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Parliamentary questions
22 January 2018
E-000314-18
Question for written answer
to the Commission
Rule 130
Hilde Vautmans (ALDE)

 Subject:  The European approach to Alzheimer's disease

By 2060, almost 30% of the European population will be over 65 years of age and 12% over 80. Whereas in 2016, almost six million people were living with dementia, the current number is 8.7 million, a figure that will double by 2040. A quarter of the population worldwide has been diagnosed with dementia, including half of the citizens in high-income countries. The diagnosis often comes too late. Currently the time that elapses between symptoms and diagnosis can average 20 months in Europe, and less than 50% of people are diagnosed. Until a cure has been found, diagnosis remains critical.

1. Does the Commission intend to appoint an EU coordinator for dementia?

2. As diagnosis is of key importance, what does the Commission intend to do in terms of coordinating an enhanced framework that can be used for early diagnosis?

3. As many pharmaceutical companies have declared that they will stop researching medicines against dementia and Alzheimer’s, what does the Commission intend to do to help research progress?

Last updated: 6 February 2018Legal notice