Procedure : 2004/2264(INI)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A6-0141/2006

Texts tabled :

A6-0141/2006

Debates :

PV 14/06/2006 - 14
CRE 14/06/2006 - 14

Votes :

PV 15/06/2006 - 9.13
CRE 15/06/2006 - 9.13
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P6_TA(2006)0276

REPORT     
PDF 216kDOC 145k
26 April 2006
PE 357.550v02-00 A6-0141/2006

on inshore fishing and the problems encountered by inshore fishermen

(2004/2264(INI))

Committee on Fisheries

Rapporteur: Seán Ó Neachtain

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION
 EXPLANATORY STATEMENT
 OPINION of the Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality
 PROCEDURE

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION

on inshore fishing and the problems encountered by inshore fishermen

(2004/2264(INI))

The European Parliament,

–   having regard to the Common Fisheries Policy,

–   having regard to European Fisheries Fund Regulations,

–   having regard to Article 11 of Council Regulation (EC) No 2792/1999 of 17 December 1999 laying down the detailed rules and arrangements regarding Community structural assistance in the fisheries sector(1),

–   having regard to its resolution of 5 April 2001 on Fisheries: safety and causes of accidents(2),

–   having regard to Council Regulation (EC) No 2371/2002 of 20 December 2002 on the conservation and sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources under the common fisheries policy(3),

–   having regard to Council Regulation 1421/2004 of 19 July 2004 amending Regulation (EC) No 2792/1999 laying down the detailed rules and arrangements regarding Community structural assistance in the fisheries sector(4),

–   having regard to its resolution of 15 December 2005 on Women's networks: fishing, farming and diversification(5),

–   having regard to the Lisbon Strategy,

–   having regard to Rule 45 of its Rules of Procedure,

–   having regard to the report of the Committee on Fisheries and the opinion of the Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality (A6-0141/2006),

A. whereas inshore fisheries, especially small-scale coastal and traditional fisheries, make a considerable contribution to the socio-economic wellbeing of coastal communities, contributing to local development, job preservation/creation both upstream and downstream, supplies of fresh fish and the preservation of traditional local cultures,

B.  whereas the economic and social crisis affecting the fisheries sector is of particular concern for the less competitive fleet segments, especially the inshore fisheries,

C. whereas there is currently a variety of measures pertaining to different aspects of small-scale fisheries in a number of Community regulations,

D. whereas the common fisheries policy and its instruments, especially with regard to the future EFP, must take account of the inshore fisheries and adapt to their specific problems, above all as regards small-scale and traditional inshore fisheries,

E.  whereas it is important to ensure the future of inshore fisheries within the European Union, given their critical contribution to employment in coastal areas, while respecting the need to prevent over-capacity in this segment of the fleets and resulting depletion of resources,

F.  whereas, despite high unemployment and an ageing coastal fishing population, there is a serious lack of recruitment of young people in some coastal areas,

G. whereas there exists a high dependency on fisheries and related industries in certain coastal areas, particularly in island or remote coastal areas,

H. whereas a large part of the processing sector in the most remote regions has its competitiveness and economic viability assured by the Community support granted,

I.   whereas there is a serious lack of accurate statistical information on the inshore fishery sector in many Member States, which precludes serious analysis and comparison of the sector,

J.   whereas there is a need for a new Community approach tending towards harmonisation and avoiding differential treatment between fishermen from different Member States, in view of the disparate national policies on inshore fisheries,

K. whereas, having regard to the crucial potential role of representative organisations in the sector and of local authorities in its development at local level, there is a need for projects and actions developed by the above in support of inshore fisheries, notably small-scale and traditional fisheries, to be encouraged and supported at Community level,

L.  whereas it is important for coastal fishermen to participate in the trading process, improving the mechanisms for marketing their products and promoting a review of the COM in fisheries products so as to ensure fairer initial sale prices and promote a better distribution of added value across the value chain,

M. whereas it is vital to ensure the participation of inshore fishermen and their representative organisations in the decision-making process of the common fisheries policy, the protection of the marine environment and the recovery of fish stocks, promoting the application of the co-management principle and decentralisation of the CFP,

N. having regard to the insecurity affecting incomes and wages in the sector, arising from its marketing practices and price formation methods at initial sale and the irregular nature of the activity,

O. whereas the inshore fisheries sector is also affected by the increase in variable costs, together with the high instability of fuel prices,

P.  whereas there is increasing tension and competition for resources between inshore fishermen, who fish for a livelihood, and recreational fishing, and whereas this is a problem that needs to be addressed,

Q. whereas it is necessary to ensure that inshore fishing techniques also contribute to improved environmental protection and sustainable development of the fisheries sector,

R.  having regard to the need to encourage professional training for inshore fishermen,

1.  Stresses that inshore fisheries make a vital contribution not only to local economies but also to maintaining the social fabric of coastal communities, given that they contribute more jobs per amount of fish caught than other segments of the fleets, particularly in island or remote coastal areas;

2.  Believes that inshore fishing activity is essential for the preservation of cultural traditions and practices, ensuring not only the protection of cultural diversity in the regions concerned but also the very survival of entire coastal communities; believes furthermore that these traditions and practices must be preserved;

3.  Recognises that inshore fisheries can and must play a constructive role in the protection and conservation of the coastal marine environment;

4.  Realises, however, that if the capacity of the inshore fleets is too great, they could also contribute to resource depletion;

5.  Takes the view that, as part of regional policy, the Member States should apply common mechanisms to protect inshore fishing, with a view to ensuring its ability to continue, and should make the achievement of objectives and the implementation of specific provisions dependent on natural conditions in inshore zones and on resource protection; inshore zones are areas where many species of fish, including industrial fish, spawn and where juvenile fish are reared;

6.  Believes, however, that there is a need for continuing research on the role and impact of inshore fisheries, with a view to ensuring, as with all fishing activities, that they are kept at a sustainable level;

7.  Considers that specific research is required into the issue of the protection of fishing within three nautical miles of the shore by vessels of up to 12 m in length using passive gear;

8.  Proposes eliminating the use of fishing gear that jeopardises the sustainability of coastal stocks and the viability of the social fabric related to the fisheries sector;

9.  Recognises the difficulties of establishing a common definition at EU level of inshore fisheries, and therefore believes that there is an urgent need for those involved to lay down minimum criteria which are acceptable to all and which establish the necessary balance between coastal, offshore and recreational fishing activities;

10. Believes that the minimum criteria must take account of, inter alia, aspects such as the following:

     (a) small-scale inshore fisheries;

     (b) the length of vessels;

     (c) the distance from the home port within which vessels operate, having regard to the different geographical and maritime conditions in the Member States;

     (d) a maximum length of time during which the vessel is away from home;

     (e) vessels which return to port daily and sell their catch fresh;

11. Believes that a harmonised approach to the collection of inshore fisheries data is essential in order to provide accurate data on inshore fisheries activities - a prerequisite for the establishment of a common definition;

12. Invites the Commission, as a matter of urgency, to propose ways of harmonising data on inshore fisheries throughout the European Union, safeguarding the characteristics of the individual national and regional fisheries;

13. Underlines that there is an urgent need to address the multiple problems in the inshore fishing sector, notably in the areas of management, structural improvement, development, education and training;

14. Believes that it is essential for inshore fisherman and dependent communities to be more directly involved in processing and trading in order to strengthen their profit base and improve their living standards;

15. Proposes maintaining support within the sector for the processing of fisheries products in the most remote regions, in particular aid for olive oil used for tuna canning;

16. Calls on the Commission to recognise the specific nature of inshore and traditional fishing in the CFP, and to determine how far the existing instruments are suitable for responding to the sector's needs, adapting them accordingly;

17. Recognises the existence in current EU legislation of certain provisions dealing specifically with the management and structural improvement of the inshore fisheries sector;

18. Believes that the new EFP must continue the financing of fleet renewal measures for inshore fisheries, especially for improving on-board working conditions, as well as providing the necessary economic and social measures;

19. Calls on the Commission to finance the modernisation of inshore fishery vessels;

20. Therefore calls on the Commission to consider a new Community initiative for this important sector of activity;

21. Further calls on the Commission, in this context, to ensure that specific and adequate finances are made available, so as to permit the proper implementation of any new policies;

22. Underlines that coastal management plans (CMPs), where they are established in a few Member States, have had positive effects on the sector, and consequently believes that CMPs should constitute an important element of any new EU initiative;

23. Points out that, currently, vocational training geared towards the sector in the Member States is either totally inadequate or non-existent;

24. Points to the need for the immediate establishment of a training programme covering safety at work in the fishing industry, protection of the marine environment, protection of resources, protection of the sea and inshore zones, catch quality and marketing and management in the fish processing sector;

25. Affirms that appropriate and specific education and training are essential if young persons in our coastal regions are to be encouraged to perpetuate coastal fishing activities and traditions;

26. Therefore calls on the Commission to bring forward specific educational and training programmes for the inshore fishery sector, notably so as to encourage the entry of young professionals into the sector, and to provide adequate funding in order to ensure the full implementation and success of those programmes;

27. Further requests, in this context, that the necessary publicity be given to the action taken, so as to ensure that comprehensive information on training opportunities is readily available to all interested parties;

28. Believes that any new inshore fisheries legislation must pay special attention to the need to establish and maintain a safety culture in which safety is given the highest priority, and to ensure that safety rules appropriate to the inshore sector are properly implemented; insists that such a safety culture must start by ensuring a more secure and modern fleet with the capacity to include new safety equipment and material, it being necessary to this end to continue with the granting of aid for the renewal and modernisation of the fleet under the future European Fisheries Fund, as already approved by Parliament;

29. Recognises that women play a major role in the inshore fisheries sector, notably in the areas of management, sales and marketing, aquaculture, processing and research;

30. Believes that women's networks can make a major contribution to the socio-economic development of fisheries-dependent communities, and notably coastal communities;

31. Calls on the Commission and the Member States to take systematic account of the gender dimension and gender equality when dealing with any of the situations and problems linked to inshore fishing and in pilot projects financed by the CFP and the structural funds, since this type of fishing is characterised by an economic structure which is chiefly based on small family firms, where women play a fundamental role which should receive legal and social recognition;

32. Takes the view that the changes which are occurring in communities which depend on inshore fishing affect women both directly and indirectly and therefore calls on the Commission to lend its support to specific projects which have as their objective the recognition, promotion and diversification of women's role in fisheries-related areas and to adopt solutions, with a view to the diversification of activities and the restructuring of such communities, that not only enjoy the support of local, regional and national governments and the European Union but also benefit from equal participation of men and women;

33. Urges the Commission firstly to gather and analyse gender-differentiated data on inshore fishing and secondly to identify and propose solutions to the specific problems facing women in inshore-fishing communities, in cooperation with the future European Institute for Gender Equality;

34. Notes that the health of women directly involved in inshore fishing may be affected by often difficult working conditions, but that in the majority of cases their lack of a legal work status means that they do not enjoy equal conditions of access to the health system; therefore calls on the Commission and the Member States to provide a rapid solution to this problem by adopting the necessary measures to guarantee those women's economic and social rights, and in particular their right of access to social security and health services, together with measures aimed at improving their safety and preserving their health in the working environment;

35. Believes as a matter of principle that inshore fishermen, small-scale processors and other coastal entities directly involved in or affected by inshore fishery activities should be involved in the management of the sector;

36. Calls on the Commission to consult with the inshore fisheries sector and to ensure the active involvement of that sector at the appropriate policy level in the decision-making process, which directly affects them;

37. Believes that the Regional Advisory Councils have an essential role to play in this context;

38. Invites the Commission to report back to the European Parliament concerning any initiative involving specific treatment for inshore fisheries;

39. Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission and the governments of the Member States.

(1)

OJ L 344, 28.12.2001, p. 17. Regulation as last amended by Regulation (EC) No 485/2005 (OJ L 81, 30.3.2005, p. 1).

(2)

OJ C 21 E, 24.1.2002, p. 359.

(3)

OJ L 358, 31.12.2002, p. 59.

(4)

OJ L 260, 6.8.2004, p. 1.

(5)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2005)0532.


EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

1.        INTRODUCTION

Inshore fisheries are of vital importance for the socio-economic survival of entire coastal economies. Potentially they have an essential role to play within the Community Fisheries Policy - which is currently not the case. Not least they play a highly significant role in the sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources in Community coastal waters.

The inshore fisheries sector is lacking a specific regulatory framework. Consequently this important sector finds itself totally excluded from current community fisheries legislation. This situation gives rise to an unfavourable environment for the inshore fishery industry and needs to be addressed as a matter of urgency.

At the request of the rapporteur and the Fisheries Committee the European Parliament commissioned a study on the sector under discussion. This study entitled "Inshore Fisheries and the Problems Encountered by Inshore Fishermen" was produced by Centro Tecnolólogico del Mar - Fundación Cetmar. It was presented to the Committee on the occasion of a public hearing which was held in Brussels on 24 November 2005. Additional presentations were made by eminent specialists from a number of Member States.

Based on the conclusions of the above study, the different presentations by the experts, the invaluable contributions from MEPS and the conclusions to the discussions, your rapporteur will focus at the current situation of inshore fisheries in the EU.

He will strive to identify the inherent weaknesses of the sector and propose a number of possible solutions that could significantly strengthen the sector, and contribute not only to the development of local economies but also to maintaining the social fabric of coastal communities

2.        THE DEFINITION OF INSHORE FISHERIES

European Community legislation refers to small inshore fishing as a fishing activity engaged in by vessels of under 12 metres length not using trawling gear.

"For the purposes of this Article 'small-scale coastal fishing' means fishing carried on by vessels of an overall length of less than 12 metres, not using the trawling gear mentioned in Table 2 of Annex 1 to Commission Regulation 2090/98 of 30 September 1998 concerning the fishing vessel register of the Community."(1)

However in practice each Member State uses its own definition. A wide range of terms are currently used to define the sector including, artisanal fishing, small scale fishing and coastal fishing. Each of these terms is subject to different interpretations in Member States. They vary according to national legislation, cultural traditions, the type of fisheries involved and the structure of nation fleets. Only two Member States have legal definitions.

Inshore fisheries can be engaged in by different types of boat - from very small vessels that only fish close to the shore to larger vessels that can fish much further offshore. The most common and frequent criteria used are vessel length, area of activity and type of fishing gear. The values assigned to each parameter vary from country to country, and even from region to region; moreover, parameters are often not clearly defined.

The Community needs to have a co-ordinated approach towards inshore fisheries. Because of the clearly heterogeneous context within which this industry is perceived in each Member State, your rapporteur believes that harmonisation of the concept and definition of small inshore fishing can only be achieved by means of an EU legislative approach.

However your rapporteur also believes that the EU must adopt a realistic approach by allowing for a nuanced definition between Member States. There must be provision in any future regulation to allow some national adjustments.

Criteria to be used in any common definition could include:

a) Fisheries which are artisanal

b) Vessels which return to port each day

c) Vessels which operate within less than 20 km from the home port.

3.        THE LEGISLATION AFFECTING INSHORE FISHERIES

        Application of Community law

One of the fundamental underlying difficulties in regulating inshore fisheries is the total absence of integration between EC regulations and national legislation. Almost all EC regulations are aimed at offshore fishing.

Ironically EC regulations often refer to the precarious economic situation of the fisheries sector and to the dependence on fishing of various coastal populations. However it is precisely those coastal communities that most depend on inshore fishing, but this is not reflected in EC law.

                    Inshore fisheries and the Common Fisheries Policy

Since there is nothing concrete in existing Community legislation that directly links inshore fishing to a given geographic or maritime space, this type of fishing is simply deemed to co-exist with other more larger and powerful commercial boats.

Along with Commission Regulation 2090/98 of 30 September 1998 concerning the fishing vessel register of the Community, one of the few references that gives a clue that small inshore vessels can operate in coastal waters under Member State management is Article 9 of Regulation 2371/2002 on the conservation and sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources under the Common Fisheries Policy:

"Member State measures within the 12 nautical mile zone

1. A Member State may take non-discriminatory measures for the conservation and management of fisheries resources and to minimise the effect of fishing on the conservation of marine eco-systems within 12 nautical miles of its baselines provided that the Community has not adopted measures addressing conservation and management specifically for this area. The Member State measures shall be compatible with the objectives set out in Article 2 and no less stringent than existing Community legislation."

        Other aspects of Regulation 2371/2002

The Regulation excludes vessels under 15 metres length from the obligation to install a remote detection and identification mechanism. This is a distinctive feature of inshore fishing that sets it apart from industrial and high-seas fishing. This aspect however is not specified in the Regulation.

In Article 31 on Regional Advisory Councils there is no mention of the specific nature of inshore fishing. It only deals with 'marine zones or fishing zones' and aquaculture, but not with types of fishing activity.

        Regulation 1421/2004

Regulation 1421/2004(2) states that 'the protection and development of aquatic resources do not exclusively concern measures taken at sea', but, far from mentioning protection of coastal resources through inshore fishing, the Regulation makes no specific reference to inshore fishing in this connection.

4.        MANAGING INSHORE FISHERIES

During the Hearing some speakers described the inshore fisheries sector as "an amalgam of many small businesses". Other speakers said that the lack of associative or cooperative structures among inshore fishing operators "creates a disjointed sub-sector of the fishing industry."

In some areas there is increasing fishing effort by individual operators. In other areas where the number of operators is declining there are efforts to amalgamate into larger more efficient units. There is also an increasing specialisation on individual species, i.e. the sector is less pluri-specific than it has been in the past.

There are few management bodies specific to inshore fisheries. The sector is also seen as being absent or totally under-represented when Community, domestic and regional fisheries policy decision are being taken. Given the restrictions on access to the 12-mile zone, it is the coastal Member States who have sole authority to manage inshore fisheries within the framework of the Common Fisheries Policy. Every country or region has therefore endeavoured to develop its own management structures. In spite of this the inshore sector still faces the serious problem of under-representation in most instances.

Recent developments of co-operative management in some Member States have had positive effects on the sector, a situation that was also highlighted during the Hearing, and which have created a suitable forum for discussions of the trends and issues of concern to the sector.

In the words of one invited speaker at the Hearing "It is now crucial to move from divergence to consensus and isolationism to inclusiveness so that inshore fishermen move forward together with a shared vision. Co-operation, as far as possible, should be based on a voluntary partnership. Connecting local fishermen and their representative organisation is a key priority for the future. Effective fisheries management can deliver sustainable and viable fisheries and maximise the economic and social benefits."

4.        SOCIO-ECONOMIC ASPECTS

The markedly traditional inshore fishery sector where the employment structure used to be based on the local community and family ties is undergoing worrying changes.

A consequence of the aging fishing communities is a growing difficulty to modernise fisheries and introduce new, enhanced technologies. As a consequence inshore fisheries today are loosing attraction for young people. Regrettably the level of education in fishing communities in both academic and occupational terms is generally low. Occupational training in the sector is informal and traditional without specific courses or training schemes.

The lack of adequate and appropriate educational programmes is a serious hindrance to the development of the sector. It seriously limits the flow of appropriate information to authorities and management bodies. In most cases it restricts involvement of this sector in the definition of management measures that affect them. It hinders the fishermen's' ability to avail of and benefit from the latest and best techniques.

During the Hearing there was unanimous agreement that education and training were vital if there was to be necessary development of this important sector.

        Living standards and social conditions

There is a high dependency on inshore fisheries in coastal areas where fishing communities exist. Regrettably however the sector is generally associated with low income for both master and crew. In a majority of cases it means unstable employment and hard working conditions.

It also means high labour-related risk and low social status. The sector is also characterised by part time work. In order to provide for their families and also to help preserve and maintain their fishing activity fishermen are regularly obliged to supplement their income with miscellaneous part time work.

It is extremely difficult for fishermen in the inshore sector to obtain financial loans and assistance. Financial institutions regard inshore fisheries as high risk. The issues outlined above are some examples of what makes it difficult for the sector to get access to finance.

        Women and inshore fisheries

It is evident that the role of women in European fisheries is marked by the strongly traditional nature of the sector and many of their activities are undertaken on a voluntary basis. The Parliament has previously recognised with its motion for an EU resolution on Women's networks(3), that women in fisheries sector are active not only in processing, harvesting and aquaculture but also in marketing, research, journalism, management, training and representation in both the fisheries and aquaculture sectors. Women play a major role in the processing industry, and in some regions women account for over 50 % of the employees. Women can make a major contribution to the socio-economic development of fisheries dependent communities and it is now urgent to take advantage of these opportunities. To focus on integrating women in decision-making bodies or association can be a first step forward.

        Economic aspects

Clear conclusions from the Hearing were that the logistics of accessing markets are difficult because of a) limited availability of onshore holding facilities b) remoteness from the market, c) product shelf life, and d) limited marketing and business experience of small operators.

These conclusions are shared by your rapporteur who believes that a significant fragmentation of unloading points for catches seriously complicates the implementation of controls, transport and marketing. The fishermen's positions regarding the sale price of the product is weakened since they lack negotiating power.

The absence of a co-operative type marketing structure results in significant financial loss to the fishermen. The price to consumers of the produce of inshore fishing is excessive in many cases, notably because of the high number of intermediate operators in the marketing of the produce. None of the price increase achieved ever reaches the producer / fisherman.

        Competition for resources and labour

The existence of different types of fisheries which are competing in the same physical space of the same coastal areas for the same fish and crustaceans cannot be ignored.

There is competition between fishermen working with the same type of fishing gear. There is the competition between fishermen using different types of fishing gear, for example between coastal trawlers and much smaller vessels.

Another serious aspect that must be considered is competition from emerging activities like recreational fishing. In the absence of any formal framework recreational fishing does raise tensions and does create animosity towards commercial uses. Unless this question is tackled seriously and solutions found, it is highly likely that we will witness further conflicts between the fishing community and other inshore users.

Your rapporteur believes that in order to avoid competition for resources the use of the sea spaces should be regulated by assigning exploitation and access rights, for example through restricting the development of certain activities and making licences compulsory.

        Safety aspects

Inshore fisheries are presently carried on by small-scale vessels mostly operating near the coast. A range of measures should also be introduced, aiming at enhancing safety on board these vessels, given that many craft under 12 metres length are old or obsolete.

Bearing in mind the significant differences between high seas and small scale fishing fleets in relation to safety, it is still important to regulate the safety of small boats. This concept clearly outlined in the Miguelez report on: Fisheries: safety and causes of accidents(4) was adopted in the Committee on Fisheries and the plenary.

6.        CONCLUSIONS

The future development of the inshore fisheries sector is dependant on the existence of appropriate representative bodies. It is dependent on the creation of appropriate management structures. It is also dependent on social changes and on economic aspects that influence operating costs and create demand for the produce. Most importantly it is dependant on the adoption of appropriate EU legislation specifically designed for the sector.

Your rapporteur would like to stress the need:

-          To acknowledge the social and economic significance of the sector.

-          To improve the living standards of the people dependant on inshore fisheries

-          To implement adequate vocational training systems geared towards concerned groups of the inshore fisheries population, not least the development of marketing skills

-          To attract young people to the sector in order to ensure its continuity

-          To encourage the integration of women in the inshore sector

-          To develop and modernise the inshore fishery sector.

-          To develop new ways of commercialization and fully integrate coastal fishermen with the marketing process.

-         To enhance co-operation and communication channels between organisations and stakeholders concerned.

-          To integrate national politics on inshore fisheries with Community policies.

-          To devise measures to minimize the effects of the increase of variable costs that result from the high instability of fuel prices.

-          To regulate the safety onboard small vessels engaged in inshore fisheries.

-          To adopt a new Community initiative for this important sector of activity, accompanied by appropriate draft legislation

(1)

Article 11, Council Regulation (EC) No 2792/1999 of 17 December 1999 laying down the detailed rules and arrangements regarding Community structural assistance in the fisheries sector.

(2)

Regulation 1421/2004 of 19 July 2004 amending Regulation (EC) No 2792/1999 laying down the detailed rules and arrangements regarding Community structural assistance in the fisheries sector

(3)

European Parliament Resolution A6-0341/2005 of 30 November 2005 on Women's networks : fishing, farming and diversification

(4)

European Parliament Resolution A5-0087/2001 of 12 March 2001 on Fisheries: safety and causes of accidents


OPINION of the Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality (25.1.2006)

for the Committee on Fisheries

on inshore fishing and the problems encountered by inshore fishermen

Draftswoman: Teresa Riera Madurell

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Women's Rights and Gender Equality calls on the Committee on Fisheries, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.   Calls on the Commission and the Member States to take systematic account of the gender dimension and gender equality when dealing with any of the situations and problems linked to inshore fishing and in pilot projects financed by the CFP and the structural funds, since this type of fishing is characterised by an economic structure which is chiefly based on small family firms, where women play a fundamental role which should receive legal and social recognition;

2.   Takes the view that the changes which are occurring in communities which depend on inshore fishing affect women both directly and indirectly and therefore calls on the Commission to lend its support to specific projects which have as their objective the recognition, promotion and diversification of women's role in fisheries-related areas and to adopt solutions, with a view to the diversification of activities and the restructuring of such communities, that not only enjoy the support of local, regional and national governments and the European Union but also benefit from equal participation of men and women;

3.   Urges the Commission firstly to gather and analyse gender-differentiated data on inshore fishing and secondly to identify and propose solutions to the specific problems facing women in inshore-fishing communities, in cooperation with the future European Institute for Gender Equality;

4.   Notes that the health of women directly involved in inshore fishing may be affected by often difficult working conditions, but that in the majority of cases their lack of a legal work status means that they do not enjoy equal conditions of access to the health system; calls, therefore, for the Commission and the Member States to provide a rapid solution to this problem by adopting the necessary measures to guarantee these women's economic and social rights, and in particular their right of access to social security and health services, together with measures aimed at improving their safety and preserving their health in the working environment;

5.   Takes the view that, because women are participating fully in the process of diversification of the economy in communities which depend on inshore fishing, particularly in island or remote regions, as well as helping to maintain cultural traditions and practices specific to fishing communities, as long as it does not lead to gender discrimination, their work needs to be given both legal and social recognition and should be promoted and its value enhanced so as to permit women's full participation and career progress in the fishing industry, especially by making it easier to reconcile working life and family life and improving their access to loans and training without any discrimination;

6.   Calls on the Commission to extend the scope of Directive 86/613/EEC on the application of the principle of equal treatment between men and women engaged in an activity, including agriculture, in a self-employed capacity, and on the protection of self-employed women during pregnancy and motherhood(1), so that it also covers women's activities in the fishing industry;

7.   Calls on the Commission and the Member States to guarantee women's full participation in decision-making, representative and advisory bodies in inshore-fishing communities at European, national and regional level;

8.   Calls on the Commission to deal with the problem of the continued ageing of the population in fishing communities by adopting measures aimed at encouraging the participation of young people, both men and women, in the fishing industry in order to ensure its continuity.

PROCEDURE

Title

Inshore fishing and the problems encountered by inshore fishermen

Procedure number

2004/2264(INI)

Committee responsible

PECH

Opinion by
  Date announced in plenary

FEMM
13.1.2005

Enhanced cooperation – date announced in plenary

 

Drafts(wo)man
  Date appointed

Teresa Riera Madurell
25.1.2005

Previous drafts(wo)man

 

Discussed in committee

5.10.2005

23.1.2006

0.0.0000

 

 

Date adopted

24.1.2006

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

22

0

0

Members present for the final vote

Edit Bauer, Věra Flasarová, Claire Gibault, Lissy Gröner, Zita Gurmai, Piia-Noora Kauppi, Urszula Krupa, Pia Elda Locatelli, Marie Panayotopoulos-Cassiotou, Teresa Riera Madurell, Raül Romeva i Rueda, Amalia Sartori, Corien Wortmann-Kool, Anna Záborská

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Anna Hedh, Mary Honeyball, Christa Klaß, Maria Martens, Zita Pleštinská, Zuzana Roithová, Heide Rühle, Bernadette Vergnaud

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

 

Comments (available in one language only)

 

(1)

OJ L 359, 19.12.1986, p. 56.


PROCEDURE

Title

Inshore fishing and the problems encountered by inshore fishermen

Procedure number

2004/2264(INI)

Committee responsible
  Date authorisation announced in plenary

PECH
13.1.2005

Committee(s) asked for opinion(s)
  Date announced in plenary

FEMM
13.1.2005

 

 

 

 

Not delivering opinion(s)
  Date of decision


 

 

 

 

Enhanced cooperation
  Date announced in plenary

 

 

 

 

 

Rapporteur(s)
  Date appointed

Seán Ó Neachtain
25.11.2004

 

Previous rapporteur(s)

 

 

Discussed in committee

23.11.2005

29.11.2005

20.3.2006

 

 

Date adopted

19.4.2006

Result of final vote

+

-

0

24

0

5

Members present for the final vote

James Hugh Allister, Stavros Arnaoutakis, Elspeth Attwooll, Marie-Hélène Aubert, Iles Braghetto, Luis Manuel Capoulas Santos, David Casa, Paulo Casaca, Zdzisław Kazimierz Chmielewski, Carmen Fraga Estévez, Ioannis Gklavakis, Alfred Gomolka, Pedro Guerreiro, Ian Hudghton, Heinz Kindermann, Henrik Dam Kristensen, Albert Jan Maat, Willy Meyer Pleite, Rosa Miguélez Ramos, Philippe Morillon, Seán Ó Neachtain, Bernard Poignant, Struan Stevenson, Margie Sudre

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Simon Coveney, Chris Davies

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

Carlos Carnero González, Salvador Garriga Polledo, Eugenijus Gentvilas, Antonio Masip Hidalgo

Date tabled

26.4.2006

Comments
(available in one language only)

 

Last updated: 1 August 2006Legal notice