Liadh NÍ RIADA : Written explanations of vote 

Members can submit a written explanation of their vote in plenary. Rule 183

Eurojust-Denmark Agreement on judicial cooperation in criminal matters (A8-0192/2019 - Claude Moraes)  
 

. – Denmark is a member of Eurojust but enjoys an opt-out from the Justice and Home Affairs pillar under Protocol 22 to the Treaties. Because of this, when the new Eurojust Regulation 2018/1727 enters into force on 12 December 2019, the country will be considered as a third country with respect to Eurojust.
The Danish authorities have expressed the wish to continue to take part in Eurojust, but waiting for the new Regulation to come into force before making a new agreement could risk an “operational gap”. This report endorses an agreement made under the current legal framework that will avoid this. I therefore voted in favour.

Coordination of social security systems (A8-0386/2018 - Guillaume Balas)  
 

. – This file is an update on the existing regulation 883/2004, which deals with the coordination of social security systems across the EU. However, when workers or individuals move between Member States there are a complicated series of impacts on social security systems which this regulation tries to deal with. For example, when someone is injured on holidays and gets medical treatment in another Member State, or when they move between Member States for work, paying insurance in several countries, and then become unemployed.
The outcome at Committee level was quite progressive including better rules to protect workers at all levels. In general there, respect has been maintained for the subsidiarity principle and the establishment of, and rules around, individual social security systems remain the competence of individual Member States, and some loopholes around social fraud have been closed.
Unfortunately negotiations with the Council and Commission reached an impasse. Rather than leaving things dangling, with this vote, the Parliament re-confirmed its support for the text adopted in Plenary last November. I voted in favour.

CO2 emission performance standards for new heavy-duty vehicles (A8-0354/2018 - Bas Eickhout)  
 

. – I voted in favour of this report. Sinn Féin supported the Parliament’s position in November 2018 vote and welcomes the agreed position between Parliament and Council after negotiations. Ambitious CO2 emissions reduction targets of new heavy-duty vehicles will be set for 2025 and for 2030, and a just transition towards zero-emission mobility is to be ensured taking into account the social effects of the transition throughout the whole automotive value chain.

Promotion of clean and energy-efficient road transport vehicles (A8-0321/2018 - Andrzej Grzyb)  
 

. – I voted in favour of this report. Our political group supported the Parliament’s position on this file when voted in October 2018, which presented a balanced report with ambitious, yet much needed targets. Despite the fact that the final agreement between the Council and the Parliament lost several of the Parliament’s ambitious commitments, we have been requesting public procurement to contribute to GHG emission reduction for a long time, and now we have binding procurement targets per Member State with sub targets for zero-emission vehicles. For these reasons I supported the final text.

Use of digital tools and processes in company law (A8-0422/2018 - Tadeusz Zwiefka)  
 

. – I voted against this provisional agreement. The proposal is part of a new company law package which aims to promote company mobility within the EU. In attempting to reduce bureaucratic red tape and harmonise e-government services, this proposal just gives additional freedoms to companies to relocate as they please, without any safeguards on fraud or tax evasion. For instance, the physical presence of a company legal representative for the establishment of a company/branch before the relevant authority in the destination Member State is only optional and on a case-by-case basis when there are reasons to suspect identity falsification. The is clearly inadequate safeguards in place, and the effect could be the facilitation of fraud rather than the prevention of it.

Cross-border conversions, mergers and divisions (A8-0002/2019 - Evelyn Regner)  
 

. – This report is part of the new 'company law package', which overall promotes company mobility by making it easier for companies to move their seat from one member state to another. EU law currently only covers cross-border mergers, but this package introduces harmonised rules for conversions and divisions (another way of moving a company's seat, which is handy for tax purposes).
While the Commission proposal had a one-dimensional focus on delivering company mobility, the Parliament’s report included strong provisions on workers' involvement, information and consultation rights in order to ensure that workers are heard and their interests are safeguarded in the event of a cross-border operation. The report also contained a 'real seat principle' requiring genuine economic activity in the member state where the company moves to in order to prevent the creation of letterbox companies. In Trilogue negotiations, however, these provisions were watered down again. Overall, the final report now grants companies greater freedoms to move, without really helping workers. I therefore voted against.

European Defence Fund (A8-0412/2018 - Zdzisław Krasnodębski)  
 

. – This file is the European Union's proposal to create a 13 billion euro slush fund for the European arms industry. This massive fund will be used to boost the profits of French and German arms companies and will increase the amount of weapons exported from Europe every year. This will fuel conflicts around the world as billions worth of European weapons are used in warzones every year.
At a time of increased global insecurity as a result of political instability, climate change, and poverty European states should prioritise funds which address these challenges not fuelling the proliferation of arms by giving billions of public money to the arms industry. I voted against.

Exposures in the form of covered bonds (A8-0384/2018 - Bernd Lucke)  
 

. – I voted against this provisional agreement. The package of a Directive and Regulation will lessen the safety level of one of the few instruments that are actually relatively stable, and remained so even during the crisis, by making them more complex and open to cross-border speculation.
In the context of the deepening the Capital Markets Union, the Commission has presented a proposal for enabling an EU framework on covered bonds facilitating the cross-border distribution of investments funds. This framework will aim to expand the capacity of credit institutions to provide financing to the real economy and contribute to the development of covered bonds across the EU, particularly in Member States where no market for them currently exists.
Covered Bonds are an asset class that has remained stable even during the financial crisis. The domestic and cross-border investments in covered bonds have worked well under the current legislative framework. The mandatory harmonisation of national models and their replacement by a European one that will allow the inclusion of derivative contracts and assets coming from third countries could endanger the risk level evaluation of the covered bonds. As a result I voted against.

Covered bonds and covered bond public supervision (A8-0390/2018 - Bernd Lucke)  
 

. – I voted against this provisional agreement. The package of a Directive and Regulation will lessen the safety level of one of the few instruments that are actually relatively stable, and remained so even during the crisis, by making them more complex and open to cross-border speculation.
In the context of the deepening the Capital Markets Union, the Commission has presented a proposal for enabling an EU framework on covered bonds facilitating the cross-border distribution of investments funds. This framework will aim to expand the capacity of credit institutions to provide financing to the real economy and contribute to the development of covered bonds across the EU, particularly in Member States where no market for them currently exists.
Covered Bonds are an asset class that has remained stable even during the financial crisis. The domestic and cross-border investments in covered bonds have worked well under the current legislative framework. The mandatory harmonisation of national models and their replacement by a European one that will allow the inclusion of derivative contracts and assets coming from third countries could endanger the risk level evaluation of the covered bonds. As a result I voted against.

InvestEU (A8-0482/2018 - José Manuel Fernandes, Roberto Gualtieri)  
 

. – I voted against the InvestEU programme because it is far from the ambitious investment programme the Commission claims. The 40.8 billion euro (from 38 million euro) is expected to be able to leverage 650 billion additional capital to cover investment gaps across Europe. However, as with the previous Juncker Plan, high levels of leverage are only achieved by offering these financial incentive to projects which are already commercially viable. When this is the case these investment funds simply function as subsidies to the private sector and ultimately socialize of loses and privatize profits.
The claim is that the additionality principle will be more stringently adhered than under EFSI. This is based on the introduction of more sophisticated scorecards; however, these remain ill-defined and unlikely to address the issue. There exists a geographical bias towards favouring wealthier countries and more developed regions. The funds also continues to support fossil-fuel projects.
Furthermore, when it comes to funding SMEs, the InvestEU uses financial intermediaries (i.e. banks, finance institutions, private equity and venture capital funds) and there has been a worrying lack of transparency and therefore oversight of how effective this have been in supporting SMEs. For these reasons, I voted against.

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