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Parliamentary questions
30 January 2013
E-000994-13
Question for written answer
to the Commission (Vice-President/High Representative)
Rule 117
Marina Yannakoudakis (ECR)

 Subject:  VP/HR — Assisting international governments, and in particular the Philippine government, in their efforts to develop and enforce legislation prohibiting the trade in, and consumption of, dog meat
 Answer(s) 

Can the European External Action Service (EEAS) indicate what steps are being taken to assist the world’s governments, and in particular the Philippine government, in their efforts to develop and enforce legislation prohibiting the trade in, and consumption of, dog meat?

When responding, could the EEAS please take account of the following points:
1. The threat of rabies continues to pose health threats to humans in the Philippines. An estimated 10 000 dogs and 350 humans die of rabies every year. Furthermore, according to the National Meat Inspection Service, additional diseases associated with consuming dog meat include E.Coli 107, salmonella, anthrax, hepatitis, internal parasites and brucellosis; a large proportion of these diseases can be fatal.
2. The commercialisation of this practice in the Philippines has led to an industry which slaughters in the region of 500 000 dogs every year. A large proportion of these are strays or are pets that have been stolen by traders.
3. During transportation, dogs endure stressful and painful conditions for a prolonged period of time, in high temperatures and without food or water. It is estimated that up to 90% of such dogs die from heatstroke or asphyxiation. At the slaughterhouses, the surviving dogs are exposed to a number of inhumane killing methods.
 OJ C 361 E, 11/12/2013
Last updated: 13 February 2013Legal notice