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EU-US trade deal: 14 EP committees have their say

Others Article - External/international trade14-04-2015 - 12:24
Flags of The United States and EU on banknotes   The EP plays a crucial role in deciding the fate of a trade deal between the US and the EU ©BELGAIMAGE/AGEFOTOSTOCK

The European Parliament is working on its position on the EU-US trade deal known as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). The international trade committee is responsible for drafting the Parliament's recommendations; however 13 other EP committees have contributed with their opinions. MEPs are due to debate and vote on the EP's position before summer.

The trade deal, which is still being negotiated, can only enter into force if it has been approved by both the Council and the European Parliament. MEPs have already warned that they would not approve the agreement at any cost and that they will be closely looking at issues such as food standards.

The international trade committee is responsible for drafting the Parliament's position based on a report prepared by Bernd Lange, a German member of the S&D group.

On 13 April the  international trade committee discussed 898 amendments to Lange's report that have been submitted. The vote on the report is expected by the end of May. During the meeting, Lange said: "It is absolutely essential for me to obtain a large majority to express our position against the Commission."

Adopted opinions:

Initially there were 14 EP committees sharing their expertise with the international trade committee. However, the transport committee decided not to participate. MEPs still have a chance to submit amendments before the plenary vote takes place.

More information

You can find more information in our TTIP top story.

Click here for more news from the European Parliament

REF. : 20150220STO24366
Updated: ( 12-05-2015 - 15:03)
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