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Procedure : 2014/0059(COD)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A8-0141/2015

Texts tabled :

A8-0141/2015

Debates :

PV 19/05/2015 - 3
CRE 19/05/2015 - 3
PV 15/03/2017 - 14
CRE 15/03/2017 - 14

Votes :

PV 20/05/2015 - 10.7
CRE 20/05/2015 - 10.7
PV 16/03/2017 - 6.5

Texts adopted :

P8_TA(2015)0204
P8_TA(2017)0090

Texts adopted
PDF 502kWORD 173k
Wednesday, 20 May 2015 - Strasbourg Final edition
Union system for self-certification of importers of certain minerals and metals originating in conflict-affected and high-risk areas ***I
P8_TA(2015)0204A8-0141/2015

Amendments adopted by the European Parliament on 20 May 2015 on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council setting up a Union system for supply chain due diligence self-certification of responsible importers of tin, tantalum and tungsten, their ores, and gold originating in conflict-affected and high-risk areas (COM(2014)0111 – C7-0092/2014 – 2014/0059(COD)) (1) (Ordinary legislative procedure: first reading)
Text proposed by the Commission   Amendment
Amendment 1
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 1
(1)  Natural mineral resources in conflict-affected or high risk areas − although holding great potential for development – can be a cause of dispute where their revenues are fuelling the outbreak or continuation of violent conflict, undermining national endeavours towards development, good governance and the rule of law. In these areas, breaking the nexus between conflict and illegal exploitation of minerals is critical to peace and stability.
(1)  Natural mineral resources in conflict-affected or high risk areas − although holding great potential for development – can be a cause of dispute where their revenues are fuelling the outbreak or continuation of violent conflict, undermining endeavours towards development, good governance and the rule of law. In these areas, breaking the nexus between conflict and illegal exploitation of minerals is a critical element in guaranteeing peace, development and stability.
Amendment 2
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 1 a (new)
(1a)  Human rights abuses are common within the extractive industry and may include child labour, sexual violence, enforced disappearance, forced resettlement and the destruction of ritually or culturally significant sites.
Amendment 3
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 2
(2)  The issue concerns resource-rich regions where the challenge posed by the desire to minimise the financing of armed groups and security forces has been taken up by governments and international organisations together with business operators and civil society organisations.
(2)  The issue concerns resource-rich areas where the challenge posed by the desire to prevent the financing of armed groups and security forces has been taken up by governments and international organisations together with business operators and civil society organisations, including women's organisations that are at the forefront of drawing attention to the exploitative conditions imposed by these groups, as well as to rape and violence used to control local populations .
(The amendment resulting in the replacement of the word 'regions' by 'areas'' applies throughout the text.)
Amendment 4
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 5 a (new)
(5a)  This Regulation is one of the ways of eliminating the financing of armed groups by means of controlling trade of minerals from conflict regions; this does not alter the fact that the European Union’s foreign and development policy actions should focus on countering local corruption and the porosity of borders, and on providing training for local populations and their representatives in order to highlight abuses.
Amendment 5
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 7
(7)  On 7 October 2010, the European Parliament passed a Resolution calling for the Union to legislate along the lines of the US 'conflict minerals' law alias Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act; and the Commission announced in its Communications of 2011 and 2012 its intention to explore ways of improving transparency throughout the supply chain, including aspects of due diligence. In the latter communication and in line with the commitment it had made at the May 2011 OECD Ministerial Council, the Commission also advocated greater support for and use of the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, and of the OECD Due Diligence Guidance – even outside the OECD membership.
(7)  In its resolutions of 7 October 2010 , of 8 March 2011, of 5 July 2011 and of 26 February 2014 , the European Parliament called for the Union to legislate along the lines of the US 'conflict minerals' law alias Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act; and the Commission announced in its Communications of 2011 and 2012 its intention to explore ways of improving transparency throughout the supply chain, including aspects of due diligence. In the latter communication and in line with the commitment it had made at the May 2011 OECD Ministerial Council, the Commission also advocated greater support for and use of the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, and of the OECD Due Diligence Guidance – even outside the OECD membership.
Amendment 6
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 8
(8)  Union citizens and civil society actors have raised awareness with respect to companies operating under the Union's jurisdiction for not being held accountable for their potential connection to the illicit extraction and trade of minerals from conflict regions. The consequence is that such minerals, potentially present in consumer products, link consumers to conflicts outside the Union. To this end, citizens have requested, notably through petitions, that legislation be proposed to the European Parliament and the Council holding companies accountable under the Guidelines as established by the UN and OECD.
(8)  Union citizens and civil society actors have raised awareness with respect to companies operating under the Union's jurisdiction for not being held accountable for their potential connection to the illicit extraction and trade of minerals from conflict regions. The consequence is that such minerals, potentially present in consumer products, link consumers to conflicts outside the Union. As such, consumers are indirectly linked to conflicts that have severe impacts on human rights, notably the rights of women, as armed groups often use mass rape as a deliberate strategy to intimidate and control local populations in order to protect their interests. To this end, citizens have requested, notably through petitions, that legislation be proposed to the European Parliament and the Council holding companies accountable under the Guidelines as established by the UN and OECD.
Amendments 71, 91 and 112
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 9 a (new)
(9a)  The Regulation reflects the need for due diligence along the entire supply chain from the sourcing site to the final product, by requiring all companies who first place covered resources, including products that contain those resources on the Union market to conduct and publicly report on their supply chain due diligence. In line with the nature of due diligence, the individual due diligence obligations contained in this Regulation should reflect the progressive and flexible nature of due diligence processes, and the need for obligations that are appropriately tailored to enterprises' individual circumstances. Obligations should be tailored to a company's size, leverage, and position in its supply chain.
Amendment 57
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11 a (new)
(11a)  Directive 2014/95/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council 1a requires companies with more than 500 employees to disclose information on a number of policies including human rights, anti-corruption and supply chain due diligence. That Directive provides for the Commission to develop guidelines in order to facilitate the disclosure of this information. The Commission should consider including in those guidelines performance indicators with regard to responsible sourcing of minerals and metals.
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1a Directive 2014/95/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 October 2014 amending Directive 2013/34/EU as regards disclosure of non-financial and diversity information by certain large undertakings and groups (OJ L 330, 15.11.2014, p. 1).
Amendment 9
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 11 b (new)
(11b)  Many existing supply chain due diligence systems could contribute to achieving the aims of this Regulation. There already exist industry schemes aimed at breaking the link between conflict and the sourcing of tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold. Those schemes use independent third-party audits to certify smelters and refiners with systems in place to ensure responsible sourcing of minerals only. Those industry schemes could be recognised in the Union system. However, the criteria and procedures for such schemes to be recognised as equivalent to the requirements of this Regulation need to be clarified to allow for respect for high standards and the avoidance of double auditing.
Amendment 10
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 12
(12)  Union companies have expressed their interest through the public consultation in the responsible sourcing of minerals and reported on current industry schemes designed to pursue their corporate social responsibility objectives, customer requests, or the security of their supplies. However, Union companies have also reported countless difficulties in the exercise of supply chain due diligence because of lengthy and complex global supply chains involving a high number of operators that are often insufficiently aware or ethically unconcerned. The cost of responsible sourcing and their potential impact on competitiveness notably on SMEs should be monitored by the Commission.
(12)  Union companies have expressed their interest through the public consultation in the responsible sourcing of minerals and reported on current industry schemes designed to pursue their corporate social responsibility objectives, customer requests, or the security of their supplies. However, Union companies have also reported countless difficulties and practical challenges in the exercise of supply chain due diligence because of lengthy and complex global supply chains involving a high number of operators that are often insufficiently aware or ethically unconcerned. The cost of responsible sourcing, third party auditing, their administrative consequences and their potential impact on competitiveness notably on SMEs should be closely monitored and reported by the Commission. The Commission should provide micro- small and medium size enterprises with technical and financial assistance and should facilitate the exchange of information in order to implement this Regulation . SMEs established in the Union which import minerals and metals and which establish due diligence systems should receive financial aid through the Commission’s COSME programme.
Amendment 12
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 12 a (new)
(12a)  Companies established in the Union operating downstream of the supply chain that voluntarily establish a responsible sourcing system for minerals and metals should be certified by the Member States’ competent authorities by means of a label. The Commission should rely on the OECD Due Diligence Guidance to set out the criteria for the granting of certification and, to that end, may consult the OECD Secretariat. The conditions for granting the 'European certification of responsibility' should be as stringent as those required by the OECD certification system. Companies benefitting from the 'European certification of responsibility' are encouraged to indicate this fact on their website and to include it in the information given to European consumers.
Amendment 14
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13
(13)  Smelters and refiners are an important point in global mineral supply chains as they are typically the last stage in which due diligence can effectively be assured by collecting, disclosing and verifying information on the mineral's origin and chain of custody. After this stage of transformation it is often considered unfeasible to trace back the origins of minerals. A Union list of responsible smelters and refiners could therefore provide transparency and certainty to downstream companies as regards supply chain due diligence practices.
(13)  Smelters and refiners are an important point in global mineral supply chains as they are typically the last stage in which due diligence can effectively be assured by collecting, disclosing and verifying information on the mineral's origin and chain of custody. After this stage of transformation it is often considered unfeasible to trace back the origins of minerals. The same applies to recycled metals, which have undergone even further steps in the transformation process. A Union list of responsible smelters and refiners could therefore provide transparency and certainty to downstream companies as regards supply chain due diligence practices. In accordance with the OECD Due Diligence Guidance, upstream undertakings such as smelters and refiners should undergo an independent third-party audit of their supply chain due diligence practices, with a view to also being included in the list of responsible smelters and refiners.
Amendment 15
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13 a (new)
(13a)  Smelters and refiners which process and import minerals and concentrates thereof should have an obligation to apply the Union system for supply chain due diligence.
Amendment 16
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 13 b (new)
(13b)  All minerals and metals within the scope of this Regulation should be used in accordance with the requirements laid down herein. It is essential that importers comply with the provisions of this Regulation.
Amendment 18
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 15 a (new)
(15a)  In order to guarantee the efficient implementation of this Regulation, provision should be made for a two-year transitional period to allow the Commission to set up a third-party audit system and for responsible importers to become familiar with their obligations under this Regulation.
Amendment 19
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 15 b (new)
(15b)  The Commission should regularly review its financial assistance and political commitments with regard to conflict-affected and high risk areas where tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold are mined, especially in the Great Lake Region, in order to ensure policy coherence, and in order to incentivise and strengthen the respect for good governance, the rule of law but above all ethical mining.
Amendment 20
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 16
(16)  The Commission should report regularly to the Council and the European Parliament on the effects of the scheme. No later than three years after entering into force and every six years thereafter, the Commission should review the functioning and the effectiveness of this Regulation, including as regards the promotion of responsible sourcing of the minerals within its scope from conflict-affected and high-risk areas. The reports may be accompanied, if necessary, by appropriate legislative proposals, which may include mandatory measures,
(16)  The Commission should report regularly to the European Parliament and the Council on the effects of the scheme. Two years after the date of application of this Regulation and every three years thereafter, the Commission should review the functioning and the effectiveness of this Regulation and the latest impact of the scheme on the ground as regards the promotion of responsible sourcing of the minerals within its scope from conflict-affected and high-risk areas and report to the European Parliament and to the Council . The reports may be accompanied, if necessary, by appropriate legislative proposals, which may include further mandatory measures.
Amendment 21
Proposal for a regulation
Recital 16 a (new)
(16a)  In their Joint Communication of 5 March 2014, the Commission and the Vice-President of the Commission/High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy committed to the implementation of accompanying measures leading to an integrated EU approach to responsible sourcing in parallel with this Regulation, with the aim not only of reaching a high level of participation by companies in the Union system provided for in this Regulation but also ensuring that a global, coherent and comprehensive approach is taken to promote responsible sourcing from conflict affected and high-risk areas.
Amendment 60
Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 — paragraph 1
1.  This Regulation sets up a Union system for supply chain due diligence self-certification in order to curtail opportunities for armed groups and security forces12 to trade in tin, tantalum and tungsten, their ores, and gold. It is designed to provide transparency and certainty as regards the supply practices of importers, smelters and refiners sourcing from conflict-affected and high-risk areas.
1.  This Regulation sets up a Union system for supply chain due diligence certification in order to curtail opportunities for armed groups and security forces12 to trade in tin, tantalum and tungsten, their ores, and gold. It is designed to provide transparency and certainty as regards the supply practices of importers, smelters and refiners sourcing from conflict-affected and high-risk areas.
__________________
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12 'Armed groups and security forces' as defined in Annex II of the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Second Edition, OECD Publishing (OECD (2013). http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264185050-en.
12 'Armed groups and security forces' as defined in Annex II of the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Second Edition, OECD Publishing (OECD (2013). http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264185050-en.
Amendment 154
Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 2
2.  This Regulation lays down the supply chain due diligence obligations of Union importers who choose to be self-certified as responsible importers of minerals or metals containing or consisting of tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold, as set out in Annex I .
2.  This Regulation lays down the supply chain due diligence obligations of all Union importers who source minerals and metals falling within the scope of this Regulation, in accordance with the OECD Due Diligence Guidance . That guidance is designed to guarantee transparency and traceability in respect of importers’ sourcing practices in conflict-affected or high-risk areas, in order to minimise or prevent violent conflicts and human rights abuses by curtailing the opportunities for armed groups and security forces, as defined in Annex II to the OECD Due Diligence Guidance, to trade in those minerals and metals.
Amendment 23
Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 2 a (new)
2a.  Metals reasonably assumed to be recycled shall be excluded from the scope of this Regulation.
Amendments 76, 97, 117 and 135
Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 2 b (new)
2b.  In order to prevent unintended distortions of the market, this Regulation shall draw a distinction between the roles of undertakings situated upstream of and those situated downstream from the supply chain. The exercise of due diligence must be tailored to the activities of the undertaking in question, its size and its position in the supply chain.
Amendments 77, 98, 118 and 136
Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 2 c (new)
2c.  The Commission, working with industry schemes and in accordance with the OECD Guidance, may provide further guidelines on the obligations to be met by undertakings, depending on their position in the supply chain, to ensure that the system involves a flexible procedure that takes into account the position of SMEs.
Amendment 155
Proposal for a regulation
Article 1 – paragraph 2 d (new)
2d.  Under this Regulation and in accordance with the OECD Due Diligence Guidance, downstream companies shall take all reasonable steps to identify and address any risks arising in their supply chains for minerals and metals coming within the scope of this Regulation. In this connection, they shall be required to provide information on the due diligence practices they employ for responsible sourcing.
Amendment 26
Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – point b a (new)
(ba)  'recycled metals' means reclaimed end-user or post-consumer products, or scrap processed metals created during product manufacturing; 'recycled metals' includes excess, obsolete, defective, and scrap metal materials which contain refined or processed metals that are appropriate to recycle in the production of tin, tantalum, tungsten and/or gold; minerals partially processed, unprocessed or a bi-product from another ore are not recycled metals;
Amendment 24
Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – point e
(e)  'conflict-affected and high-risk areas' means areas in a state of armed conflict, fragile post-conflict as well as areas witnessing weak or non-existent governance and security, such as failed states, and widespread and systematic violations of international law, including human rights abuses ;
(e)  'conflict-affected and high-risk areas' means areas in a state of armed conflict, with presence of widespread violence, collapse of civil infrastructure, fragile post-conflict areas as well as areas of weak or non-existent governance and security, such as failed states, characterised by widespread and systematic violations of human rights, as established under international law ;
Amendment 25
Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – point g
(g)  'importer' means any natural or legal person declaring minerals or metals within the scope of this Regulation for release for free circulation within the meaning of Article 79 of Council Regulation (EEC) No 2913/1992 13 ;
(g)  'importer' means any natural or legal person established in the Union making a declaration for the release for free circulation of minerals and metals within the scope of this Regulation in his own name or the person on whose behalf such declaration is made; a representative making the declaration while acting in the name of and on behalf of another person or a representative acting in his own name and on behalf of another person are equally considered to be importers for the purposes of this Regulation;
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13 Council Regulation (EEC) No 2913/92 of 12 October 1992 establishing the Community Customs Code (OJ L 302, 19.10.1992, p. 1).
Amendment 100
Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – point h
(h)  'responsible importer' means any importer who chooses to self-certify according to the rules set out in this Regulation;
deleted
Amendment 138
Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – point i
(i)  'self-certification' means the act of declaring one's adherence to the obligations relating to management systems, risk management, third-party audits and disclosure as set out in this Regulation;
deleted
(This AM applies throughout the text)
Amendment 29
Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – point q a (new)
(qa)  'industry scheme' means a combination of voluntary supply chain due diligence procedures, tools and mechanisms, developed and overseen by relevant industry associations, including third-party conformity assessments;
Amendment 30
Proposal for a regulation
Article 2 – point q b (new)
(qb)  'armed groups and security forces' means groups referred to in Annex II of the OECD Due Diligence Guidance;
Amendment 31
Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – point a
(a)  adopt and clearly communicate to suppliers and the public its supply chain policy for the minerals and metals potentially originating from conflict-affected and high-risk areas,
(a)  adopt and clearly and systematically communicate to suppliers and the public its supply chain policy for the minerals and metals potentially originating from conflict-affected and high-risk areas,
Amendments 85, 126 and 145
Proposal for a regulation
Article 4 – paragraph 1 a (new)
Where any undertaking can reasonably conclude that resources are derived only from recycled or scrap sources, it shall, with due regard to business confidentiality and competitive concerns:
(a)  publicly disclose its determination; and
(b)  describe in reasonable detail the due diligence measures it exercised in making that determination.
Amendment 67
Proposal for a regulation
Article 6 — paragraph 2 a (new)
Certified responsible importers of smelted and refined metals shall be exempted from carrying out independent third-party audits pursuant to Article 3(1a) of this Regulation provided they submit substantive evidence that all smelters and refiners in their supply chain conform to the provisions of this Regulation.
Amendment 40
Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 a (new)
Article 7a
List of responsible importers
1.  On the basis of the information provided by the Member States in their reports, as referred to in Article 15, the Commission shall adopt and make publicly available a decision listing the names and addresses of responsible importers of minerals and metals within the scope of this Regulation.
2.  The Commission shall adopt the list using the template set out in Annex Ia and in accordance with the advisory procedure referred to in Article 13(2).
3.  The Commission shall update and publish, including on the internet, the information included in the list in a timely manner. The Commission shall remove from the list the names of the importers that, in case of inadequate remedial action by the responsible importers, are no longer recognised as responsible importers by Member States in accordance with Article 14(3).
Amendment 43
Proposal for a regulation
Article 7 b (new)
Article 7b
Due diligence obligations applicable to smelters and refiners
1.  Smelters and refiners established in the Union which process and import minerals and concentrates thereof shall have an obligation to apply the Union system for supply chain due diligence or a due diligence system recognised as equivalent by the Commission.
2.  The Member States competent authorities shall ensure the proper application of the European due diligence system by smelters and refiners. If there is a failure to comply with these obligations, the authorities shall notify the fact to the smelter or refiner, and shall ask them to take corrective measures in order to comply with the European due diligence system. In the event of a persistent failure to comply, the Member States competent authorities shall impose penalties for the infringement of this Regulation. These penalties shall cease when the smelter or refiner complies with the provisions of this Regulation.
Amendment 44
Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 1
1.  On the basis of the information provided by the Member States in their reports as referred to in Article 15, the Commission shall adopt and make publicly available a decision listing the names and addresses of responsible smelters and refiners of minerals within the scope of this Regulation .
1.  On the basis of the information provided by the Member States in their reports as referred to in Article 15, the Commission shall adopt and make publicly available a decision listing the names and addresses of responsible smelters and refiners.
Amendment 45
Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 2
2.  The Commission shall identify on the list referred to in paragraph 1 those responsible smelters and refiners that source – at least partially – from conflict-affected and high-risk areas.
2.  The Commission shall identify on the list referred to in paragraph 1 those responsible smelters and refiners that source – at least partially – from conflict-affected and high-risk areas. This list shall be drawn up taking into account existing equivalent industry, governmental or other due diligence schemes covering the minerals and metals within the scope of this Regulation.
Amendment 46
Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 3
3.  The Commission shall adopt the list in accordance with the template in Annex II and the regulatory procedure referred to in Article 13(2). The OECD Secretariat shall be consulted.
3.  The Commission shall adopt the list using the template in Annex II and in accordance with the advisory procedure referred to in Article 13(2). The OECD Secretariat shall be consulted.
Amendment 47
Proposal for a regulation
Article 8 – paragraph 4
4.  The Commission shall update the information included in the list in a timely manner. The Commission shall remove from the list the names of the smelters and refiners that are no longer recognised as responsible importers by Member States in accordance with Article 14(3), or the names of the smelters and refiners in the supply chain of the no longer recognised responsible importers.
4.  The Commission shall update and publish , including on the internet, the information included in the list in a timely manner. The Commission shall remove from the list the names of the smelters and refiners that are no longer recognised as responsible importers by Member States in accordance with Article 14(3), or the names of the smelters and refiners in the supply chain of the no longer recognised responsible importers.
Amendment 48
Proposal for a regulation
Article 9 – paragraph 2
2.  The Commission shall make a decision to publish, including on the internet, a list of competent authorities in accordance with the template in Annex III and the regulatory procedure referred to in paragraph 2 of Article 13. The Commission shall update the list regularly.
2.  The Commission shall make a decision to publish, including on the internet, a list of competent authorities using the template in Annex III and in accordance with the advisory procedure referred to in Article 13(2) . The Commission shall update the list regularly.
Amendment 151
Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 1
1.  The competent authorities of the Member States shall carry out appropriate ex-post checks in order to ensure whether self-certified responsible importers of minerals and metals within scope of this Regulation comply with the obligations set out in Articles 4, 5, 6 and 7.
1.  The competent authorities of the Member States shall carry out appropriate ex-post checks in order to ensure whether responsible importers of minerals and metals within the scope of this Regulation comply with the obligations set out in Articles 4, 5, 6 and 7.
Amendment 49
Proposal for a regulation
Article 10 – paragraph 2
2.  The checks referred to in paragraph 1 shall be conducted by taking a risk-based approach. In addition, checks may be conducted when a competent authority is in possession of relevant information, including on the basis of substantiated concerns provided by third parties, concerning the compliance by a responsible importer with this Regulation.
2.  The checks referred to in paragraph 1 shall be conducted by taking a risk-based approach. In addition, checks shall be conducted when a competent authority is in possession of relevant information, including on the basis of substantiated concerns provided by third parties, concerning the compliance by a responsible importer with this Regulation.
Amendment 51
Proposal for a regulation
Article 12 a (new)
Article 12a
In order to create clarity and certainty for and consistency among economic operators, in particular SMEs, the Commission, in consultation with the European External Action Service and the OECD, shall prepare non-binding guidelines in the form of a handbook for companies, explaining how best to apply the criteria for those areas that may fall within the scope of this Regulation. This handbook shall be based on the definition of conflict-affected and high-risk areas as laid down in Article 2(e) of this Regulation and take into account the OECD Due Diligence Guidance in this field.
Amendment 52
Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 2 – subparagraph 2
Where the opinion of the committee is to be obtained by written procedure, that procedure shall be terminated without result when, within the time-limit for delivery of the opinion, the chair of the committee so decides or a simple majority of committee members so request.
deleted
Amendment 53
Proposal for a regulation
Article 13 – paragraph 2 a (new)
(2a)  Where reference is made to this paragraph, Article 5 of Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 shall apply.
Amendment 55
Proposal for a regulation
Article 15 a (new)
Article 15a
Accompanying measures
1.  The Commission shall submit a legislative proposal, as appropriate, within the transitional period setting up accompanying measures in order to enhance the effectiveness of this Regulation in line with the Joint Communication to the European Parliament and the Council entitled "Responsible sourcing of minerals originating in conflict-affected and high risk areas. Towards an integrated EU approach" (JOIN (2014)0008).
Accompanying measures to ensure an integrated EU approach to the duty of responsible sourcing shall foresee:
(a)  support for responsibly sourcing enterprises in the form of incentives, technical assistance and guidance to enterprises, taking into account the situation of small and medium-sized enterprises and their position in the supply chain, in order to facilitate compliance with the requirements of this Regulation;
(b)  ongoing policy dialogues with third countries and other stakeholders, including the possibility of harmonization with national and regional certification systems and cooperation with public-private initiatives;
(c)  continued, targeted development cooperation with third countries, in particular aid for the marketing of non-conflict minerals and placing local enterprises in a better position to comply with this Regulation;
(d)  close cooperation with Member States for the launching of complementary initiatives in the area of consumer, investor and customer information and further incentives for responsible business conduct and performance clauses in procurement contracts signed by the national authorities under the terms of Directive 2014/24/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council 1a .
2.  The Commission shall present an annual performance report of the accompanying measures implemented pursuant to paragraph 1 and of their impact and effectiveness.
1a Directive 2014/24/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 February 2014 on public procurement and repealing Directive 2004/18/EC (OJ L 94, 28.3.2014, p. 65).
Amendment 56
Proposal for a regulation
Article 16 – paragraph 1 a (new)
This Regulation shall apply from...*
___________________________
*Two years after the date of entry into force of this Regulation
Amendment 59
Proposal for a regulation
Annex II – Column C a (new)
Column Ca: Type of mineral

(1) The matter was referred back to the committee responsible for reconsideration pursuant to Rule 61(2), second subparagraph (A8-0141/2015).

Last updated: 7 February 2017Legal notice