927/2006(1) (EGF Regulation),

–  having regard to Council Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1311/2013 of 2 December 2013 laying down the multiannual financial framework for the years 2014-2020(2), and in particular Article 12 thereof,

–  having regard to the Interinstitutional Agreement of 2 December 2013 between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management(3) (IIA of 2 December 2013), and in particular point 13 thereof,

–  having regard to Special Report No 7/2013 of the Court of Auditors, according to which the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF) delivers genuine EU added value when it is used to cofinance services for redundant workers or allowances not ordinarily existing under Member States’ unemployment benefit systems,

–  having regard to the trilogue procedure provided for in point 13 of the IIA of 2 December 2013,

–  having regard to its resolutions adopted since January 2007 on the mobilisation of the EGF, including the comments of the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs on the respective applications,

–  having regard to the letter of the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs,

–  having regard to the letter of the Committee on Regional Development,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Budgets (A8-0367/2017),

A.  whereas the Union has set up legislative and budgetary instruments to provide additional support to workers who are suffering from the consequences of major structural changes in world trade patterns or of the global financial and economic crisis and to assist their reintegration into the labour market;

B.  whereas Greece submitted application EGF/2017/003 GR/Attica retail for a financial contribution from the EGF following 725 redundancies in nine enterprises operating in the retail-trade sector in the region of Attica and 10 other regions(4);

C.  whereas the application is based on the intervention criteria laid down in Article 4(2) of the EGF Regulation;

D.  whereas, in order to establish the link between the redundancies and the global financial and economic crisis, Greece argues that its economy was in serious recession for six consecutive years (2008-2013); whereas, between 2008 and 2016, Greek GDP and public consumption fell by 26,2 % and 22,8 %, respectively, and there are 700 000 more people unemployed in the country; whereas since 2008, Greek Governments have, to deal with foreign debt repayments, significantly raised tax rates, streamlined public expenditure and reduced public-sector pay, in particular pensions, while private-sector pay has also decreased as a result of the combination of policies applied; whereas the fall in incomes has been reflected in a fall in consumption that has hit the retail sector hard;

1.  Agrees with the Commission that the conditions set out in Article 4(2) of the EGF Regulation are met and that Greece is entitled to a financial contribution of EUR 2 949 150 under that Regulation, which represents 60 % of the total cost of EUR 4 915 250;

2.  Notes that the Commission respected the deadline of 12 weeks calculated from receipt of the completed application from the Greek authorities until finalisation of its assessment on the compliance with the conditions for providing a financial contribution on 23 October 2017, and notified that assessment to Parliament on the same day;

3.  Notes that the nine enterprises concerned own shops and supermarkets that sell consumer goods; deplores the significant fall in retail sales between 2008 and 2015, which ranged from 60 % for household appliance retailers to 30 % for food retailers and 23 % for supermarkets;

4.  Acknowledges that the redundancies in question are directly linked to the decline in the retail sector since 2008; notes that 164 000 jobs were lost between 2008 and 2015 in the retail trade, manufacturing and construction sectors, which account for 64,2 % of total job losses;

5.  Points out that the economic crisis has put significant downward pressure on Greek households’ purchasing power since 2008; notes that the drastic reduction in lending to businesses and individuals has had an impact on retailers; deplores the fact that the combined impact of those two factors has led to a drop in the overall turnover index in the retail trade sector, decreasing by more than 63 % between 2008 and 2016; points out that the austerity measures applied since 2008, in particular pay cuts, renegotiation of leases and deferring due dates for bills, have caused the situation to deteriorate; points out that this case demonstrates that the measures applied could not tackle the economic crisis effectively and in the long term;

6.  Emphasises, with concern, that the Attica region, where over 70 % of the redundancies are concentrated, has an unemployment rate of 22,9 % while in the other 10 regions it ranges from 19,5 % in the Aegean region to 26,8 % in the Epirus and Western Macedonia regions; is concerned by the fact that such lay-offs may compound still further the unemployment situation that the regions in question have been facing since the onset of the economic and financial crisis; notes in particular that 31,8 % of the population of Attica is at risk of poverty or social exclusion;

7.  Notes that Greece is planning five types of measures: (i) occupational guidance, (ii) training, retraining and vocational training, (iii) help with business start-ups, (iv) job search allowances and training allowances, and (v) job creation subsidies;

8.  Notes that 85,2 % of the targeted beneficiaries are over 55 years of age, and that 24,8 % are over 64; stresses how regrettable it is that no viable solution could be found to prevent them from being made redundant, particularly given that age is an aggravating factor when looking for a job; welcomes Greece’s decision to offer vocational training courses to workers which correspond to their needs, especially those of the elderly beneficiaries, and to current labour market requirements;

9.  Notes and welcomes the fact that the co-ordinated package of personalised services has been drawn up in consultation with the General Secretary and representatives of the Institute of Labour of the Greek General Confederation of Labour (GSEE); points out that strong social dialogue based on mutual trust and shared responsibility is the best tool with which to seek consensual solutions and common outlooks when predicting, preventing and managing restructuring processes; stresses that that could help prevent job losses and, therefore, EGF cases;

10.  Notes that the income support measures will constitute 34,72 % of the overall package of personalised measures, just below the maximum 35 % set out in the EGF Regulation and a much higher percentage than those proposed for other recent cases; recalls that these actions are conditional on the active participation of the targeted beneficiaries in job-search or training activities;

11.  Points out that the Greek authorities have confirmed that the eligible actions are not receiving assistance from other EU financial instruments;

12.  Points out that the coordinated package of personalised services benefiting from the EGF should be geared, in terms of its design, to initiatives conducive to employment, to upskilling of workers and to making the most of their employment history so as to reach out to the business community, including cooperatives, and should be coordinated with existing Union programmes, including the European Social Fund; is convinced that a coherent strategy would reduce the risk of relocation and create an environment conducive for industrial production to return to the Union; stresses that a serious policy of preventing and pre-empting restructurings ought to be given priority over any use of the EGF; stresses also the importance of a genuine industrial policy at Union level to bring sustainable and inclusive growth;

13.  Recalls that it already expressed concern about the disparity between resources requested from the EGF and amounts reimbursed by Member States in its resolution of 15 September 2016 on the activities, impact and added value of the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund between 2007 and 2014(5); invites the Commission to continue encouraging Member States to make more realistic forecasts of likely costs so as to minimise the need to subsequently recover funds;

14.  Recalls that in line with Article 7 of the EGF Regulation, the design of the coordinated package of personalised services should anticipate future labour market perspectives and required skills and should be compatible with the shift towards a resource-efficient and sustainable economy;

15.  Reiterates that EGF assistance must not replace actions which are the responsibility of enterprises, under national law or collective agreements, or of measures for restructuring enterprises or sectors;

16.  Reiterates its call on the Commission to ensure access by the public to all documents relating to EGF applications;

17.  Approves the decision annexed to this resolution;

18.  Instructs its President to sign the decision with the President of the Council and arrange for its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union;

19.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution, including its Annex, to the Council and the Commission

ANNEX

DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

on the mobilisation of the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund following an application from Greece – EGF/2017/003 GR/Attica retail

(The text of this annex is not reproduced here since it corresponds to the final act, Decision (EU) 2018/6.)

(1) OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 855.
(2) OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 884.
(3) OJ C 373, 20.12.2013, p. 1.
(4) Eastern Macedonia, Thrace (EL11), Central Macedonia (EL12), Western Macedonia (EL13), Thessaly (EL14), Epirus (EL21), Western Greece (EL23), Central Greece (EL24), Peloponnese (EL25), Southern Aegean (EL42), Crete (EL43).
(5) Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0361.


Mobilisation of the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund: application EGF/2017/005 FI/Retail
PDF 330kWORD 47k
Resolution
Annex
European Parliament resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council on the mobilisation of the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (application from Finland – EGF/2017/005 FI/Retail) (COM(2017)0618 – C8-0364/2017 – 2017/2231(BUD))
P8_TA(2017)0457A8-0366/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to the European Parliament and the Council (COM(2017)0618 – C8‑0364/2017),

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) No 1309/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 December 2013 on the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (2014-2020) and repealing Regulation (EC) No 1927/2006(1) (EGF Regulation),

–  having regard to Council Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1311/2013 of 2 December 2013 laying down the multiannual financial framework for the years 2014-2020(2), and in particular Article 12 thereof,

–  having regard to the Interinstitutional Agreement of 2 December 2013 between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management(3) (IIA of 2 December 2013), and in particular point 13 thereof,

–  having regard to the trilogue procedure provided for in point 13 of the IIA of 2 December 2013,

–  having regard to the letter of the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs,

–  having regard to the letter of the Committee on Regional Development,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Budgets (A8-0366/2017),

A.  whereas the Union has set up legislative and budgetary instruments to provide additional support to workers who are suffering from the consequences of major structural changes in world trade patterns or of the global financial and economic crisis, and to assist their reintegration into the labour market;

B.  whereas the Union’s financial assistance to workers made redundant should be dynamic and made available as quickly and efficiently as possible;

C.  whereas Finland submitted application EGF/2017/005 FI/Retail for a financial contribution from the EGF under the intervention criteria set out in point (b) of Article 4(1) of the EGF Regulation following 1 660 redundancies in three enterprises operating in the economic sector classified under the NACE Revision 2 Division 47 (Retail trade, except motor vehicles and motorcycles) in the NUTS level 2 regions of Länsi Suomi, Helsinki-Uusimaa, Etelä-Suomi and Pohjois- ja Itä-Suomi in Finland; whereas 1 500 redundant workers are expected to participate in the measures;

D.  whereas the financial control of the actions supported by the EGF is the responsibility of the Member State concerned, as laid down in Article 21(1) of the EGF Regulation;

1.  Agrees with the Commission that the conditions set out in point (b) of Article 4(1) of the EGF Regulation are met and that Finland is entitled to a financial contribution of EUR 2 499 360 under that Regulation, which represents 60 % of the total cost of EUR 4 165 600;

2.  Notes that the Commission respected the deadline of 12 weeks from the receipt of the completed application from the Finnish authorities until the finalisation of its assessment on the compliance with the conditions for providing a financial contribution on 23 October 2017 and notified its assessment to Parliament on the same day;

3.  Notes that Finland argues that the redundancies are linked to major structural changes in world trade patterns due to globalisation, more particularly to the exponential growth of international online trading; notes, in particular, that the increase in online sales of retail products in Finland, combined with the popularity of non-EU web-shops with Finnish consumers, has led to a steady decrease in the sales of conventional Finnish department stores since 2014;

4.  Notes that all four NUTS-2 regions of Finland are affected by the dismissals that occurred at two major Finnish department store chains; recognises that such stores have faced declining cash-flow and profitability arising from the growth of e-commerce, changing shopping habits and weak consumer confidence;

5.  Recalls that the dismissals occurred at two major Finnish department store chains and one subsidiary, which since 2015 have all experienced serious issues of declining profitability and deteriorating cash-flow due to the rise of e-commerce, changing shopping habits and weak consumer confidence; regrets that in early 2017 two of the companies concerned had to close down completely;

6.  Is aware that, at the same time, a major change in the nature of retail jobs has occurred, with part-time jobs requiring new skills, such as IT, forecasting, data analysis, communication, customer knowledge and logistical skills, on the rise; regrets that 43 % of Finnish retail staff, who are over 45 years old, lack such skills; considers that impediments to re-employment for those over 50 years old represent an important issue and awaits with interest an evaluation of the career coaching pilots that have been included for this group of redundant workers;

7.  Underlines that a large number of the redundant workers are over the age of 55 and over 76 % are women; in view of this, acknowledges the importance of active labour market measures co-funded by the EGF for improving the chances of reintegration in the labour market of these vulnerable groups; welcomes that particular importance has been paid to tailoring the proposed measures to the specific needs of the target groups;

8.  Notes that Finland is planning seven types of measures for the redundant workers covered by this application: (i) coaching measures and other preparatory measures, (ii) employment and other business measures, (iii) training courses, (iv) start-up grants, (v) career coaching pilots, (vi) pay subsidies, (vii) allowances for travel and accommodation; welcomes the planned career coaching pilots looking at physical, mental, or other issues that may act as an impediment to re-employment for beneficiaries over 50 years old; notes that sufficient funds are allocated to control and reporting;

9.  Notes that the income supports measures will constitute 22,05 % of the overall package of personalised measures, well below the maximum 35 % set out in the EGF Regulation and that those actions are conditional on the active participation of the targeted beneficiaries in job-search or training activities;

10.  Acknowledges that the coordinated package of personalised services has been drawn up in consultation with representatives of the Centres for Economic Development, Transport and Environment of Uusimaa, Pirkanmaa, Pohjois-Pohjanmaa, Varsinais-Suomi and the Employment and Economic Development Office of Uusimaa, as well as company and trade union representatives;

11.  Notes that the Finnish authorities have provided assurances that the proposed actions will not receive financial support from other Union funds or financial instruments, that any double financing will be prevented and that they will be complementary with actions funded by the Structural Funds;

12.  Recalls that the design of the coordinated package of personalised services supported by the EGF should anticipate future labour market perspectives and required skills, and should be compatible with the shift towards a resource-efficient and sustainable economy;

13.  Reiterates that assistance from the EGF must not replace actions which are the responsibility of companies, by virtue of national law or collective agreements, or measures for restructuring companies or sectors;

14.  Calls on the Commission to urge national authorities to provide more details, in future proposals, on the sectors which have growth prospects and are therefore likely to hire people, as well as to gather substantiated data on the impact of the EGF funding, including on the quality of jobs and the reintegration rate achieved through the EGF;

15.  Recalls its appeal to the Commission to assure public access to all the documents related to EGF cases;

16.  Approves the decision annexed to this resolution;

17.  Instructs its President to sign the decision with the President of the Council and arrange for its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union;

18.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution, including its Annex, to the Council and the Commission.

ANNEX

DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL

on the mobilisation of the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund following an application from Finland – EGF/2017/005 FI/Retail)

(The text of this annex is not reproduced here since it corresponds to the final act, Decision (EU) 2018/7.)

(1) OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 855.
(2) OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 884.
(3) OJ C 373, 20.12.2013, p. 1.


2018 budgetary procedure
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Resolution
Annex
European Parliament legislative resolution of 30 November 2017 on the joint text on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2018 approved by the Conciliation Committee under the budgetary procedure (14587/2017 – C8-0416/2017 – 2017/2044(BUD))
P8_TA(2017)0458A8-0359/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the joint text approved by the Conciliation Committee and the relevant Parliament, Council and Commission statements (14587/2017 – C8‑0416/2017),

–  having regard to the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2018, which the Commission adopted on 29 June 2017 (COM(2017)0400),

–  having regard to the position on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2018, which the Council adopted on 4 September 2017 and forwarded to Parliament on 13 September 2017 (11815/2017 – C8‑0313/2017),

–  having regard to Letter of amendment No 1/2018 to the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2018, which the Commission presented on 16 October 2017,

–  having regard to its resolution of 25 October 2017 on the Council position on the draft general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2018(1) and to the budget amendments contained therein,

–  having regard to Article 314 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to Article 106a of the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community,

–  having regard to Council Decision 2014/335/EU, Euratom of 26 May 2014 on the system of own resources of the European Union(2),

–  having regard to Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on the financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union and repealing Council Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002(3),

–  having regard to Council Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1311/2013 of 2 December 2013 laying down the multiannual financial framework for the years 2014-2020(4),

–  having regard to the Interinstitutional Agreement of 2 December 2013 between the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on budgetary discipline, on cooperation in budgetary matters and on sound financial management(5),

–  having regard to Rule 90 and Rule 91 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of its delegation to the Conciliation Committee (A8-0359/2017),

1.  Approves the joint text agreed by the Conciliation Committee, which consists of the following documents taken together:

   list of budget lines not modified, compared to the draft budget or the Council's position;
   summary figures by financial framework headings;
   line by line figures on all budget items;
   a consolidated document showing the figures and final text of all lines modified during the conciliation;

2.  Confirms the joint statements by Parliament, the Council and the Commission annexed to this resolution;

3.  Takes note of the unilateral statements by the Commission and by the Council annexed to this resolution;

4.  Instructs its President to declare that the general budget of the European Union for the financial year 2018 has been definitively adopted and to arrange for its publication in the Official Journal of the European Union;

5.  Instructs its President to forward this legislative resolution to the Council, the Commission, the other institutions and bodies concerned and the national parliaments.

ANNEX

18.11.2017

FINAL

Budget 2018 – Elements for joint conclusions

These joint conclusions cover the following sections:

1.  Budget 2018

2.  Budget 2017 – Draft Amending Budget 6/2017

3.  Statements

Summary overview

A.  Budget 2018

According to the elements for joint conclusions:

—  The overall level of commitment appropriations in the 2018 budget is set at EUR 160 113,5 million. Overall, this leaves a margin below the MFF ceilings for 2018 of EUR 1 600,3 million in commitment appropriations.

—  The overall level of payment appropriations in the 2018 budget is set at EUR 144 681,0 million.

—  The Flexibility Instrument for 2018 is mobilised in commitment appropriations for an amount of EUR 837,2 million for heading 3 Security and Citizenship.

—  The Global margin for commitments is used at a level of EUR 1 113,7 million for heading 1a Competitiveness for Growth and Jobs and heading 1b Economic, Social and Territorial Cohesion.

—  The decision (EU) 2017/344 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 December 2016 on the mobilisation of the Contingency margin in 2017(6) will be amended to adjust the offsetting profile to decrease the amount offset in heading 5 Administration in 2018 from EUR 570 million to EUR 318 million and correspondingly introduce offsetting of EUR 252 million for the same heading in 2020.

—  The 2018 payment appropriations related to the mobilisation of the Flexibility Instrument in 2014, 2016, 2017 and 2018 are estimated by the Commission at EUR 678,3 million.

B.  Budget 2017

According to the elements for joint conclusions, Draft Amending Budget 6/2017 is accepted as proposed by the Commission.

1.  Budget 2018

1.1.  'Closed' lines

Unless stated otherwise below in these conclusions, all budget lines not amended by either Council or Parliament, and those for which Parliament accepted Council's amendments during their respective reading, are confirmed.

For the other budget lines, the Conciliation Committee has agreed on the conclusions included in sections 1.2 to 1.7 below.

1.2.  Horizontal issues

Decentralised agencies

The EU contribution (in commitment and payment appropriations and the number of posts) for all decentralised agencies are set at the level proposed by the Commission in the Draft Budget, as amended by Amending Letter 1/2018 with the exception of:

—  Under heading 3:

o The European Police Office (EUROPOL, budget article 18 02 04) for which 10 additional posts are allocated and commitment and payment appropriations increased by EUR 3 690 000.

o The European Asylum Office (EASO, budget article 18 03 02) for which the commitment and payment appropriations are increased by EUR 5 000 000.

o The European Body for the Enhancement of Judicial Cooperation (EUROJUST, budget article 33 03 04) for which 5 additional posts are allocated and commitment and payment appropriations increased by EUR 1 845 000.

—  Under heading 1a:

o The European GNSS Agency (GSA, budget article 02 05 11) for which 5 additional posts are allocated and commitment and payment appropriations increased by EUR 345 000.

o The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA, budget article 12 02 06) for which the level of commitment and payment appropriations and the number of posts are reduced at the level of the Draft Budget.

Executive agencies

The EU contribution (in commitment and payment appropriations and the number of posts) for executive agencies are set at the level proposed by the Commission in the Draft Budget 2018, as amended by Amending Letter 1/2018.

Pilot Projects/Preparatory Actions

A comprehensive package of 87 pilot projects/preparatory actions (PP/PA), for a total amount of EUR 100,0 million in commitment appropriations is agreed as proposed by the Parliament in addition to the preparatory action proposed by the Commission in the Draft budget 2018.

When a pilot project or a preparatory action appears to be covered by an existing legal basis, the Commission may propose the transfer of appropriations to the corresponding legal basis in order to facilitate the implementation of the action.

This package fully respects the ceilings for pilot projects and preparatory actions set in the Financial Regulation.

1.3.  Expenditure headings of the financial framework - commitment appropriations

After taking into account the above conclusions on 'closed' budget lines, agencies and pilot projects and preparatory actions, the Conciliation Committee has agreed on the following:

Heading 1a – Competitiveness for Growth and Jobs

Commitment appropriations are set at the level proposed by the Commission in the Draft Budget, as amended by Amending Letter 1/2018 but with the adjustments, agreed by the Conciliation Committee, detailed in the following table:

 

 

 

 

In EUR

Budget line / Programme

Name

DB 2018 (incl. AL1)

Budget 2018

Difference

1.1.11

European satellite navigation systems (EGNOS and Galileo)

 

 

-4 090 000

02 05 01

Developing and providing global satellite-based radio navigation infrastructures and services (Galileo) by 2020

623 949 000

621 709 000

-2 240 000

02 05 02

Providing satellite-based services improving the performance of GPS to gradually cover the whole European Civil Aviation Conference (ECAC) region by 2020 (EGNOS)

185 000 000

183 150 000

-1 850 000

1.1.13

European Earth Observation Programme (Copernicus)

 

 

-10 370 000

02 06 01

Delivering operational services relying on space-borne observations and in-situ data (Copernicus)

130 664 000

129 364 000

-1 300 000

02 06 02

Building an autonomous Union’s Earth observation capacity (Copernicus)

507 297 000

498 227 000

-9 070 000

1.1.14

European Solidarity Corps (ESC)

 

 

-30 000 000

15 05 01

European Solidarity Corps

68 235 652

38 235 652

-30 000 000

1.1.31

Horizon 2020

 

 

110 000 000

02 04 02 01

Leadership in space

173 389 945

184 528 490

11 138 545

02 04 02 03

Increasing innovation in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs)

36 937 021

43 178 448

6 241 427

06 03 03 01

Achieving a resource-efficient, environmentally-friendly, safe and seamless European transport system

53 986 199

56 835 072

2 848 873

08 02 01 01

Strengthening frontier research in the European Research Council

1 827 122 604

1 842 122 604

15 000 000

08 02 02 01

Leadership in nanotechnologies, advanced materials, laser technology, biotechnology and advanced manufacturing and processing

518 395 125

524 204 453

5 809 328

08 02 03 03

Making the transition to a reliable, sustainable and competitive energy system

330 244 971

336 486 398

6 241 427

08 02 03 04

Achieving a European transport system that is resource-efficient, environmentally friendly, safe and seamless

230 777 055

239 323 675

8 546 620

08 02 03 05

Achieving a resource-efficient and climate change resilient economy and a sustainable supply of raw materials

297 738 618

303 307 891

5 569 273

08 02 08

SME instrument

471 209 870

481 209 870

10 000 000

09 04 02 01

Leadership in information and communications technology

722 055 754

725 189 515

3 133 761

15 03 01 01

Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions — generating, developing and transferring new skills, knowledge and innovation

870 013 019

885 710 765

15 697 746

32 04 03 01

Making the transition to a reliable, sustainable and competitive energy system

300 984 111

320 757 111

19 773 000

1.1.4

Competitiveness of enterprises and small and medium-sized enterprises (COSME)

 

 

15 000 000

02 02 02

Improving access to finance for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the form of equity and debt

199 554 000

214 554 000

15 000 000

1.1.5

Education, Training and Sport (Erasmus+)

 

 

54 000 000

15 02 01 01

Promoting excellence and cooperation in the European education and training area and its relevance to the labour market

1 955 123 300

1 979 123 300

24 000 000

15 02 01 02

Promoting excellence and cooperation in the European youth area and the participation of young people in European democratic life

182 672 916

212 672 916

30 000 000

1.1.7

Customs, Fiscalis and Anti-Fraud

 

 

-1 365 232

14 02 01

Supporting the functioning and modernisation of the customs union

80 071 000

78 860 555

-1 210 445

14 03 01

Improving the proper functioning of the taxation systems

32 043 000

31 888 213

-154 787

1.1.81

Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) - Energy

 

 

-19 773 000

32 02 01 04

Union contribution to Financial Instruments for creating an environment more conducive to private investment for energy projects

19 773 000

0

-19 773 000

1.1.DAG

Decentralised agencies

 

 

-3 965 555

02 05 11

European GNSS Agency

30 993 525

31 338 525

345 000

12 02 06

European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA)

15 947 170

11 636 615

-4 310 555

1.1.OTH

Other actions and programmes

 

 

-2 346 000

02 03 02 01

Support to standardisation activities performed by CEN, Cenelec and ETSI

18 908 000

18 562 000

-346 000

26 02 01

Procedures for awarding and advertising public supply, works and service contracts

8 500 000

7 500 000

-1 000 000

29 02 01

Providing quality statistical information, implementing new methods of production of European statistics and strengthening the partnership within the European Statistical System

59 475 000

58 475 000

-1 000 000

1.1.PPPA

Pilot projects and preparatory actions

 

 

51 650 000

1.1.SPEC

Actions financed under the prerogatives of the Commission and specific competences conferred to the Commission

 

 

-2 900 000

01 02 01

Coordination and surveillance of, and communication on, the economic and monetary union, including the euro

12 000 000

11 500 000

-500 000

04 03 01 08

Industrial relations and social dialogue

16 438 000

15 038 000

-1 400 000

06 02 05

Support activities to the European transport policy and passenger rights including communication activities

11 821 000

10 821 000

-1 000 000

 

Total

 

 

155 840 213

As a consequence, the agreed level of commitment appropriations is set at EUR 22 001,5 million, with no margin left under the expenditure ceiling of heading 1a of EUR 21 239 million, and the use of the Global Margin for Commitments for an amount of EUR 762,5 million.

Heading 1b – Economic, social and territorial Cohesion

Commitment appropriations are set at the level proposed by the Commission in the Draft Budget, as amended by Amending Letter 1/2018 but with the adjustment, agreed by the Conciliation Committee, detailed in the following table:

 

 

 

 

In EUR

Budget line / Programme

Name

DB 2018 (incl. AL1)

Budget 2018

Difference

1.2.5

Youth Employment initiative (specific top-up allocation)

 

 

116 666 667

04 02 64

Youth Employment Initiative

233 333 333

350 000 000

116 666 667

1.2.PPPA

Pilot projects and preparatory actions

 

 

7 700 000

 

Total

 

 

124 366 667

As a consequence, the agreed level of commitment appropriations is set at EUR 55 532,2 million, with no margin left under the expenditure ceiling of heading 1b of EUR 55 181 million, and the use of the Global Margin for Commitments for an amount of EUR 351,2 million.

Heading 2 – Sustainable Growth: Natural Resources

Commitment appropriations are set at the level proposed by the Commission in the Draft Budget, as amended by Amending Letter 1/2018 but with the adjustments, agreed by the Conciliation Committee, detailed in the following table:

 

 

 

 

In EUR

Budget line / Programme

Name

DB 2018 (incl. AL1)

Budget 2018

Difference

2.0.10

European Agricultural Guarantee Fund (EAGF) — Market related expenditure and direct payments

 

 

-229 900 000

05 03 01 10

Basic payment scheme (BPS)

16 556 000 000

16 326 100 000

-229 900 000

2.0.PPPA

Pilot projects and preparatory actions

 

 

15 600 000

 

Total

 

 

-214 300 000

The decrease of commitment appropriations is fully attributed to higher assigned revenue available arising from the EAGF surplus of 31 October 2017 which will cover the full needs of the sector as updated in Amending Letter 1/2018. Among these updated needs, Amending Letter 1/2018 increases the payments for :

—  Young farmers by EUR 34 million (budget item 05 03 01 13),

—  Agricultural practices beneficial for the climate and environment by EUR 95 million (budget item 05 03 01 11),

—  Other measures for pigmeat, poultry, eggs, bee-keeping and other animal products by EUR 60 million (budget item 05 02 15 99)

—  National support programmes for the wine sector by EUR 7 million (budget item 05 02 09 08), and

—  Storage measures for skimmed-milk powder by EUR 2 million (budget item 05 02 12 02).

As a consequence, the agreed level of commitment appropriations is set at EUR 59 285,3 million, leaving a margin of EUR 981,7 million under the expenditure ceiling of heading 2.

Heading 3 – Security and Citizenship

Commitment appropriations are set at the level proposed by the Commission in the Draft Budget, as amended by Amending Letter 1/2018 but with the adjustments, agreed by the Conciliation Committee, detailed in the following table:

 

 

 

 

In EUR

Budget line / Programme

Name

DB 2018 (incl. AL1)

Budget 2018

Difference

3.0.11

Creative Europe

 

 

3 500 000

15 04 01

Strengthening the financial capacity of SMEs and small and very small organisations in the European cultural and creative sectors, and fostering policy development and new business models

34 528 000

35 528 000

1 000 000

15 04 02

Culture sub-programme — Supporting cross-border actions and promoting transnational circulation and mobility

68 606 000

71 106 000

2 500 000

3.0.8

Food and feed

 

 

-6 500 000

17 04 01

Ensuring a higher animal health status and high level of protection of animals in the Union

161 500 000

160 000 000

-1 500 000

17 04 02

Ensuring timely detection of harmful organisms for plants and their eradication

25 000 000

22 000 000

-3 000 000

17 04 03

Ensuring effective, efficient and reliable controls

57 483 000

55 483 000

-2 000 000

3.0.DAG

Decentralised agencies

 

 

10 535 000

18 02 04

European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol)

116 687 271

120 377 271

3 690 000

18 03 02

European Asylum Support Office (EASO)

85 837 067

90 837 067

5 000 000

33 03 04

The European Union’s Judicial Cooperation Unit (Eurojust)

36 506 468

38 351 468

1 845 000

3.0.PPPA

Pilot projects and preparatory actions

 

 

12 650 000

 

Total

 

 

20 185 000

As a consequence, the agreed level of commitment appropriations is set at EUR 3 493,2 million, with no margin left under the expenditure ceiling of heading 3, and the mobilisation of EUR 837,2 million through the Flexibility Instrument.

Heading 4 – Global Europe

Commitment appropriations are set at the level proposed by the Commission in the Draft Budget, as amended by Amending Letter 1/2018, but with the adjustments, agreed by the Conciliation Committee, detailed in the following table:

 

 

 

 

In EUR

Budget line / Programme

Name

DB 2018 (incl. AL1)

Budget 2018

Difference

4.0.1

Instrument for Pre-accession assistance (IPA II)

 

 

-95 000 000

05 05 04 02

Support to Turkey — Economic, social and territorial development and related progressive alignment with the Union acquis

148 000 000

131 000 000

-17 000 000

22 02 01 01

Support to Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo(7), Montenegro, Serbia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia — Political reforms and related progressive alignment with the Union acquis

189 267 000

199 267 000

10 000 000

22 02 03 01

Support to Turkey — Political reforms and related progressive alignment with the Union acquis

217 400 000

167 400 000

-50 000 000

22 02 03 02

Support to Turkey - Economic, social and territorial development and related progressive alignment with the Union acquis

274 384 000

236 384 000

-38 000 000

4.0.2

European Neighbourhood Instrument (ENI)

 

 

50 000 000

22 04 01 03

Mediterranean countries — Confidence building, security and the prevention and settlement of conflicts

262 072 675

296 072 675

34 000 000

22 04 01 04

Support to the peace process and financial assistance to Palestine and to the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA)

293 379 163

299 379 163

6 000 000

22 04 02 02

Eastern Partnership — Poverty reduction and sustainable development

351 556 726

361 556 726

10 000 000

4.0.3

Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI)

 

 

20 000 000

21 02 07 03

Human development

193 374 058

205 874 058

12 500 000

21 02 20

Erasmus+ — Contribution from the development cooperation instrument (DCI)

94 928 673

102 428 673

7 500 000

4.0.4

Partnership instrument for cooperation with third countries (PI)

 

 

-3 000 000

19 05 01

Cooperation with third countries to advance and promote Union and mutual interests

126 263 000

123 263 000

-3 000 000

4.0.OTH

Other actions and programmes

 

 

-1 083 000

13 07 01

Financial support for encouraging the economic development of the Turkish Cypriot community

32 473 000

34 473 000

2 000 000

21 02 40

Commodities agreements

5 583 000

2 500 000

-3 083 000

4.0.PPPA

Pilot projects and preparatory actions

 

 

8 900 000

4.0.SPEC

Actions financed under the prerogatives of the Commission and specific competences conferred to the Commission

 

 

1 000 000

19 06 01

Information outreach on the Union’s external relations

12 000 000

15 000 000

3 000 000

21 08 01

Evaluation of the results of Union aid and follow-up and audit measures

30 676 000

29 176 000

-1 500 000

21 08 02

Coordination and promotion of awareness on development issues

13 036 000

12 536 000

-500 000

 

Total

 

 

-19 183 000

As a consequence, the agreed level of commitment appropriations is set at EUR 9 568,8 million, leaving a margin of EUR 256,2 million under the expenditure ceiling of heading 4.

Heading 5 – Administration

The number of posts in the establishment plans of the Institutions and the appropriations proposed by the Commission in the Draft Budget, as amended by Amending Letter 1/2018 are agreed by the Conciliation Committee with the following exceptions:

—  The section of the Parliament for which its reading is approved;

—  The section of the Council for which its reading is approved;

—  The European External Action Service for which EUR 800 000 are allocated to a newly created budget item 2 2 1 4 Strategic Communication Capacity. This is aimed at properly equipping the European External Action Service to cover strategic communication tools, contracting strategic communication expertise, supporting language plurality of strategic communication products and engaging and maintaining a network of counter-disinformation specialists in Member States and neighbouring countries. The budget item 3 0 0 4 Other administrative expenditure is reduced by EUR 800 000 to ensure budget neutrality.

Moreover, the impact in the Budget 2018 of the automatic salary update to be applied from 1 July 2017 is integrated in all sections of the Institutions as follows:

 

in EUR

Parliament

-2 796 000

Council

-948 000

Commission (including pensions)

-13 179 600

Court of Justice

-868 800

Court of Auditors

-357 000

European Economic & Social Committee

-193 000

Committee of the Regions

-146 000

Ombudsman

-24 600

European Data Protection Supervisor

-13 459

European External Action Service

-878 400

Total

-19 404 859

Finally, additional reductions of EUR 5 million were identified across all Institutions for expenditure related to buildings, as follows:

 

in EUR

Council

-378 623

Commission (including pensions)

-3 637 499

Court of Justice

-270 611

Court of Auditors

-96 409

European Economic & Social Committee

-89 461

Committee of the Regions

-63 393

Ombudsman

-7 016

European Data Protection Supervisor

-9 526

European External Action Service

-447 462

Total

-5 000 000

As a consequence, and after taking into account pilot projects and preparatory actions (EUR 3,5 million) proposed under section 1.2 above, the agreed level of commitment appropriations is set at EUR 9 665,5 million, leaving a margin of EUR 362,5 million under the expenditure ceiling of heading 5, after the use of EUR 318,0 million of the margin to offset the mobilisation of the Contingency margin in 2017.

Special instruments: EGF, EAR and EUSF

Commitment appropriations for the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF) and for the Emergency Aid Reserve (EAR) are set at the level proposed by the Commission in the Draft Budget, as amended by Amending Letter 1/2018. The reserve for the European Union Solidarity Fund (EUSF) is suppressed (budget article 40 02 44).

1.4.  Payment appropriations

The overall level of payment appropriations in the 2018 Budget is set at the level of the Draft Budget, as amended by Amending Letter 1/2018 with the following adjustments agreed by the Conciliation Committee:

1.  First, account is taken of the agreed level of commitment appropriations for non-differentiated expenditure, for which the level of payment appropriations is equal to the level of commitment appropriations. This includes the additional reduction of agricultural expenditure by -EUR 229,9 million. The combined effect is a decrease of -EUR 255,3 million;

2.  The payment appropriations for all new pilot projects and preparatory actions proposed by the Parliament are set at 50 % of the corresponding commitment appropriations, or at the level proposed by Parliament if lower. In the case of extension of existing pilot projects and preparatory actions the level of payment appropriations is the one defined in the Draft Budget plus 50 % of the corresponding new commitment appropriations, or at the level proposed by Parliament if lower. The combined effect is an increase of EUR 50,0 million;

3.  The adjustments on the following budget lines are agreed as a result of the evolution in commitment appropriations for differentiated expenditure:

 

 

 

 

In EUR

Budget line / Programme

Name

DB 2018 (incl. AL1)

Budget 2018

Difference

1.1.14

European Solidarity Corps (ESC)

 

 

-22 501 000

15 05 01

European Solidarity Corps

51 177 000

28 676 000

-22 501 000

1.1.5

Education, Training and Sport (Erasmus+)

 

 

12 000 000

15 02 01 01

Promoting excellence and cooperation in the European education and training area and its relevance to the labour market

1 845 127 000

1 857 127 000

12 000 000

1.1.DAG

Decentralised agencies

 

 

-3 965 555

02 05 11

European GNSS Agency

30 993 525

31 338 525

345 000

12 02 06

European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA)

15 947 170

11 636 615

-4 310 555

1.1.OTH

Other actions and programmes

 

 

-900 000

26 02 01

Procedures for awarding and advertising public supply, works and service contracts

8 200 000

7 300 000

-900 000

3.0.DAG

Decentralised agencies

 

 

10 535 000

18 02 04

European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation (Europol)

116 687 271

120 377 271

3 690 000

18 03 02

European Asylum Support Office (EASO)

85 837 067

90 837 067

5 000 000

33 03 04

The European Union’s Judicial Cooperation Unit (Eurojust)

36 506 468

38 351 468

1 845 000

4.0.1

Instrument for Pre-accession assistance (IPA II)

 

 

-76 300 000

05 05 04 02

Support to Turkey — Economic, social and territorial development and related progressive alignment with the Union acquis

120 000 000

107 200 000

-12 800 000

22 02 01 01

Support to Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo(8), Montenegro, Serbia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia — Political reforms and related progressive alignment with the Union acquis

219 000 000

221 500 000

2 500 000

22 02 03 01

Support to Turkey — Political reforms and related progressive alignment with the Union acquis

86 000 000

48 500 000

-37 500 000

22 02 03 02

Support to Turkey - Economic, social and territorial development and related progressive alignment with the Union acquis

291 000 000

262 500 000

-28 500 000

4.0.2

European Neighbourhood Instrument (ENI)

 

 

12 500 000

22 04 01 03

Mediterranean countries — Confidence building, security and the prevention and settlement of conflicts

125 000 000

133 500 000

8 500 000

22 04 01 04

Support to the peace process and financial assistance to Palestine and to the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA)

260 000 000

261 500 000

1 500 000

22 04 02 02

Eastern Partnership — Poverty reduction and sustainable development

320 000 000

322 500 000

2 500 000

4.0.3

Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI)

 

 

16 900 000

21 02 07 03

Human development

170 000 000

179 400 000

9 400 000

21 02 20

Erasmus+ — Contribution from the development cooperation instrument (DCI)

95 995 100

103 495 100

7 500 000

4.0.OTH

Other actions and programmes

 

 

1 000 000

13 07 01

Financial support for encouraging the economic development of the Turkish Cypriot community

25 000 000

26 000 000

1 000 000

4.0.SPEC

Actions financed under the prerogatives of the Commission and specific competences conferred to the Commission

 

 

1 500 000

19 06 01

Information outreach on the Union’s external relations

13 700 000

15 200 000

1 500 000

 

Total

 

 

-49 231 555

4.  Additional reductions in payment appropriations are made on the following budget lines:

 

 

 

 

In EUR

Budget line / Programme

Name

DB 2018 (incl. AL1)

Budget 2018

Difference

1.2.12

Transition regions

 

 

-55 000 000

04 02 61

European Social Fund — Transition regions — Investment for growth and jobs goal

1 345 000 000

1 305 000 000

-40 000 000

13 03 61

European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) — Transition regions — Investment for growth and jobs goal

2 750 463 362

2 735 463 362

-15 000 000

1.2.13

Competitiveness (More developed regions)

 

 

-90 000 000

04 02 62

European Social Fund — More developed regions — Investment for growth and jobs goal

2 882 000 000

2 847 000 000

-35 000 000

13 03 62

European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) — More developed regions — Investment for growth and jobs goal

3 497 060 077

3 442 060 077

-55 000 000

1.2.2

European territorial cooperation

 

 

-90 500 000

13 03 64 01

European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) — European territorial cooperation

1 004 701 248

914 201 248

-90 500 000

1.2.31

Technical assistance

 

 

-4 500 000

13 03 65 01

European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) — Operational technical assistance

72 000 000

69 000 000

-3 000 000

13 03 66

European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) — Innovative actions in the field of sustainable urban development

43 321 859

41 821 859

-1 500 000

 

Total

 

 

-240 000 000

1.  The reserve for the European Union Solidarity Fund (budget article 40 02 44) is suppressed (-EUR 88,0 million).

These actions will provide a level of payment appropriations of EUR 144 681,0 million, a reduction of –EUR 582,5 million in comparison with the Draft Budget, as amended by Amending Letter 1/2018.

1.5.  Reserve

There are no reserves in addition to those of the Draft Budget, as amended by Amending Letter 1/2018, except for budget item 22 02 03 01 Support to Turkey — Political reforms and related progressive alignment with the Union acquis for which EUR 70 000 000 in commitment appropriations and EUR 35 000 000 in payment appropriations are placed in reserve pending the fulfilment of the following condition:

"Amount to be released when Turkey makes measurable sufficient improvements in the fields of rule of law, democracy, human rights and press freedom, according to the annual report of the Commission."

The budget remark of budget item 22 02 03 01 is modified accordingly.

1.6.  Budget remarks

Unless otherwise specifically addressed in previous paragraphs, amendments introduced by the European Parliament or the Council to the text of budget remarks are agreed, with the exception of those on budget lines listed in the two following tables:

—  Budget lines for which the amendments introduced by the European Parliament are approved with the modification proposed by the Commission in its Executability Letter.

Budget line

Name

06 02 01 01

Removing bottlenecks, enhancing rail interoperability, bridging missing links and improving cross-border sections

09 05 01

MEDIA Sub-programme — Operating transnationally and internationally and promoting transnational circulation and mobility

18 04 01 01

Europe for citizens — Strengthening remembrance and enhancing capacity for civic participation at the Union level

21 02 07 03

Human development

22 02 03 02

Support for economic, social and territorial development and related progressive alignment with the Union acquis

—  Budget lines for which the respective budget remark as proposed in the Draft Budget, as amended by Amending Letter 1/2018 and the EAGF update, are approved.

Budget line

Name

02 02 01

Promoting entrepreneurship and improving the competitiveness and access to markets of Union enterprises

02 03 04

Internal market governance tools

05 02 08 03

Operational funds for producer organisations

05 03 01 01

Single payment scheme (SPS)

05 03 01 10

Basic payment scheme (BPS)

05 04 60 01

Promoting sustainable rural development, a more territorially and environmentally balanced, climate-friendly and innovative Union agricultural sector

08 02 02 02

Enhancing access to risk finance for investing in research and innovation

09 05 05

Multimedia actions

13 03 61

European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) — Transition regions — Investment for growth and jobs goal

13 03 62

European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) — More developed regions — Investment for growth and jobs goal

13 06 01

Assistance to Member States in the event of a major natural disaster with serious repercussions on living conditions, the natural environment or the economy

18 02 01 02

Prevention and fight against cross-border organised crime and better management of security- related risks and crisis

18 03 01 01

Strengthening and developing the common European asylum system and enhancing solidarity and responsibility-sharing between the Member States

21 04 01

Enhancing the respect for and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms and supporting democratic reforms

23 02 01

Delivery of rapid, effective and needs-based humanitarian aid and food assistance

33 02 07

European Institute for Gender Equality (EIGE)

This is with the understanding that amendments introduced by the European Parliament or the Council cannot modify or extend the scope of an existing legal base, or impinge on the administrative autonomy of institutions, and that the action can be covered by available resources.

1.7.  New budget lines

The budget nomenclature proposed by the Commission in the Draft Budget, as amended by Amending Letter 1/2018, is agreed with the inclusion of:

—  the new pilot projects and preparatory actions, proposed under section 1.2 above; and

—  the new budget item 2 2 1 4 within the section of the European External Action Service, proposed under 1.3 above.

2.  Budget 2017

Draft Amending Budget (DAB) 6/2017 is approved as proposed by the Commission.

3.  Statements

3.1.  Joint statement by the European Parliament, Council and Commission on the payment appropriations

The European Parliament and the Council recall the need to ensure, in the light of implementation, an orderly progression of payments in relation to the appropriations for commitments so as to avoid any abnormal level of unpaid invoices at year-end.

The European Parliament and the Council calls on the Commission to continue monitoring closely and actively the implementation of the 2014-2020 programmes. To that end, they invite the Commission to present in a timely manner, updated figures concerning the state of implementation and estimates regarding payment appropriations requirements in 2018.

The Council and the European Parliament will take any necessary decisions in due time for duly justified needs to prevent the accumulation of an excessive amount of unpaid bills and to ensure that payment claims are duly reimbursed.

3.2.  Joint statement by the European Parliament, Council(9) and Commission on the Youth Employment Initiative

The Parliament, the Council and the Commission recall that reducing unemployment and, in particular, youth unemployment, remains a high and shared political priority, and to this end they reaffirm their determination to make the best possible use of budgetary resources available to tackle it, and in particular through the Youth Employment Initiative.

Therefore, they welcome the increase of the amount allocated to this initiative in 2018. However, it is not only essential to provide for an adequate financing in the EU budget, but also to put in place, at the same time, the right procedures to implement them effectively.

In this regard, an effective cooperation between the Parliament, the Council and the Commission is needed to ensure the highest possible impact of the measures adopted.

Therefore, the Council and the European Parliament undertake to consider as a matter of priority the modification in the Common Provisions Regulation required by the adoption of the 2018 budget.

The Commission shall facilitate the swift approval of the changes in the programmes to implement the YEI.

3.3.  Unilateral statement by the Commission on the Youth Employment Initiative

Reducing youth unemployment remains a high political priority. The Commission undertakes to monitor closely the implementation trend of the Youth Employment Initiative (YEI). Should the trend of this initiative accelerate and should the absorption capacity allow for an increase, the Commission will propose an increase of the YEI funding through an amending budget to be financed by the Global margin for commitments in accordance with Article 14 of the MFF Regulation.

In that case, the Commission expects the Council and the European Parliament to process rapidly any such draft amending budget.

3.4.  Unilateral statement by the Council on the 5 % staff reduction

The Council recalls that the target year for the full implementation of the 5 % reduction of staff was 2017. However, as not all institutions, bodies and agencies have met the reduction target, the Council urges continued efforts in 2018 in order to fulfil the agreement.

It is essential that the 5 % staff reduction target is implemented by all institutions, bodies and agencies, and monitored until it is fully achieved. With that in mind, the Council invites the Commission to continue to assess the outcome of the exercise in order to draw lessons for the future.

(1) Texts adopted of that date, P8_TA(2017)0408.
(2) OJ L 168, 7.6.2014, p. 105.
(3) OJ L 298, 26.10.2012, p. 1.
(4) OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 884.
(5) OJ C 373, 20.12.2013, p. 1.
(6) OJ L 50, 28.2.2017, p. 57.
(7) This designation is without prejudice to positions on status, and is in line with the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244(1999) and the International Court of Justice opinion on Kosovo’s declaration of independence.
(8) This designation is without prejudice to positions on status, and is in line with the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244(1999) and the International Court of Justice opinion on Kosovo’s declaration of independence.
(9) The United Kingdom does not support this statement


Request for waiver of the immunity of Ana Gomes
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European Parliament decision of 30 November 2017 on the request for waiver of the immunity of Ana Gomes (2017/2096(IMM))
P8_TA(2017)0459A8-0363/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the request for waiver of the immunity of Ana Gomes, forwarded on 30 May 2017 by the Permanent Representation of Portugal to the European Union and signed by the Deputy Attorney General of the Portuguese Republic in connection with criminal proceedings pending before the Peso da Régua District Court Public Prosecutor’s Office – District of Vila Reale (ref. NUIPC 430/16.6T9LSBP), and announced in plenary on 12 June 2017,

–  having heard Ana Gomes in accordance with Rule 9(6) of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to Article 8 of Protocol No 7 on the Privileges and Immunities of the European Union, and Article 6(2) of the Act of 20 September 1976 concerning the election of the members of the European Parliament by direct universal suffrage,

–  having regard to the judgments of the Court of Justice of the European Union of 12 May 1964, 10 July 1986, 15 and 21 October 2008, 19 March 2010, 6 September 2011 and 17 January 2013(1),

–  having regard to Rule 157(2) of the Constitution of the Portuguese Republic and Article 11 of the Statute of Members of the Assembly of the Portuguese Republic,

–  having regard to Rule 5(2), Rule 6(1) and Rule 9 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Legal Affairs (A8-0363/2017),

A.  whereas a prosecutor of the Vila Real Public Prosecution Service attached to the Peso de Régua District Court has requested waiver of the parliamentary immunity of Ms Ana Gomes in connection with statements made by her in an interview with the Diário de Noticias, published by that newspaper on the Internet on 29 April 2016; whereas the request has been made with a view to initiating criminal proceedings against Ms Gomes and so that she may be questioned in that connection;

B.  whereas the newspaper article indicated that investigations were under way in relation to the Viana shipyards and, in this connection, Ms Gomes commented that ‘something was starting to happen with regard to a case of blatant corruption’, expressing the view that the Atlántida ferry had been sold for ‘peanuts’;

C.  whereas, in principle, the acts allegedly committed by Ms Gomes constitute three offences, that is to say affront to an organisation, service or legal person, defined by, and punishable under, the terms of Article 187(1) and (2)(a) and Article 183(2) of the Penal Code, against two parties, an offence punishable by a prison sentence of up to two years, or a fine of no less than 120 daily units;

D.  whereas, according to Article 8 of Protocol No 7 on the Privileges and Immunities of the European Union, Members of the European Parliament may not be subject to any form of inquiry, detention or legal proceedings in respect of opinions expressed or votes cast by them in the performance of their duties;

E.  whereas, pursuant to Rule 5 of the European Parliament’s Rules of Procedure, in the exercise of its powers in respect of privileges and immunities, Parliament shall act to uphold its integrity as a democratic legislative assembly and to ensure the independence of its Members in the performance of their duties;

F.  whereas the European Court of Justice has ruled that a statement made by a Member outside the European Parliament may constitute an opinion expressed in the performance of his duties within the meaning of Article 8 of Protocol No 7, where it contains a subjective assessment having a direct and obvious connection with the performance of that Member’s duties in the European Parliament; whether or not this is the case must therefore be determined by the character and content of the statement and not to the place where it was made;

G.  whereas today political debate takes place to an increasing extent outside Parliament’s premises through the media, in the form of press statements, interviews and blogs and on the internet;

H.  whereas statements by Ms Gomes during the interview were made in the performance of her duties as a Member of the European Parliament and within her remit as Vice-Chair of the Committee of Inquiry to investigate alleged contraventions and maladministration in the implementation of Union law in relation to money laundering, tax avoidance and tax evasion;

I.  whereas the comments made by Ms Gomes are directly related to her observations during the‘TV124-Cara a Cara’ televised debate between her and Carlos Abreu Amorim that was broadcast on 29 November 2013, concerning which the European Parliament upheld her immunity(2);

J.  whereas the observations made by Ms Gomes therefore fall within the sphere of activities of the European Parliament;

1.  Decides not to waive the immunity of Ana Gomes;

2.  Instructs its President to forward this decision and the report of its committee responsible immediately to the appropriate authorities of the Portuguese Republic and to Ana Gomes.

(1) Judgment of the Court of Justice of 12 May 1964, Wagner v Fohrmann and Krier, 101/63, ECLI:EU:C:1964:28; judgment of the Court of Justice of 10 July 1986, Wybot v Faure and others, 149/85, ECLI:EU:C:1986:310; judgment of the General Court of 15 October 2008, Mote v Parliament, T-345/05, ECLI:EU:T:2008:440; judgment of the Court of Justice of 21 October 2008, Marra v De Gregorio and Clemente, C-200/07 and C-201/07, ECLI:EU:C:2008:579; judgment of the General Court of 19 March 2010, Gollnisch v Parliament, T-42/06, ECLI:EU:T:2010:102; judgment of the Court of Justice of 6 September 2011, Patriciello, C-163/10, ECLI:EU:C:2011:543; judgment of the General Court of 17 January 2013, Gollnisch v Parliament, T-346/11 and T-347/11, ECLI:EU:T:2013:23.
(2) Decision of the European Parliament of 13 November 2014 on the request for waiver of the immunity of Ana Gomes (OJ C 285, 5.8.2016, p. 19).


Changes to the resources for economic, social and territorial cohesion and to the resources for the investment for growth and jobs goal and for the European territorial cooperation goal ***I
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Resolution
Text
European Parliament legislative resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Regulation (EU) No 1303/2013 as regards the changes to the resources for economic, social and territorial cohesion and to the resources for the Investment for growth and jobs goal and for the European territorial cooperation goal (COM(2017)0565 – C8-0342/2017 – 2017/0247(COD))
P8_TA(2017)0460A8-0358/2017

(Ordinary legislative procedure: first reading)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to Parliament and the Council (COM(2017)0565),

–  having regard to Article 294(2) and Article 177 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Commission submitted the proposal to Parliament (C8‑0342/2017),

–  having regard to Article 294(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  after consulting the European Economic and Social Committee,

–  after consulting the Committee of the Regions,

–  having regard to the letter of the Committee on Budgets,

–  having regard to Rule 59 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Regional Development (A8-0358/2017),

A.  Whereas for reasons of urgency it is justified to proceed to the vote before the expiry of the deadline of eight weeks laid down in Article 6 of Protocol No 2 on the application of the principles of subsidiarity and proportionality;

1.  Adopts its position at first reading hereinafter set out;

2.  Calls on the Commission to refer the matter to Parliament again if it replaces, substantially amends or intends to substantially amend its proposal;

3.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the national parliaments.

Position of the European Parliament adopted at first reading on 30 November 2017 with a view to the adoption of Regulation (EU) 2017/… of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Regulation (EU) No 1303/2013 as regards the changes to the resources for economic, social and territorial cohesion and to the resources for the Investment for growth and jobs goal and for the European territorial cooperation goal

(As an agreement was reached between Parliament and Council, Parliament's position corresponds to the final legislative act, Regulation (EU) 2017/2305.)


EU-Egypt Agreement for scientific and technological cooperation: participation of Egypt in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) ***
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European Parliament legislative resolution of 30 November 2017 on the draft Council decision on the conclusion of the Agreement for scientific and technological cooperation between the European Union and the Arab Republic of Egypt setting out the terms and conditions for the participation of the Arab Republic of Egypt in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) (11965/2017 – C8-0345/2017 – 2017/0196(NLE))
P8_TA(2017)0461A8-0353/2017

(Consent)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the draft Council decision (11965/2017),

–  having regard to the draft agreement for scientific and technological cooperation between the European Union and the Arab Republic of Egypt setting out the terms and conditions for the participation of the Republic of Egypt in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) (11926/2017),

–  having regard to Decision (EU) 2017/1324 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 4 July 2017 on the participation of the Union in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) jointly undertaken by several Member States(1),

–  having regard to the request for consent submitted by the Council in accordance with Article 186 and Article 218(6), second subparagraph, point (a)(v), of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (C8-0345/2017),

–  having regard to Rule 99(1) and (4) and Rule 108(7) of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the recommendation of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (A8-0353/2017),

1.  Gives its consent to conclusion of the agreement;

2.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the governments and parliaments of the Member States and of the Arab Republic of Egypt.

(1) OJ L 185, 18.7.2017, p. 1.


EU-Algeria Agreement for scientific and technological cooperation: participation of Algeria in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) ***
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European Parliament legislative resolution of 30 November 2017 on the draft Council decision on the conclusion of the Agreement for scientific and technological cooperation between the European Union and the People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria setting out the terms and conditions for the participation of the People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) (11964/2017 – C8-0346/2017 – 2017/0197(NLE))
P8_TA(2017)0462A8-0354/2017

(Consent)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the draft Council decision (11964/2017),

–  having regard to the draft agreement for scientific and technological cooperation between the European Union and the People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria setting out the terms and conditions for the participation of the People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) (11924/2017),

–  having regard to Decision (EU) 2017/1324 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 4 July 2017 on the participation of the Union in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) jointly undertaken by several Member States(1),

–  having regard to the request for consent submitted by the Council in accordance with Article 186 and Article 218(6), second subparagraph, point (a)(v), of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (C8-0346/2017),

–  having regard to Rule 99(1) and (4) and Rule 108(7) of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the recommendation of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (A8-0354/2017),

1.  Gives its consent to conclusion of the agreement;

2.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the governments and parliaments of the Member States and of the People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria.

(1) OJ L 185, 18.7.2017, p. 1.


EU-Jordan Agreement for scientific and technological cooperation: participation of Jordan in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) ***
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European Parliament legislative resolution of 30 November 2017 on the draft Council decision on the conclusion of the Agreement for scientific and technological cooperation between the European Union and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan setting out the terms and conditions for the participation of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) (11966/2017 – C8-0343/2017 – 2017/0200(NLE))
P8_TA(2017)0463A8-0355/2017

(Consent)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the draft Council decision (11966/2017),

–  having regard to the draft agreement for scientific and technological cooperation between the European Union and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan setting out the terms and conditions for the participation of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) (11927/2017),

–  having regard to Decision (EU) 2017/1324 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 4 July 2017 on the participation of the Union in the Partnership for Research and Innovation in the Mediterranean Area (PRIMA) jointly undertaken by several Member States(1),

–  having regard to the request for consent submitted by the Council in accordance with Article 186 and Article 218(6), second subparagraph, point (a)(v), of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (C8-0343/2017),

–  having regard to Rule 99(1) and (4) and Rule 108(7) of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the recommendation of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (A8-0355/2017),

1.  Gives its consent to conclusion of the agreement;

2.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the governments and parliaments of the Member States and of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan.

(1) OJ L 185, 18.7.2017, p. 1.


Accession of Chile, Iceland and Bahamas to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction *
PDF 238kWORD 41k
European Parliament legislative resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a Council decision authorising Romania to accept, in the interest of the European Union, the accession of Chile, Iceland and Bahamas to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (COM(2017)0360 – C8-0234/2017 – 2017/0150(NLE))
P8_TA(2017)0464A8-0364/2017

(Consultation)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the proposal for a Council decision (COM(2017)0360),

–  having regard to Article 38, fourth paragraph, of the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction,

–  having regard to Article 81(3) and Article 218(6), second subparagraph, point (b), of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Council consulted Parliament (C8‑0234/2017),

–  having regard to the opinion of the Court of Justice(1) on the exclusive external competence of the European Union for a declaration of acceptance of an accession to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction,

–  having regard to Rules 78c and 108(8) of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Legal Affairs (A8-0364/2017),

1.  Approves the authorisation for Romania to accept, in the interest of the European Union, the accession of Chile, Iceland and Bahamas to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction;

2.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the governments and parliaments of the Member States, as well as to the Permanent Bureau of the Hague Conference on Private International Law.

(1) Opinion of the Court of Justice of 14 October 2014, 1/13, ECLI:EU:C:2014:2303.


Accession of Panama, Uruguay, Colombia and El Salvador to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction *
PDF 238kWORD 41k
European Parliament legislative resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a Council decision authorising Austria and Romania to accept, in the interest of the European Union, the accession of Panama, Uruguay, Colombia and El Salvador to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (COM(2017)0369 – C8-0231/2017 – 2017/0153(NLE))
P8_TA(2017)0465A8-0362/2017

(Consultation)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the proposal for a Council decision (COM(2017)0369),

–  having regard to Article 38, fourth paragraph, of the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction,

–  having regard to Article 81(3) and Article 218(6), second subparagraph, point (b), of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Council consulted Parliament (C8‑0231/2017),

–  having regard to the opinion of the Court of Justice(1) on the exclusive external competence of the European Union for a declaration of acceptance of an accession to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction,

–  having regard to Rules 78c and 108(8) of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Legal Affairs (A8-0362/2017),

1.  Approves the authorisation for Austria and Romania to accept, in the interest of the European Union, the accession of Panama, Uruguay, Colombia and El Salvador to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction;

2.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the governments and parliaments of the Member States, as well as to the Permanent Bureau of the Hague Conference on Private International Law.

(1) Opinion of the Court of Justice of 14 October 2014, 1/13, ECLI:EU:C:2014:2303.


Accession of San Marino to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction *
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European Parliament legislative resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a Council decision authorising Croatia, the Netherlands, Portugal and Romania to accept, in the interest of the European Union, the accession of San Marino to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (COM(2017)0359 – C8-0232/2017 – 2017/0149(NLE))
P8_TA(2017)0466A8-0360/2017

(Consultation)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the proposal for a Council decision (COM(2017)0359),

–  having regard to Article 38, fourth paragraph, of the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction,

–  having regard to Article 81(3) and Article 218(6), second subparagraph, point (b), of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Council consulted Parliament (C8‑0232/2017),

–  having regard to the opinion of the Court of Justice(1) on the exclusive external competence of the European Union for a declaration of acceptance of an accession to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction,

–  having regard to Rules 78c and 108(8) of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Legal Affairs (A8-0360/2017),

1.  Approves the authorisation for Croatia, the Netherlands, Portugal and Romania to accept, in the interest of the European Union, the accession of San Marino to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction;

2.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the governments and parliaments of the Member States, as well as to the Permanent Bureau of the Hague Conference on Private International Law.

(1) Opinion of the Court of Justice of 14 October 2014, 1/13, ECLI:EU:C:2014:2303.


Accession of Georgia and South Africa to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction *
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European Parliament legislative resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a Council decision authorising Luxembourg and Romania to accept, in the interest of the European Union, the accession of Georgia and South Africa to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (COM(2017)0357 – C8-0233/2017 – 2017/0148(NLE))
P8_TA(2017)0467A8-0361/2017

(Consultation)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the proposal for a Council decision (COM(2017)0357),

–  having regard to Article 38, fourth paragraph, of the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction,

–  having regard to Article 81(3) and Article 218(6), second subparagraph, point (b), of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Council consulted Parliament (C8‑0233/2017),

–  having regard to the opinion of the Court of Justice(1) on the exclusive external competence of the European Union for a declaration of acceptance of an accession to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction,

–  having regard to Rules 78c and 108(8) of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Legal Affairs (A8-0361/2017),

1.  Approves the authorisation for Luxembourg and Romania to accept, in the interest of the European Union, the accession of Georgia and South Africa to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction;

2.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the governments and parliaments of the Member States, as well as to the Permanent Bureau of the Hague Conference on Private International Law.

(1) Opinion of the Court of Justice of 14 October 2014, 1/13, ECLI:EU:C:2014:2303.


Transitional arrangements for mitigating the impact of the introduction of IFRS 9 ***I
PDF 246kWORD 45k
Resolution
Text
European Parliament legislative resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Regulation (EU) No 575/2013 as regards the leverage ratio, the net stable funding ratio, requirements for own funds and eligible liabilities, counterparty credit risk, market risk, exposures to central counterparties, exposures to collective investment undertakings, large exposures, reporting and disclosure requirements and amending Regulation (EU) No 648/2012 (COM(2016)0850 – C8-0158/2017 – 2016/0360B(COD))
P8_TA(2017)0468A8-0255/2017

(Ordinary legislative procedure: first reading)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to Parliament and the Council (COM(2016)0850),

–  having regard to Article 294(2) and Article 114 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Commission submitted the proposal to Parliament (C8‑0158/2017),

–  having regard to Article 294(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to the reasoned opinion submitted, within the framework of Protocol No 2 on the application of the principles of subsidiarity and proportionality, by the Swedish Parliament, asserting that the draft legislative act does not comply with the principle of subsidiarity,

–  having regard to the opinion of the European Central Bank of 8 November 2017(1),

–  having regard to the opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee of 30 March 2017(2),

–  having regard to the decision by the Conference of Presidents on 18 May 2017 to authorise the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs to split the above-mentioned Commission proposal and to draw up two separate legislative reports on the basis thereof,

–  having regard to the provisional agreement approved by the committee responsible under Rule 69f(4) of its Rules of Procedure and the undertaking given by the Council representative by letter of 15 November 2017 to approve the Parliament’s position, in accordance with Article 294(4) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to Rule 59 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (A8-0255/2017),

1.  Adopts its position at first reading hereinafter set out;

2.  Calls on the Commission to refer the matter to Parliament again if it replaces, substantially amends or intends to substantially amend its proposal;

3.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the national parliaments.

Position of the European Parliament adopted at first reading on 30 November 2017 with a view to the adoption of Regulation (EU) 2017/… of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Regulation (EU) No 575/2013 as regards transitional arrangements for mitigating the impact of the introduction of IFRS 9 on own funds and for the large exposures treatment of certain public sector exposures denominated in the domestic currency of any Member State

(As an agreement was reached between Parliament and Council, Parliament's position corresponds to the final legislative act, Regulation (EU) 2017/2395.)

(1) Not yet published in the Official Journal.
(2) OJ C 209, 30.6.2017, p. 36.


Instrument contributing to stability and peace ***I
PDF 247kWORD 43k
Resolution
Text
Annex
European Parliament legislative resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Regulation (EU) No 230/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 March 2014 establishing an instrument contributing to stability and peace (COM(2016)0447 – C8-0264/2016 – 2016/0207(COD))
P8_TA(2017)0469A8-0261/2017

(Ordinary legislative procedure: first reading)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to Parliament and the Council (COM(2016)0447),

–  having regard to Article 294(2), Article 209(1) and Article 212(2) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Commission submitted the proposal to Parliament (C8-0264/2016),

–  having regard to the opinion of the Committee on Legal Affairs on the proposed legal basis,

–  having regard to Article 294(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to the provisional agreement approved by the committee responsible under Rule 69f(4) of its Rules of Procedure and the undertaking given by the Council representative by letter of 27 October 2017 to approve Parliament’s position, in accordance with Article 294(4) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to Rules 59 and 39 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the opinion of the Committee on Development (A8-0261/2017),

1.  Adopts its position at first reading hereinafter set out;

2.  Approves the joint statement by Parliament, the Council and the Commission annexed to this resolution, which will be published in the L series of the Official Journal of the European Union together with the final legislative act;

3.  Calls on the Commission to refer the matter to Parliament again if it replaces, substantially amends or intends to substantially amend its proposal;

4.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the national parliaments.

Position of the European Parliament adopted at first reading on 30 November 2017 with a view to the adoption of Regulation (EU) 2017/… of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Regulation (EU) No 230/2014 establishing an instrument contributing to stability and peace

(As an agreement was reached between Parliament and Council, Parliament's position corresponds to the final legislative act, Regulation (EU) 2017/2306.)

ANNEX TO THE LEGISLATIVE RESOLUTION

Declaration concerning sources of funding of assistance measures under Article 3a of Regulation (EU) No 230/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 March 2014 establishing an instrument contributing to stability and peace

The European Parliament, the Council and the Commission agree that capacity building in support of development and security for development should be financed within Heading IV of the multiannual financial framework for the years 2014-2020, primarily through redeployments, while preserving the financial balance among all instruments to the maximum extent possible. Furthermore, without prejudice to the prerogatives of the budgetary authority in the annual budgetary procedure, such redeployments should not include use of appropriations allocated to measures under Regulation (EU) No 233/2014 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 March 2014 establishing a financing instrument for development cooperation for the period 2014-2020.


Ranking of unsecured debt instruments in insolvency hierarchy ***I
PDF 242kWORD 45k
Resolution
Text
European Parliament legislative resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on amending Directive 2014/59/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards the ranking of unsecured debt instruments in insolvency hierarchy (COM(2016)0853 – C8-0479/2016 – 2016/0363(COD))
P8_TA(2017)0470A8-0302/2017

(Ordinary legislative procedure: first reading)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to Parliament and the Council (COM(2016)0853),

–  having regard to Article 294(2) and Article 114 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Commission submitted the proposal to Parliament (C8‑0479/2016),

–  having regard to Article 294(3) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to the opinion of the European Central Bank(1),

–  having regard to the opinion of the European Economic and Social Committee(2),

–  having regard to the provisional agreement approved by the committee responsible under Rule 69f(4) of its Rules of Procedure and the undertaking given by the Council representative by letter of 15 November 2017 to approve the Parliament’s position, in accordance with Article 294(4) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

–  having regard to Rule 59 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (A8-0302/2017),

1.  Adopts its position at first reading hereinafter set out;

2.  Calls on the Commission to refer the matter to Parliament again if it replaces, substantially amends or intends to substantially amend its proposal;

3.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the national parliaments.

Position of the European Parliament adopted at first reading on 30 November 2017 with a view to the adoption of Directive (EU) 2017/… of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Directive 2014/59/EU as regards the ranking of unsecured debt instruments in insolvency hierarchy

(As an agreement was reached between Parliament and Council, Parliament's position corresponds to the final legislative act, Directive (EU) 2017/2399.)

(1) OJ C 132, 26.4.2017, p. 1.
(2) OJ C 173, 31.5.2017, p. 41.


Value added tax obligations for supplies of services and distance sales of goods *
PDF 373kWORD 48k
European Parliament legislative resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a Council directive amending Directive 2006/112/EC and Directive 2009/132/EC as regards certain value added tax obligations for supplies of services and distance sales of goods (COM(2016)0757 – C8-0004/2017 – 2016/0370(CNS))
P8_TA(2017)0471A8-0307/2017

(Special legislative procedure – consultation)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to the Council (COM(2016)0757),

–  having regard to Article 113 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Council consulted Parliament (C8‑0004/2017),

–  having regard to Rule 78c of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (A8-0307/2017),

1.  Approves the Commission proposal as amended;

2.  Calls on the Commission to alter its proposal accordingly, in accordance with Article 293(2) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union;

3.  Calls on the Council to notify Parliament if it intends to depart from the text approved by Parliament;

4.  Asks the Council to consult Parliament again if it intends to substantially amend the Commission proposal;

5.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the national parliaments.

Text proposed by the Commission   Amendment
Amendment 1
Proposal for a directive
Recital -1 (new)
(-1)   The difference between expected VAT revenues and VAT actually collected (the ‘VAT gap’) in the Union was approximately EUR 152 billion in 2015 and cross-border fraud amounts to a VAT revenue loss in the Union of approximately EUR 50 billion a year, all of which makes VAT an important issue to be addressed at Union level and the adoption of a definitive VAT regime based on the destination principle essential.
Amendment 2
Proposal for a directive
Recital 3
(3)  The assessment of those special schemes as introduced on 1 January 2015 has identified a number of areas for improvement. First, the burden for micro-businesses established in a Member State occasionally supplying such services to other Member States of having to comply with VAT obligations in Member States other than their Member State of establishment should be reduced. A Community-wide threshold should therefore be introduced up to which these supplies remain subject to VAT in their Member State of establishment. Second, the requirement of having to comply with the invoicing and record keeping requirements of all Member States to which supplies are made is very burdensome. Hence, to minimise burdens on business, the rules concerning invoicing and record keeping should be those applicable in the Member State of identification of the supplier making use of the special schemes. Third, taxable persons not established in the Community but having a VAT registration in a Member State (e.g. because they carry out occasional transactions subject to VAT in that Member State) can use neither the special scheme for taxable persons not established in the Community, nor the special scheme for taxable persons established in the Community. As a consequence, it is proposed that such taxable persons should be permitted to use the special scheme for taxable persons not established within the Community.
(3)  The assessment of those special schemes as introduced on 1 January 2015 has identified a number of areas for improvement. First, the burden for micro-businesses established in a Member State occasionally supplying such services to other Member States of having to comply with VAT obligations in Member States other than their Member State of establishment should be reduced. A Community-wide threshold should therefore be introduced up to which these supplies remain subject to VAT in their Member State of establishment. Second, the requirement of having to comply with the invoicing requirements of all Member States to which supplies are made is very burdensome. Hence, to minimise burdens on business, the rules concerning invoicing should be those applicable in the Member State of identification of the supplier making use of the special schemes. Third, taxable persons not established in the Community but having a VAT registration in a Member State (e.g. because they carry out occasional transactions subject to VAT in that Member State) can use neither the special scheme for taxable persons not established in the Community, nor the special scheme for taxable persons established in the Community. As a consequence, it is proposed that such taxable persons should be permitted to use the special scheme for taxable persons not established within the Community.
Amendment 3
Proposal for a directive
Recital 3 a (new)
(3a)   While the assessment of the Mini-One Stop Shop (MOSS) has been largely positive, 99 % of the VAT revenue processed via the MOSS is declared by only 13 % of the businesses registered, demonstrating the need for Member States to promote the MOSS to a wider range of small and medium sized enterprises, in order to overcome barriers to cross-border e-commerce.
Amendment 4
Proposal for a directive
Recital 9 a (new)
(9a)   This amending Directive could lead to an increase in administrative costs for small consignments, since relevant packages require a distinguishing mark indicating that the VAT import scheme has been used and the postal sector is required to sort the packages based on whether the VAT import scheme is used. Member States and the Commission should pay close attention to the impact on the postal sector.
Amendment 5
Proposal for a directive
Recital 14
(14)  The date of application of the provisions of this Directive shall, where relevant, take account of the time needed to put in place the measures necessary to implement this Directive and for the Member States to adapt their IT system for registration and for declaration and payment of the VAT.
(14)  The date of application of the provisions of this Directive should, where relevant, take account of the time needed to put in place the measures necessary to implement this Directive and for Member States and businesses to adapt their IT system for registration and for declaration and payment of the VAT.
Amendment 6
Proposal for a directive
Recital 17 a (new)
(17a)   The Commission's proposal is only a building block for closing the VAT gap; further measures are needed to effectively combat VAT fraud in the Union;
Amendment 7
Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point -1 (new)
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 14 – paragraph 3 a (new)
(-1)  In Article 14, the following paragraph is added:
‘3a. Where a taxable person, acting in its own name but on behalf of another person, participates in a distance sale of goods imported from third countries or territories in a consignment having an intrinsic value of less than EUR 150, or the equivalent in national currency, and has an annual turnover exceeding EUR 1 000 000, or the equivalent in national currency, in the current calendar year, and including cases where a telecommunications network, an interface or a portal is used for the purpose of the distance sale, that taxable person shall be deemed to have received and supplied those goods itself.’
Amendment 8
Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 58 – paragraph 2 – point b
(b)  services are provided to customers located in any Member State other than the Member State referred to in point (a);
(b)  services are provided to customers located in any Member State other than the Member State referred to in point (a); and
Amendment 9
Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 2
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 58 – paragraph 2 – point c
(c)  the total value, exclusive of VAT, of such supplies does not in the current calendar year exceed EUR 10 000, or the equivalent in national currency, and did not do so in the course of the preceding calendar year.
(c)  the total value, exclusive of VAT, of such supplies does not in the current calendar year exceed EUR 35 000, or the equivalent in national currency, and did not do so in the course of the preceding calendar year.
Amendment 10
Proposal for a directive
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 369 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 2
‘The Member State of identification shall determine the period throughout which those records shall be kept by the taxable person not established within the Community.’
‘Those records shall be kept for a period of five years from the end of the calendar year during which the transaction was carried out.’
Amendment 11
Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – title
Amendments to Directive 2006/112/EC with effect from 1 January 2021.
Amendments to Directive 2006/112/EC with effect from 1 April 2021.
Amendment 12
Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1
With effect from 1 January 2021, Directive 2006/112/EC is amended as follows:
With effect from 1 April 2021, Directive 2006/112/EC is amended as follows:
Amendment 13
Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 6
Directive 2006/112/EC
Title V – Chapter 3a – Article 59c – paragraph 1 – point c
(c)  the total value, exclusive of VAT, of the supplies covered by these provisions does not in the current calendar year exceed EUR 10 000, or the equivalent in national currency, nor did it do so in the course of the preceding calendar year.
(c)  the total value, exclusive of VAT, of the supplies covered by these provisions does not in the current calendar year exceed EUR 35 000, or the equivalent in national currency, nor did it do so in the course of the preceding calendar year.
Amendment 14
Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 7
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 143 – paragraph 1 – point ca
‘(ca) the importation of goods where the VAT is declared under the special scheme in Chapter 6, Section 4, of Title XII and where, at the latest upon lodging of the import declaration, the VAT identification number of the supplier or of the intermediary acting on his behalf allocated under Article 369q has been provided to the competent customs office in the Member State of importation;’
‘(ca) the importation of goods where the VAT is declared under the special scheme in Chapter 6, Section 4, of Title XII and where, at the latest upon lodging of the import declaration, the VAT identification number of the supplier or of the intermediary acting on his behalf allocated under Article 369q has been provided to the competent customs office in the Member State of importation, while the Commission shall specify in an act the precise nature of the import declaration;’
Amendment 15
Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 21
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 369b – paragraph 1
Member States shall permit any taxable person carrying out intra-Community distance sales of goods and any taxable person not established in the Member State of consumption supplying services to a non-taxable person who is established or has his permanent address or usually resides in that Member State, to use this special scheme. This special scheme applies to all those goods or services supplied in the Community.
Member States shall permit any taxable person carrying out intra-Community distance sales of goods and any taxable person not established in the Member State of consumption supplying any services to a non-taxable person to use the special scheme under this chapter, regardless of where such non-taxable person is established or has his permanent address or usually resides. This special scheme applies to all those goods or services supplied in the Community.
Amendment 16
Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 29
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 369l – paragraph 1 – point 5 a (new)
(5a)   The value of the goods, which may not exceed EUR 150 in accordance with this paragraph, shall be determined by the currency conversion pursuant to Article 53 of the Union Customs Code, provided that the goods are being traded in foreign currencies.
Amendment 17
Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 30
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 369y – paragraph 1
Where the person for whom the imported goods in consignments of an intrinsic value not exceeding EUR 150 are destined does not opt for the application of the standard arrangements for importation of goods, including for the application of a reduced VAT rate in accordance with Article 94(2), the Member State of importation shall permit the person presenting the goods to customs within the territory of the Community to make use of special arrangements for declaration and payment of import VAT in respect of goods for which the dispatch or transport ends in that Member State.
Where the special scheme referred to in Section 4 of Chapter 6 is not used for the importation of goods in consignments having an intrinsic value not exceeding EUR 150, the Member State of importation shall permit the person presenting the goods to customs on behalf of the person for whom the goods are destined within the territory of the Community to make use of special arrangements for declaration and payment of import VAT in respect of goods for which the dispatch or transport ends in that Member State.
Amendment 18
Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 30
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 369z – paragraph 1 – point b
(b)  the person presenting the goods to customs within the territory of the Community shall be responsible for collecting the VAT from the person for whom the goods are destined.
(b)  the person declaring the goods to customs within the territory of the Community shall be responsible for collecting the VAT from the person for whom the goods are destined.
Amendment 19
Proposal for a directive
Article 2 – paragraph 1 – point 30
Directive 2006/112/EC
Article 369z – paragraph 2
2.  Member States shall provide that the person presenting the goods to customs within the territory of the Community takes appropriate measures to ensure that the correct tax is paid by the person for whom the goods are destined.
2.  Member States shall provide that the person declaring the goods to customs within the territory of the Community takes appropriate measures to ensure that the correct tax is paid by the person for whom the goods are destined.
Amendment 20
Proposal for a directive
Article 3 – paragraph 1
With effect from 1 January 2021, Title IV of Directive 2009/132/EC is deleted.
With effect from 1 April 2021, Title IV of Directive 2009/132/EC is deleted.
Amendment 21
Proposal for a directive
Article 4 – paragraph 1 – subparagraph 4
They shall apply the provisions necessary to comply with Articles 2 and 3 of this Directive with from 1 January 2021.
They shall apply the provisions necessary to comply with Articles 2 and 3 of this Directive from 1 April 2021.

Administrative cooperation and combating fraud in the field of value added tax *
PDF 259kWORD 44k
European Parliament legislative resolution of 30 November 2017 on the proposal for a Council regulation amending Regulation (EU) No 904/2010 on administrative cooperation and combating fraud in the field of value added tax (COM(2016)0755 – C8-0003/2017 – 2016/0371(CNS))
P8_TA(2017)0472A8-0306/2017

(Special legislative procedure – consultation)

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to the Commission proposal to the Council (COM(2016)0755),

–  having regard to Article 113 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, pursuant to which the Council consulted Parliament (C8‑0003/2017),

–  having regard to Rule 78c of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (A8-0306/2017),

1.  Approves the Commission proposal as amended;

2.  Calls on the Commission to alter its proposal accordingly, in accordance with Article 293(2) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union;

3.  Calls on the Council to notify Parliament if it intends to depart from the text approved by Parliament;

4.  Asks the Council to consult Parliament again if it intends to substantially amend the Commission proposal;

5.  Instructs its President to forward its position to the Council, the Commission and the national parliaments.

Text proposed by the Commission   Amendment
Amendment 1
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 1 a (new)
(1a)   The VAT gap in the Union is estimated at 12,8 % or EUR 152 billion per year including EUR 50 billion of cross-border VAT fraud, making VAT an important issue to be addressed at Union level.
Amendment 2
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5
(5)  As under the special schemes, a Member State of identification collects and controls VAT on behalf of the Member States of consumption, it is appropriate to provide for a mechanism whereby the Member State of identification would receive a fee from the Member States of consumption concerned compensating for the costs of collection and control. However, as the current system whereby a fee is retained from the VAT amounts to be transferred by the Member State of identification to the Member States of consumption has caused complications for tax administrations, in particular when dealing with reimbursements, such a fee should be calculated and paid annually, outside the special schemes.
(5)  As under the special schemes, a Member State of identification collects and controls VAT on behalf of the Member States of consumption, it is appropriate to provide for a mechanism whereby the Member State of identification would receive a fee from the Member States of consumption concerned compensating for the costs of collection and control. However, as the current system whereby a fee is retained from the VAT amounts to be transferred by the Member State of identification to the Member States of consumption has caused complications for tax administrations, in particular when dealing with reimbursements, such a fee should be calculated and paid annually, outside the special schemes, and where a rebate is paid between differing national currencies, the valid exchange rate published by the European Central Bank should be applied.
Amendment 3
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 6
(6)  To simplify the collection of statistical data concerning the application of the special schemes, the Commission should be authorised to automatically access general information related to the special schemes stored in the Member States' electronic systems, with the exception of data concerning individual taxable persons.
(6)  To simplify the collection of statistical data concerning the application of the special schemes, the Commission should be authorised to automatically access general information related to the special schemes stored in the Member States' electronic systems, with the exception of data concerning individual taxable persons. Member States should be encouraged to ensure that such general information is available to other relevant national authorities, if that is not already the case, in order to combat VAT fraud and money laundering.
Amendment 4
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 7 a (new)
(7a)   Communication between the Commission and Member States should be adequate and effective, with a view to attaining the objectives of this Regulation in a timely manner.
Amendment 5
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 9 a (new)
(9a)   The use of IT in combating fraud could allow the competent authorities to identify fraud networks faster and in a comprehensive manner. A targeted and balanced approach using new technologies could reduce the need for Member States' general anti-fraud measures and at the same time increase the efficiency of anti-fraud policy.
Amendment 6
Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 5 – point b
Regulation (EU) No 904/2010
Section 3 – Subsection 1 – Article 47a – paragraph 1
The provisions of this Section shall apply from 1 January 2021.
The provisions of this Section shall apply from 1 January 2021. Member States shall exchange all information referred to in Subsection 2 without delay, unless expressly stated otherwise.
Amendment 7
Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 5 – point b
Regulation (EU) No 904/2010
Section 3 – Subsection 3 – Article 47j – paragraph 4
4.  Each Member State shall communicate to the other Member States and the Commission the details of the competent person responsible for coordination of administrative enquiries within that Member State.
4.  Each Member State shall communicate to the other Member States and the Commission the details of the competent person responsible for coordination of administrative enquiries within that Member State. That information shall be published on the website of the Commission.
Amendment 8
Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 5 – point b
Regulation (EU) No 904/2010
Section 3 – Subsection 4 – Article 47l – paragraph 3 a (new)
Within two years of the date of application of this Regulation, the Commission shall conduct a review to ensure the viability and cost effectiveness of the fee and, if necessary, take steps for correction.
Amendment 9
Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 5 – point b
Regulation (EU) No 904/2010
Section 3 – Subsection 5 – Article 47m –paragraph 1
Member States shall grant the Commission access to statistical information stored in their electronic system pursuant to Article 17(1)(d). This information shall not contain any personal data.
Member States shall grant the Commission access to statistical information stored in their electronic system pursuant to Article 17(1)(d). This information shall not contain any personal data and shall be limited to the information necessary for relevant statistical purposes.
Amendment 10
Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 1 – point 5 – point b
Regulation (EU) No 904/2010
Section 3 – Subsection 6 – Article 47n – paragraph 1 – point f
(f)  the information to be accessed by the Commission as referred to in Article 47m as well as the technical means for the extraction of this information.
(f)  the information to be accessed by the Commission as referred to in Article 47m as well as the technical means for the extraction of this information. The Commission shall ensure that the extraction of data does not impose an unnecessary administrative burden on Member States.

Situation in Yemen
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European Parliament resolution of 30 November 2017 on the situation in Yemen (2017/2849(RSP))
P8_TA(2017)0473RC-B8-0649/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to its previous resolutions on Yemen, in particular those of 15 June 2017(1) and 25 February 2016(2) on the humanitarian situation in Yemen, and of 9 July 2015 on the situation in Yemen(3),

–  having regard to the statements by the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy (VP/HR) of 8 October 2016 on the attack in Yemen, of 19 October 2016 on the ceasefire in Yemen and of 21 November 2017 on the situation in Yemen,

–  having regard to the statement by the EU Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management, Christos Stylianides, of 11 November 2017 on the humanitarian situation in Yemen,

–  ‎having regard to the Council conclusions of 3 April 2017 on the situation in Yemen,

–  having regard to its resolution of 28 April 2016 on attacks on hospitals and schools as violations of international humanitarian law(4) and its resolution of 27 February 2014 on the use of armed drones(5),

–  having regard to the EU Guidelines on promoting compliance with international humanitarian law,

–  having regard to the UN Security Council (UNSC) resolutions on Yemen, in particular Resolutions 2342 (2017), 2266 (2016), 2216 (2015), 2201 (2015) and 2140 (2014),

–  having regard to the statements by the UN Special Envoy for Yemen, Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed, of 30 January, 12 July, 19 August and 26 October 2017 on the situation in Yemen,

–  having regard to the statement of then UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs Stephen O’Brien to the UNSC of 12 July 2017,

–  having regard to the joint statement of the World Food Programme (WFP), the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) of 16 November 2017 calling for the immediate lifting of the humanitarian blockade in Yemen,

–  having regard to the UN High-Level Pledging Event for the Humanitarian Crisis in Yemen, of 25 April 2017, during which USD 1,1 billion was pledged to bridge a USD 2,1 billion funding gap for 2017,

–  having regard to the decision of the UN Human Rights Council of September 2017 to investigate all alleged abuses of human rights in Yemen during the conflict,

–  having regard to the presidential statements issued by the UN Security Council on 15 June 2017 calling on parties in Yemen to engage constructively in a good-faith effort for conflict resolution, and on 9 August 2017 on the threat of famine in Yemen,

–  having regard to Rule 123(2) and (4) of its Rules of Procedure,

A.  whereas the various rounds of UN-brokered negotiations have not yet led to a meaningful progress towards a political solution in Yemen; whereas the conflicting parties and their regional and international backers, including Saudi Arabia and Iran, have failed to reach a ceasefire agreement or any type of settlement and the fighting and indiscriminate bombings continue unabated; whereas neither side has achieved a military victory and is unlikely to do so in the future; whereas finding a political solution to the conflict under the auspices of the UN peace initiative in Yemen should be a priority for the EU and the international community as a whole;

B.  whereas the humanitarian situation in Yemen continues to be catastrophic; whereas the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) declared the situation in Yemen the ‘largest food security emergency in the world’; whereas, according to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), 20,7 million people in Yemen require assistance, especially food assistance, with 7 million of that number facing a ‘food security emergency’; whereas 2,2 million children are suffering from severe acute malnourishment, with one child dying of preventable causes every ten minutes; whereas there are 2,9 million internally displaced persons and 1 million returnees;

C.  whereas, according to the UN, more than 8 000 people, 60 % of whom civilians, have been killed and more than 50 000 injured, including a high number of children, in airstrikes and fighting on the ground since the Saudi-led coalition intervened in Yemen’s civil war in March 2015; whereas the fighting, both on the ground and in the air, made it impossible for UN Human Rights Office field monitors to access the area to verify the number of civilian casualties; whereas these figures therefore only reflect the deaths and injuries that the OHCHR has managed to corroborate and confirm;

D.  whereas vulnerable groups, women and children are particularly affected by the on-going hostilities and the humanitarian crisis; whereas the number of civilian casualties continues to increase;

E.  whereas, according to Save the Children, 130 children die in Yemen every day; whereas at least 1,8 million children have had to drop out of school, in addition to the 1,6 million who were not in school before the conflict began;

F.  whereas the World Health Organisation reports that ‘more than half of all health facilities closed due to damage, destruction or lack of funds’ and medical supplies are in severe shortages; whereas 30 000 critical health workers have not been paid in over a year;

G.  whereas the destruction of infrastructure and breakdown of public services have fuelled the outbreak of cholera; whereas on 2 November 2017, OCHA announced that nearly 895 000 suspected cases of cholera with nearly 2 200 associated deaths had been reported since 27 April 2017; whereas more than half of the suspected cases involve children; whereas it is difficult to accurately ascertain the true number of cholera cases as there is limited access to many regions and many suspected patients are treated before being completely diagnosed;

H.  whereas imports account for almost 90 % of the country’s staple foods; whereas the UN Special Rapporteur on the negative impact of the unilateral coercive measures has already stressed in the past that the aerial and naval blockade imposed on Yemen by the coalition forces has been one of the main causes of the ongoing humanitarian catastrophe; whereas this blockade has restricted and disrupted the import and export of food, fuel and medical supplies, as well as humanitarian aid; whereas the unreasonable delay and/or denial of entry to vessels to Yemeni ports amounts to an unlawful unilateral coercive measure (UCM) under international law;

I.  whereas the humanitarian situation in Yemen was further exacerbated by the imposition on 6 November 2017 by the Saudi-led coalition of a blockade of the country’s land, sea and air borders; whereas the sea port of Aden and the al-Wadea land crossing at the Saudi-Yemeni border have been reopened; whereas, however, the ports of Hodeida and Saleef, as well as the airport of Sana’a, taken by the Houthi rebels in March 2015, through which approximately 80 % of imports, including commercial and humanitarian goods, enter Yemen, are still subject to the blockade; whereas aid agencies have warned that, if the blockade is not lifted, Yemen will face the largest famine the world has seen for decades, with millions of victims;

J.  whereas UNSC Resolution 2216 explicitly provides for individuals to be classed by the Sanctions Committee as ‘obstructing the delivery of humanitarian assistance in Yemen’;

K.  whereas the coalition-led air strikes in and around Sana’a have intensified in recent weeks, causing civilian casualties and the destruction of infrastructure; whereas dozens of Saudi-led airstrikes have been blamed for indiscriminately killing and wounding civilians in violation of the laws of war, including through the use of internationally banned cluster munitions; whereas Houthi rebels fired ballistic missiles on Riyadh’s main civilian international airport on 4 November 2017; whereas dozens more rockets have been fired into Saudi territory this year; whereas the laws of war prohibit deliberate and indiscriminate attacks on civilians; whereas such attacks are considered war crimes and individuals who commit them may be prosecuted for these crimes;

L.  whereas the situation in Yemen carries grave risks for the stability of the region, in particular that of the Horn of Africa, the Red Sea and the wider Middle East; whereas Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) has been able to benefit from the deterioration of the political and security situation in Yemen, expanding its presence and increasing the number and scale of its terrorist attacks; whereas AQAP and the so-called Islamic State (ISIS/Daesh) has established its presence in Yemen and has carried out terrorist attacks, killing hundreds of people;

M.  whereas there is an international arms embargo in place against the Iranian-backed Houthi/Saleh forces; whereas according to the 18th EU Annual Report on Arms Exports, EU Member States have continued to authorise transfers of arms to Saudi Arabia since the escalation of the conflict, in a violation of Council Common Position 2008/944/CFSP of 8 December 2008 on arms export control; whereas Parliament’s resolution of 25 February 2016 on the humanitarian situation in Yemen called on the VP/HR to launch an initiative to impose an EU arms embargo on Saudi Arabia, in line with Common Position 2008/944/CFSP;

N.  whereas the education of 2 million children has completely stopped according to the UNICEF; whereas ‘more than 1 700 schools are currently unfit for use due to conflict-related damage, hosting of IDPs, or occupation by armed groups’ according to the OCHA; whereas cases of recruitment and use of children to fight or perform military duties have been documented; whereas thousands of teachers, after not getting paid for over a year, were forced to quit their jobs to find an alternative income; whereas, due to the destruction of crucial infrastructure, the small percentage of schools that are still functioning are hard to reach;

O.  whereas journalists are repeatedly blocked from entering Yemen, namely by the Saudi-led coalition, including by banning them from UN aid flights to the Houthi rebel-controlled capital, Sana’a;

P.  whereas the decision to add certain individuals to the target lists of drone operations is often made without court warrants or orders; whereas the targeting and subsequent killing of certain individuals are carried out without due process;

Q.  whereas, since the start of the conflict, the European Union has allocated EUR 171,7 million in humanitarian aid; whereas EU humanitarian aid gives priority to health, nutrition, food security, protection, shelter, and water and sanitation;

R.  whereas despite the High-Level Pledging Event for the Humanitarian Crisis in Yemen, held in Geneva in April 2017 – during which various countries and organisations made pledges amounting to USD 1,1 billion – as of 21 November 2017, donors had delivered funds amounting to only 56,9 % of the UN’s USD 2,3 billion humanitarian appeal for Yemen for 2017;

1.  Condemns in the strongest terms the ongoing violence in Yemen and all attacks against civilians and civilian infrastructure, which constitute war crimes; expresses grave concern at the alarming deterioration of the humanitarian situation in Yemen; deeply regrets the loss of life caused by the conflict and the extreme suffering of those deprived of humanitarian aid and vital commodities caught up in the fighting being displaced or losing their livelihoods, and expresses its condolences to the families of the victims; reaffirms its commitment to continuing to support Yemen and the Yemeni people;

2.  Reiterates its full support for the efforts of the UN Secretary-General and the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen to achieve a resumption of negotiations; stresses that only a political, inclusive and negotiated solution to the conflict can restore peace and preserve the unity, sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity of Yemen; calls on all international and regional actors to engage constructively with Yemeni parties to enable a de-escalation of the conflict and a negotiated settlement; urges Saudi Arabia and Iran to work to end the fighting in Yemen and to improve bilateral relations; calls on Iran to immediately cease providing support to Houthi forces in Yemen, either directly or through proxies;

3.  Calls on all parties to the conflict to urgently agree on a cessation of hostilities to be monitored by the UN as a first step towards the resumption of peace talks under UN leadership; urges all parties to engage, in good faith and without preconditions, in a new round of UN-led peace negotiations as soon as possible; regrets the decision of Houthi fighters and their allies to reject Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed as a peace negotiator;

4.  Calls on the VP/HR to urgently propose an integrated EU strategy for Yemen and to make a renewed push for a Yemeni peace initiative under the auspices of the UN; restates its support for the efforts of the European External Action Service (EEAS) to facilitate a resumption of negotiations, and urges all parties to the conflict to react in a constructive manner and without attaching preconditions to these efforts; emphasises that the implementation of confidence-building measures, such as the release of political prisoners, immediate steps towards a sustainable ceasefire, a mechanism for a UN-monitored withdrawal of forces, facilitation of humanitarian and commercial access, Track II initiatives involving political, security and civil society actors, is essential to facilitating a return to the right political track;

5.  Deplores the closure of Yemen’s seaports, airports and land crossings by Saudi Arabia and its coalition partners, which has led to a further deterioration of the situation in the country; considers measures by the coalition to resume operations in the port of Aden and to open the al-Wadea border crossing as a step in the right direction; urges the coalition to ensure immediate resumption of the activities of the ports of Hodeida and Saleef and the opening of land borders for humanitarian relief and the delivery of basic commercial commodities;

6.  Stresses that the UN Security Council, with a view both to addressing the humanitarian emergency, and to building confidence between the sides in a way which will be conducive to political negotiations, is encouraging rapid agreement on the deployment of additional UN Verification and Inspection Mechanism monitors, increasing the capacity of all Yemeni ports, and increased access to Sana’a Airport;

7.  Calls on all the parties involved to allow immediate and full humanitarian access to the conflict-affected areas in order to be able to reach those in need and calls for the security of aid workers to be ensured; calls on the Council and the UNSC, in implementing UNSC Resolution 2216, to identify individuals obstructing the delivery of humanitarian assistance in Yemen and impose targeted sanctions on them;

8.  Condemns the indiscriminate coalition-led airstrikes leading to civilian casualties, including children, and destruction of civilian and medical infrastructure; condemns the similarly indiscriminate attacks by Houthi and allied forces that have resulted in the deaths of civilians and the use of hospitals and schools by these groups as bases from which to stage attacks;

9.  Condemns the indiscriminate missile attacks on Saudi cities, notably the main civilian international airport in Riyad, King Khaled International Airport, on 4 November 2017, by the Houthi/Saleh forces;

10.  Urges all parties to grant journalists access into the country, including within all territories and across front lines within the country; notes that Yemen’s block on journalists from entering the country is responsible for the lack of coverage of the crisis, which hinders humanitarian workers’ efforts to draw the attention of the international community and donors to the catastrophic situation; welcomes the recent release of Yahya Abdulraqeeb al-Jubeihi, Abed al-Mahziri and Kamel al-Khozani and urges the immediate and unconditional release of all remaining imprisoned journalists;

11.  Calls on all sides to comply with international humanitarian law and international human rights law, to ensure the protection of civilians and to refrain from directly targeting civilian infrastructure, in particular medical facilities and water systems;

12.  Recalls that the deliberate targeting of civilians and civilian infrastructure, including hospitals and medical personnel, amounts to a grave violation of international humanitarian law; urges the international community to make provisions for the international criminal prosecution of those responsible for violations of international law committed in Yemen; fully supports, in this regard, the decision of the UN Human Rights Council to carry out a comprehensive investigation into the crimes committed in the conflict in Yemen;

13.  Fully supports efforts by EU Member States and third countries to establish international mechanisms to gather evidence and to hold those responsible for grave human rights violations and breaches of international humanitarian law to account; stresses that ensuring accountability for violations is indispensable to achieving a long-term settlement of the conflict; welcomes, in this regard, the setting up of a UN Group of Eminent International and Regional Experts with the mandate to monitor and report on the human rights situation in Yemen and carry out a comprehensive examination of all alleged violations and abuses of international human rights law and other appropriate and applicable fields of international law committed by all parties to the conflict since March 2015; deplores the fact that efforts to set up an independent inquiry were blocked;

14.  Expresses grave concern that the instability in Yemen has been exploited by terrorist and extremist organisations such as ISIS/Daesh and AQAP; urges the Government of Yemen to assume its responsibilities in the fight against ISIS/Daesh and AQAP; emphasises the need for all parties to the conflict to take resolute action against such groups, whose activities represent a grave threat to a negotiated settlement and the security of the region and beyond; affirms the EU’s commitment to opposing extremist groups and their ideologies and stresses the need for parties in the region to do the same;

15.  Calls on the Council to effectively promote compliance with international humanitarian law, as provided for in the relevant EU guidelines; reiterates, in particular, the need for the strict application by all EU Member States of the rules laid down in Common Position 2008/944/CFSP; recalls, in this regard, its resolution on the humanitarian situation in Yemen of 25 February 2016, which calls on the VP/HR to launch an initiative to impose an EU arms embargo against Saudi Arabia, given the serious allegations of breaches of international humanitarian law by Saudi Arabia in Yemen and the fact that the continued licensing of weapons sales to Saudi Arabia would therefore be in breach of Common Position 2008/944/CFSP;

16.  Supports the EU’s call on all parties to the conflict to take all necessary steps to prevent and respond to all forms of violence, including sexual and gender-based violence, in situations of armed conflict; strongly condemns the violations of the rights of the child and is concerned by children’s limited access to even basic health care and education; condemns the recruitment and use of child soldiers in hostilities, be it by government forces or by armed opposition groups;

17.  Welcomes the commitments made at the High-Level Pledging Event for the Humanitarian Crisis in Yemen and stresses the need for coordinated humanitarian action under UN leadership to ease the suffering of the people of Yemen; calls for the immediate mobilisation of the funds pledged to Yemen and for full funding of the UN 2017 Humanitarian Response Plan for Yemen;

18.  Welcomes the fact that the EU and its Member States are ready to step up humanitarian assistance to the population across the country in order to respond to rising needs and to mobilise their development assistance to fund projects in crucial sectors;

19.  Strongly supports the work of UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Mark Lowcock and his predecessor Stephen O’Brien in seeking to ease the suffering of the Yemeni population;

20.  Calls for the EU and its Member States, alongside their humanitarian and political efforts, to support peacebuilding and resilience actions, including by supporting civil society actors and local economic and governance structures, in order to ensure the rapid restoration of basic services and infrastructure, stimulate the local economy and promote peace and social cohesion;

21.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission, the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, the governments and parliaments of the Member States, the Secretary-General of the United Nations, the Secretary-General of the Gulf Cooperation Council, the Secretary-General of the League of Arab States and the Government of Yemen.

(1) Texts adopted, P8_TA(2017)0273.
(2) Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0066.
(3) OJ C 265, 11.8.2017, p. 93.
(4) Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0201.
(5) OJ C 285, 29.8.2017, p. 110.


Implementation of the European Disability Strategy
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European Parliament resolution of 30 November 2017 on implementation of the European Disability Strategy (2017/2127(INI))
P8_TA(2017)0474A8-0339/2017

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to Articles 2, 9, 10, 19, 168 and 216(2) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) and Articles 2 and 21 of the Treaty on European Union (TEU),

–  having regard to Articles 3, 15, 21, 23, 25 and 26 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union,

–  having regard to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) and its entry into force in the EU on 21 January 2011 in accordance with Council Decision 2010/48/EC of 26 November 2009 concerning the conclusion, by the European Community, of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities(1),

–  having regard to the Code of Conduct between the Council, the Member States and the Commission setting out internal arrangements for the implementation by and representation of the European Union relating to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities,

–  having regard to the Concluding Observations of the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities of 2 October 2015 on the initial report of the European Union(2),

–  having regard to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (European Treaty Series No 5, 1950) and its protocols,

–  having regard to the European Social Charter (ETS No 35, 1961, revised 1996; ETS No 163),

–  having regard to Council of Europe Recommendation Rec(2002)5 of the Committee of Ministers to Member States on the protection of women against violence, and to Recommendation CM/Rec(2007)17 on gender equality standards and mechanisms,

–  having regard to the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) of 18 December 1979 and its Optional Protocol of 6 October 1999,

–  having regard to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights,

–  having regard to Directive 2014/24/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 February 2014 on public procurement and repealing Directive 2004/18/EC(3),

–  having regard to Council Directive 2000/78/EC of 27 November 2000 establishing a general framework for equal treatment in employment and occupation(4),

–  having regard to the Commission proposal of 2 December 2015 for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on the approximation of the laws, regulations and administrative provisions of the Member States as regards the accessibility requirements for products and services (COM(2015)0615),

–  having regard to The new European consensus on development ‘Our world, our dignity, our future’ – joint statement by the Council and the representatives of the governments of the Member States meeting within the Council, the European Parliament and the European Commission and the commitment therein to take into account the specific needs of persons with disabilities in development cooperation,

–  having regard to the Commission staff working document of 2 February 2017 entitled ‘Progress Report on the implementation of the European Disability Strategy 2010-2020’ (SWD(2017)0029),

–  having regard to the Commission communication of 15 November 2010 entitled ‘European Disability Strategy 2010-2020: A renewed commitment to a barrier-free Europe’ (COM(2010)0636),

–  having regard to its resolution of 13 December 2016 on the situation of fundamental rights in the European Union in 2015(5),

–  having regard to its resolution of 15 September 2016 on application of Council Directive 2000/78/EC of 27 November 2000 establishing a general framework for equal treatment in employment and occupation (‘Employment Equality Directive’)(6),

–  having regard to its resolution of 7 July 2016 on the implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, with special regard to the Concluding Observations of the UN CRPD Committee(7),

–  having regard to its resolution of 20 May 2015 on the List of Issues adopted by the United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in relation to the initial report of the European Union(8),

–  having regard to its resolution of 25 October 2011 on mobility and inclusion of people with disabilities and the European Disability Strategy 2010-2020(9),

–  having regard to its resolution of 6 May 2009 on the active inclusion of people excluded from the labour market(10),

–  having regard to the European Parliamentary Research Service briefing entitled ‘The European Disability Strategy 2010-2020’,

–  having regard to the study of Parliament’s Directorate-General for Internal Policies of the Union entitled ‘Discrimination Generated by the Intersection of Gender and Disability’,

–  having regard to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,

–  having regard to the Annual Report 2016 of the European Ombudsman,

–  having regard to the 2016 and 2017 Fundamental Rights Reports of the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights,

–  having regard to the thematic reports of the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights,

–  having regard to the 2014 Eurostat disability statistics on labour market access, access to education and training, and poverty and income inequalities,

–  having regard to the Council Conclusion on ‘A sustainable European Future: The EU response to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development’ published on 20 June 2017,

–  having regard to the Voluntary European Quality Framework for Social Services (SPC/2010/10/8),

–  having regard to the New Urban Agenda (A/RES/71/256),

–  having regard to the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction,

–  having regard to the Council Conclusions on the Gender Action Plan 2016-2020,

–  having regard to the Action Plan on Human Rights and Democracy (2015-2019),

–  having regard to Rule 52 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs and the opinions of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, the Committee on Culture and Education, the position in the form of amendments of the Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality and the opinion of the Committee on Petitions (A8-0339/2017),

A.  whereas, as full citizens(11), all persons with disabilities have equal rights in all fields of life and are entitled to inalienable dignity, equal treatment, independent living, autonomy and full participation in society;

B.  whereas there are an estimated 80 million persons with disabilities in the European Union, of whom 46 million are women;

C.  whereas the TFEU requires the Union to combat discrimination based on disability when defining and implementing its policies and activities (Article 10) and gives it the power to adopt legislation to address such discrimination (Article 19);

D.  whereas Articles 21 and 26 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union explicitly prohibit discrimination on the grounds of disability and provide for equal participation of persons with disabilities in society;

E.  whereas the UNCRPD is the first international human rights treaty ratified by the EU and has also been signed by all 28 Member States and ratified by 27; whereas the EU is the world’s biggest development aid donor and one of the most influential stakeholders at international level;

F.  whereas the EU is committed to implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) within the EU and in development cooperation with partner countries;

G.  whereas the UNCRPD states that persons with disabilities include those who have long-term physical, mental, intellectual or sensory impairments which in interaction with various barriers may hinder their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others; whereas Article 9 of the UNCRPD is of particular importance in that regard;

H.  whereas the case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union reinforces the fact that the UNCRPD is binding on the EU and its Member States when implementing EU law, as it is in instruments of secondary law(12); whereas it is imperative to enforce existing EU law and policy tools in order to maximise the implementation of the UNCRPD;

I.  whereas persons with disabilities represent a diverse group, and whereas women, children, older persons, and individuals with complex support needs, temporary or invisible disabilities face additional barriers and multiple forms of discrimination;

J.  whereas persons with disabilities face additional expenses, lower incomes and higher unemployment; whereas benefits related to disability should be regarded as state support aimed at helping people to remove barriers in order to participate fully in society, including through employment;

K.  whereas children with disabilities have the right to live in their families or a family environment in line with their best interests; whereas family members often have to reduce or stop professional activities in order to care for family members with a disability;

L.  whereas the UNCRPD principles go far beyond discrimination, pointing the way to the full enjoyment of human rights by all persons with disabilities and their families in an inclusive society;

M.  whereas there continues to be new and revised legislation without any reference to the UNCRPD and accessibility; whereas accessibility is a prerequisite for participation; whereas the EU, as a party to the UNCRPD, has the duty to ensure the close involvement and active participation of persons with disabilities and their representative organisations in the development and implementation of legislation and policies while respecting diverse concepts of disability;

N.  whereas stereotypes, misconceptions and prejudices are part of the root causes of discrimination, including multiple discrimination, stigma, and inequality;

O.  whereas persons with disabilities often suffer from a lack of support, protection communication and information about health care services and rights, protection against violence, childcare, and have little or no access to such services and information; whereas health service personnel should be properly trained on the specific needs of persons with disabilities;

P.  whereas a considerable proportion of the four million people experiencing homelessness every year have disabilities, having been largely overlooked as a target group of the UNCRPD and the EU Disability Strategy;

Q.  whereas, in spite of the numerous international conventions, EU and national legislation and strategies, persons with disabilities are still not fully participating in society and enjoying their rights; whereas the participation of persons with disabilities can only be achieved if they are included in political and public life, where they are often under-represented, in accordance with Article 29 UNCRPD;

R.  whereas the Commission’s progress report shows that there is an obvious delay in the implementation of obligations deriving from the UNCRPD at both EU and Member State level; whereas challenges and gaps remain in the framework of the strategy and a long-term perspective is needed for the alignment of EU policies, laws and programmes with the UNCRPD;

S.  whereas the model of independent living, as underlined by the UNCRPD, safeguards the highest degree of accessibility possible; whereas access to other services such as accessible transport, cultural and leisure activities are also a component of quality living and can contribute to the integration of persons with disabilities;

T.  whereas it is imperative to have inclusive and active labour market access as this is one of the principle means of promoting independence for persons with disabilities; whereas labour market access currently stands at 58,5 % compared with 80,5 % among persons without disabilities, with some groups facing additional discrimination based on the type of disability, whereas the social economy provides numerous employment opportunities for persons with disabilities;

U.  whereas stronger guidelines at European level and adequate resources, as well as training in disability issues could strengthen the effectiveness and independence of equality bodies at national level;

V.  whereas one of the four priorities established by the Commission after the Paris Declaration on promoting citizenship and the common values of freedom, tolerance and non‑discrimination through education is that of ‘fostering the education of disadvantaged children and young people, by ensuring that our education and training systems address their needs’;

W.  whereas the overall cost of keeping persons with disabilities out of the labour market is higher than including them in the workplace; whereas this holds especially true for persons with multiple support needs where family members might be forced to become carers;

X.  whereas the number of persons with disabilities in employment might be lower than data indicates, considering many fall into the category of ‘not employable’, or work in the sheltered sector or more protected environments, do not have employee status and are therefore not visible in official data and statistics;

Y.  whereas employers must be supported and encouraged to ensure that persons with disabilities are empowered all the way from education to employment; whereas, to this end, awareness‑raising among employers is one way to combat discrimination in the recruitment of persons with disabilities;

Z.  whereas measures in the workplace are crucial for promoting positive mental health, and for preventing mental ill-health and psychosocial disabilities;

AA.  whereas the EU is the largest donor of development aid and has a leading role in disability-inclusive programmes;

AB.  whereas employment discrimination is not a stand‑alone issue; whereas discrimination in education, vocational training, housing, and lack of access to transport equal discrimination in employment;

AC.  whereas 75 % of persons with severe disabilities in the EU do not have the opportunity to participate fully in the labour market; whereas underemployment as well as unemployment can be an issue particularly for those with autism spectrum disorders or who are deaf and hard of hearing as well as blind or deafblind;

AD.  whereas the SDGs and the Pillar of Social Rights might be potential vehicles of UNCRPD implementation;

AE.  whereas the lack of legal capacity constitutes a significant barrier to exercising the right to vote, including in European elections;

AF.  whereas 34 % of women with a health problem or a disability have experienced physical or sexual violence committed by a partner in their lifetime;

AG.  whereas Article 168(7) of the TFEU gives Member States the responsibility to define their health policies and deliver health services, demonstrating the vital importance of consulting and engaging with Member States in order for the European Disability Strategy to be successful;

AH.  whereas Article 25 of the UNCRPD reinforces the right of persons with disabilities to enjoy the highest attainable standard of healthcare, without discrimination;

AI.  whereas persons with disabilities are particularly vulnerable to deficiencies in healthcare services, engaging in health risk behaviours and higher rates of premature death;

Key areas for action

Accessibility

1.  Recognises the importance of a holistic definition and application of accessibility, and its value as the basis for persons with disabilities to enjoy equal opportunities and genuine social inclusion and participation in society, as recognised in the UNCRPD and in line with UNCRPD General Comment No 2, taking into account the diversity of the needs of persons with disabilities and promoting the steadily growing importance of universal design as a principle of the EU;

2.  Reminds the Commission of its obligation to mainstream disability and develop and promote accessibility in all policy areas in both public and private sectors, and recommends setting up units with expertise in accessibility within the hierarchy of the Commission to verify that this duty is being accomplished;

3.  Calls on the Commission to set mandatory requirements on the accessibility of public spaces and especially the built environment;

4.  Calls on the Member States to fully implement and continuously monitor all accessibility-related legislation, including the Audiovisual Media Services Directive, the Telecoms Package and the Web Accessibility Directive, as well as the relevant transport and passengers’ rights regulations; calls for the EU, in this context, to coordinate and monitor the implementation thereof in addition to promoting the ratification of the UNCRPD internally and externally;

5.  Hopes that the EU’s co-legislators will, without delay, adopt the European Accessibility Act; recommends that, in order to fully implement the UNCRPD, the final text should enhance the accessibility of products and services for persons with disabilities and people with functional limitations; stresses that comprehensive European rules on the accessibility of public spaces and the built environment, as well as on access to all modes of transport, are needed;

6.  Is concerned that the monitoring of some pieces of legislation, such as the Web Accessibility Directive(13) or the Regulation on Rail Accessibility (TSI-PRM)(14), is through self-assessment by industry and the Member States and is not conducted by an independent entity; recommends, therefore, that the Commission improve its assessment of compliance and considers developing monitoring legislation in order to ensure that the rights of persons with disabilities are respected, including, for example, in the implementation of Regulation (EC) No 261/2004(15);

7.  Recalls that the implementation of all accessibility‑related obligations require sufficient funding at EU, national and local level; calls on the EU to ensure that all funding programmes are accessible, that they follow a universal design approach and include a separate budget for accessibility; calls on the Member States to boost public investment in order to ensure accessibility for persons with disabilities to both the physical and the digital environment;

8.  Calls on the Commission and the Member States to increase accessibility through supporting the development of ICT and by supporting all initiatives, including start-ups operating in the field of safety of persons with disabilities;

9.  Favours the study and utilisation of the best practices in relation to independent living in the EU;

10.  Calls on the Commission and the Member States to take the necessary measures to ensure that the emergency number 112 is fully accessible to all persons with all types of disabilities, and that all aspects of disaster-risk reduction policies and programmes are inclusive of and accessible to all persons with disabilities;

11.  Is concerned that the public procurement ex-ante conditionality of buying accessibly before signing a public contract is not sufficiently implemented at national level; recommends, to this end, to set up a portal, along similar lines to green public procurement, containing all the accessibility guidelines;

12.  Strongly recommends making the passenger rights complaints procedures fully accessible and disability‑friendly and assigning a greater number of and equally strong enforcement responsibilities to the National Enforcement Bodies (NEBs);

13.  Emphasises, in particular, that accessibility is a core principle of the UNCRPD, and a precondition for the exercise of other rights enshrined in the Convention; underlines that a consistent number of petitions lodged by European citizens complain about the lack of accessibility or the presence of architectural barriers; stresses that the right to accessibility, as defined in Article 9 of the UNCRPD, must be implemented in a comprehensive manner to ensure that persons with disabilities can access their environment, transportation, public facilities and services, as well as information and communications technologies; calls on the Commission and the Member States to ensure that accessibility is a high priority and that it is better integrated into all disability policy areas;

14.  Notes that the Digital Single Market Strategy should be implemented in such a way as to ensure full access to all of its aspects for persons with disabilities;

Participation

15.  Welcomes the EU Disability Card project; calls on the Commission, together with the Member States, to include all countries in a future long-term initiative with a view to achieving an identical scope to that of the European parking card and to include access to services allowing participation in cultural life and tourism;

16.  Is concerned about the continued use of the medical model of disability that focuses on the medical diagnoses of persons with disabilities rather than the environmental barriers they experience; urges the Commission to initiate the revision of this approach, particularly in the field of data collection; calls on the Member States to look at ways to work towards a common definition of disability;

17.  Welcomes the progress made in relation to the Marrakesh Treaty; points out that the Court of Justice of the European Union, in its opinion of 14 February 2017, indicated that the EU has exclusive competence with regard to the conclusion of the Marrakesh Treaty, as the body of the obligations of the Marrakesh Treaty falls within an area that is already covered to a large extent by common EU rules; recommends that the EU and the Member States establish an action plan to ensure it is fully implemented; calls on the EU not to ratify the option concerning the economic burden;

18.  Is of the opinion that the European Structural and Investment Funds must, particularly in the next programming period, adhere to the UNCRPD and should continue to foster deinstitutionalisation as a matter of priority and that they should, moreover, finance support services to enable persons with disabilities to realise the right to live independently in the community; believes that the Commission should closely monitor the implementation by Member States of the ex ante conditionalities on the transition from institutional to community‑based services, which must be concrete and quality‑assessed in an ongoing and transparent manner; believes that EU funded project proposals, including those in the framework of the European Fund for Strategic Investments and European Investment Bank lending should respect accessibility rules following a universal design approach; considers that financial instruments alone cannot be relied on to achieve these objectives;

19.  Emphasises that there is a need to ensure free access to communication that is adapted to suit the type of disability, and emphasises that this is vitally important when it comes to the civic participation of persons with disabilities;

20.  Is concerned by the barriers to participation that persons under guardianship and those living in institutions face across Europe and calls on the Commission to ensure that persons deprived of their legal capacity can exercise all the rights enshrined in European Union treaties and legislation; calls on the Member States to foster participation by accelerating the deinstitutionalisation process and the replacement of substitute decision-making by supported decision-making;

21.  Calls on the Commission, as part of its series of regular reports on the implementation of Council Directives 93/109/EC(16) and 94/80/EC(17) to include an assessment of whether they are being interpreted in a manner consistent with Article 29 of the UNCRPD;

22.  Highlights the fact that women and girls with disabilities suffer from double discrimination due to the intersection of gender and disability, and may even be exposed to multiple discrimination arising from the intersection of gender and disability with sexual orientation, age, religion or ethnicity in many instances;

23.  Reiterates that women with disabilities are often at a greater disadvantage than their male counterparts and are more often at risk of poverty and social exclusion;

24.  Considers that the European Institute for Gender Equality should provide guidance at European and Member State level concerning the specific situation of women and girls with disabilities, and should play an active role in advocacy work to secure equal rights and combat discrimination;

25.  Recalls that combating poverty and social exclusion among persons with disabilities is closely linked to the issue of improving conditions for family members who often act as unpaid carers and are not considered employed persons; encourages the Member States, therefore, to present national support strategies for informal carers, who are mostly female relatives of persons with disabilities;

26.  Underlines that the number of elderly people is on the increase and that, according to the WHO, disability prevalence is higher among women, who are particularly affected by this phenomenon owing to their longer life expectancy; stresses that, therefore, there will be a proportionate increase in the numbers of women with disabilities;

27.  Highlights the value of micro‑financial instruments for job creation and growth; calls on the Member States to make such instruments more easily available to women with disabilities;

28.  Underlines that, in order to ensure independent living for persons with disabilities, it is necessary to support research and innovation aimed at developing products to help persons with disabilities in their everyday activities;

Equality

29.  Highlights that equality and non-discrimination are at the core of the Disability Strategy;

30.  Calls on the Commission to address disability in its Strategic Engagement for Gender Equality 2016-2019;

31.  Deeply regrets the prolonged deadlock in the European Council on progress towards the anti-discrimination directive and calls on the Member States to contribute to the adoption of the Horizontal anti-Discrimination Directive(18), moving towards a pragmatic solution, which should extend to the protection against discrimination in all areas of life of persons with disabilities, including the recognition of the denial of reasonable accommodation as a form of discrimination, and of multiple and intersectional discrimination;

32.  Is alarmed by existing data on discrimination and abuse of persons with disabilities; remains concerned by cases of under-reporting due to the inaccessibility of complaint and reporting mechanisms, a lack of trust and of awareness of rights; insists that gender-disaggregated data should be collected and recommends, in this respect, the development of a new method for gathering data, particularly regarding cases of denied boarding and refused or unavailable assistance;

33.  Calls on the Member States to ensure that all national equality bodies have a mandate in the area of disability, adequate resources and the independence to provide victims of discrimination the necessary assistance, and to guarantee that any extension of their mandate is accompanied by an increase in human resources;

34.  Calls for the EU and the Member States to fund training and develop models of good practice by and for persons with disabilities, their organisations, trade unions, employers’ federations, equality bodies, civil servants on the principle of non-discrimination, including multiple and intersectional discrimination and reasonable accommodation;

35.  Calls for the EU to develop research programmes addressing equality principles when drawing up the post‑Horizon 2020 framework for Research and Development;

Employment

36.  Highlights that access to the labour market is a holistic issue requiring the implementation of support measures that result in a win-win situation for both the individual and the employer, ensuring social inclusion and which should include accessible recruitment procedures, accessible transport from and to the workplace, career progression, and on-going training, as well as reasonable accommodation and accessible work places; calls on the Commission to update the Compendium of good practice on supported employment for people with disabilities in the EU and EFTA‑EEA;

37.  Encourages the adoption of positive discrimination measures, including the adoption of minimum percentages for the employment of persons with disabilities in the public and private sectors;

38.  Regrets that the denial of reasonable accommodation does not constitute discrimination within the framework of the Employment Equality Directive(19), which has been criticised by the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; recalls that the first article of the Directive on equal treatment in employment prohibits any form of discrimination on grounds of disability;

39.  Calls on the Member States to ensure that benefit traps do not constitute a barrier to participation in the labour market, and asks for the separation of disability‑related benefits from income support taking into account additional care and other needs that persons with disabilities may have, enabling them to live a dignified life and enjoy access to the labour market; calls on the Member States, in this respect, to ensure that disability‑related benefits are not waived on grounds of employment;

40.  Calls on the Commission to support social enterprises in line with the principles stated in the Bratislava Declaration and the Madrid Declaration on the Social Economy, as an important source of employment opportunities for persons with disabilities;

41.  Calls on the Member States, in line with the UNCRPD, to consider removing all legal barriers to employability, including, for example, measures that run contrary to Article 12 of the UNCRPD, preventing persons with disabilities from signing work contracts, opening a bank account and having access to their money, leaving them financially excluded, or national clauses declaring certain categories of persons with disabilities as ‘unable to work’;

42.  Highlights the importance of effective reintegration and rehabilitation as well as activation and retention measures in an ageing society, which enable people to return to or stay in work after a disease or physical, mental or emotional disabilities;

43.  Recalls that burdening persons with disability and their partners with the cost of their assistance reduces not only their present income, but also their employment prospects and future income in old age;

44.  Understands that work-life balance measures, including voluntary flexible and inclusive working arrangements, such as smart working, teleworking and flexible working hours might be beneficial to persons with disabilities and positive for mental health, ensuring security and stability for all, but is concerned that digital working environments might create new barriers if they are not accessible and reasonable accommodation is not provided;

45.  Calls on the Commission to include good and bad practices in future reports to enable employers to effectively implement disability legislation;

46.  Is concerned that in some Member States, persons with disabilities working in sheltered workshops are not formally recognised as workers under the law, are paid less than the minimum wage and are not entitled to the same social advantages as regular workers;

47.  Is particularly concerned about young persons with disabilities and those who have been unemployed over a longer period of time; calls on the Member States to work towards including young persons with disabilities in the labour market as a matter of priority, for example, by establishing special career advisory hubs in order to give advice to students and unemployed young people on their future careers, or as part of the Youth Guarantee programme;

48.  Calls on the Commission and the Member States to further promote diversity as a business case and encourage diversity charters that advocate the added value of persons with disabilities in the workplace;

49.  Calls on the EU to ensure that the rights of persons with disabilities and their families are included in the proposed package on work‑life balance;

Education and training

50.  Is concerned that many children with disabilities remain excluded from quality inclusive education in different EU Member States as a result of, for example, segregation policies, as well as of architectural barriers, which constitute a form of discrimination against children and young persons with disabilities;

51.  Emphasises that education and vocational training are essential for the employability of persons with disabilities and that employers should be engaged in the process in order to mainstream the needs of persons with disabilities, also, but not exclusively, by taking into account the possible benefits of new technologies in areas such as job searching, personal development and greater independence;

52.  Calls on the Commission and the Member States to remove legal, physical and organisational barriers for all persons with disabilities in order to guarantee inclusive education and lifelong learning systems;

53.  Calls for the EU institutions and Member States to ensure reasonable accommodation for trainees and requests that traineeship application procedures be accessible and that specific traineeships are offered for persons with disabilities, including incentive-driven traineeships for employers;

54.  Calls for the EU institutions and Member States to ensure that the Erasmus + and other youth programmes, such as the Youth Guarantee and European Solidarity Corps, are fully accessible to persons with disabilities through individualised reasonable accommodation and that information on their accessibility rights is made available to persons with disabilities to encourage their participation; recommends, to this end, that existing tools, such as, for example, those provided in the MappED! inclusive mobility platform be maximised;

55.  Regrets that the new skills agenda does not include a specific target for persons with disabilities; stresses that the current underemployment and labour market discrimination of persons with disabilities is also a waste of valuable skills; calls, therefore, on the Commission to take into account the needs of persons with disabilities in all future skill-related initiatives;

56.  Urges the Member States to develop effective measures aimed at tackling the segregation and rejection of students with disabilities in schools and learning environments and to develop, in this context, national transition programmes to ensure quality inclusive education and vocational training, both formal and non-formal, including for persons with disabilities requiring a high level of support, based on the UNCRPD Committee recommendations;

57.  Highlights the importance of training and re-training educational staff, in particular to support persons with complex needs;

58.  Recommends making better use of the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education to maximise its existing mandate;

59.  Highlights that preparing teachers and trainers to work with children with disabilities and providing them with adequate support is essential; encourages the Member States to design inclusive education, training and continuous professional development for teachers and trainers, with inputs from a variety of stakeholders, particularly organisations representing persons with disabilities and professionals with disabilities;

60.  Calls, given the high number of early school leavers among young persons with disabilities and/or SEN, for further exploration of the opportunities offered by lifelong learning and the provision of attractive alternatives; considers the promotion of lifelong learning programmes for persons with disabilities to be a vital part of the European Disability Strategy;

61.  Encourages the exchange of best practices on inclusive education and lifelong learning between teachers, staff, governing bodies, students and pupils with disabilities;

62.  Expresses its concerns that, in spite of improvements, persons with disabilities are still at high risk of unemployment and that less than 30 % have completed tertiary education or equivalent, compared to around 40 % for persons without disabilities; calls, therefore, on the Member States and the Commission to pay special attention to the difficulties young persons with disabilities and/or SEN encounter during their transition from secondary and university education and/or vocational training to employment;

63.  Encourages EU public institutions and companies to implement diversity policies and the national Diversity Charters;

64.  Underlines that young persons with disabilities participate less in physical activity than their peers without disabilities and that schools play an important role in adopting a healthy lifestyle; stresses, therefore, the importance of fostering greater participation of young persons with disabilities in physical activities; calls on the Member States to swiftly eliminate all existing barriers hindering the participation of persons with disabilities or people with special needs in sports activities;

65.  Recalls the need to bridge the digital gap and to ensure that persons with disabilities benefit fully from the Digital Union; stresses, in this context, the importance of improving the digital skills and competences of persons with disabilities, notably through projects financed by the Erasmus+ programme, and calls on the Member States to ensure the protection of vulnerable citizens – including persons with disabilities – online, through efficient measures against hate speech, cyberbullying and all forms of online discrimination and by providing more education in digital and media literacy as part of both non-formal and formal education; calls, in addition, on the Member States to make appropriate technological educational tools available free of charge to children with disabilities, to allow them to fully join in with educational and training activities;

Social protection

66.  Calls on the Commission to ensure that the 2030 EU Disability Strategy includes specific actions to promote inclusive social protection systems across the EU, which would guarantee access to benefits and services to persons with disabilities across the life cycle; calls on the Member States to set a social protection floor for persons with disabilities that would guarantee their adequate standard of living;

67.  Calls on the co-legislators to give consideration to the inclusion of persons with disabilities as a specific target group in the Social Security Coordination Regulation(20);

68.  Urges the Member States to apply the principle of mutual recognition when undertaking their disability assessment and determination, which should follow and must not undermine the UNCRPD human rights-based model of disability, taking into account the environmental and societal barriers a person encounters and including all relevant stakeholders in order to ensure that the living standards of persons of disabilities are not jeopardised by, for example, economic adjustment programmes;

69.  Calls on the Commission to ensure that the European Pillar of Social Rights mainstream disability in all aspects;

70.  Recommends that the European Social Fund (ESF), the European Programme for Employment and Social Innovation (EaSI) and future EU social funds be used not only for employment activation measures, but also for social inclusion; stresses the importance of rehabilitation as a means of social inclusion to ensure that persons with disabilities remain active within the community;

71.  Recommends that the Member States take specific measures, such as providing financial assistance and respite care, to promote inclusive social protection systems across the EU that guarantee an adequate standard of living, benefits and access to services for all persons with disabilities across the life cycle;

72.  Urges the Member States to ensure that deinstitutionalisation never leads to homelessness for persons with disabilities because of a lack of adequate and/or accessible housing for delivering care in the community;

Health

73.  Calls on the Member States to fully implement the 2011 Directive on patients’ rights in cross-border healthcare(21); recommends that the Commission include a strong disability component in the transposition of the Directive in order to guarantee access to affordable and quality cross-border border healthcare for persons with disabilities; calls, in this connection, on the Commission to carry out an impact assessment of the Directive with a view to revising it to bring it into line with the UNCRPD and to prepare EU-wide guidance on mainstreaming disability in the work of the National Contact Points with common performance criteria, including disability-specific recommendations; encourages the Member States to provide appropriate education and training for healthcare professionals on the specific needs of patients with disabilities;

74.  Is concerned about violations, including human rights violations, in mental health and care services, which have in many cases had a significant impact on the quality of services provided, and points out that those services must be recovery-focused, adequately funded and provided in accordance with a human rights-based model;

75.  Calls on the Member States to ensure mental health services that respect legal capacity and that require the person with a disability and not a substitute decision-maker to give informed consent for treatment and hospitalisation, also taking into consideration assisted decision-making measures;

76.  Calls on the Commission to ensure eHealth, health and care services are fully accessible and safe to use for all persons with disabilities, including those who have intellectual disabilities and complex needs, and their family members;

77.  Points to the urgency of addressing the general lack of access to multidisciplinary specialist care for persons with disabilities and, where it does exist, the long patient waiting times, as a major obstacle to equal access to healthcare prevention and treatment, often resulting in the deterioration of a disabled patient’s condition and an avoidable burden on healthcare systems;

78.  Points out that healthcare systems should ensure the detection, reporting and prevention of sexual violence and/or abuse;

79.  Urges the Member States to increase the number of multidisciplinary assessment and re-assessment services for adults with disabilities, with a view to developing tailor-made plans which can be implemented by using territorial resources (such as home/day care/residential services) which meet the biopsychosocial requirements identified;

80.  Urges the Commission and the Member States to make full use of the European Reference Networks framework to develop, and expand access to, multidisciplinary and specialised healthcare for persons with disabilities in general and, in particular, for those with rare disabilities;

81.  Highlights the Commission’s lack of attention to disabilities in the Action Plan for the EU health workforce and the EU agenda for effective, accessible and resilient health systems, as they are not specifically dealt with in either of the two texts;

82.  Highlights the success of the second Joint Action on Dementia, hoping, meanwhile, that, for the following third-year period, additional funds will be disbursed by the pharmaceutical companies taking part in the Innovative Medicines Initiative;

83.  Invites the Commission to present a strategy for assisting persons with serious disabilities following the death of relatives who had been in charge of their daily care (cf. the recently adopted Italian law dopo di noi);

84.  Urges the Commission to undertake a thorough analysis of the gaps between the UN’s Concluding Observations and its own progress report, specifically in relation to the health priority area of the European Disability Strategy;

85.  Calls for local obstetric care provision to be consistently promoted as a public service in the Member States, in order to reduce instances of disability resulting from birth complications and to ensure a safe birth for both mothers and babies, in line with the WHO Safe Childbirth Checklist;

86.  Is encouraged by the progress made in the European telemedicine sector, which has the power to fundamentally change the ability of persons with disabilities to access services; believes, furthermore, that the roll-out of 4G technology, the rise of 5G and the spread of the Internet of Things will lead to improvements in healthcare provision for persons with disabilities; calls on the Commission to ensure that the European health technology sector is not burdened by excessive regulation and has adequate access to finance;

External action

87.  Calls for the EU’s external action to be fully compliant with the UNCRPD;

88.  Calls for the EU to ensure that development cooperation and humanitarian action are fully accessible to and inclusive of persons with disabilities;

89.  Calls for the EU to introduce a disability rights marker in official development assistance reporting;

90.  Calls on the EU to ensure it plays a key role in ensuring that persons with disabilities are not left behind in development cooperation and humanitarian aid, as committed to in the European Consensus on Development, and to include addressing the multiple discriminations faced by vulnerable persons and marginalised groups;

91.  Calls on the Commission to be a leader in achieving disability‑inclusive implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals in external action, independently of a new European disability strategy, by adopting a clear, transparent and inclusive roadmap to achieving the goals;

92.  Regrets that the EU SDGs’ indicator on employment is not disaggregated by disability; calls on the EU to encourage the disaggregation of data by type of disability in cooperation with partner countries;

93.  Calls on the EU and partners to include persons with disabilities and their representative organisations at all stages of policy development and projects, including on the ground in partner countries with the active participation of organisations of persons with disabilities;

94.  Reiterates that women with disabilities often face even bigger challenges and dangers in countries involved in conflict and in conflict zones; highlights, therefore, the need to protect women with disabilities in the EU’s external policies;

Obligations within the EU institutions

95.  Urges the EU institutions to make accessible the functionality, content, documents, videos and web services of their external and internal websites, including public consultations, and public reports on conformity and compliance with web accessibility guidelines, recommendations and obligations;

96.  Regrets that the INSIGN project which enables independent communication for deaf and hard of hearing persons during their interaction with the EU institutions by connecting them with sign language interpreters and captioners in Member States has not yet been implemented, although the Commission financed the development of the prototype of the service platform, which was successfully tested in 2014 in the European Parliament;

97.  Calls for the EU institutions to make – upon simple request – all of its public meetings accessible, including through the provision of sign language interpretation, speech-to-text captioning and documents provided in braille, as well as through other augmentative and alternative methods of communication and the physical accessibility of their buildings; recognises the difficulties in providing subtitles for all live streams and videos of meetings; calls, however, for the institutions to continue to monitor technological developments in this area in order to improve accessibility in the future;

98.  Advises the European institutions to give priority to interpretation from and into national sign language(s) rather than International Sign, in line with the EU’s multilingualism policy;

99.  Urges the Member States to ensure that their European Parliament elections are accessible and include those currently living in institutions and/or under guardianship;

100.  Recognises the lack of accessible and inclusive election processes for persons with disabilities, especially persons with mental/intellectual disabilities, both at EU and Member State level; urges the European Parliament to ensure that their communication materials on the European Parliament elections are fully accessible;

101.  Calls on the European schools, nurseries and after-school centres to provide quality inclusive and UNCRPD-compliant education to all children of EU staff, including those with complex or high‑level support needs;

102.  Calls on the EU to facilitate the provision of reasonable accommodation and other forms of employment support, such as smart working for employees, including for accredited parliamentary assistants with disabilities within the EU institutions;

103.  Calls on the Commission to revise the joint rules, implementing provisions, scope, disability representation, accessibility and practices of its Joint Sickness and Insurance Scheme to bring it into line with the UNCRPD;

104.  Urges all EU institutions, agencies and bodies to establish focal points, and stresses the need for a horizontal interinstitutional coordination mechanism across Directorates-General and EU institutions; calls for the necessary arrangements to achieve this to form part of a UNCRPD implementation strategy;

105.  Urges the institutions to adopt comprehensive recruitment, retention and promotion policies, including temporary positive measures, to increase actively and substantially the number of officials or staff and trainees with disabilities, including psychosocial and intellectual disabilities, in line with Article 5 of Directive 2000/78/EC;

106.  Recalls the role of the Disability Intergroup of the European Parliament for the implementation of the European Disability Strategy, in accordance with the UN Convention, as a platform that brings together members of the European and national Parliaments and representatives of organisations and civil society, both at national and local level; notes that the Intergroup is a privileged forum for encouraging discussions and debates in order to ensure the implementation of the strategy;

107.  Calls for the European institutions to fully consult and effectively involve staff and Members with disabilities in formulating, implementing and monitoring their internal rules, policies and practices, including the Staff Regulations and reasonable accommodation and accessibility provisions;

Gaps in the progress report vis-à-vis the Concluding Observations

108.  Regrets that the EU institutions’ websites do not comply with level AAA accessibility standards; calls on the Institutions to comply as soon as possible;

109.  Regrets that the EU’s and the Member States’ transport legislation is still not fully implemented at national level; recommends, to this end, that national enforcement bodies be established in each Member State;

110.  Notes the progress made in terms of rail accessibility; calls for the same level of accessibility regulations for all other transport modes, including air travel, to resolve conflicts between safety and accessibility;

111.  Notes that the Horizontal Equal Treatment Directive is not addressed in the Commission’s Progress Report;

112.  Finds it regrettable that little progress has been made with regard to the European Union’s ratification of the Optional Protocol to the UNCRPD;

113.  Notes that the Commission has so far not undertaken a cross-cutting, comprehensive review of its legislation in order to ensure full harmonisation with the provisions of the UNCRPD;

114.  Welcomes the updated list of instruments, including recently adopted instruments, but regrets that the declaration of competences has not been revised and that the list of instruments does not include instruments which do not specifically refer to persons with disabilities, but are nevertheless relevant to persons with disabilities;

115.  Regrets that the Commission has not made progress in mainstreaming the rights of women and girls with disabilities in all its gender equality policies and programmes, and in including a gender perspective in its disability strategies;

116.  Applauds the EU’s signing of the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (the Istanbul Convention), and calls upon the Council to swiftly ratify it;

117.  Regrets that the current European policies on the rights of the child do not sufficiently include a comprehensive rights-based strategy for boys and girls with disabilities or safeguards to protect their rights, and that the disability strategies do not sufficiently address and mainstream the rights of boys and girls with disabilities; calls on the Commission, in accordance with the UNCRPD and in line with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), to pay particular attention to children with disabilities; highlights, in particular, the need for role models for women and girls with disabilities;

118.  Notes that the EU has not organised a comprehensive campaign to raise awareness about the UNCRPD and to combat prejudice against persons with disabilities;

Towards a comprehensive and effective 2030 Disability Strategy

Horizontal issues

119.  Calls on the Commission to ensure that the future Disability Strategy aims at fully implementing the UNCRPD in all areas of EU policy and at mainstreaming accessibility, participation, non-discrimination and equality, encompassing all articles of the UNCRPD and that it include an adequate budget, a timeframe for implementation and a monitoring mechanism, as well as having the same legal value as the current strategy; is aware that the strategy can be a success only if all stakeholders, including civil society, are involved;

120.  Stresses that the 2020-2030 strategy should be based on a cross‑cutting, comprehensive review of all EU legislation and policy in order to ensure full harmonisation with the provisions of the UNCRPD, and that it should include a revised declaration of competences;

121.  Calls on the Commission to encourage measures related to effective reintegration and rehabilitation to reduce or eliminate the effects of a disease or physical, mental or emotional disability on a person’s earning capacity;

122.  Recommends that the Commission ensure that any future strategy and the consultation process related to it should be transparent, understandable and fully accessible, and include clear indicators and benchmarks;

123.  Notes that the EU SDGs’ set of indicators are not inclusive of persons with disabilities when it comes to goal 4 (education), goal 5 (gender equality) and goal 8 (decent work and economic growth); calls for the future strategy to use global SDGs’ indicators to monitor the implementation of the main EU actions and policies in the field of employment;

124.  Stresses the importance of ensuring that the future Disability Strategy is coherent with other EU initiatives and strategies, in order to foster the employment and inclusion of persons with disabilities, in particular women;

125.  Recommends that the post‑2020 strategy include public procurement and standardisation as horizontal issues to increase the employability of persons with disabilities, as well as to favour the compilation and exchange of good practices among Member States;

126.  Urges the Commission to ensure that EU‑funded projects are in line with the UNCRPD’s human rights approach, by not funding any projects that would create results that are not accessible, that exclude persons with disabilities, or do not respect accessibility standards;

127.  Calls on the Commission to propose an accessible assessment tool with ongoing monitoring, including specific indicators and tangible goals;

128.  Calls for the EU and the Member States, following the EU’s ratification of the Istanbul Convention, to adopt specific measures addressing violence against women and girls with disabilities; urges the Commission to draft a comprehensive European strategy to fight violence against women, with particular emphasis on women and girls with disabilities;

129.  Recognises that women with disabilities, especially intellectual disabilities, are more vulnerable to gender-based violence, sexual harassment or other forms of abuse; acknowledges, in addition, that due to their position of dependence they may be unable to identify or report the abuse; stresses the need to further accommodate implementation of the European Disability Strategy that allows preventive measures aimed at avoiding all types of abuses and to provide high-quality, accessible and tailor-made support for victims of violence;

130.  Calls for the EU to mainstream the European Disability Strategy across all EU legislation and the EU Semester process; calls, in this connection, for a genuine structured dialogue between the EU and organisations representing persons with disabilities for the drafting of the post‑2020 strategy;

131.  Recommends that the future strategy include the essential role of support services for the enjoyment of human rights of persons with disabilities;

132.  Recommends that the future strategy include issues related to staff training, which are fundamental if support according to the UNCRPD principles is to be provided;

Additional areas for action

133.  Urges equality, gender and non-discrimination, including, for example, of LGBTQI with disabilities who are exposed to multiple discrimination, to be mainstreamed in all areas in a future strategy; calls on the Commission and the Member States to promote campaigns and training courses to raise awareness of the UNCRPD and of the need for respect of diversity in order to combat discrimination, stigma and prejudices against persons with disabilities, persons with psychosocial disabilities, learning disabilities or autism;

134.  Emphasises that more must be done to overcome stereotypes and prejudices about disability in the media in order to change the prevalent exclusionary social norms; calls on the Commission and the Member States to invest in public awareness initiatives in order to ensure the depiction of persons with disabilities as equal citizens to counteract stereotypes about disability;

135.  Points to the intersection of gender and disability, particularly with regard to informed consent about the use of contraception, forced sterilisation and access to reproductive rights; calls on the Member States to consider the need to evaluate their legislation in this regard;

136.  Urges the EU to mainstream the rights of children with disabilities into all areas of the future strategy;

137.  Recognises that legal capacity is one of the prerequisites for the enjoyment of human rights, including the right to vote, and that any new strategy must work towards no one being denied legal capacity on the basis of disability in all areas of life; stresses, to this end, that the EU should adopt appropriate measures to ensure that all persons with disabilities can exercise all the rights enshrined in European Union treaties and legislation, such as access to justice, goods and services, including banking, employment and health care, as well as voting in European elections and consumer rights in line with the Convention, and encourage non-coercive measures and supported-decision making in line with the UNCRPD;

138.  Strongly urges the Commission to include all possible measures in the new strategy to ensure the liberty and security of all persons with all types of disabilities in line with the Convention and the UNCRPD Committee;

139.  Strongly urges the Commission to retain the partnership principle in future regulations on funding and to ensure that it is fully respected;

140.  Calls on the Commission to promote the structural involvement of persons with disabilities and their representative organisations in all decision-making processes, both nationally and at EU level, and to fund capacity building of organisations of persons with disabilities to enable persons with disabilities to engage in structural participation in all decisions that concern them; calls on the Member States to continue delivering UNCRPD training to ensure that persons with disabilities are aware of their rights so that discrimination can be prevented;

141.  Recalls that the UNCRPD Committee has expressed its deep concern with the precarious situation of persons with disabilities in the current migration crisis in the EU; strongly urges the Commission to mainstream disability in its migration and refugee policies and to ensure that all EU funding directed towards tackling this humanitarian crisis is disability-inclusive;

142.  Strongly urges the Member States to disaggregate data by types of disability, and to work closely with Eurostat to collect comparable data on disability in different fields, which includes persons living in institutions, while linking the disability strategy to the SDGs process and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development;

143.  Stresses the need for measurable and comparable quantitative and qualitative indicators, including on accessibility, equality, employment, social protection, health, school outcomes and the numbers of students in inclusive education, in order to assess the implementation of the UNCRPD by the EU and the Member States, and strongly urges that data be collected in order to help apply these indicators;

144.  Urges the EU to develop a human rights-based indicator system in cooperation with persons with disabilities and their representative organisations, as well as a comparable comprehensive data collection system, with data disaggregated by gender, age, rural or urban population and impairment type;

145.  Recognises that persons with intellectual disabilities are particularly vulnerable to discrimination and abuse, and are often placed in institutions, with no access to education and no self‑determination;

146.  Strongly urges the Commission and the Member States to take additional measures to reach out to the most vulnerable, such as homeless persons with disabilities;

147.  Stresses the need for continuous monitoring of the implementation of the UNCRPD in line with Article 33 thereof and in consultation with disability organisations;

148.  Calls on the Commission to ensure that the work of the European Union High Level Group on combating racism, xenophobia and other forms of intolerance in relation to improving the recording and collection of data on hate crime fully includes hate crime against persons with disabilities;

149.  Urges all Member States to allocate sufficient and stable financial and human resources to the monitoring frameworks established under Article 33(2) of the UNCRPD to carry out their functions independently;

150.  Urges the Commission to provide adequate resources to the EU Monitoring Framework to enable it to perform its functions independently and adequately;

151.  Recalls that the Committee on Petitions (PETI) receives a considerable number of petitions each year referring to the difficulties encountered by persons with disabilities across the EU in their everyday activities in relation to the eight main areas of action identified in the European Disability Strategy and other accessibility issues, such as access to healthcare and social protection, education and training, the labour market, the built environment and transport, goods and services, information and communication, and participation in political, public and cultural life;

152.  Calls on all Member States to ratify the UNCRPD and to sign the Optional Protocol;

153.  Highlights the protection role played by the Committee on Petitions through the petition process (alongside the European Ombudsman, appointed to protect citizens in the event of maladministration) in the context of the EU framework for the UNCRPD, enabling the petitioner to lodge a complaint against an infringement of their rights on the part of European, national and local authorities; stresses that the petitions received by the Committee illustrate the need to adopt an effective, horizontal, non‑discriminatory and human rights‑based approach to disability policies; stresses the role of the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights in strengthening the fundamental rights of persons with disabilities in the EU and in supporting the EU’s implementation of the UNCRPD;

154.  Emphasises that most of the petitions submitted by European citizens concern the difficulties involved in the application procedures, in obtaining recognition and in relation to late payments of invalidity pensions by the relevant administrations; underlines that the implementation of the European Disability Strategy and its social protection area for action should pay special attention to these issues, in accordance with Article 28 of the UNCRPD on an adequate standard of living and social protection;

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155.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council and the Commission.

(1) OJ L 23, 27.1.2010, p. 35.
(2) UNCRPD/C/EU/CO/1.
(3) OJ L 94, 28.3.2014, p. 65.
(4) OJ L 303, 2.12.2000, p. 16.
(5) Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0485.
(6) Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0360.
(7) Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0318.
(8) OJ C 353, 27.9.2016, p. 41.
(9) OJ C 131 E, 8.5.2013, p. 9.
(10) OJ C 212 E, 5.8.2010, p. 23.
(11) In the context of this resolution, ‘full citizen’ should be understood within the meaning of the UNCRPD – that all persons with disabilities should have full enjoyment of all human rights.
(12) Judgment of the Court of Justice of 11 April 2013, HK Danmark, Joined Cases C-335/11 and C-337/11, ECLI:EU:C:2013:222, paragraphs 29-30; Judgment of the Court of Justice of 18 March 2014, Z, C-363/12, ECLI:EU:C:2014:159, paragraph 73; Judgment of the Court of Justice of 22 May 2014, Glatzel, C-356/12, ECLI:EU:C:2014:350, paragraph 68.
(13) Directive (EU) 2016/2102 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 October 2016 on the accessibility of the websites and mobile applications of public sector bodies (OJ L 327, 2.12.2016, p. 1).
(14) Commission Regulation (EU) No 1300/2014 of 18 November 2014 on the technical specifications for interoperability relating to accessibility of the Union’s rail system for persons with disabilities and persons with reduced mobility (OJ L 356, 12.12.2014, p. 110).
(15) Regulation (EC) No 261/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 February 2004 establishing common rules on compensation and assistance to passengers in the event of denied boarding and of cancellation or long delay of flights, and repealing Regulation (EEC) No 295/91 (OJ L 46, 17.2.2004, p. 1).
(16) Council Directive 93/109/EC of 6 December 1993 laying down detailed arrangements for the exercise of the right to vote and stand as a candidate in elections to the European Parliament for citizens of the Union residing in a Member State of which they are not nationals (OJ L 329, 30.12.1993, p. 34).
(17) Council Directive 94/80/EC of 19 December 1994 laying down detailed arrangements for the exercise of the right to vote and to stand as a candidate in municipal elections by citizens of the Union residing in a Member State of which they are not nationals (OJ L 368, 31.12.1994, p. 38).
(18) Proposal for a Council Directive on implementing the principle of equal treatment between persons irrespective of religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation (COM(2008)0426).
(19) Council Directive 2000/78/EC of 27 November 2000 establishing a general framework for equal treatment in employment and occupation (OJ L 303, 2.12.2000, p. 16).
(20) Regulation (EC) No 883/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 29 April 2004 on the coordination of social security systems (OJ L 200, 7.6.2004, p. 1).
(21) Directive 2011/24/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 March 2011 on the application of patients’ rights in cross-border healthcare (OJ L 88, 4.4.2011, p. 45).

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