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  • 80-95% less emission from the buildings by 2050
  • New buildings to be fitted with loading stations for electric cars
  • Support for the renovation of existing buildings

Member States will be obliged to develop long-term strategies to ensure that buildings in the EU become highly energy efficient by 2050

The Directive for Energy Performance of Buildings (EPBD) and is part of the “Clean Energy for All Europeans” package presented in November 2016, and the first one to reach a provisional agreement.

 

Long-term strategies to reduce emissions and mitigate safety risks

 

The text of the provisional agreement requires Member States to establish national long-term strategies to support the renovation of residential and non-residential buildings, aimed at an emissions reduction in the EU by 80-95 % compared to 1990. The scheme will be a cost-efficient contribution to the EU’s energy efficiency targets.

 

The strategies must be used to address issues such as health and indoor climate and obstacles to renovations, while providing access to financing assistance.

 

Electro-mobility

 

As regards the residential building with more than 10 parking spaces, which are new or undergo major renovation, the provisional agreement requires the installation of cabling infrastructure necessary for the installation at a later stage of recharging points for electric vehicles.

 

As regards the residential buildings, the provisional agreement requires the installation of cabling infrastructure necessary for the installation at a later stage of recharging points for electric vehicles.

 

Monitoring energy performance

 

By the end of 2019, the European Commission will have to develop a concept for a common European Union scheme for rating the “smart-readiness” of buildings and a method to calculate and introduce it. This would be a measuring tool to help manage and reduce the demand of energy in buildings, while adapting the building to the needs of the occupant.

 

Quote

 

Bendt Bendtsen (EPP, DK), rapporteur, said: “We take an important step to ensure that our buildings contribute to a decarbonised and energy efficient economy - to the benefit of both the climate and the wallets of European citizens and businesses. We have agreed using the Directive as a driver for rolling out infrastructure for electrical cars, and made sure to safeguard the incentives to renovate, keeping the cost of electro-mobility at a reasonable level and limiting the burdens on our smaller households and SMEs.”

 

Next steps

                                                                                                                                                                  

The provisional agreement needs to be formally approved by the Parliament and the Council before entering into force.

 

Quick facts

 

Buildings consume most energy in Europe, absorbing 40% of final energy.

About 75% of buildings are energy-inefficient and, depending on the Member State, only 0.4-1.2% of them are renovated each year.

 

The construction industry generates about 9% of European GDP and accounts for 18 million jobs.