Procedure : 2006/2113(INI)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A6-0426/2006

Texts tabled :

A6-0426/2006

Debates :

PV 14/12/2006 - 3
CRE 14/12/2006 - 3

Votes :

PV 14/12/2006 - 6.35
CRE 14/12/2006 - 6.35
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P6_TA(2006)0603

REPORT     
PDF 389kWORD 384k
28 November 2006
PE 378.549v02-00 A6-0426/2006

on a European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy - Green paper

(2006/2113(INI))

Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

Rapporteur: Eluned Morgan

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION
 OPINION of the Committee on Foreign Affairs
 OPINION of the Committee on Development
 OPINION of the Committee on International Trade
 OPINION of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs
 OPINION of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety
 OPINION of the Committee on Transport and Tourism
 OPINION of the Committee on Regional Development
 PROCEDURE

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION

on a European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy - Green paper

(2006/2113(INI))

The European Parliament,

–   having regard to the Commission green paper - A European Strategy for Sustainable, Competitive and Secure Energy (COM(2006)0105)(1),

–   having regard to the joint paper by the Commission and the High Representative on the external aspects of energy policy, submitted to the European Council of 15-16 June 2006,

–   having regard to its position adopted at second reading on 8 March 2005 with a view to the adoption of a European Parliament and Council Regulation on conditions for access to the natural gas transmission networks(2),

–   having regard to its position adopted at first reading on 26 October 2005 on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council determining the general rules for the granting of Community financial aid in the field of the trans-European transport networks and energy and amending Council Regulation (EC) No 2236/95(3),

–   having regard to its position adopted at second reading on 13 December 2005 with a view to the adoption of a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on energy end-use efficiency and energy services and repealing Council Directive 93/76/EEC(4),

–   having regard to its position adopted at second reading on 4 April 2006 with a view to the adoption of a decision of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down guidelines for trans-European energy networks and repealing Decision 96/391/EC and Decision No 1229/2003/EC(5),

–   having regard to its position of 18 May 2006 on the proposal for a Council decision on the conclusion by the European Community of the Energy Community Treaty(6),

–   having regard to its position of 16 November 2005 on the proposal for a Council regulation on the implementation of Protocol No 9 on the Bohunice V1 nuclear power plant in Slovakia, as annexed to the Act concerning the conditions of accession to the European Union of the Czech Republic, Estonia, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Malta, Poland, Slovenia and Slovakia(7),

–   having regard to its resolution of 16 November 2005 on the use of financial resources earmarked for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants(8),

–   having regard to its resolution of 16 November 2005 on "Winning the Battle against Global Change"(9)

–   having regard to its position of 14 December 2004 on the proposal for a Council directive imposing an obligation on Member States to maintain minimum stocks of crude oil and/or petroleum products (Codified version)(10),

–   having regard to its position adopted at first reading on 5 July 2005 on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council concerning measures to safeguard security of electricity supply and infrastructure investment(11),

–   having regard to its position of 5 July 2006 on the proposal for a Council directive on the supervision and control of shipments of radioactive waste and nuclear spent fuel(12),

–   having regard to its resolution of 14 February 2006 with recommendations to the Commission on heating and cooling from renewable sources of energy(13)

–   having regard to its resolution of 29 September 2005 on the share of renewable energy sources in the European Union and proposals for concrete actions(14),

–   having regard to its resolution of 23 March 2006 on security of energy supply in the European Union(15),

–   having regard to its resolution of 1 June 2006 on Energy efficiency or doing more with less: Green Paper(16),

–   having regard to the Presidency Conclusions of the European Councils of 23-24 March 2006, concerning the European Council's endorsement of the Green Paper on an Energy Policy for Europe, and of 15-16 June 2006 concerning the Joint Paper by the Commission and High Representative on the External Aspects of Energy Security,

–   having regard to deliberations of the Public Hearing organised by its Committee on Industry, Research and Energy on the subject on 12 September 2006,

–   having regard to the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe under which energy is a field in which there is shared competence with the Member States,

–   having regard to Rule 45 of its Rules of Procedure,

–   having regard to the report of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy and the opinions of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Committee on Development, the Committee on International Trade, the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, the Committee on Transport and Tourism and the Committee on Regional Development (A6-0426/2006),

1.  Welcomes the Commission’s green paper on a European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy, but underlines the need to acknowledge the ever changing conditions in the broader global energy market and highlights the importance of extending the producer perspective to a systematic approach that takes account of production, distribution and consumption in order to develop a European energy policy securing affordable energy as far as possible from low-carbon sources in the short term and carbon free sources in the medium term and indigenous resources, respecting market mechanisms, whilst protecting the environment, combating climate change and promoting energy efficiency;

2.  Stresses that the Commission stated in its green paper that € 1 trillion needs to be invested in the European energy market in order to secure energy supplies in Europe in the long term; also notes that it cannot be assumed that these resources can be funded from the public purse and that it is therefore important to involve energy industry operators in the European Union in the further development of the consensus on energy policy;

3.  Urges the 2007 Spring European Council to adopt an action plan, which should at least contain the following elements: for consumers to be placed at the centre of energy policy, a radical reform of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) to guide the market into investment in a low carbon economy which should be driven by a set target for EU carbon emissions by 2020 including a target of 25% of energy from renewable sources by 2020 and a binding target for car emissions, a step change in energy efficiency, strengthened laws with regard to competition policy and full ownership unbundling of energy networks, minimum binding guidelines set out for regulators, including a procedure for the nomination of regulators, independence, transparency and accountability, an ambitious R&D strategy on clean energy technologies, a common foreign energy policy strategy and full implementation of all current EU energy legislation;

Sustainability

Climate Change

4.  Recognises that climate change is causing serious environmental problems requiring immediate EU and international action; believes that by 2050 the overwhelming proportion of EU energy needs must come from carbon free sources or be produced with technologies which withhold greenhouse gas emissions, with a focus on energy saving, efficiency and renewable energies and that there is therefore a need to set out a clear roadmap for attaining this objective; urges EU leaders to agree by the end of next year on a binding 2020 CO2 target and an indicative 2050 CO2 target and further believes that:

a)    the Commission should propose a revision of the ETS including economically acceptable management of ETS credits such as a progressive move towards auctioning or benchmarking based on output; the ETS scheme should be based on a careful evaluation of economic and environmental impacts, a comprehensive assessment of the allocation methodologies, the wide use of flexible mechanisms and a review of the penalty scheme,

b)    during the second ETS financing period (2008-2012), financial resources should be allocated in a way that leads to action being taken to reduce CO2 emissions and energy consumption through the modernisation of energy production plants,

c)    a cap and trade emissions regime should be extended internationally and should run for a longer period than at present,

d)    the ETS should include additional large emitting sectors including all modes of freight transport; a strategy to cut emissions from ships should be developed, following an impact assessment, and a separate system for aviation should be set up as soon as possible,

e)    given the volatility of prices for emission certificates, calls upon the Commission to consider mitigation option;.such options should include the promotion of confidence in the market by increasing market transparency, e.g. through the timely and uniform publication of emissions data throughout the EU, as well as extended use of the flexible mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol (Joint Implementation and Clean Development) to increase market liquidity,

f)     calls upon the Commission to examine by 2007 in which way national allocation methods should be further harmonised and how the ETS methodology may be simplified and rendered transparent, in line with stock market rules;

5.  Recalls its abovementioned resolution on "Winning the Battle against Global Climate Change", which calls for significant emission reductions: 30% by 2020 and 60-80% by 2050, to be undertaken by developed countries; stresses that the EU strategy on climate change should be built on binding greenhouse gas emission targets; urges the Member States to internalise external costs, including those relating to climate change, into the price of energy production and remove "perverse" incentives such as fossil fuel subsidies;

Research, Development and Innovation

6.  Calls for the Spring European Council of March 2007 to ensure that the future energy policy of Europe is backed up by an ambitious R & D strategy in the field of energy including more adequate public funding and strong incentives for increased private R & D funding, fulfilling corporate social responsibility obligations; encourages Member States to set out a strategy for increasing the budget for energy research, especially when there is a mid-term review of the EC budget in the Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration activities (FP7) and in the Intelligent Energy Specific Program; calls for a European strategic energy technology plan and hopes that its content will cover research fields focusing on new energy technologies in the medium and long term, including in particular energy storage;

Energy Efficiency and Saving

7.  Calls on the Commission to ensure that the contribution of hydrogen and fuel cells applications to accelerating the transition from fossil fuels to an efficient and CO2 lean energy and transport system is reflected in EU's short term energy and transport policy actions and supporting bodies;

8.   Recalls that the EU must remain a key player in initiatives such as the International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy (IPHE)(17) or the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)(18);

9.  Calls on the Commission and the Member States to create a road map for climate-friendly and environmentally-friendly innovation based not only on technological innovation but also on developing strategies to increase the market penetration of the best available technologies and organisational improvements, e.g. in the logistic sector;

10. Calls on the Commission to carry out an energy audit on existing technology platforms in order to improve coordination and the exchange of expertise;

11. Notes that research in the field of energy technologies is an important step on the way to opening up export markets; therefore calls on the Commission to continue supporting research into all sources of energy (conventional, nuclear and renewable) so that Europe, as well as exploiting such research for its own purposes in the EU Member States, may also open up export markets;

Investments

12.  Recalls the need for significant investment in electricity and gas infrastructure in order to secure energy supply in Europe; requests the Commission to:

a)      contribute to the creation of a favourable investment climate,

b)     ensure that markets are allowed to send the right investment signals to investors;

13. As electricity networks will have to adapt to the growing share of renewable energies and decentralised generation, calls upon the Commission and Member states to further promote research into the necessary information and communication technologies;

14. Encourages the involvement of regional stakeholders in energy issues, as many problems find their solution through investment at regional and urban level, especially solutions favouring the use of diverse and renewable energy sources; emphasises the potential for SME entrepreneurship in energy investments and the role that sustainable energy investments (i.e. in biomass, biofuels and district heating) can play in regional and urban development; therefore asks Member States and the Commission to involve regional and local authorities in these issues so as to commit even more strongly to the promotion of renewable energy sources within the overall energy mix;

15. Draws attention to the problems that border regions encounter because of the differences in national energy policies, the lack of information-exchange between Member State energy providers and the lack of a harmonised EU energy policy;

16. Stresses the positive impact that the promotion and development of renewable energy technology has on the creation of new, long-term and highly-skilled jobs;

Security of Supply

Energy Efficiency and Energy-Saving

17. Calls on the Council and Commission to adopt measures to make the EU the most energy efficient economy in the world by 2020 and to set energy efficiency measures as an horizontal priority for all policy sectors in the EU; calls on the Commission to ensure timely implementation of EC directives in the field and urges the Council to adopt the proposals in the energy efficiency action plan and Member States to use best practice as a basis for their national energy efficiency action plans, to be submitted by June 2007; urges the Commission to dedicate enough staff at all levels to transform the measures proposed in the action plan into concrete actions; recalls that if Member States were to fully implement existing EU legislation, 50% of the EU target to save 20% of energy by 2020 would already be met; calls on the President of the Commission to promote a global energy efficiency agreement;

18.  Points to the fact that there are very promising technologies available for use in combined heat and power and cooling processes and that district heating also offers an infrastructure for future renewable energy sources;

19. Recalls that 40% of all EU energy is used in buildings and that there is a huge potential to reduce this consumption when planning new buildings and modernising existing buildings; urges the Commission to revise the existing buildings directive in order to include buildings below the 1000m² threshold; calls on the Commission to ensure that all EU institution buildings set an example by achieving carbon neutral status by 2012; believes that Member States should commit to ensuring that this is true also of all National Government buildings and that this goal should be extended to local authority and regional buildings by 2015; urges the Commission to implement a programme aimed at the large scale deployment of passive and net positive energy houses and buildings in the EU;

20. Calls on the President of the Commission to host a meeting of representatives of the Member States’ biggest cities for the purpose of exchanging their experience of local energy-reduction projects in an endeavour to reduce and make more efficient urban energy consumption; believes that serious efforts should be made to increase the power derived from combined heat and power and cooling production and district heating; adds that these technologies are very promising for increasing the use of biomass and biofuels and emphasises that district heating offers an infrastructure also for future renewable energy sources; believes that the Commission should work closely with the Committee of the Regions on this matter;

21. Calls on the Commission, by spring 2007 at the latest, to submit implementing measures regarding energy-efficient products under Directive 2005/32/EEC of the European Community and of the Council of 6 July 2005, establishing a framework for the setting of eco-design requirements for energy-using products (EUP Directive)(19) ;

22. Requests the Commission to help industry to develop and roll out smart metering and charging systems, possibly via intelligent metering system managed by remote mechanisms (AMM); calls upon the Commission to carry out a thorough cost-benefit analysis of these measures, taking on board changes in the behaviour of consumers;

23. Considers that taxation plays a prominent role in enhancing energy efficiency; believes that efforts should be made so that Member States' national tax systems discriminate in favour of energy efficient practices;

24. Draws the Commission's attention to the need for EU structural funds to be used, particularly in the new Member States, in the large-scale modernisation of the thermal insulation of housing, which will bring significant reductions in energy consumption and CO2 emissions;

25. Calls for a comprehensive EU strategy in the transport sector, aiming at the phasing out of fossil fuel use a reduction of EU dependency on oil and the gradual use of clean energies for transportation; favours a shift towards the most energy efficient and clean transport modes, to be achieved notably through new legislation, including the introduction of legislation in the automotive industry including promotion of market penetration of plug-in hybrid cars and fully electric vehicles;

26. Stresses that many outlying and outermost regions have considerable potential in terms of renewable energies, linked to their geographical or climate-related characteristics (sunshine, wind, biomass, wave energy); hopes that more use will be made of this outstanding opportunity, particularly in order to make an active contribution to achieving the Kyoto objectives;

27. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to adopt practical measures to improve the energy efficiency of small and medium-sized businesses, including, in particular, measures to increase awareness and action to ensure easier access to funding, including funding from the structural funds, the EBRD and the EIB, to enable such businesses to invest in reducing energy consumption;

28. Hopes that greater energy efficiency will be encouraged in third countries and endorses the Commission’s proposal to work towards the adoption of an international energy efficiency agreement;

29. Takes the view that the benchmark system agreed on in the directive in order to achieve final energy efficiency is an economically rational, unbureaucratic and effective means of increasing energy efficiency and proposes that this system be used to a greater extent in other energy sector; asks the Commission to make efforts to accelerate the setting of common EU-wide benchmarks in all the relevant areas based on sectoral energy efficiency indicators in accordance with Article 16 of the end-use energy efficiency and energy services directive (2006/32/EC);

Energy Mix

30. Believes that the diversification of energy sources along with increased use of indigenous sources and decentralised energy production will improve security of supply, but acknowledges the fact that decisions on energy mix in one Member State can affect security of supply in other Member States; regards the EU's dependency on a limited number of energy producers and supply routes as a serious risk to the stability and prosperity of the EU; welcomes the introduction of a mechanism able to ensure rapid solidarity and assistance to Member States facing difficulties following damage to their infrastructure;

31. Considers it vital that the European energy strategy be based on maximum subsidiarity and that decisions concerning the energy mix should remain the prerogative of the EU Member States;

32. Welcomes the high efficiency and high renewables scenario from July 2006 presented by DG TREN of the Commission and the study commissioned by ITRE on security of supply presented to the same committee on 9 October; urges therefore the Commission to take both scenarios as a basis for the energy review scheduled for January 2007;

33. Asks the Commission and the Member States, without neglecting short and medium-term costs, to give priority to those forms of energy which reduce the import dependency, especially from fossil fuels, and support the environment, are sustainable and reduce risks of continuous supply, not least because of the decentralisation of production;

34. Calls on the President of the Commission to carry out the plan to publish monthly figures on European stocks, imports, and exports of oil and petroleum products, broken down by product type (crude, petrol, diesel oil, heating oil, and others); believes that figures of this kind (which would be in the public domain, as they are in the United States) would give a clearer idea of the pressures being brought to bear on the world market and a clear picture of European consumption, as well reducing the obsession which operators have with American stocks and consequently helping to make oil prices less volatile;

35. Calls on the Commission to conduct a transparent and objective debate on the future energy mix, taking into account the advantages and drawbacks of all forms of energy, including economic and environmental costs and consequences;

36. Urges the Commission to finalise by the end of 2008 at the latest a new energy and transport modelling tool for the EU; believes that such a bottom-up model should be developed in close collaboration between the Commission services, the IEA and the national governments and aim at streamlining all statistical energy and transport data in Europe, that the model would then replace the multitude of models existing today within the different Commission services and also harmonise energy statistics all over Europe; further believes that the model should be in the public domain and could, as it is the case today in the US, be used on demand by the different stakeholders to develop different scenarios for the EU energy future;

37. Proposes, in order to boost the diversification of energy sources, that the EU set a long-term stable policy framework in order to create the necessary investment climate; believes that such a framework should contain an EU target for energy efficiency improvements of at least 20% by 2020, and asks the Commission to propose a framework for options of harmonised support schemes for renewable energies as part of the renewable energy roadmap and, furthermore, set binding sectoral targets for renewables in order to achieve 25% of renewables in primary energy by 2020 and a road map at Council and Commission level for reaching a target for renewables of 50% by 2040, an EU 30% reduction of the CO2 target for 2020 and a 60-80% reduction for 2050;

38. Stresses that the need to change the current energy production mix is not a burden but an opportunity; the use of solar, wind, biomass, hydro or geothermal energy and more energy efficiency technologies will help to fulfil the commitments made in Kyoto and under the UN Framework Climate Change Convention and also strengthen innovation, job creation and competitiveness in Europe;

39. Believes that the proposed Strategic Energy Review (SER) should integrate the work of the proposed Energy Supply Observatory (which should not be an independent body) and that it should analyse security of supply on a regular basis; considers that the SER's remit should involve strategic analysis of the problems confronting the EU in the energy sector, including the external aspects; encourages the Commission to use the SER to develop a formula that enables Member States to analyse the trade-offs between different policy options with regard to the environment, security of supply, competitiveness and job creation and that thus helps to minimise risks; welcomes the Commission’s effort to undertake a detailed study of the subsidies and costs of all energy sources, including the internalisation of externalities within the SER, applying the life-cycle and well-to-wheel approach; requests the publication of such a study in order to raise public awareness; proposes that a Europe-wide forward study of supply and demand in the medium and long-term be conducted in order to identify investment needs, especially on the production side, and raise the profile of operators; proposes that a cost-benefit analysis should focus on the contribution of each energy source to the EU’s three objectives in the energy field, namely security of supply, competitiveness, and environmental sustainability;

40. Believes that the SER should also cover trade issues, meaning that it should analyse the impact of international cooperation and long-term contracts already signed or to be signed and assess the consistency between policies pursued by business and national and EU policies;

41. Recalls that oil is still the most important primary energy source in the EU, for which the EU depends almost completely on imports; regrets the lack of attention paid in the Commission’s green paper to the fact; calls upon the Commission and Member States to take into account the need for diminishing the use of oil, decreasing import dependency and contributing to reducing CO2 emissions;

42. Insists that Member States develop a systematic approach, including economic, ecological and technological aspectsof the production, distribution, consumption and market penetration of liquid and gaseous biofuels, in particular those used in transport, in order to improve access to and promote trade in biofuels; insists on the full implemtation of existing binding legislation; urges the Commission to remove technical and administrative barriers to blending levels and to ensure consistency between different policy areas, e.g. transport, agriculture trade, and that recognition is given to both liquid and gaseous biofuels as an option for the  transport sector and not just as a fuel for generating electricity; encourages Member States to take into account a mandatory and comprehensive certification scheme to be introduced by the Commission allowing the sustainable production of biofuels at all stages, as well as for the overall life-cycle greenhouse gas balance for biofuels produced within and imported into the EU;

43. Calls on the Commission to present a proposal for a directive on heating and cooling from renewable energy sources as soon as possible and recalls its resolution of 14 February 2006 with recommendations to the Commission and Council on heating and cooling from renewable sources of energy;

44. Calls on the Commission to recognise in the medium term the important role of fossil fuels and the possibility of undertaking further studies to reduce their carbon intensity in line with the 2 ° C degree target for CO2 reduction; considers that this should include the continuous modernisation and the improvement of their efficiency, development of a new generation of installations based on gasification and parallel electricity and chemical production, the further development of an economical method of carbon capture and storage in relation to coal and gas and oil, in accordance with the decisions taken by the European Technology Platform for Zero Emission Fossil Fuel Power Plant, and the removal of barriers posed by EU legislation;

45. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to recognise the socio-economic importance of local and indigenous sources of energy in the EU and to encourage their development as a means of contributing to the security of energy supply in Europe;

46. Regrets the lack of attention paid in the Green Paper to reducing dependence on oil, when petroleum products are still the most important primary energy source in the EU, and where the EU is almost completely import dependent;

47.      Calls on the Commission to implement the trans-European energy networks and establish a priority interconnection plan, in view of the recently amended decision laying down the guidelines for trans European energy transmission networks, without neglecting the liquefied natural gas reception regasification infrastructure and storage facilities; in addition, believes that all energy sources including renewables should be given fair and non-discriminatory access to the power grids so as to further the integration of markets and ensure security of supply; considers that offshore wind power installations should be integrated first into a regional grid and ultimately into the trans-European energy network;

48. Asks the Commission to give special consideration to developing marine-based renewable energies (offshore wind, wave power, tidal) in particular in the North Sea, the Baltic Sea, the Irish Sea and the Mediterranean, and solar, in particular in the Mediterranean region, so as to ensure that these resources are in the 2007 road map on renewable energy sources and are fully developed rapidly;

49. Believes that nuclear energy is a part of the European political debate on the energy mix; recognises the role that nuclear energy currently plays in some Member States in maintaining security of electricity supply, as part of the energy mix and as a way of avoiding CO2 emissions; considers that decisions on whether nuclear energy production should continue to play a role in some Member States can only be taken at Member State level, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity;

50. Urges the Commission to investigate the development of nuclear energy in Member States, taking account of both the benefits of that technology (low volatility of production costs and no CO2 emissions) and the risks linked to the existence of nuclear power stations (failures and waste disposal);

51. Draws attention to the fact that, in view of the high level of European Union dependence on imports, it is particularly important to increase the diversity of countries of origin and transit routes;

52. Recognises that decisions about the make-up of the energy mix must take account of specific national and regional circumstances; considers, therefore, that the promotion of renewables must be geared to relevant geographical, climatic and economic conditions;

Infrastructure and investments for security of supply

53. Calls on Member States to implement their political commitments regarding the development of the missing energy interconnections, paying special attention in the isolated and border regions of the EU, such as the Baltic States; recalls the necessity of investments to achieve this goal, and requests the Commission to establish a favourable investment climate in order to ensure that markets send the right signals to investors; calls on the Member States and the Commission to thoroughly consider the environmental aspects, before approving further major infrastructure investments, such as the planned North European Pipe line - North Stream;

54. Takes the view that, in addition to environmental benefits, economic efficiency should also be a determining factor in the promotion of renewables, so that the financial burden on the end user can be minimised;

External aspects

55. Believes that development of a common stance in the EU in the dialogue with third countries will increase the EU's ability to negotiate with energy producing and consuming countries and that the Commissioner responsible for energy should follow a well-defined mandate which sets out a European long-term energy planning vision;

56.      Urges Member States, mindful of improving cooperation with EU institutions, to set down a list of priority areas where they have reached agreement in terms of external energy policy, including:

a) climate change targets, energy efficiency and savings targets, the development of renewable technologies,

b) human rights and social dialogue, in an endeavour to set standards for Corporate Social Responsibility in the field, both at EU and at UN level,

c) the inclusion, in all new EU trade and international agreements, of an energy section, in recognition of the principle of reciprocity, transparency and the rule of law,

d) the establishment at EU level of an exchange of information on substantive gas contracts or the sale of energy infrastructure with third countries,

e) the diversification of supplies and transit routes for oil and gas, in recognition of the EU’s Neighbourhood Policy;

57. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to support investment in the European Union, and the acquisition of market share here, by firms from energy-producing countries only on the condition of reciprocity, i.e. security of investment in those countries, and with a strategy that combines the transfer of best available technologies with the creation of an international ruled-based, stable framework for investment that draws on WTO and bilateral economic agreements;

58. Regards it as vital for the EU to continue to lead the global fight against climate change and to strive for achievement of the Kyoto protocol targets; considers it necessary to integrate the EU's endeavours in the development of renewable and clean energy resources and technologies for energy saving and efficiency into all external relations, in line with the global sustainable development agenda agreed in Johannesburg in 2002;

59. Stresses the need to create a common energy policy with regard to internal market regulations as well as external aspects that takes into account the political and economic interests of all the Member States;

60. Underlines the importance of developing of a pan-European Energy Community Treaty;

61. Welcomes, in the context of the green paper, the Commission's recent initiative to undertake a study "addressing the interlinkages between natural resource management and conflict in the Commission's external relations", and stresses in particular the links between energy security and climate security;

62. Asks the Commission to formulate, as the supreme aim of the EU´s external energy policy, a reduction in the dependence on fossil fuels from a few big suppliers and to diversify the sources of energy,and, for this purpose, believes that a long-term plan with indicative dates should be presented to Parliament and Council.

63. Stresses the fact that a new form of political dialogue and cooperation among consumer countries has become indispensable, especially with the US, China, India and Japan; notes that a similar dialogue between key consumer and producer countries has also become necessary in order to develop a global approach to energy; believes that these new forms of global energy dialogue should aim at making global energy markets stable, secure and transparent, and at the same time provide a continued boost in favour of clean energy sources and energy efficiency;

64. Calls on the Commission and the Council to develop a strategic energy partnership with countries such as China, India, South Africa, Brazil and Mexico to financially assist them in developing sustainable energy strategies and thereby secure their participation in climate change mitigation efforts;

65. Calls on the Commission, as a matter of urgency, to focus not only on closer cooperation with Russia, but also to step up cooperation with other energy exporters, the CIS and particularly the OPEC countries; welcomes the planned development of an EU-wide energy community;

66. Urges the Commission and the Member States to take very seriously the real danger of a deficit in gas supplies from Russia after 2010 due among other things to the lack of investment, excessive leakage and energy waste in the Russian domestic market; insists that Member States make plain that the kind of investment necessary is more likely to be forthcoming if there is a higher degree of security for investments since these will not be made without long term contracts; insists that the Member States and the Union in its energy-related discussions with Russia, demand the ratification of the Transit Protocol and the Energy Charter Treaty, which is instrumental to ensuring future much-needed foreign investment in Russia’s energy infrastructure and ensuring an adequate gas supply to the EU in the future;

67. Notes that the informal European Council meeting in Lahti agreed that the principles of the Energy Charter and the G8 conclusions should be incorporated in the forthcoming agreement between the EU and Russia, which should, inter alia, include :

a) a mechanism, like those in the WTO, to decide in disputes concerning the EU and Russia and/or the individual investors,

b) a provision for mutual access to infrastructure,

c) competition rules limiting the power of quasi-monopolistic companies which have not been unbundled having access to their respective energy markets,

d) the issue of technical failures in the third countries, affecting cross-border supplies to the EU Member State, be addressed;

68. Stresses that a precarious energy and climate security situation is frequently the trigger for international crises and conflicts, which have consequences for democracy, human rights and poverty;

69. States that last winter's failure in the gas energy market of several Member States has already resulted in the relocation of enterprises in energy intensive industries; considers it necessary in this context to examine opportunities for promoting solidarity between Member States and considering how to deal with this issue as a priority in order to ensure the proper operation of both existing and future interconnectors;

70. Calls on the EU to seek to include provisions governing energy trade in WTO regulations, enabling that organisation to become an international mediator able to resolve disputes concerning the delivery and distribution of energy;

71. Believes that the EU has a responsibility to develop with the relevant countries decentralised energy solutions adapted to rural areas;

72. Calls upon the Commission to analyse and address the issue of technical failures in third countriesthat affect cross-border supplies to the EU Member States, such as the disruption of the oil supply from the Druzhba pipeline;

73. Stresses the need to increase diversity in the EU's gas market by seeking ways of securing greater energy supplies directly from producers in Central Asia, i.e. Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan;

74. Calls for steps to be taken to ensure that the Pan European Energy Community (PEEC) is developed,extending the Energy Community Treaty to include Turkey, and examining the possibility of the Mashreq and the Maghreb joining the PEEC;

Single market in energy and competitiveness

75. Calls upon the Member States to recognise that the EU energy market is still not fully liberalised and that full implementation is imperative; is of the opinion that a clear and stable political framework and a competitive and fair energy market is needed to establish a high degree of energy independence, long-term stability, efficiency, environmental sensitivity and security of supply; thus calls upon the Commission and the Member States to carefully assess the need for regulatory intervention against this background;

76. Notes that Member States have been encouraging energy market liberalisation policies in different ways and that differences can also be seen in their regulatory frameworks;

77. Calls for the Spring Council of March 2007 to provide a broader vision of the common European interest in the energy field, in order to place the completion of the internal market in a clear political framework, something that is currently lacking;

78. Calls on the Commission to use its powers under Article 86(3) of the EC Treaty to increase its efforts to unbundle gas infrastructure in order to promote competition in the gas transit network sector and incentivise operators to open markets to operators other than the traditional gas suppliers;

79. Congratulates the Commission on the energy sector inquiry; calls on the Commission to pursue enforcement action including fines against companies which breach competition rules; encourages the Commission to pursue Member States which unduly protect national energy champions, and attempt to re-regulate end prices at a level below the market price, or attempt to block mergers and acquisitions which harm the development of the internal market; requests the Commission to provide guidance on the appropriate form of long term supply contracts and conditions under which arrangements are acceptable;

80. Considers that Member States and regions should ensure that small and medium-sized energy producers and large producers are treated equally on the market, with a view to protecting energy consumers against the effects of market monopolies;

81. Urges the Commission in its appraisal of National Allocation Plans (NAPs) to reject the market distortions arising from NAPs and insists on the harmonisation of NAPs, many of which currently undermine the "polluter pays" principle;

82. Calls on the Commission to put an end to regulated energy prices because these undermine the very essence of open energy markets; calls above all on Commission to address regulated energy price systems for energy intensive industries because these undermine not only the EU energy market but also the internal market in other commodities; accepts that special measures might be necessary for EU energy intensive industries which are exposed to global competition, but that these measures must be taken in an coordinated way across the EU; urges therefore DG Competition to come up with a clear set of criteria to define what are energy intensive industries exposed to global competition and to use these criteria to assess the validity of special national energy regimes for energy intensive industries;

83. Urges the Commission to take further steps to address concentrations in the energy market;

84. Proposes significant increases in the powers of Member State regulators, who should be fully independent of government and industry, and to harmonise their powers which could be achieved via the establishment of common rules on transparency, disclosure and accountability, which should be monitored by the Commission and annually by the European Parliament, and to set minimum binding guidelines on the procedure for the appointment of regulators; believes that national energy regulators should be given a role of advising competition authorities in the Member States and of ensuring that energy companies have a statutory obligation to give energy saving advice to customers;

85. Calls on the Commission to prepare a review of the power and independence of national regulators and only afterwards to prepare a recommendation on the harmonised development of regulation on the internal market;

86. Calls on the Member States to grant powers to national regulators, agreed at EU level, to deliver on cross–border electricity and gas transmission, including non–discriminatory grid access, transmission tariffs, capacity allocation, congestion management procurement and network operating, and a clear timetable for bids in the energy market; considers that national regulators should also insist on the need for network operators to act in the interests of European consumers; considers that, before a European regulator is established, the areas of responsibility of Member State regulators should be harmonised in order to ensure greater consistency of action aimed at improving the way the market works;

87. Urges the Commission and Member States to promote improved cooperation by Transmission System Operators (TSOs), especially in areas such as cross-border capacity allocation, transparency, intra-day markets, planning of grids and investments relevant to development of regional markets; asks the Commission to prepare, together with the TSOs, a European grid code;

88. Calls on the Commission to provide a solution to the problems relating to independence/conflicts of interests and transparency with regard to TSOs and to come forward with proposals that enable TSOs to aquit themselves of their responsibility as market facilitators and to harmonise the international regulations for TSOs so as to improve cross-border transport;

89. Calls on the Commission to ensure that there is strict compliance by the Member States with the conditions set out in Article 7(6) of Directive 2001/77/EC, namely that the transmission charges applied by operators for the transport of electricity through the grid do not discriminate in one form or another against electricity from renewable energy sources produced in peripheral regions, such as island regions and regions of low population density; urges the Commission to take further steps to end existing discrimination within Member States.

90. Calls upon the Commission and the Member States to carefully assess whether new institutions like a European Centre for Energy Networks are needed to create a level-playing field, given the already significant number of existing institutions which could be built upon;

91. Urges the Commission to provide greater support to interconnectors across the Member States and particularly within the Member States, thereby giving island and remote energy suppliers better access to the mainland grid.

92. Calls on the Commission to analyse precisely the existing problems in granting planning permission at borders and to submit a report to the European Parliament; calls on the Member States to grant planning permission at borders within a period of four years from presentation of an application; adds that one possible way to achieve this might be the introduction of legislation, where necessary;

93. Takes the view that the establishment of regional energy markets should help to speed up the integration of EU energy markets and that, under no circumstances, should further barriers to the integration of all energy markets be raised;

94. Calls on the Commission to ensure that greater use is made of market-based allocation systems where cross-border transmission capacity is limited; considers that revenue from congestion management should be used to build more interconnectors;

95. Calls on the Commission to make the establishment of well functioning harmonised regional electricity markets by 2009 a priority, with a view to integrating the markets with the biggest potential for development at European level by 2012 and to advancing the establishment of a single European energy market and grid ;

96. Notes that cross-border interconnections will require special measures, e.g. preferential treatment of funding or tax exemptions; urges the EU to rapidly advance with its trans-European energy network (TEN) projects; notes that completing the missing links in TEN will improve security of supply as well as contribute to the completion of the internal market;

97. Considers it appropriate that the possible expansion of the regulatory framework must be deferred and that, instead, the implementation of existing EC rules in the Member States must be accelerated; considers that additional regulatory measures such as full ownership unbundling should be considered only if the mechanisms envisaged in the existing legislation relating to the internal market prove ineffective in practice; underlines the importance of improving the effectiveness of regulation and of ensuring proper, coherent implementation of the provisions relating to the separation of activities laid down in existing directives;

98. Calls on Member States to fully implement the unbundling provisions provided for in the electricity and gas directives both by in letter and in spirit; welcomes the bringing of infringement procedures by the Commission to enforce implementation of the directives;

99. Believes that the Commission should come forward with a comprehensive gas strategy that examines the need to reduce gas consumption, assurance of third party access providing for the economical and efficient use of gas, the diversification of supplies and transit routes and improved gas infrastructure (e.g. gas storage, LNG facilities and missing gas hubs) - thus also preparing for the introduction of biogas - and the need in some Member States to reverse the direction of the flow of gas and, furthermore, that deals with the question of storage and stocks after conducting a thorough cost/benefit analysis taking into account the physical and economic constraints of the gas sector;

100.    Calls on the Commission to produce proposals for a directive on natural nas directive to balance those for biofuels and hydrogen;

101.    Requests the Commission to come forward with a definition of what constitutes a high energy user; requests the Commission to give special consideration to high energy users in the EU competing in the global economy;

102.    Urges the Commission to use its powers in competition matters to address the existence of market splitting clauses in supply contracts between gas producers and national energy providers in the EU, which prohibit national energy providers in the EU from on-selling the spare gas of gas producers into other EU markets and also to investigate the legality of long term supply contracts, which foreclose the market to other suppliers;

Energy Poverty and Consumer Rights

103.    Believes that consumers must be placed at the centre of all future energy policies and that energy poverty should feature more clearly in the Commission's proposals; recalls that consumers, particularly public authorities, which must set an example in this area, also have obligations in terms of energy economy; recognises the central role that smart metering and billing can play in increasing consumer awareness of how and why energy is being used and therefore in changing consumer behaviour; calls on the Council and the Commission to propose measures which help low income households to achieve energy savings in their homes, thereby reducing their energy bills and their exposure to future price increases;

104.               Insists on the need to campaign for education and behavioural change in favour of the more sustainable mobility of European citizens;

105.               Demands that integrated and continuous support be given to local and regional authorities in relation to energy efficiency and sustainability measures under all European funding schemes, in particular the Structural Funds, FP7, Intelligent Energy Europe, and, in general, all regional policy and financial engineering measures encompassed within cohesion policy for the period from 2007 to 2013, as well as in relation to the activities of the EIB;

106.Calls on the Commission to show interest in both renewable energy sources and energy saving by emphasising these policies in all initiatives financed by the Structural Fund and the Cohesion Fund (mainstreaming) and, in particular, by European Regional Development Fund initiatives for all regions of the Union, over the programming period 2007-2013, and to draw up a proposal on how to remove the limitation of the energy saving progress caused by the 3% limit on energy efficiency spending from these funds and to consider the removal of the treshold after 2013. 

107.    Reaffirms its view that supplying people with energy to meet basic needs is indispensable and that such supplies must be assured; therefore requests energy regulators in the Member States to ensure that universal service obligations are honoured and that vulnerable and poor consumers are adequately protected;

108.    Endorses the inclusion of energy policy aims in the formulation of criteria for awarding public contracts where it is feasible for the awarding authority, reasonable for the respective tender and does not represent unfair intervention in competition;

109.    Stresses the importance of consumers having easy access to price and choice information, an easy method of switching energy provider and a right to be heard by the regulators in each Member State

Development

110.    Requests the Commission and Council to recognise that there are 2 billion people in the world without access to basic energy services and that the EU should set out a policy direction alleviating this position and meeting the Millennium Development Goals;

111.    Welcomes the Global Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fund initiative as part of a global policy responsibility to promote development;

112.    Emphasises that the EU and the Member States must use their diplomatic, aid and trade relations with energy supplying countries to promote fiscal transparency; urges the Commission to formally endorse and promote the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative (EITI) and develop a strategy to mainstream the principles of the EITI and the Corporate Social Responsibility Scheme into all agreements with third countries; considers that specific provisions in these agreements should support the role of civil society as an independent watchdog of energy revenue management

113.    Considers that the impact of EU measures would be greatly enhanced by a strong foreign policy seeking to persuade all industrialised countries to participate in the struggle to combat climate change and by incorporating in European Union development policy a greater number of programmes seeking to promote clean and efficient energy;

114.    Furthermore, believes that the EU, together with the most ‘advanced’ developing countries, should explore ways of playing a greater part in the worldwide effort to combat global warming, for instance under a wider clean development mechanism and by adopting policies and measures to promote clean development, combined with a sector-based approach, possibly including targets serving as an incentive to expand the world carbon market and that the EU should also consider what steps could be taken to strengthen world solidarity in the face of the effects of climate changes, especially on the poorest countries;

115.    Stresses that economic development is a right for all developing countries; emphasises, however, that developing countries do not have to repeat the polluting practices of the industrialised countries, and calls therefore for increased attention to be paid to technology cooperation and capacity building in the field of sustainable energy and to global efficiency standards for energy-using products;

116.    Calls for greater support to be given, for example through knowledge and technology transfer, to the use of sustainable, locally available forms of energy and decentralised energy networks in particular in developing countries, in order to ensure access to energy, save resources, create jobs, reduce dependency and assist the development of properly functioning market economies;

°

°          °

117.    Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council and Commission.

(1)

Not yet published in the OJ.

(2)

OJ C 320 E, 15.12.2005, p. 36.

(3)

OJ C 272 E, 9.11.2006, p. 404.

(4)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2005)0496.

(5)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2006)0118.

(6)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2006)0219.

(7)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2005)0429.

(8)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2005)0432.

(9)

Texts Adopted P6_TA(2005)0433.

(10)

OJ C226 E, 15.9.2005, p. 44.

(11)

OJ C157 E, 6.7.2006, p. 61.

(12)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2006)0300.

(13)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2006)0058.

(14)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2005)0365.

(15)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2006)0110.

(16)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2006)0243.

(17)

www.iphe.net

(18)

www.iter.org

(19)

OJ L 191, 22.7.2005, p. 29.


OPINION of the Committee on Foreign Affairs (12.10.2006)

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on a European Strategy for Sustainable, Competitive and Secure Energy - Green paper

(2006/2113(INI))

Draftsman: Josef Zieleniec

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Foreign Affairs calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.  Strongly supports the aim of developing a comprehensive and sustainable common European energy policy and underlines that this must include a coherent, strategic and focused external component, as stressed in the paper from the Commission and SG/HR of the Council on “An External Policy to serve Europe’s Energy Interests”;

2.  Recalls that serious changes are taking place in the global economic and political order, which, accompanied by a sharp increase in the world's energy demand and crude oil prices, will lead to a situation where the energy market is determined by the strategic interests of the main global actors and the geopolitical balance of power is influenced by energy contention;

3.  Recalls that a substantial part of the world's oil and gas resources is concentrated in unstable regions and in States with authoritarian governments; stresses that the low predictability of the political environment and the poor democratic and human rights records of the governments in question enhance the risk of maltreatment of foreign investors and energy consumers and hamper the development of genuine and long-lasting relations; points out that the EU and its energy suppliers are part of the global energy market, within which they are to a considerable level interdependent;

4.   Stresses that the current vulnerability and high energy dependency of the EU on countries with authoritarian regimes deeply undermine the development of a credible, effective and consistent common foreign and security policy with regard, in particular, to respecting, supporting and promoting the values upon which the EU is founded;

5.   Regards the EU's dependency on a limited number of energy producers and supply routes as a serious risk to the stability and prosperity of the EU; is concerned that it weakens the EU's ability to efficiently promote respect for international rules, to stabilise the global order and to encourage the rule of law in energy-producing countries;

6.   Believes that ensuring predictability in the global energy market and guaranteeing security of energy supply is not only an economic or environmental issue but, first and foremost, a question of strategic importance with serious political implications;

7.   Considers it vital that the common energy policy to be set up by the EU should enhance the EU's strength and credibility as a global actor, enable it to take an active part in the formation of the global energy market, ensure its energy supplies, by applying the principle of reciprocity in EU relations with third countries, promote sustainable development and strengthen its self-sufficiency; calls on the Member States to take appropriate steps to make such a common policy possible;

8.   Welcomes the Commission's proposal for a strategic EU energy review; urges, however, that it should result not in an action plan but in a fully fledged European energy strategy with concrete targets, obligations and steps guaranteeing the implementation of common measures, strengthening solidarity among the Member States as well as between the EU and the rest of the world and ensuring coherent action by the whole EU in the external energy relations and in the internal energy policies of the Member States;

9.   Calls on the Commission and the Council to start, subsequent to the first strategic energy review, a rapid political process to prepare the European energy strategy as a first step towards a fully effective common energy policy; demands that the views of the European Parliament be duly taken into account;

10. Underlines the need to decrease the EU's dependency on oil and gas; welcomes the Commission proposal to set up an overall strategic objective for a minimum level of energy originating from secure and low-carbon energy sources in the EU energy mix; notes that such an objective should be part of the European energy strategy; underlines the need for an indicative and targeted timetable for the reduction of the EU’s energy dependency over the coming decades;

11. Considers that, since energy self-sufficiency for the EU is currently impossible, the EU energy strategy should build on a combination of diversification of energy sources, suppliers and routes as well as trans-national investment, in order to strengthen – having regard to global interdependencies – the stability and predictability of the global energy market;

12. Stresses that one of the vital pillars of the strategy should be a common understanding regarding the development of the infrastructure supplying the EU with oil and gas, ensuring coordination of the strategic decisions taken by Member States; advocates diversifying the geographical origin of supplies and transit routes;

13. Points out that enhancing the interconnections among national electricity and gas infrastructure strengthens the ability of the EU to counter emergencies; calls on the Commission to deepen and broaden its analysis and evaluation of the energy supply vulnerability of Member States and regions, so that such analysis would thereafter serve as a basis for a plan of concrete and rapid measures to remove technical barriers for energy flow in the EU;

14. Calls on the Commission to develop a programme in close cooperation with the Member States to support the construction of gas storage facilities, which are necessary for ensuring energy security if supplies are disrupted;

15. Advocates cooperation between the Member States in the prevention of energy supply interruptions and in the event of an energy supply crisis; underlines the need for an efficient, integrated EU emergency mechanism;

16. Welcomes the project of the Energy Community Treaty as an essential contribution to the stabilisation of South-East Europe, to the openness of energy markets and to the security of transit routes in Europe; calls on the Commission to draw up a plan to gradually extend the Energy Community to Norway and Turkey, and to all countries involved in the European Neighbourhood Policy;

17. Urges the EU to engage actively in a close dialogue with all large oil and gas consuming countries, particularly the US, but also Japan, China and India, in order to establish a stable and predictable global energy market, based on market rules; calls on the EU to seek to include provisions governing energy trade in WTO regulations, allowing that organisation to become an international mediator that is able to resolve disputes concerning the delivery and distribution of energy; considers that Russia’s WTO membership will contribute to the transparency and security of supply contracts and to an improved climate for investments;

18. Urges the Commission to give greater consideration to the problem of energy security in negotiations with Russia and Ukraine;

19. Regards it as vital for the EU to continue to lead the global fight against climate change and to strive for the Kyoto protocol targets to be met; considers it necessary to integrate the EU's endeavours for development of renewable and clean energy resources and technologies for energy saving and efficiency into all levels of its external relations, in line with the global sustainable development agenda agreed in Johannesburg in 2002;

20. Underlines the need to anchor relations with the major energy-supplying countries in a transparent, mutually beneficial strategic framework; supports the energy dialogue between the EU and Russia, in which the necessary investments in the Russian and European energy infrastructures are taken into account, provided that the rule of law is ensured and market rules are respected on both sides, in order to ensure both security of supply and security of demand; stresses the crucial importance of ensuring the efficiency of the dialogue through a coherent policy, based on close coordination of Member States' actions and the development of a really genuine partnership based on shared common values;

21. Perceives reciprocity of market access and respect for market rules as fundamental principles of energy cooperation; therefore, holds the view that access reciprocity cannot be applied in a situation where the Russian energy market is controlled by a state monopoly operating as an instrument of the State's power interests; calls, in this regard, for Russia to act on its pledge to openness, transparency and fair competition and to ratify without further delay the 1991 Energy Charter Treaty; considers therefore that the energy relations between the EU and Russia should be an integral part of the renewed Partnership and Cooperation Agreement.

PROCEDURE

Title

A European Strategy for Sustainable, Competitive and Secure Energy - Green Paper

Procedure number

2006/2113(INI)

Committee responsible

ITRE

Opinion by
  Date announced in plenary

AFET
15.6.2006

Enhanced cooperation – date announced in plenary

 

Drafts(wo)man
  Date appointed

Josef Zieleniec
21.6.2006

Previous drafts(wo)man

 

Discussed in committee

14.9.2006

10.10.2006

 

 

 

Date adopted

10.10.2006

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

48

2

4

Members present for the final vote

Angelika Beer, Panagiotis Beglitis, Monika Beňová, Simon Coveney, Ryszard Czarnecki, Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos, Jas Gawronski, Maciej Marian Giertych, Ana Maria Gomes, Alfred Gomolka, Richard Howitt, Jana Hybášková, Ioannis Kasoulides, Bogdan Klich, Helmut Kuhne, Vytautas Landsbergis, Edward McMillan-Scott, Willy Meyer Pleite, Francisco José Millán Mon, Pasqualina Napoletano, Annemie Neyts-Uyttebroeck, Raimon Obiols i Germà, Cem Özdemir, Tobias Pflüger, Lydie Polfer, Michel Rocard, Raül Romeva i Rueda, José Ignacio Salafranca Sánchez-Neyra, Jacek Emil Saryusz-Wolski, György Schöpflin, Gitte Seeberg, Hannes Swoboda, Konrad Szymański, Antonio Tajani, Paavo Väyrynen, Ari Vatanen, Jan Marinus Wiersma, Luis Yañez-Barnuevo García, Josef Zieleniec

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Alexandra Dobolyi, Árpád Duka-Zólyomi, Hélène Flautre, Michael Gahler, Tunne Kelam, Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez, Yiannakis Matsis, Rihards Pīks, Aloyzas Sakalas, Inger Segelström

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

Elspeth Attwooll, Christopher Beazley, Hanna Foltyn-Kubicka, Toomas Savi, Diana Wallis

Comments (available in one language only)

...


OPINION of the Committee on Development (5.10.2006)

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on a European Strategy for Sustainable, Competitive and Secure Energy - Green Paper

(2006/2113(INI))

Draftsman: Anders Wijkman

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Development calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

A.  whereas access for the poor to clean and affordable energy services is a major prerequisite to meet the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); and whereas low-income countries are particularly affected by soaring oil prices,

B.   whereas climate change poses serious threats to poverty reduction in most low-income countries, not least because of the rapidly increasing risks from natural hazards, such as heavy storms, floods and drought; and whereas industrialised countries have a major responsibility for the accumulation of green house gas (GHG) emissions in the atmosphere and therefore must take the lead in climate change mitigation but also in technical and financial assistance for low-income countries to adapt to climate change,

C.  whereas energy security and climate security must go hand in hand and whereas Europe's energy and climate security depend to a large extent on the choices made by large economies such as China and India; whereas climate change mitigation can only be effective if developing countries – in particular large and rapidly growing economies such as China and India – are actively involved in efforts to curb GHG emissions,

1.   Stresses that economic development is a right for all developing countries; emphasises, however, that developing countries do not have to repeat the polluting practices of the industrialised countries, and calls therefore for increased attention to be paid to technology cooperation and capacity building in the field of sustainable energy and to global efficiency standards for energy-using products;

2.   Stresses that the European Union must, in connection with the strategy for diversifying its energy supply, respect the founding principles underpinning its cooperation and development policy: the fight against poverty, transparency, promotion of sustainable development and decent work; calls in particular for this approach to be favoured within the context of the partnership between the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries and the European Union, on the basis of Article 32 of the Cotonou Agreement of 23 June 2000;

3.   Stresses that a precarious energy and climate security situation is frequently the trigger for international crises and conflicts, which have consequences for democracy, human rights and poverty;

4.   Calls on the Commission and the Council to make access to efficient and renewable energy technologies a priority within EU development cooperation; calls at the same time on partner countries to make sustainable energy a priority within poverty reduction strategies;

5.   Calls on the Commission and the Council to develop a strategic energy partnership with countries such as China, India, South Africa, Brazil and Mexico to financially assist them in developing sustainable energy strategies and thereby securing their participation in climate change mitigation efforts;

6.   Stresses that the preconditions for the development of renewable technologies are excellent in many developing countries and that the expansion of such technologies would be an effective way of meeting the soaring costs of imported oil, reducing the negative effects on health and the environment from conventional fuels, but also of developing export markets; suggests that support for large-scale ethanol and bio-diesel production and other renewable technologies in partner countries – within a framework of sustainable management of natural resources - should be a top priority for development banks, including the EIB, export-credit agencies, GEF (Global Environment Facility), CDM (Clean Development Mechanism) etc;

7.  Takes note of the significant potential provided by plants such as elephant grass and jethropa for the production of bio-fuels – not least because of the fact that these species grow well on marginal lands and need little water – and calls on the Commission, the Council and partner countries to support efforts to develop this potential further;

8.   Underlines the importance of transparency in the management of extracting industries; urges the Commission, the Council and partner countries to promote fiscal transparency and good governance in relation to energy revenue management together with democratic control of the use of revenue; calls, furthermore, on the Commission and the Member States to explicitly and publicly endorse the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative;

9.   Stresses that the European Union's dependence on energy imports must not lead to any change in its position vis-à-vis the democracy and human rights situation in countries of origin and transit.

PROCEDURE

Title

European Strategy for Sustainable, Competitive and Secure Energy - Green Paper

Procedure number

2006/2113(INI)

Committee responsible

ITRE

Opinion by
  Date announced in plenary

DEVE
18.5.2006

Enhanced cooperation – date announced in plenary

 

Draftsman
  Date appointed

Anders Wijkman
11.7.2006

Previous drafts(wo)man

 

Discussed in committee

28.8.2006

25.9.2006

3.10.2006

 

 

Date adopted

3.10.2006

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

27

0

0

Members present for the final vote

Margrete Auken, Alessandro Battilocchio, Margrietus van den Berg, Danutė Budreikaitė, Marie-Arlette Carlotti, Thierry Cornillet, Nirj Deva, Alexandra Dobolyi, Michael Gahler, Filip Andrzej Kaczmarek, Glenys Kinnock, Maria Martens, Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez, Gay Mitchell, Luisa Morgantini, José Javier Pomés Ruiz, Horst Posdorf, Frithjof Schmidt, Jürgen Schröder, Anna Záborská, Mauro Zani

Substitutes present for the final vote

Milan Gaľa, Manolis Mavrommatis, Anne Van Lancker, Ralf Walter, Anders Wijkman, Gabriele Zimmer

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

 

Comments (available in one language only)

 


OPINION of the Committee on International Trade (10.10.2006)

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on a European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy - Green Paper

(2006/2113(INI))

Draftsman: Helmuth Markov

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on International Trade calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.   Stresses the global dimension of the objectives of sustainable energy use, fair competition, fair access to resources and security of supply and the resulting need for a multilateral approach to energy policy, within the framework of the United Nations and international organisations, particularly the IEA, the OECD, the WTO, the IMF and the World Bank; calls on the Commission, the Council and the Member States to support, within the internal and external action of the EU and, particularly, in those bodies, the idea of a global agenda and a joint strategy based on an in-depth assessment of the worldwide energy and climate situation and aimed at achieving energy savings and efficiency, use of decentralised, renewable energy sources, decoupling of energy demand from economic growth and promoting sustainable development throughout the world; calls on the Commission and the Member States in this connection to pay particular attention to the aspects of diversification, decentralisation and energy efficiency; strongly supports the aim of developing a comprehensive common European energy policy and stresses that it must have a coherent, strategic and focused external dimension, including trade policy;

2.   Supports the progressive opening of the services markets in the energy sector, and in particular the fullest application of multinational trade rules and disciplines to the petroleum and natural gas sectors;

3.   Underlines the important role of the international trade system and trade agreements in providing a stable and predictable regulatory framework to increase investment and generate the appropriate environment for new innovative energy solutions;  

4.   Points out that the finite nature of conventional energy sources and the very high, and growing, consumption in major industrialised countries and emerging economies could lead to further price rises, which may have a negative impact on production costs, added value, export prices and trade balances; considers it necessary, therefore, to switch, for energy supplies, towards renewable and other alternative energy sources, to reduce losses occurring in the transport of energy and to step up support for the development of new technologies and energy infrastructures;

5.   Supports the more widespread production and use of biofuels, particularly those obtained from the industrial processing of agricultural products, and of second-generation biofuels, with a view to reducing the energy dependency of the EU and underpinning development and employment levels;

6.   Considers that energy savings and energy supply contracts should expressly include the supply of a package in which different sources of energy should be combined according to efficiency and cost-saving criteria;

7.   Considers that non-compliance with, or non-ratification, of the Kyoto Protocol entail comparative disadvantages for the EU economy by virtue of the effects on production costs and trade volume; calls for agreements on climate and environmental protection to be taken into consideration within the WTO framework; stresses the obligation to ensure compliance with international and European safety regulations regarding the construction and operation of nuclear power plants;

8.   Considers it necessary to make serious efforts to put in place an international climate protection regime for the period after 2012;

9.   Calls on the Commission to develop strategies whereby added value can be generated by the export of technology in the fields of energy savings and energy efficiency, thus creating jobs in Europe; 10.   Calls on the Commission to push within the WTO for specific rules on the transparency of the energy market as well as on State aid and other trade distorting measures in order to promote fair competition; asks the Commission and the Member States to propose the establishment of a price-setting mechanism at global level and to provide the European Parliament with an assessment of the convenience and feasibility of the creation of a World Energy Market Observation System;

11. Asks the Commission to propose and promote an international agreement on energy efficiency;

12.  Notes that research in the field of energy technologies is an important step on the way to opening up export markets; therefore calls on the Commission to continue supporting research into all sources of energy (conventional, nuclear and renewable) so that Europe, as well as exploiting such research for its own purposes in the EU Member States, may also open up export markets;  

13.  Considers that emissions trading can help encourage more energy-conscious behaviour, provided that emissions limits provide genuine incentives for energy savings, provided that all major economic areas participate, and provided that emissions trading does not result in distortions in the market or in emissions simply being moved from one place to another;

14.  Regards the Energy Charter as a possible starting point for the creation of a regulatory framework for international trade and investments in the energy sector;

15. Supports calls for gas prices to be decoupled from crude oil price movements;

16.  Stresses the need to promote decentralised energy supplies with short energy chains, based on the use of locally available resources, including the use of biomass and the development of biofuels, in order to help reduce dependence on imports and minimise expenditure on intervention for energy policy reasons;

17.   Considers that the future of nuclear energy must be closely linked to a solid strategy at internal and external level to deal with the safety of nuclear material, radiological protection and joint R&D programmes for the reliable disposal of nuclear waste;

18.  Recalls that the EU must remain a key player in initiatives such as the International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy or the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor;

19. Calls for greater support to be given, for example through knowledge and technology transfer, to the use of sustainable, locally available forms of energy and decentralised energy networks in particular in developing countries, in order to ensure access to energy, save resources, create jobs, reduce dependency and assist the development of properly functioning market economies;

20.  Calls on the EU institutions and the Member States to engage, as a matter of urgency, in a close dialogue and cooperation with all large consuming and producing countries, particularly the US, India, China, Japan and the Gulf Cooperation Council, in order to establish effective and coherent frameworks and partnerships, which should contribute to a more stable, predictable, transparent and non-discriminatory global rules-based market;

21.  Insist that the Commission should, as a matter of principle, require compliance with universal services obligations, in both its offers and requests in connection with energy services within the framework of services agreements at bilateral and multilateral level;

22. Calls on the Commission to speed up the implementation of the Trans-European Networks programme which aims at improving interconnections between the EU and neighbouring countries including Russia, the MEDA and Caspian Sea regions, on the basis of common strategies for exploiting energy resources and for accessing the transport infrastructure;  

23. Highlights the valuable contribution that the use of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) can make in achieving the objectives on energy, and urges the Commission to promote initiatives to ensure its adequate development in the EU and in third countries;

24.  Shares the Commission's view that Europe has not yet developed fully competitive internal energy markets, and that on the basis of current trends the EU's energy imports would be increasingly concentrated, and that energy prices are rising steeply at the international level; calls, therefore, for an intensified monitoring of the deregulation process within the European energy market; points, however, to the need to create a favourable framework for renewable energy sources;

25.  Welcomes the Commission’s Sector Enquiry on Gas and Electricity Markets; notes that increased concentration in the EU internal market may aggravate existing distortions, thus requiring the improvement of Member States' and the EU's regulatory capabilities in order to guarantee consumer rights and compliance with EU energy efficiency.

PROCEDURE

Title

A European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy - Green Paper

Procedure number

2006/2113(INI)

Committee responsible

ITRE

Opinion by
  Date announced in plenary

INTA
18.5.2006

Enhanced cooperation – date announced in plenary

NO

Drafts(wo)man
  Date appointed

Helmuth Markov
18.4.2006

Previous drafts(wo)man

 

Discussed in committee

11.7.2006

11.9.2006

 

 

 

Date adopted

3.10.2006

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

20

4

1

Members present for the final vote

Jean-Pierre Audy, Françoise Castex, Giulietto Chiesa, Christofer Fjellner, Béla Glattfelder, Jacky Henin, Sajjad Karim, Alain Lipietz, Erika Mann, Helmuth Markov, David Martin, Georgios Papastamkos, Godelieve Quisthoudt-Rowohl, Robert Sturdy, Gianluca Susta, Johan Van Hecke, Daniel Varela Suanzes-Carpegna, Zbigniew Zaleski

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Panagiotis Beglitis, Margrietus van den Berg, Danutė Budreikaitė, Małgorzata Handzlik, Pierre Jonckheer, Zuzana Roithová, Antolín Sánchez Presedo

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

 

Comments (available in one language only)

...


OPINION of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (3.10.2006)

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on a European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy - Green paper

(2006/2113(INI))

Draftsman: Jan Christian Ehler

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.  supports the Commission's adoption of an approach to energy policy based on the assumption that economic competitiveness requires a stable and predictable regulatory framework respectful of market mechanisms;

2.  supports an integrated approach to energy policy, which takes the objectives of security of energy supply, competitiveness and environmental sustainability including climate change equally into account;

3.  stresses that establishing an internal EU market in energy, with the option of extending it to include non-member countries, could make a vital contribution to security of supply;

4.  urges Member States not to seek solutions to supposed national interests with regard to the security of supply to the detriment of a functioning internal market;

5.  stresses the particular importance of effective regulatory structures and the endowment of national regulatory and competition authorities with power proportionate to preventing market dominance and establishing a functioning internal market with a view to ensuring affordable energy prices; stresses its support for the Commission's sector inquiries and urges the Commission to make full use of all available instruments to deal with breaches of competition law;

6.  points out that the current tax burden accounts for a large proportion of energy costs and stresses therefore that the competitiveness of European industry should be supported by the implementation of energy policy objectives - such as improvement of energy efficiency or the promotion of renewable energies - and consequently positive incentive mechanisms - i.e. "Green Taxes" should be chosen;

7.  considers crucial the objective of reducing the EU's dependency on imported oil in order to mitigate the impact of higher international energy prices on the EU economy and its citizens;

8.  calls for the implementation of fair competition rules in the energy sector as a way to improve competitiveness;

9.  considers it appropriate that the possible expansion of the regulatory framework must be deferred and that, instead, the implementation of existing EC rules in the Member States must be accelerated; considers that additional regulatory measures should be considered only if the mechanisms envisaged in the existing legislation on the internal market have not proved effective in practice;

10. clearly states that it is inappropriate to set up new institutional structures at European Union level if this entails the creation of overlapping competences and additional bureaucracy, or if the tasks to be tackled by such structures could be carried out by institutions in the Member States or existing networks; encourages the Commission, in this context, to play an active part in optimising the potential of such stuctures;

11. clearly states that it regards technology-oriented, non-discriminatory and increased support for research and development relating to the use of competitive environmentally friendly technologies as making a vital contribution to ensuring secure energy supplies and affordable energy prices;

12. believes that there is an urgent need to improve the investment conditions in respect of power plant capacity and energy supply infrastructure by means of simplified and streamlined approval procedures and streamlined legal procedures; emphasises, in this context, that decentralised energy infrastructure and generation can contribute to improved energy supply security and should be promoted in the formulation of energy policy strategies;

13. warns against state-controlled restriction of supply caused by discrimination against particular energy sources; draws attention to the adverse impact of such course of action on security of supply, energy prices and competitiveness;

14. endorses the inclusion of energy policy aims into the formulation of criteria for awarding public contracts if it is feasible for the awarding authority, reasonable for the respective tender and if it does not represent unfair intervention in competition;

15. states that last winter's failure in the gas energy market of several Member States, has already resulted in the relocation of enterprises of energy intensive industries; considers it to be necessary in this context to examine opportunities to promote solidarity between Member States and to consider dealing with this issue as a priority in order to ensure the proper operation of both existing and future interconnectors; notes that for a fully functioning market and mutual assistance in the event of supply disruption, particular attention to design criteria between Member States is necessary, which may have cost implications.

PROCEDURE

Title

A European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy - Green paper

Procedure number

2006/2113(INI)

Committee responsible

ITRE

Opinion by
  Date announced in plenary

ECON

18.5.2006

Enhanced cooperation – date announced in plenary

 

Drafts(wo)man
  Date appointed

Jan Christian Ehler

18.5.2006

Previous drafts(wo)man

 

Discussed in committee

12.9.2006

2.10.2006

 

 

 

Date adopted

3.10.2006

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

36

1

0

Members present for the final vote

Zsolt László Becsey, Pervenche Berès, Sharon Bowles, Udo Bullmann, Ieke van den Burg, Jan Christian Ehler, Elisa Ferreira, Jean-Paul Gauzès, Robert Goebbels, Donata Gottardi, Benoît Hamon, Gunnar Hökmark, Karsten Friedrich Hoppenstedt, Sophia in 't Veld, Piia-Noora Kauppi, Wolf Klinz, Christoph Konrad, Guntars Krasts, Andrea Losco, Astrid Lulling, Cristobal Montoro Romero, John Purvis, Alexander Radwan, Eoin Ryan, Antolín Sánchez Presedo, Margarita Starkevičiūtė, Ivo Strejček, Lars Wohlin.

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Satu Hassi, Sergej Kozlík, Alain Lipietz, Jules Maaten, Vladimír Maňka, Thomas Mann, Sérgio Marques, Gilles Savary, Andreas Schwab.

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

 

Comments (available in one language only)

...


OPINION of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (11.10.2006)

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on a European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy - Green paper

2006/2113(INI))

Draftsman: Evangelia Tzampazi

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.   Welcomes the Green Paper on a European Strategy for Sustainable, Competitive and Secure Energy;

2.   Stresses that the European Union is committed to the objective of tackling climate change and therefore of limiting global temperature increase to +2°C compared to pre-industrialised levels;

3.  Recalls the need for a legal basis in order to pursue a common European policy in the field of energy, which will secure a safe, affordable and decentralised efficient energy economy whilst protecting the environment; insists that transport is a key component of such a sustainable energy policy and must therefore be fully addressed;

4.   Urges the Commission, given the present situation of 25 separate Energy Regulators in the Member States, to complete a review of the role of Regulators within each Member State together with a full assessment of the potential need for a European Energy Regulator;

5.   Stresses that the current use of fossil fuels to produce energy is adversely affecting the climate and above all leading to shortages and depletion of these resources, making the Member States dependent for energy on exports from outside the EU; therefore demands that the proposed action plans both for Energy Efficiency and for a Sustainable, Competitive and Secure Energy be sufficiently ambitious to lead to a 20% cut in our current energy consumption by 2020, be accompanied by a monitoring and control mechanism and be consistent with each other;

6.  Stresses that energy security and climate security must go hand in hand and that all efforts to diversify energy supply should give priority to energy efficiency and low-carbon alternatives, with a priority to renewable energy sources;

7.  Stresses that energy and climate security for the EU depends to a considerable extent on developments in countries like the US, China, India etc, and urges the Commission and Council to increase efforts to engage these countries in climate change mitigation; considers that one important initiative would be to assist financially developing countries like China and India to invest in more efficient and low-carbon energy technologies;

8.  Points out that geo-thermal energy as well as wave energy represent huge potentials in terms of energy supply, including in Europe, and should be vigorously pursued;

9.  Recalls the importance of raising the awareness both of the industry and citizens concerning the rational use of energy and prevention of energy waste and calls for wide-ranging information and education campaigns to be launched; calls also for the promotion of renewable sources of energy.;

10. Urges that the European energy strategy should include ambitious targets in order gradually to increase the share of low-CO2 energy sources in its energy mix; supports the idea of agreeing an overall strategic objective such as aiming for a minimum level in the overall EU energy mix originating from secure and low-carbon energy sources;

11. Points out that the EU's dependence on imported energy has already had a significant effect and will continue to weaken the EU's independence in its decision making in other policy areas, unless strong measures are taken to support the development and use of indigenous energy sources;

12. Welcomes, in the context of the Green Paper, the Commission's recent initiative to undertake a study "addressing the interlinkages between natural resource management and conflict in the Commission's external relations", and stresses in particular the links between energy security and climate security;

13. Recalls that 40% of the EU's energy is used in buildings; supports the idea of extending the current buildings Directive to all buildings; in this context asks the Commission to assess the possibility of creating a pan-European system of 'white certificates' in the field of energy efficiency;

14. Calls for adequate attention to be given to the transport sector in the strategy;

15. Calls for binding targets for CO2 emissions from cars, i.e.120 grams CO2 per vehicle/kilometre by 2012; considers that these targets should be lowered further by at least 10g per km every two years thereafter until a ceiling of 80g/km for all road vehicles is reached in 2020;

16. Calls on the Commission to submit the implementing measures for products with a high energy-saving potential within the framework of the EUP Directive (Directive 2005/32/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 July 2005 establishing a framework for the setting of ecodesign requirements for energy-using products, OJ L 191, 22.7.2005, p. 29) by spring 2007 at the latest.

17. Considers it alarming that the targets set by the European Union for increasing the use of renewable sources of energy for 2010 will probably not be met by all Member States; calls on the Commission to take the necessary measures to ensure that the objectives set will be achieved;

18. Insists that increased efforts are needed in research and technological demonstration particularly in the new Member States, to encourage and develop even more effectively the use of renewable sources of energy; stresses the importance of introducing tax incentives for the use of biofuels in the transport sector, which may also make a contribution as an alternative source of income in some rural areas of the European Union;

19. Sees a need, in this connection, for increased approximation and harmonisation of support for electricity from renewable energies so that they are used above all in places with the best natural conditions; believes that, according to current knowledge, a European feed-in law would be the best possibility, but that other systems may also be taken into consideration;

20. Hopes that the roadmap on renewable sources of energy provided for in the Green Paper will prove ambitious, put the emphasis on research, and include an annual mechanism for evaluating the targets met;

21. Calls for consideration to be given to the possibility of guaranteeing and prioritizing access to the grid for energy from renewable sources; calls for a coordinated effort to create a more favourable framework for micro generation, and for the possible benefits of decentralised generation in general to be considered;

22. Draws attention to the high demand for primary energy and high potential for savings in relation to heating buildings, and therefore supports the announcement made by Commissioner Piebalg to the effect that he will be submitting a directive on environmentally friendly heating systems before the end of 2006;

23. Recalls that renewable sources of energy are already competitive today in some cases and require only start-up funding or the removal of barriers to their entry into the market, and that, where higher costs still remain, greater weight must be placed on the risks linked to other energy sources, such as CO2 production and the importing of raw materials from politically unstable regions.

24. Recalls that a long-term diversification strategy for energy sources will benefit from the implementation of a level playing field, i.e. ensuring that comparisons between sources are made with full internalisation of their external costs (waste, dismantling, resource depletion) and taking into account their respective environmental benefits;

25. Calls on the Commission to show its interest both in renewable sources of energy and in saving energy and to integrate these policies in all actions funded by the structural and cohesion funds (mainstreaming) and in particular those of the European Regional Development Fund for all regions of the Union without exception, taking account of their specific features, during the next programming period (2007-2013); )

26. Stresses the need to create more ambitious goals for the revision of the Emissions Trading Directive as part of the strategy presented under the Climate Change Chapter;

27. Calls on the Commission to submit in 2010 a mid-term evaluation of the action proposed in paragraph 25 and finally an ex post evaluation at the end of the programming period;

28. Considers that the impact of the European Union’s actions would be considerably strengthened by a strong external policy aimed at persuading all industrialised countries to join the fight against climate change and by greater inclusion of clean and efficient energy programmes in the Union’s development policy.

SHORT JUSTIFICATION

Never before, since the energy crises of the 70s, were energy issues so high on the political and social agenda. Changes that take place in the energy sector are significant and radical and they will map out in the longer-term the economic course of all countries. Without long-term energy planning the Union is in danger to suffer the consequences that derive from the painful childbirth of a new energy season.

At the social level, public dialogue is mainly focused on high oil prices (which are not foreseen to decrease to the low levels of previous years). At the pure energy level the debate of experts is carried out in various fields. The main controversy lies in whether the production of argon already has touched upon maximum or if peak-oil will appear in the coming decade. This discussion has however relatively limited importance for a long-lasting planning. That is why the draftswoman considers it essential to create at least a common external energy policy.

Europe should fight the energy wastefulness in all directions. In the beginning of the 80's, immediately after the second petroleum shock, Europe began a giant effort of energy saving that resulted at a roughly 10% decrease of oil consumption in OECD countries in 3 years, while maintaining simultaneously the increase of economic product. The restriction of wastefulness and the rational energy use constitute an imperative and universal need, if we want to make the transition in the new energy era as painless as possible while simultaneously protecting the environment. The high oil and gas prices underline the need for an effort to use energy rationally. An effort that in the short-term will create 1.000.000 posts in the EU (energy inspectors, electricians, work of insulation of buildings, work of renovation of residences etc.).

At the same time the EU could save up to 20% of its current energy consumption, in buildings, transport and industry. Half of this save emanates from the application from the member states of the existing European legal framework. The remaining half emanates from innovative solutions. This is the reason why we call the European Commission to demonstrate minimum tolerance in the non application from the member states of the regulation on building energy efficiency.

This objective of energy saving by 20% should, according to the draftswoman, be binding for the member states. At the same time the full transposition and application of the existing directives on buildings, co-production of electricity and heat, eco-design, energy efficiency, labelling of energy consumption in the electric appliances in the all member states remains imperative. The Commission is furthermore called to work on the labelling of air conditioning appliances in buildings.

Taking into account that public buildings also participate in the energy wastefulness, this issue should be faced with continuous annual energy inspections and the resulting data should be publicized so that public control is more feasible. The creation of an independent institution that will have the responsibility of overseeing the energy saving plan, attending and verifying the accomplishment of obligations that arise from the Community objective of a 20% reduction, is deemed necessary. Moreover, the draftswoman considers necessary the annual publication of an assessment of the above mentioned and the obligation to keep the European Commission and the European Parliament informed.

In the transport sector, the draftswoman welcomes the efforts made to save fuel with the help of hybrid engines or STOP and START engines; she believes however that these efforts should also be extended to other elements of the car such as the air conditioning. She urges, therefore, the automobile industry to act on the subject after consulting the European Commission in the framework of “voluntary agreements”.

The EU however has at its power useful tools for the implementation of these policies in the European level and these tools are the structural funds. The draftswoman considers that for all funding from the Regional Fund concerning construction of buildings or any intervention in the building sector the energy behaviour of the buildings as well as the possibility of using internal energy sources (geothermics - bioclimatic etc) should be taken into consideration.

The European Commission is therefore called to proceed in the mainstreaming not only of the general request of rational energy use but also of the promotion of renewable energy sources through the structural funds for all European regions.

In this way the Lisbon objectives are supported, Internal Energy Consumption Market is strengthened and at the same time the international competitive position of the EU is promoted through a sector where the EU plays a leading role.

PROCEDURE

Title

A European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy - Green paper

Procedure number

2006/2113(INI)

Committee responsible

ITRE

Opinion by
  Date announced in plenary

ENVI
18.5.2006

Enhanced cooperation – date announced in plenary

 

Draftsman
  Date appointed

Evangelia Tzampazi
16.5.2006

Previous drafts(wo)man

 

Discussed in committee

13.9.2006

10.10.2006

 

 

 

Date adopted

10.10.2006

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

44

1

0

Members present for the final vote

Georgs Andrejevs, Liam Aylward, Irena Belohorská, Johannes Blokland, John Bowis, Frieda Brepoels, Dorette Corbey, Avril Doyle, Mojca Drčar Murko, Jill Evans, Anne Ferreira, Matthias Groote, Satu Hassi, Gyula Hegyi, Jens Holm, Mary Honeyball, Caroline Jackson, Dan Jørgensen, Christa Klaß, Eija-Riitta Korhola, Urszula Krupa, Marie-Noëlle Lienemann, Peter Liese, Linda McAvan, Riitta Myller, Péter Olajos, Miroslav Ouzký, Karin Scheele, Horst Schnellhardt, Richard Seeber, Bogusław Sonik, María Sornosa Martínez, Antonios Trakatellis, Evangelia Tzampazi, Thomas Ulmer, Marcello Vernola, Anja Weisgerber, Åsa Westlund, Anders Wijkman

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

María del Pilar Ayuso González, Hélène Goudin, Kartika Tamara Liotard, Caroline Lucas, Bart Staes

 

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

Fausto Correia

Comments (available in one language only)

...


OPINION of the Committee on Transport and Tourism (12.10.2006)

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on a European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy - Green Paper

(2006/2113(INI))

Draftsman: Hannu Takkula

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Transport and Tourism calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy , as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.   Notes that transport accounts for almost one third of final energy demand in the European Union and is the second fastest growing demand sector for energy in the European Union; considers therefore that specific measures for more efficient energy use in each of the transport sectors are essential to secure sustainable use of energy in the transport sector; recalls that, unless major changes are instigated, passenger transport activity will continue to increase over all modes but most particularly in road transport and aviation;

2.   Underlines the transport sector's heavy dependency on fuels derived from petroleum, principally gasoline, diesel oil and kerosene, which together account for 98 % of final energy demand in the transport sector; notes that these fuels are overwhelmingly imported from third countries, which raises questions about security of supply and sustainability; notes that greater energy efficiency, recognised as fundamental in the Commission's Green Paper, must be achieved first and foremost in the transport sector, where 80 % of consumption is accounted for by road transport, which must receive absolute priority;

3.   Takes the view that the percentage of additives to diesel fuel and petrol will have to be increased and if necessary made compulsory if first-generation biofuels are to be brought into use;

4.   Considers therefore that transport has a key role to play in the attainment of sustainable, competitive and secure energy supply and use in the European Union, given the short-term possibility of a specific and measurable reduction in consumption and the medium-term possibility of effective and sustainable infrastructural improvement; notes that the integrated development of energy strategy and transport policy are necessary to achieve industrial competitiveness at European level;

5.   Welcomes the legislative and other initiatives taken by the Union's institutions which have improved energy intensity (primary energy demand per unit of GDP) in the transport sector; accordingly calls for measures to promote a European platform for energy reduction and alternative consumption for the transport sector in particular, applicable not only to road but also air and sea transport;

6.   Recalls that these initiatives include measures for the improvement of the environmental performance of freight transport systems (Marco Polo II); charging of heavy goods vehicles for the use of certain infrastructures; the encouragement of short sea shipping; measures to facilitate inland waterway transport (Naiades); the CARS 21 initiative to speed up the development of more fuel efficient vehicles; restructuring vehicle taxation regimes to encourage the use of fuel efficient vehicles; steps to facilitate the introduction and use of bio fuels in the transport sector; the development of a "Single Sky" and the SESAR system, which will reduce aviation kerosene consumption, including aviation in the European Emissions Trading Scheme; and the Galileo project, which will optimise traffic management;

7.   Insists that further progress needs to be realised through the development of a coherent Trans European Transport network largely in rail, inland waterway and short sea shipping; striking the right balance for the future development of modes of transport and encouraging research and technological innovation to improve fuel efficiency, reduce dependency on petroleum derivatives and lessen wastage by tackling congestion and aircraft 'holding' and by further research into energy efficient vehicles and vehicles powered by alternative fuels; and measures to encourage the use of energy efficient and environmentally friendly public and private transport, especially in urban areas;

8.   Considers that greater aviation efficiency and reduced time in the air, the development and use of fuel efficient, hybrid vehicles which exploit the opportunities presented by fuel cell technology and biofuels, for example, and further development of the rail freight sector, together with improved load factors for freight generally, would assist a more limited and efficient consumption of energy;

9.   Insists on the necessity of campaigning for education and behavioural change in favour of the more sustainable mobility of the European citizen.

PROCEDURE

Title

European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy - Green Paper

Procedure number

2006/2113(INI)

Committee responsible

ITRE

Opinion by
  Date announced in plenary

TRAN
18.5.2006

Enhanced cooperation – date announced in plenary

 

Drafts(wo)man
  Date appointed

Hannu Takkula
21.3.2006

Previous drafts(wo)man

 

Discussed in committee

14.9.2006

9.10.2006

 

 

 

Date adopted

10.10.2006

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

37

1

0

Members present for the final vote

Gabriele Albertini, Etelka Barsi-Pataky, Philip Bradbourn, Paolo Costa, Michael Cramer, Arūnas Degutis, Petr Duchoň, Saïd El Khadraoui, Robert Evans, Emanuel Jardim Fernandes, Roland Gewalt, Luis de Grandes Pascual, Ewa Hedkvist Petersen, Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, Stanisław Jałowiecki, Georg Jarzembowski, Dieter-Lebrecht Koch, Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou, Jörg Leichtfried, Bogusław Liberadzki, Eva Lichtenberger, Patrick Louis, Erik Meijer, Robert Navarro, Seán Ó Neachtain, Josu Ortuondo Larrea, Willi Piecyk, Reinhard Rack, Dirk Sterckx, Ulrich Stockmann, Georgios Toussas, Marta Vincenzi, Corien Wortmann-Kool

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Zsolt László Becsey, Den Dover, Elisabeth Jeggle, Sepp Kusstatscher, Rosa Miguélez Ramos

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

 

Comments (available in one language only)

...


OPINION of the Committee on Regional Development (7.11.2006)

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on a European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy - Green Paper

(2006/2113(INI))

Draftsman: Oldřich Vlasák

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Regional Development calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.   Encourages the Commission in its efforts to establish a common approach to energy policy leading to fully sustainable, competitive internal markets, security of supply, reduced costs for the consumer and universal access, and underlines that this policy must include a sustainable, coherent, strategic and focused sub-national component;

2.   Urges the Commission, the Member States, the regions and the other interlocutors involved, both as part of the national strategic reference frameworks and in the operational programmes for the period 2007-2013, and in accordance with the strategic guidelines agreed with Parliament, to make effective use of the possibilities offered to them by the cohesion policy to support this European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy;

3.   Urges the Commission to include the proposals under this European strategy in the drawing-up of the fourth cohesion report, paying particular attention to the role of secure access to energy and diversified, sustainable and efficient energy use as a complementary indicator of economic, social and regional cohesion; calls on the Commission, to this end, to boost the presence and activity of both the EIB and the new cohesion financing instruments (JASPERS, JEREMIE and JESSICA) in projects involving energy efficiency and support for renewable energies;

4.  Considers it necessary to fully evaluate current measures and practices falling within the scope of energy policy at European level and their implementation by Member States and only after that to propose new rules and institutions, if necessary;

5.   Regrets that the proposed energy policy is oriented mainly to the supply side and that energy efficiency issues are not given sufficient importance within the strategy; insists that a common energy policy should give clear priority to sustainable energy efficiency, which even now can achieve real and measurable savings, as well as to renewable and decentralised energy sources, particularly in connection with equipment and technologies used by public utilities and households; maintains that a common energy policy must also establish conditions enabling new technologies utilisable in the short and medium term to be exploited rapidly and to better effect;

6.   Asks that the regional dimension should be an integral part of the Union's energy policy in order to favour the more balanced distribution of energy production and consumption across EU territory, so as to ensure a better spread of economic activities and population;

7.   Stresses that many outlying and outermost regions have considerable potential in terms of renewable energies, linked to their geographical or climate-related characteristics (sunshine, wind, biomass, wave energy); hopes that more use will be made of this outstanding opportunity, particularly in order to make an active contribution to achieving the Kyoto objectives;

8.   Highlights the key role that local and regional authorities play and the potential role that they could play regarding the introduction and implementation of measures concerning the incorporation of renewable energy and energy saving technologies in projects being carried out by them and receiving Community and national funding, such as measures concerning the energy performance of buildings, where they can take full advantage of the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive(1); calls on local and regional authorities to use the most energy efficient infrastructures and services in outdoor lighting and public transport systems, for example;

9.   Demands that integrated and continuous support be given to local and regional authorities in relation to energy efficiency and sustainability measures under all European funding schemes, in particular the Structural Funds, FP7, Intelligent Energy Europe, and, in general, all regional policy and financial engineering measures encompassed within cohesion policy for the period from 2007 to 2013, as well as in relation to the activities of the EIB;

10. Calls on the Commission, following a structured dialogue, to publish a communication on the role of local and regional authorities in energy policy, with special focus on energy efficiency, non-CO2 producing renewable and/or decentralised energy sources as well as sustainable transport and the urban dimension of energy policy;

11. Calls on the Commission to give full support to a properly functioning internal market for gas and electricity working for the benefit of all European citizens, not least in order to overcome the domination of former monopoly suppliers; further calls for greater interconnection between national gas and electricity markets, which will be of particular benefit to the border regions of the Union.

PROCEDURE

Title

A European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy - Green Paper

Procedure number

2006/2113(INI)]

Committee responsible

ITRE

Opinion by
  Date announced in plenary

REGI
18.5.2006

Enhanced cooperation – date announced in plenary

 

Drafts(wo)man
  Date appointed

Oldřich Vlasák
11.7.2006

Previous drafts(wo)man

 

Discussed in committee

4.10.2006

 

 

 

 

Date adopted

6.11.2006

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

24

2

0

Members present for the final vote

Stavros Arnaoutakis, Elspeth Attwooll, Jean Marie Beaupuy, Rolf Berend, Jana Bobošíková, Graham Booth, Bernadette Bourzai, Ambroise Guellec, Gábor Harangozó, Konstantinos Hatzidakis, Mieczysław Edmund Janowski, Tunne Kelam, Miroslav Mikolášik, Francesco Musotto, Lambert van Nistelrooij, Jan Olbrycht, Markus Pieper, Francisca Pleguezuelos Aguilar, Elisabeth Schroedter, Grażyna Staniszewska, Margie Sudre, Oldřich Vlasák

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Jan Březina, Mojca Drčar Murko, Emanuel Jardim Fernandes

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

Chris Davies

Comments (available in one language only)

...

(1)

Directive 2006/32/EC of the European Parliament and of Council of 5 April 2006 on energy end-use efficiency and energy services and repealing Council Directive 93//76/EEC (OJ L 114, 27.4.2006, p. 64).


PROCEDURE

Title

European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy - Green paper

Procedure number

2006/2113(INI)

Committee responsible
  Date authorisation announced in plenary

ITRE
18.5.2006

Committee(s) asked for opinion(s)
  Date announced in plenary

AFET
15.6.2006

DEVE
18.5.2006

INTA
18.5.2006

ECON
18.5.2006

ENVI
18.5.2006

 

TRAN
18.5.2006

REGI
18.5.2006

 

 

 

Not delivering opinion(s)
  Date of decision

 

 

 

 

 

Enhanced cooperation
  Date announced in plenary

 

 

 

 

 

Rapporteur(s)
  Date appointed

Eluned Morgan
20.3.2006

 

Previous rapporteur(s)

 

 

Discussed in committee

13.7.2006

2.10.2006

9.10.2006

23.10.2006

 

Date adopted

23.11.2006

Result of final vote

+

-

0

34

0

3

Members present for the final vote

Šarūnas Birutis, Jan Březina, Jerzy Buzek, Giles Chichester, Lena Ek, Nicole Fontaine, David Hammerstein Mintz, Rebecca Harms, Romana Jordan Cizelj, Pia Elda Locatelli, Eugenijus Maldeikis, Eluned Morgan, Angelika Niebler, Reino Paasilinna, Miloslav Ransdorf, Vladimír Remek, Herbert Reul, Paul Rübig, Andres Tarand, Britta Thomsen, Patrizia Toia, Catherine Trautmann, Claude Turmes, Nikolaos Vakalis, Alejo Vidal-Quadras

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Gabriele Albertini, Alexander Alvaro, Ivo Belet, Zdzisław Kazimierz Chmielewski, Neena Gill, Matthias Groote, Pier Antonio Panzeri, Manuel António dos Santos, Esko Seppänen, Antonios Trakatellis

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

Esther Herranz García, Francisco José Millán Mon

Date tabled

28.11.2006

Comments
(available in one language only)

 

Last updated: 30 November 2006Legal notice