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EP Plenary Session Newsletter 23-26 October 2017

18-10-2017

What will MEPs be working on in next week's plenary session in Strasbourg? Among the items on the agenda will be the EU General Budget for 2018, the removal of glyphosate products, minimum income policies, and trade deals with Australia and New Zealand.

EU summit and future of Europe

Council President Donald Tusk will discuss with MEPs the outcome of the 19-20 October meeting of European leaders, which focussed on migration and asylum, defence, and the Brexit negotiations.

President Tusk will also brief MEPs on first reactions and deliberations among heads of states and governments on different scenarios for the future of Europe.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Wednesday, 25 October

Procedure: Council and Commission statements (without resolution)

#EUCO @EU2017EE #MigrationEU #EUdefence

Agenda of the Council of the European Union 19-20 October Audiovisual material for professionals

Irish MEPs following this issue: Lynn Boylan, Matt Carthy, Seàn Kelly.

 

Media freedom debate after murder of Maltese journalist

Political groups will discuss media freedom and protection for journalists, after the brutal murder of Daphne Caruana Galizia, a Maltese journalist noted for her work on the Panama papers, corruption, and also drug trafficking.

The debate, scheduled for Tuesday afternoon, will be preceded by a minute of silence at noon before the votes. Ms Caruana Galizia’s family has been invited to attend.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Tuesday, 24 October

Procedure: Statements from the Council and the Commission without resolution

#DaphneCaruanaGalizia

Political groups will discuss media freedom and protection for journalists, after the brutal murder of Daphne Caruana Galizia, a Maltese journalist noted for her work on the Panama papers, corruption, and also drug trafficking.

Ms Caruana Galizia’s family has been invited to attend the Tuesday afternoon debate, which will be preceded by a minute of silence.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Tuesday, 24 October

Procedure: Statements from the Council and the Commission without resolution

#DaphneCaruanaGalizia

Audiovisual material for professionals
 

Shielding investors and the EU economy against bad loan packages

Packaged loans will have to be made less complex and more transparent before they can be sold on to investors, say draft rules to be voted on Thursday.

Under new rules, would-be investors in packages that bundle together individual loans and other assets (such as mortgages, consumer loans or leasing contracts) to form tradable securities - a process known as “securitisation” - would have to be properly informed about the quality of those assets beforehand.

Securitisation is an important source of funding, which enables banks to lend more to the real economy. But securitisation packages must be made “simple, transparent and standardised” to prevent the resale of bad loans fuelling a financial meltdown and revive the process subdued after the US sub-prime crisis in 2008

To discourage moral hazard, under the new rules financial institutions will have to retain an interest in any bundled securities that they sell.

Furthermore, “re-securitisation” - the bundling of securities that are themselves bundles of assets - would be banned.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Wednesday, 25 October

Vote: Thursday, 26 October

Procedure: Ordinary legislative procedure, first reading agreement

#STSsecuritisation #CRR #CMU

Draft report laying down common rules on securitisation and creating a European framework for simple, transparent and standardised securitisationDraft report on prudential requirements for credit institutions and investment firmsPress release after an agreement struck with the Maltese Presidency of the Council (30.05.2017)

Irish MEPs following this issue: Matt Carthy.

 

Strengthening security checks at Europe’s borders

A common electronic system to speed up checks at the Schengen area’s external and register all non-EU travellers will be debated and voted on Wednesday.

The new Entry/Exit System (EES) will register information (such as name, fingerprints, facial image, date and place) on entry, exit and refusal of entry of non-EU nationals, both for travellers requiring a visa and for visa-exempt travellers who cross the external borders of the Schengen area or those of Bulgaria and Romania. The data will be kept for 90 days.

EES would also make it easier to check that the authorised duration of a short stay - 90 days in any 180 day period - is respected.

The system will replace the stamping of passports and speed up border crossings, while making it easier to detect over-stayers and document or identity fraud. Data on people who are refused entry will be stored for three years to prevent their arrival via a different border.

Parliament will vote on an informal deal which was reached in negotiations with Council on 30 June.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Wednesday, 25 October

Vote: Wednesday, 25 October

Procedure: Ordinary legislative procedure

#Bordercontrols #migrationEU

Draft report on establishing an Entry/Exit System (EES) to register entry and exit data and refusal of entry data of third country nationals crossing the external borders of the Member StatesPress release: Border control: political agreement on new Entry-Exit system (30-06-2017)Procedure fileEP Research: Smart borders: EU Entry/Exit SystemCouncil press release: Entry-exit system: Council confirms agreement between Presidency and European Parliament on main political provisionsAudiovisual material for professionals and existing EP TV and WEBCOMM products to be picked up here
 

Posted workers: EP ready for negotiations with member states

Parliament will be ready to start talks with EU governments on the revised rules on the posting of workers, as MEPs are expected to back the negotiating mandate in plenary.

The reform of the rules will ensure better protection of posted workers and fair competition for companies. EP's draft negotiating mandate, to be tabled for plenary by the Employment and Social Affairs Committee, is based on the principle that the same work in the same workplace should be remunerated in the same manner.
The main changes include remuneration of posted workers, duration of the posting, collective agreements and temporary agency workers.

If there are no objections at next week’s plenary, the Parliament can start negotiations with the Council, which has yet to agree its position.

Quick Facts

A posted worker is an employee who is sent by his or her employer to carry out a service in another EU member state on a temporary basis. In 2015 there were 2.05 million posted workers in the EU.

Poland, Germany and France send the highest number of posted workers, while Germany, France and Belgium receive the highest number of posted workers.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

SCRIBO topic:

Procedure Code: 2016/0070(COD

Specialist: Urša

Procedure: Ordinary legislative procedure

Press release on committee vote (16.10.2017)Legislative file Profile of rapporteur Agnes Jongerius (S&D, NL)EP briefing: The revision of the posting of workers directiveEP Research: Posting of workers directiveEP study: Posting of workers directive - current situation and challengesInfographic on posted workersAudiovisual material - posting of workers
 

European Parliament President to announce 2017 Sakharov Prize winner

The winner of the 2017 Sakharov Prize will be decided by European Parliament President Antonio Tajani and political group leaders and announced by Mr Tajani in plenary session on Thursday.


In Thursday’s Conference of Presidents meeting, President Tajani and political group leaders will select the 2017 winner from among the three shortlisted finalists:

• Guatemalan human rights defender Aura Lolita Chavez Ixcaquic
• Democratic Opposition in Venezuela, and
• Swedish-Eritrean journalist Dawit Isaak.

President Tajani will announce the finalist in the plenary chamber at noon.

The Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought, named in honour of Soviet physicist and political dissident Andrei Sakharov, is awarded each year by the European Parliament. It was set up in 1988 to honour individuals and organisations defending human rights and fundamental freedoms. Last year the prize was awarded to Nadia Murad and Lamiya Aji Bashar.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Scribo topic: Human Rights / Sakharov Prize

Specialist: Emilie

Vote: during CoP on Thursday

#SakharovPrize

EP LiveEbS+ (26.10.2017)Sakharov Prize 2017 three finalistsAudiovisual material: Sakharov Prize 2017Website of the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought
 

EU Commission to-do list for 2018: debate with First Vice-President Timmermans

The 2018 work programme, the current Commission’s last, aims to translate the policy priorities set out in September’s State of the Union debate into draft laws and non-legislative proposals or actions.

Quick Facts

Every year, the European Commission adopts a plan of action for the year to come. The presentation of its work programme is preceded by an annual State of the Union address, delivered in September by the Commission President.

Next steps

Once the College of Commissioners has approved the work programme, the presidents of the Parliament, Council and Commission will discuss and sign a joint declaration in Strasbourg in December on key EU proposals for 2018, upon which the co-legislators (member states and MEPs) are committed to focus their work.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Tuesday, 24 October

Procedure: Commission statement followed by a debate

Procedure Code: 2017/2746(RSP)

#CWP2018 #EU2018Agenda

Commission website dedicated to its annual Work Programme
 

Drugs: speed up clamp-down on new psychoactive substances

Updated rules to declare “legal highs” illegal and remove them from the market more quickly will be debated in plenary on Monday and put to a vote on Tuesday. These new substances can have a similar effect to heroin, cocaine and other illicit drugs.

The changes, already agreed with the Council, reduce the deadlines for determining the risks posed by new psychoactive substances (NPS) such as the synthetic opioid furanylfentanyl, shortening the whole procedure almost by half. Europol’s role to determine to what extent and which criminal organisations are involved in the manufacture and distribution of the drugs is also strengthened.

As is the case for other illicit drugs, the production, distribution and sale of the most dangerous new substances by criminal gangs could be punishable with a maximum penalty of at least ten years imprisonment.

Quick facts

According to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), new psychoactive substances (NPS) are substances not subject to checks, and may pose a public health threat. They have rapidly proliferated over the last decade, benefitting from globalisation and new communications technologies, and are often sold openly in specialised shops and via the internet.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Monday, 23 October

Vote: Tuesday, 24 October

Procedure: Ordinary legislative procedure, first-reading agreement (changes to the EMCDDA Regulation) and second-reading agreement (directive on minimum provisions on criminal acts and penalties)

#EMCDDA

Draft report amending EMCDDA founding Regulation as regards information exchange, early warning system and risk assessment procedure on new psychoactive substancesDraft report laying down minimum provisions on the constituent elements of criminal acts and penalties in the field of illicit drug trafficking, as regards the definition of drug. Profile of rapporteur Michal Boni (EPP, PL) (changes to EMCDDA Regulation)Profile of rapporteur Teresa Jiménez-Becerril (EPP, ES) (criminal acts and penalties in the field of illicit drug trafficking) Procedure (changes to EMCDDA Regulation)Procedure (criminal acts and penalties in the field of illicit drug trafficking)New psychoactive substances in Europe: legislation and prosecution — current challenges and solutions (Joint publication by EMCDDA & Eurojust, November 2016)Study: A review and assessment of EU drug policy (November 2016)EP TV: Bringing “legal highs” to a low
 

EP to call for glyphosate phase-out, with full ban by end 2020

MEPs want a full ban on glyphosate-based herbicides by December 2020, and immediate restrictions on the use of the substance.

A draft resolution to be put to the vote on Tuesday opposes the European Commission’s proposal to renew the controversial herbicide licence for 10 years, as requested by some member states. Instead, MEPs say the EU should draw up plans to phase out the substance, starting with a complete ban on household use and a ban on using it for farming when biological alternatives (i.e. “integrated pest management systems”) work well for weed control.

Glyphosate should be completely banned in the EU by 15 December 2020, with the necessary intermediate steps taken, says the draft text.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Vote: Tuesday, 24 October

Procedure: non-legislative resolution

#glyphosate

EP research: EU’s Pesticide Risk Assessment System: The Case of GlyphosateAudiovisual material for professionals

Irish MEPs following this issue: Lynn Boylan, Mairead McGuinness, Marian Harkin.

Boosting the use of organic and safer fertilisers in the EU

Innovative fertilisers produced from organic or recycled materials could be sold more easily across the EU under new draft rules to be debated on Monday and put to the vote on Tuesday. MEPs also want to introduce limits for heavy metals, such as cadmium, in phosphate fertilisers to reduce health and environmental risks.

The new rules would promote using more recycled materials to produce fertilisers, thus helping to develop the circular economy, while reducing dependency on imported nutrients from countries outside the EU. Allowing innovative, organic fertilisers to be sold more easily across the EU would give farmers and consumers a broader choice and promote green innovation.

Cadmium limits

Cadmium, a heavy metal found mostly in mineral phosphate fertilisers, can pose a risk to human and animal health and the environment, as it accumulates in the environment and enters the food chain. The cadmium limits would be decreased from 60 mg/kg to 40 mg/kg after three years and to 20 mg/kg after nine years, MEPs propose, instead of 12 years as planned by the EU Commission. (AMs 7, 124)

After the vote in plenary, the new law stills needs to be negotiated with the EU Council of Ministers to reach an agreement.

Background for colleagues

Currently, only 5% of waste organic material is recycled and used as a fertiliser, but recycled bio-waste could substitute up to 30% of mineral fertilisers. The EU imports more than 6 million tonnes of phosphate rock a year, but it could recover up to 2 million tonnes of phosphorus from sewage sludge, biodegradable waste, meat and bone meal or manure, according to the Commission. Nearly half of the fertilisers on the EU market are not covered by the existing regulation.

The main fertiliser constituent is phosphate rock, which has been identified by the Commission as a critical raw material. For phosphate fertilisers, the EU is currently highly dependent on imports of phosphate rock mined outside of the EU (more than 90% of the phosphate fertilisers used in the EU are imported, mainly from Morocco, Tunisia and Russia).

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Monday, 23 October

Vote: Tuesday, 24 October

Procedure: Co-decision (Ordinary Legislative Procedure), 1st reading

#fertilisers #circulareconomy

Draft report on the proposal for a regulation laying down rules on the making available on the market of CE marked fertilising productsPress release on committee vote (13.07.2017)Procedure fileEP Research: CE marked fertilising productsInfographic on the circular economyAudiovisual material for professionals

Irish MEPs following this issue: Deidre Clune, Mairead McGuinness, Marian Harkin.

 

Forest fires in Northern Spain and Portugal: how to step up EU help

Ways to improve and mobilise EU emergency response and funding tools more quickly to help Spain and Portugal in the wake of recent deadly forest fires will be discussed with Council and Commission on Wednesday night.

Over 100 people died over the last four months in Portugal and Spain due to forest fires.

This summer the EU's Civil Protection Mechanism has been put into action a record eight times to help countries affected by forest fires.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Wednesday, 25 October

Procedure: Council and Commission statements followed by debate

#ForestFires #Portugal #Spain

Statement by Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management Christos Stylianides on the deadly forest fires and storms in several Member States (16.10.2017)Tweet by European Parliament President Antonio Tajani on the wild fires in Portugal and Spain Portuguese and EU flags at half-mast in the European Parliament Audiovisual material for professionals
 

Trade negotiations with Australia and New Zealand

Trade talks with Australia and New Zealand should aim to boost the EU economy while protecting farmers and consumers, MEPs say in a resolution to be debated on Wednesday and put to the vote on Thursday.

MEPs will propose a number of issues that the Council and the Commission should focus on during talks. These include creating new opportunities for EU business in obtaining contracts with public authorities, the protection of EU farmers and consumers, and the right of governments to legislate in the public interest. The outcome of negotiations will have to be approved by the EP.
The Council is expected to adopt the negotiating mandates in November and the Commission could then start talks with the two countries before the end of the year.

Quick facts

The EU and Australia conduct their trade and economic relations under the 2008 EU-Australian Partnership Framework, while the EU and New Zealand entered into a partnership agreement this year. Australia's exports to the EU are dominated by minerals and agricultural products, while the EU exports to Australia are mainly manufactured goods. New Zealand’s exports to the EU are agricultural products, while the majority of EU exports to New Zealand are again manufactured goods.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Wednesday, 25 October

Vote: Thursday, 26 October

Procedure: Non-legislative resolutions

#EUtrade

Press release on committee vote (12 October 2017)EP Research: Australia: Economic indicators and trade with the EU (June 2017)EP Research Briefing: From TPP to new trade arrangements in the Asia-Pacific region (May 2017)Procedure file for Australia negotiating mandateProcedure file for New Zealand negotiating mandateProfile of rapporteur Daniel Caspary (EPP, DE)Committee on International TradeAudiovisual material for professionals

Irish MEPs following this issue: Matt Carthy, Seàn Kelly, Marian Harkin.

 

How to tap into the Eurozone’s full economic potential

Up to one percent additional growth could be achieved through balanced structural reforms, employment policies and investment in member states, MEPs believe. A debate with Commissioner Moscovici on Wednesday afternoon will be followed by a vote on Thursday.

MEPs voiced concerns that the growth in the EU remains too low to create new jobs and severely lags behind the projected growth for the whole world, in a resolution drafted on the initiative of Gunnar Hökmark (EPP, SE).

They outlined policy actions such as a sound implementation of the country-specific recommendations (CSR), taxation reform and increased innovation, education, research and technology investments. The draft resolution further calls on the Commission and member states to take a fiscal stance appropriate for the euro area, reflecting the differences in fiscal policies required by each country.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Wednesday, 25 October

Vote: Thursday, 26 October

Procedure: Non-legislative resolution

#eurozone

Procedure file: Economic policies of the euro areaRapporteur: Gunnar Hökmark (EPP, SE) EP think tank: Structural reform support programme 2017-2020

Irish MEPs following this issue: Brian Hayes, Matt Carthy.

 

MEPs to agree on robust 2018 EU Budget ahead of negotiations with member states

Parliament will vote on an amended EU budget proposal for next year amounting to €162.6 billion in commitments, €2 billion more than the original Commission proposal of €160.6 billion.

The plenary is set to give Parliament’s negotiating team a mandate to defend a robust EU budget for next year in the upcoming “conciliation” talks with Council and Commission. MEPs propose rejecting all cuts requested by Council and adding funds for migration, security, jobs and to fight youth unemployment.

Details on the draft EP position on the 2018 EU budget are included in the press releases after recent votes on the figures and on the corresponding resolution in the Committee on Budgets.

Next steps

The plenary vote will kick off three weeks of “conciliation” talks with the Council, with the aim of reaching a deal between the two institutions in time for next year's budget to be voted on by Parliament and signed by its President on 30 November.

What are commitment and payment appropriations?

Given the need to manage multiannual actions (e.g. financing a research project lasting 2-3 years), the EU budget distinguishes between
commitment appropriations (the cost of all legal obligations contracted during the
current financial year, possibly bearing consequences in the following years) and
payment appropriations (money actually paid out during the current year, possibly
to implement commitments entered into in previous years).

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Tuesday, 24 October

Vote: Wednesday, 25 October

Procedure: Budgetary

#EUBudget #EUBudget2018

Draft report on the EU Budget for 2018Press release on committee vote – Budget figures (27.09.2017)Press release on committee vote – Budget resolution (10.10.2017)Lead rapporteur (Commission section) — Siegfired Muresan (EPP, RO)Rapporteur for the other sections — Richard Ashworth (ECR, UK)Documents in the 2018 budgetary procedureAudiovisual material for professionals and existing EP TV and WEBCOMM products to be picked-up

Irish MEPs following this issue: Lynn Boylan, Deidre Clune, Mairead McGuinness, Matt Carthy.

 

EU’s long-term budget: first reform proposals for post-2020 financial framework

The EU’s current long-term budget (2014-2020) is “stretched to its limits”, MEPs say in a draft resolution, to be voted on Tuesday. To “significantly increase” it, the next (post-2020) Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) should amount to at least 1.23% of EU GNI, they add. The current spending ceiling is 1%.

The draft resolution is a first political reaction to the Commission’s reflection paper on the future of EU finances. It wraps up the debate held in plenary on 4 July.

For an overview of the draft resolution, please see our press release on the recent Budgets Committee vote.

Next steps

Parliament’s full position on the next MFF will be set out in an upcoming own-initiative report. The EU Commission is expected to present the draft regulation for the post-2020 MFF in May 2018.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: 4 July

Vote: Tuesday, 24 October

Procedure: Non-legislative resolution

#EUBudget #MFF

Draft resolution on the Reflection Paper on the Future of EU FinancesPress release on committee vote (10.10.2017) EP fact sheet: Multiannual Financial FrameworkAt a glance: The future of EU finances Procedure fileAudiovisual material for professionals
 

EU-wide protection for whistle-blowers

Whistle-blowers acting in the public interest deserve proper protection and support, say MEPs, who will call for new rules on Tuesday.

MEPs say that whistle-blower protection in the EU is patchy and inadequate in many EU countries. In a draft resolution to be debated on Monday and voted on Tuesday, MEPs call on the EU Commission to propose rules before the end of this year to provide EU-wide protection.

All EU countries should introduce clearer reporting mechanisms and protective measures against retaliation, and provide support such as legal and financial aid.

MEPs also call for an EU authority to facilitate coordination in cross-border cases.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Monday, 23 October

Vote: Tuesday, 24 October

Procedure: non-legislative resolution

#whistleblowers

Draft resolution on legitimate measures to protect whistle-blowers acting in the public interest Profile of rapporteur: Virginie Rozière (S&D, FR) Procedure file
 

Protecting workers through stricter rules on carcinogens

Stricter EU rules to protect workers from exposure to carcinogens or mutagens will be debated on Wednesday and put to a final vote on Thursday.

The new rules add eleven substances to the existing list of harmful substances, which are subject to exposure limits. For two cancer-causing substances already on the list, i.e. hardwood dust and vinyl chloride monomer, the limits that workers can be exposed to have been lowered.

Employers will have to assess the risk of exposure for workers and take preventive measures. MEPs also oblige the Commission to assess the possibility of including reprotoxic substances, i.e. those which affect sexual function and fertility, by the first quarter of 2019.

Quick Facts

Cancer is the primary cause of work-related deaths in the EU. The new rules aim to potentially save 100 000 lives over the next 50 years. They will particularly benefit workers in the construction sector, and chemical, automotive, wood working and furniture industries, manufacturers of food products and textiles, the healthcare sector and hospitals.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Wednesday 25 October

Vote: Thursday 26 October

Procedure: ordinary legislative procedure

Draft resolution on the protection of workers from the risks related to exposure to carcinogens or mutagens at workPress release on committee vote (30.8.2017)Procedure fileProfile of rapporteur Marita Ulvskog (S&D, SV)EP Research: Limits on exposure to carcinogens and mutagens at workAudiovisual material for professionals

Irish MEPs following this issue: Lynn Boylan, Deidre Clune, Marian Harkin.

Sexual harassment and abuse in the EU

Following the Hollywood scandal of systemic sexual harassment in the film industry and the worldwide #MeToo campaign of women speaking out about the abuse that they have faced, MEPs will discuss sexual harassment in the EU on Tuesday evening.

Members will quiz the Commission on what the EU is doing to prevent sexual violence and support victims.

Parliament’s Women’s Rights committee held a hearing in June 2017 on “Measures to prevent and combat mobbing and sexual harassment in the workplace, in public spaces, and political life in the EU".

The outcome of the hearing will feed into a non-legislative resolution to be tabled in plenary before the end of the term.

MEPs might seize the opportunity to urge all member states to swiftly ratify and implement the Istanbul Convention.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Tuesday, 24 October

Procedure: Commission statement (without resolution)

#MeToo #StopVAW #IstanbulConvention

 

Minimum income schemes: helping people out of poverty and back into active life

A minimum income scheme is one of the most effective ways to lift people out of poverty, says a draft resolution to be debated on Monday and put to a vote on Tuesday.

Most EU countries already have such schemes, but not all provide adequate support for everyone in need. MEPs recommend various measures to improve the schemes’ effectiveness and stress the importance of combining financial support with easier access to social and public services like housing, health care and education.

These schemes should aim not just to assist people, but to help them out of social exclusion into an active life, says the text.
Due to the economic crisis, almost 120 million people in the EU are still at risk of poverty and social exclusion (data for 2015). Children, women, unemployed, single-parent households and people with disabilities are especially vulnerable.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Monday, 23 October

Vote: Tuesday, 24 October

Procedure: non-legislative resolution

Draft resolution on minimum income policiesPress release on committee vote (28.9.2017)Profile of the rapporteur Laura Agea (EFDD, IT)EP study: Minimum income policies in EU Member StatesProcedure file

Irish MEPs following this issue: Deidre Clune, Marian Harkin.

 

Anti-gypsyism - combatting discrimination against Roma in the EU

Member states and the EU are failing to secure equal rights for Roma people. MEPs will therefore debate on Monday how this discrimination can end. On Tuesday, they will adopt a resolution listing concrete measures to be taken at EU and national level.

The draft report was prepared by Soraya Post (S&D, SE) and the Civil Liberties Committee. The 10 to 12 million Roma living in the EU currently suffer from persistent and structural anti-Gypsyism “at all levels of European society, throughout all of Europe, on a daily basis”, the draft says.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Debate: Tuesday, 24 October

Vote: Wednesday, 25 October

Procedure: Non-legislative resolution

Draft resolution on fundamental rights aspects in Roma integration in the EU: fighting anti-Gypsyism Press release: MEPs call for better Roma integration and condemn anti-Gypsyism (28.09.17)Profile of rapporteur Soraya POST (S&D, SE)Procedure fileMEP Soraya Post on Roma (Video): Ending Roma discrimination:

Other items on the agenda

- Control of spending and monitoring of EU Youth Guarantee schemes cost-effectiveness (Derek Vaughan — CONT A8-0296/2017)

Irish MEPs following this issue: Seàn Kelly, Brian Hayes.

- EU-Morocco Euro-Mediterranean Aviation Agreement (Dominique Riquet — TRAN A8-0303/2017)

Irish MEPs following this issue: Deidre Clune, Matt Carthy.

- Commission Work Programme

Irish MEPs following this issue: Matt Carthy, Seàn Kelly.

- Authorisation of genetically modified soybean, maize, and oilseed rapes

Irish MEPs following this topic: Lynn Boylan.

- Prudential requirements for credit institutions and investment firms (Othmar Karas — ECON A8-0388/2016)

Irish MEPs following this issue: Brian Hayes.

- Implementation of the Environmental Liability Directive (Laura Ferrara — JURI A8-0297/2017)

Irish MEPs following this issue: Lynn Boylan.