Procedure : 2007/2020(INI)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A6-0128/2007

Texts tabled :

A6-0128/2007

Debates :

PV 25/04/2007 - 15
CRE 25/04/2007 - 15

Votes :

PV 26/04/2007 - 8.9
CRE 26/04/2007 - 8.9
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P6_TA(2007)0165

REPORT     
PDF 518kWORD 844k
10 April 2007
A6-0128/2007

on the Annual Report on Human Rights in the World 2006 and the EU's policy on the matter

(2007/2020(INI))

Committee on Foreign Affairs

Rapporteur: Simon Coveney

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION
 ANNEX I
 ANNEX II
 ANNEX III
 PROCEDURE

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION

on the Annual Report on Human Rights in the World 2006 and the EU's policy on the matter

(2007/2020(INI))

The European Parliament,

–    having regard to the eighth EU Annual Report on Human Rights (2006)(1),

–    having regard to Articles 3, 6, 11, 13 and 19 of the Treaty on European Union and Articles 177 and 300 of the EC Treaty,

–    having regard to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and to all relevant international human rights instruments(2),

–    having regard to the United Nations Charter,

–    having regard to all UN human rights conventions and their optional protocols,

–    having regard to the entry into force on 1 July 2002 of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) and to its resolutions related to the ICC(3),

–    having regard to the Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings and the 2005 EU plan on best practices, standards and procedures for combating and preventing trafficking in human beings(4);

–    having regard to Protocol No. 13 to the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (ECHR), concerning the abolition of the death penalty in all circumstances,

–    having regard to the United Nations Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment,

–    having regard to the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union(5),

–    having regard to the ACP-EU Partnership Agreement and its revision(6),

–    having regard to its previous resolutions on human rights in the world,

–    having regard to its resolution of 16 March 2006 on the outcome of the negotiations on the UN Human Rights Council and on the 62nd session of the UNCHR(7),

–    having regard to its resolution of 14 February 2006 on the human rights and democracy clause in European Union agreements(8),

–   having regard to its resolution of 1 February 2007 on the initiative in favour of a universal moratorium on the death penalty(9),

–    having regard to all urgency human rights resolutions adopted by it,

–    having regard to its resolution of 18 January 2007 on the Council's Seventh and Eighth Annual Reports according to Operative Provision 8 of the European Union Code of Conduct on Arms Exports(10),

–    having regard to the conclusions of the EU Human Rights Forum, held in Helsinki in December 2006,

–    having regard to the UN International Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Rights and Dignity of Persons with Disabilities, adopted on 13 December 2006, which lays down an obligation to incorporate the interests and concerns of persons with disabilities in human rights actions towards third countries,

–    having regard to the International Convention for the Protection of all Persons from Enforced Disappearance, adopted in December 2006,

–    having regard to the European Union Guidelines on promoting compliance with international humanitarian law (IHL)(11),

–    having regard to Rule 45 of its Rules of Procedure,

–    having regard to the report of the Committee on Foreign Affairs (A6-0128/2007),

A.     whereas the Council and Commission's EU Annual Report on Human Rights 2006 provides a general overview of the activities of the European Union institutions regarding human rights inside and outside the EU,

B.     whereas the 2006 European Parliament Annual Report sets out to examine, evaluate and, in specific cases, offer constructive criticism of the human rights activities of the Commission and the Council and of the overall activities of Parliament, in particular by drawing attention to issues neglected in those activities,

C.     whereas it should be acknowledged that there is a link between the EU's internal and external policies on the basis that the EU's internal human rights record has a direct impact on its credibility and ability to implement an effective external policy,

D.     whereas respect for human rights and a democratic system of governance are necessarily interrelated, and whereas the promotion of human rights should be linked to the promotion and application of democratic governance,

E.     whereas efforts must be made in general to focus greater attention on respect for fundamental human rights, in particular political rights, in negotiating bilateral or regional trade agreements even with important trading partners,

1.      Welcomes the fact that the EU is playing an increasingly active role on the world stage to improve human rights and democracy globally; considers that the most recent enlargement of the EU to 27 Member States with 494 million inhabitants has increased the global importance of the EU and has thus given it greater weight in its efforts to promote human rights and democracy internationally;

2.      Considers that greater priority needs to be given to improving the ability of the EU to respond to human rights breaches by third countries, not least by mainstreaming human rights policy with respect to EU policies vis-à-vis such countries, including the external impact of EU internal policies;

3.      Continues to emphasise the need for a consistent policy implemented by all EU Member States in their bilateral relations with third countries where human rights are frequently violated or where there is a genuine risk that they may be, and calls upon Member States to conduct their bilateral contacts with those countries in a manner consistent with EU policy, particularly as regards active efforts to ensure respect for human rights;

4.      Considers that the progress made in setting up the Fundamental Rights Agency represents a first step in responding to Parliament's call for the establishment of an integrated framework of rules and institutions designed to confer binding force on the Charter of Fundamental Rights and to ensure compliance with the system provided for in the ECHR; underlines the fact that the mandate of the Agency also covers those countries which have concluded a Stabilisation and Association Agreement with the EU; believes that the Agency should have the competence to play a role in assisting the EU in the implementation of its external policies, when these require an assessment of the situation in a third country with respect to human rights;

The EU Annual Report on Human Rights in the World 2006 (drawn up by the Council and the Commission)

5.      Underlines the importance of the EU Annual Report on Human Rights in analysing and evaluating the EU's human rights policy, notably with a view to raising the visibility of human rights issues in general;

6.      Welcomes the public presentation of the 2006 Report by the Council and the Commission at the December 2006 plenary, in parallel with Parliament's award of its annual Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought to Mr Alexandr Milinkevic the freedom and democracy campaigner from Belarus; considers that, by establishing this practice, the December European Parliament plenary session has become an annual focal point for the EU's activities on human rights;

7.      Recognises the volume of EU human rights-related activities in different parts of the world, but reiterates its call for increased assessment of the use of EU instruments and initiatives in third countries; welcomes the evaluations mentioned in the report by the Council and the Commission; considers that a mechanism should be developed enabling Members of Parliament to receive evaluations carried out in specific subject areas, such as individual countries, groups of countries and geographic areas, but, first and foremost, regarding specific human rights problem areas considers that such a mechanism should enable Parliament to discuss the outcome of those evaluations within the most appropriate framework;

8.      Underscores the importance of ongoing efforts to promote the mainstreaming of human rights and democracy and the coherence and consistency of the policies and actions of the Council, the Commission, the European Parliament and the Member States of the EU in the field of human rights and democracy;

9.      Regards it as a positive development that the report endeavours to do justice to the activities of the European Parliament, but reiterates its request, included in the 2006 Parliament resolution on human rights, that future Presidencies report in the EU Annual Reports on the ways in which Parliament's resolutions - including urgency resolutions on cases of breaches of human rights, democracy and the rule of law - have been taken into account by the Council and the Commission; notes with satisfaction the developments mentioned in paragraph 13 below;

10.    Reiterates that, in their future Annual Reports on Human Rights, the Council and the Commission should analyse the ways in which human rights are dealt with in other EU policies, such as the Common Foreign and Security Policy, the policies on development and trade and immigration, and other relevant policies relating to the EU’s external relations, in particular within the Council's working groups and in specific mechanisms established in cooperation agreements; considers that they should also take note of decisions made by the European Court of Human Rights;

11.    Calls on the Council and the Commission to consider adopting the approach taken by governments of some Member States and by certain international NGOs, and thus to identify an overall list of “countries of particular concern” with respect to human rights violations in the context of their Annual Report each year;

12.    Understands that, especially in the area of human rights, EU activities such as demarches to third countries must sometimes be confidential; however, believes that a list of those activities should be included in the Annual Report while allowing some scope for bilateral diplomatic contacts with governments in full confidentiality;

13.    Welcomes the increased consultation with the European Parliament and moves towards the drafting of an EU Annual Report that represents the activities of the Council, the Commission and the European Parliament, while taking the view that Parliament must continue to issue its own report on this matter; considers in this context that in the future an open discussion at draft stage in Committee would give Parliament an opportunity to improve the accuracy and content of the report;

Council and Commission activities in the area of human rights in international fora

14.    Pays tribute to the excellent work of the outgoing Personal Representative for Human Rights of the High Representative, Mr Michael Matthiessen, during 2006; continues to support the newly appointed Personal Representative of the High Representative, Mrs Riina Kionka, in her efforts to increase the visibility and strengthen the role of the EU in international human rights fora; expects that the High Representative, the Council and all Member State representatives will fully support her work at all times;

15.    Considers that the EU's capacity to prevent, respond to and manage crises is insufficient at present; recommends that a new infrastructure be put in place for the prevention and management of civil conflicts requiring proactive/preventive measures, the provision of suitable civilian early warning systems, the introduction of preventive contingency planning, the training of specialised personnel for international conflict management missions and greater concentration on promoting societies that are structurally capable of living in peace;

16.    Requests the Commission to encourage EU Member States to sign up to, and ratify, all core UN and Council of Europe human rights conventions and the optional protocols thereto; draws the attention of EU Member States to, in particular, the need to ratify the International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of their Families and the newly adopted International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance;

17.    Recognises the active involvement of the EU and its Member States with respect to human rights and democracy issues in a variety of international fora in 2006, including the newly established UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC), the UN General Assembly, the Ministerial Council of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) and the Council of Europe;

18.    Welcomes the Council’s intention to strengthen the relationship between the European Union and the Council of Europe; to that end, calls on the Council and the Commission to take into account the recommendations set out in the Juncker report of 11 April 2006 entitled “Council of Europe-European Union: a sole ambition for the European continent;

19.    Notes that the new UNHRC has the potential to develop into a valuable framework for the EU's multilateral human rights efforts and recognises that, in its first year of existence, the UNHRC set an ambitious working programme which includes reviewing and maintaining of the system of Special Procedures, the establishment and implementation of the Universal Periodic Review to which all states will be subject, the definition of its working methods and the promotion and protection of human rights, especially where those rights have been violated or are at risk; regrets, however, that the new UNHRC has proven to be ineffectual in responding appropriately to human rights crises around the world due to the use of the UNHRC by many states as a forum for political pressure instead of the promotion of human rights;

20.    Calls on EU Foreign Ministers and Presidencies to use their political influence to work towards tackling the difficulties encountered by the new UNHRC; affirms the need for a clear political agenda as regards action by Member States within the UNHRC; stresses that the UNHRC must no longer be used as a political forum for conflict between different geographical and ideological blocs globally; therefore urges EU Foreign Ministers and Presidencies to work towards building a consensus within the UNHRC in favour of greater involvement on the part of the international community in contributing to the resolution of serious human rights and humanitarian abuses;

21.    Reiterates its call for a wide-ranging human rights agreement between the parties to the conflict in Sri Lanka and its facilitation by an effective, independent international monitoring mission, with unhindered access to areas controlled both by the government and by the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, as recommended by UN Special Rapporteur Philip Alston; considers that the European Union, as Co-Chair of the Tokyo Donor Conference, should take the lead in developing a consensus on the proposals submitted to the UNHRC in this regard;

22.    Recognises the need for the EU to make more effective use of its leverage in order to promote important issues on the agenda of the UNHRC and to better fine-tune its lobbying and outreach activities;

23.    Reminds the Council of its above-mentioned resolution of 16 March 2006, which welcomed the establishment of the UNHRC and called on the EU to play a pioneering role within that institution; welcomes, in this context, the setting-up of a mechanism aimed at holding special sessions to respond to urgent crises and human rights violations; is concerned, however, about the already high degree of politicisation of UNHRC special sessions; calls for the retention and protection of the independence of the Special Procedures; welcomes the creation of a universal periodic review mechanism and calls in this regard for an evaluation process based on the implementation of the recommendations made by UN independent mechanisms; encourages the involvement of independent civil society where appropriate, and recognises the value of the involvement of victims of human rights violations in an interactive dialogue with the international community, especially in cases where people cannot express their opinions in their own countries; calls on EU members of the UNHRC to explain their votes on all resolutions;

24.    Underlines the positive role that Special Rapporteurs can play in the UNHRC structure, and calls for continued support for such special procedures; recognises, however, that, if Special Rapporteurs are to be effective, they need to be properly financed and staffed; underlines that their independence should be preserved;

25.    Urges Member States, in their bilateral dealings with UNHRC members, to push the agenda of the UNHRC in a positive direction; recognises that Parliament and the EU must continue to forge alliances outside Geneva, particularly with influential states; considers that Parliament needs to continue to attend UNHRC meetings on a regular basis;

26.    Expresses its disappointment at the weakness of the UNHRC resolution on Darfur; considers that the Darfur conflict is increasingly affecting the stability of the Central African region and constitutes a threat to international peace and security; deplores the fact that the UNHRC delegation was prevented from entering Sudan by not being granted visas by the authorities; considers that immediately halting the spread of violence and protecting the people of Darfur must remain the highest priority for the international community; recognises also that long-term security can only be guaranteed with a political settlement of disputes in the region; urges both the Council and the Commission to work within the UNHRC towards the establishment of a comprehensive peace strategy involving all parties; urges the European Union and Member States to make more effective use of their leverage at UNHRC level and for the UNHRC to adopt appropriate and strong measures to respond to the humanitarian catastrophe in Darfur, following the report of the special UNHRC mission;

27.    Expresses its concern at the difficulties experienced by EU Member States in reaching agreement with the Organization of the Islamic Conference on a series of UNHRC resolutions; considers that the continuing unresolved Israeli-Palestinian conflict is a major stumbling block to positive cooperation;

28.    Expresses its concern at the effect on the ordinary Palestinian people of the EU decision to suspend aid to the people, whether provided direct or through the Palestinian Authority, consequent upon the failure of the Authority to fulfil legitimate conditions, and urges expansion of the temporary international mechanism and a continuing proactive search for a satisfactory context for a resumption of direct aid;

29.    Expresses its disappointment at the lack of any positive results in the process to obtain the release of, or ensure a fair trial for, five Bulgarian nurses and one Palestinian doctor, who were detained and sentenced to death by the Libyan regime for intentionally infecting children with the AIDS virus, on the grounds of confessions obtained through brutal physical torture; notes that, despite ongoing efforts by the Commission to resolve the issue through political dialogue and by providing medical treatment to the infected children, the Libyan regime remains as defiant as ever with regard to the case and continues to issue provocative statements in the media; in light of this, urges the Commission to review its policy tools vis-à-vis Libya so as to find a more efficient approach to resolving the issue quickly and put an end to eight years of agony and flagrant human rights violations;

30.    Encourages EU members of the UNHRC to examine how they might make more effective use of their debating time;

31.    Is concerned that, despite the fact that the Council's Working Party on Human Rights (COHOM) has increased the number of meetings it holds, more time and resources are required to achieve EU goals at UNHRC level; calls on Member States and the Commission to strengthen available human resources in Geneva;

32.    Urges Member States not to support as candidates for positions of responsibility in international fora countries which have been shown to commit gross and systematic human rights and democracy violations; calls on Member States to enter into negotiations with like-minded influential states aimed at blocking the election of such countries to such positions; supports the call for all candidate countries to be required to cooperate with Special Procedures and other mechanisms set up by the UNHRC; in this respect, calls once again on Member States to express support for membership criteria which would link accession to the UNHRC to the obligation for Member States to issue a standing invitation to UN mechanisms;

33.    Encourages the Council to use targeted sanctions, as introduced against the Belarusian regime, to penalise persons particularly responsible for violations of human rights in other countries;

34.    Reiterates its request to the Council to explain how it was possible for Belarus to be elected onto the Governing Body of the International Labour Organization (ILO) in June 2005 when four major EU countries are permanent members of that Governing Body; asks the Council to explain its diplomatic demarches prior to that election and whether it considered opposing Belarus' membership;

35.    Notes with concern that in October 2006 a report of a UN group of experts concluded that conflict diamonds from Côte d'Ivoire were infiltrating the legitimate diamond trade through Ghana, a Kimberley Process participant; calls on the Commission to use its position, as Chair of the Kimberley Process throughout 2007, to strengthen the mechanisms designed to stem the flow of conflict diamonds; recommends that the Commission work towards building a consensus requiring all sectors of the diamond trade to implement systems which track diamonds from the mines to the retailer, to have responsible and transparent policies in place with warranties verified by an independent auditor and to improve the accuracy of the rough diamond trade statistics so that effective analyses may be produced quickly enough to detect any trade in conflict diamonds;

36.    Calls on the Council and the Commission to uphold the Oslo Declaration of 23 February 2007 signed by 46 countries, which seeks the conclusion by 2008 of an international treaty prohibiting the production, use, transfer or storage of cluster bombs in accordance with the principles of international humanitarian law; calls on the Council and the Commission to take action at European Union level to ensure that the various Member States follow the example of Austria and Belgium in banning cluster bombs and at international level to ensure that those countries which have not yet signed the Oslo Declaration now do so;

37.    Calls on the Council and the Commission to continue their vigorous efforts to promote the universal ratification of the Rome Statute and the adoption of the necessary national implementing legislation, in conformity with Council Common Position 2003/444/CFSP of 16 June 2003 on the International Criminal Court(12) and the Action Plan; welcomes the fact that Chad recently ratified the Rome Statute, thereby bringing the total number of states parties to 104 as at 1 January 2007; urges the Czech Republic, as the only remaining EU Member State not to have ratified the Rome Statute, to do so without delay; in the same spirit, calls on the Council and the Commission to encourage third countries to promote transitional justice mechanisms on their territory as a step towards securing justice for the victims of grave violations of human rights;

38.    Welcomes the fact that references to the ICC have been included in several new European Neighbourhood Action Plans (relating to Egypt, Jordan, Moldova, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Lebanon and Ukraine) and are being negotiated in the context of other new Action Plans as well as Partnership and Cooperation Agreements with several countries; fully supports the Commission's financing, via the European Initiative for Democracy and Human Rights (EIDHR), of the work of, inter alia, the Coalition for the International Criminal Court, of No Peace Without Justice, of the International Federation for Human Rights and of Parliamentarians for Global Action to promote the ratification and implementation of the Rome Statute;

39.    Recognises the importance that ratification of the Rome Statute by the US would have from a global perspective; calls once again on the Council and the Commission to use all available mechanisms to encourage the US to sign and ratify the Rome Statute and also to express strong disapproval of US efforts to actively prevent other countries from ratifying the Statute and from proposing to third countries parallel agreements such as bilateral exemption treaties;

40.    Urges all Member States to collaborate fully in international criminal justice mechanisms, and especially in bringing fugitives to justice;

41.    Urges all Member States to contribute actively to ad hoc international judicial mechanisms, particularly those receiving voluntary funding;

42.    Stresses that the above-mentioned transitional judicial mechanisms must never deviate from respect for human rights and the rule of law, this being the only means of ensuring justice for victims and preventing continued impunity for the most serious human rights violations;

Performance regarding the EU Human Rights Guidelines

43.    Appreciates the ongoing efforts to implement the methods and policy priorities outlined in the five EU guidelines on human rights as well as the production of impact assessments for each of those guidelines, weighing up their effectiveness in forging change in third countries; is concerned at regular reports that the embassies of EU Member States in third countries and EU missions have little or no knowledge of the guidelines;

44.    Asks the Commission to ensure that all its staff, in particular those working in the field of development policy, are sufficiently aware of the human rights guidelines; recognises the need for greater transparency regarding the way in which the different guidelines are operated, including feedback on individual cases and information on action taken by NGOs; calls for regular and transparent evaluations of the implementation of the EU guidelines involving Parliament, so as to allow it to play an active role in accountability;

45.    Commends the German Presidency's commitment to establish EU human rights guidelines on the rights of the child; encourages it to consult Parliament, the Commission and civil society on the detail of such guidelines and, if necessary, to coordinate with the future Portuguese Presidency in order to complete the introduction of those guidelines, which should aim at the effective elimination of child labour, focusing principally on teaching and educating children, this being one of the Millennium Development Goals;

46.    Notes that the EU guidelines relate to different countries in different ways and that individual plans to implement the guidelines are required in different circumstances;

47.    Notes the responsibility of EU Special Representatives and EU missions abroad in promoting the EU guidelines; encourages a more proactive approach to promoting the guidelines at all levels; underlines the resource and personnel problem within EU missions in third countries concerning guideline awareness, monitoring and implementation; calls on the Member State representations in third countries and the Commission delegations to coordinate more effectively, sharing structures and staff so as to create genuine “European Union embassies” throughout the world and thereby assume responsibilities in the field of human rights;

Death penalty

48.    Urges Presidencies to continue the approach of promoting the abolition of the death penalty by prioritising a specific number of countries where there are prospects for a positive change in policy;

49.    Encourages Presidencies to disclose which countries they intend to target in the context of the EU guidelines on the death penalty under the so-called “countries on the cusp” campaign aimed at states whose policy on the death penalty is in flux; encourages the Council and the Commission to seek greater support for moves by the current UN General Assembly to achieve a universal moratorium on capital punishment leading to its total abolition, including sentencing; urges the Council to update the guidelines, which date back to 1998, so that new elements and strategies which have developed since then can be taken into consideration;

50.    Suggests that the Council undertake a review of the guidelines and that this review could provide for the EU to intervene with regard to individual cases of particular concern which do not fall under UN minimum standards as provided for in the guidelines;

51.    Calls on the Presidency to encourage those remaining countries which have not signed up to and ratified the Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) to do so, as well as those Member States that have not signed Protocol No. 13 to the ECHR on the death penalty(13); recognises, in that regard, that the guidelines on the death penalty could be implemented more coherently if Member States were to sign up to and ratify such protocols and conventions;

52.    Welcomes the organisation in Paris (1-3 February 2007) of the third World Congress against the Death Penalty and associates itself with its final declaration; intends to follow up on the Congress, notably by developing the parliamentary dimension of the global campaign against the death penalty and raising the matter through its inter-parliamentary delegations and participations in joint parliamentary assemblies; calls on the Council and the Commission to take every possible opportunity to support the establishment of regional abolitionist coalitions, with a special focus on Arab countries;

53.    Welcomes – as a good example of the effective use of the EU guidelines on the death penalty – the coordinated and public reaction of EU representations in Peru to the proposals to extend the death penalty in that country in violation of the Peruvian constitution and the American Convention on Human Rights;

54.    Applauds the coordinated, effective action - both public and diplomatic - of the European Parliament, the Commission, concerned Member States and NGOs to secure the sovereign decision of the President of Pakistan to commute the death sentence imposed on, and ultimately release, Mirza Tahir Hussain, a British national who had served 18 years on death row in Pakistan; urges the EU to continue to raise individual cases under the death penalty guidelines and recommends that the Council and the Commission make effective use of the parliamentary dimension in this regard, having recourse, in particular, to timely and useful interventions by inter-parliamentary delegations;

Torture and other cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment

55.    Welcomes the entry into force on 22 June 2006 of the Optional Protocol to the Convention Against Torture (OPCAT); notes that only 19 EU Member States have so far signed and only 9 ratified the Protocol(14); urges all EU Member States which have not so far signed and ratified the OPCAT to do so in the coming year;

56.    Welcomes the launch of the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance, approved by the United Nations General Assembly on 20 December 2006 and opened for signature on 6 February 2007; asks all EU Member States to sign and ratify it promptly;

57.    Recommends that the EU continue to raise individual cases of torture under the torture guidelines in the same way as it has done with death penalty cases under the death penalty guideline;

58.    Approves of the Council's decision to make the terms of certain demarches public, and recognises this step as progress towards greater transparency; asks the Council and the Commission to take into particular consideration the conclusions and recommendations of Parliament's study concerning implementation of the EU guidelines on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment;

59.    Underlines that, although those guidelines were adopted as long ago as 2001, the use of political dialogues, declarations and demarches in relation to the actual practice of torture has been minimal; encourages future Presidencies to carry out an assessment, evaluation and planning for the torture guidelines; calls on the Council to take into consideration the recommendations provided by the study on this matter requested by its sub-committee in the future process of evaluation of those guidelines; encourages the EU to broaden the scope of implementation, in particular by developing a procedure to identify and demarche on individual cases in selected countries;

60.    Recommends to the German and Portuguese Presidencies that they continue the series of demarches on torture when and where relevant; underlines nevertheless that demarches alone are not enough and that other complementary actions should be carried out consistently and after thorough analysis of local situations, for example by strengthening relations with civil society groups working in the field of torture and ill-treatment, considering efficient ways to address individual cases of torture and ill-treatment in addition to those involving well-known human rights defenders and ensuring the coherence and continuity of action of EU missions committed to fighting torture and ill-treatment in third countries;

61.    Emphasises that the regular presence of the Presidency or the Council Secretariat in the relevant UN Committees as well as further cooperation with the Council of Europe and its Committee for the Prevention of Torture can result in substantial and useful material input into decision-making concerning demarches towards certain countries;

62.    Urges the Council and the Commission to continue the practice of demarches in respect of all of the EU's international partners regarding the ratification of international conventions banning the use of torture and ill-treatment, as well as the provisions of rehabilitation to torture survivors; calls on the EU to regard the fight against torture and ill-treatment as a top priority of its human rights policy, in particular through enhanced implementation of the EU guidelines and all other EU instruments such as the EIDHR and by ensuring that EU Member States refrain from using diplomatic assurances with third countries where there is a real risk of people being subjected to torture or ill-treatment;

63.    Reaffirms that female genital mutilation is a violation of the human right to physical integrity and is alarmed at attempts to place such acts of mutilation in the same category as standard medical practices;

Children and armed conflict (CAAC)

64.    Welcomes the nomination of a Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict in April 2006, with the mandate of defining strategies to deliver tangible protection for children affected by armed conflict and to ensure the full implementation of international child protection standards and norms;

65.    Welcomes the joint organisation by the French Foreign Minister and UNICEF of the Conference entitled “Free Children from War” in February 2007, and the adoption of the Paris Principles and guidelines on children associated with armed forces or armed groups, as an important step in motivating the international community to promote protection, to raise awareness and to make the issue of children in armed conflicts central to peacekeeping and peace-building;

66.    Calls on all the Member States to ratify the optional protocols to the Convention on the Rights of the Child;

67.    Welcomes the Implementation Strategy (IS) adopted in April 2006 by the Austrian Presidency, which identifies specific recommendations for action, and its indications that human rights issues should be considered systematically in the early stages of the planning of ESDP operations; praises the efforts made by the Finnish Presidency with a view to implementation of the IS; regrets that political tools available to the EU (such as demarches and political dialogues) have not been applied to their full potential since the adoption of the guidelines in 2003;

68.    Emphasises the importance of continuing to focus on the guidelines in addition to the IS, inasmuch as the guidelines are more holistic; regrets that the Finnish Presidency undertook only very few demarches and other steps regarding CAAC and no implementation of the IS; insists that the EU maintain high standards of quality and depth when monitoring and reporting on CAAC; urges the Commission and the High Representative for the CFSP to ensure that future Presidencies are fully aware of the IS;

69.    Asks the Commission and the Council to draw up a list of questions for heads of missions to refer to in order to assist them in their regular reporting; asks the Commission and the Council to draw up a list of criteria determining whether or not a country is a “priority”, and asks that the Commission and the Council consult more with stakeholders with a view to seeking their opinions; urges the Commission and the Council to produce a paper, as suggested in the IS recommendations, containing proposals as to how to implement UN Security Council Resolution S/RES/1612 (2005);

70.    Calls on the Commission to better reflect the aims of the guidelines by mainstreaming CAAC in all areas, including development cooperation;

71.    Welcomes the call for proposals launched by the Commission in early 2006 with a view to selecting for funding projects that fight against the trafficking of women and children and seek to protect the rights of vulnerable groups in armed conflicts, especially children's rights;

72.    Welcomes also the adoption in December 2006 of the EU Concept for support to Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration, containing strong and systematic references to children, and EC support (via ECHO) to the UNICEF-led process of revision of the “Cape Town Principles” on the disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration of children;

Human rights defenders

73.    Stresses that full implementation of the EU Guidelines on Human Rights Defenders must be prioritised and that the Council recommendations adopted in June 2006, further to the first review of the implementation of the guidelines conducted by the Austrian Presidency, must be followed up with concrete action; encourages the Council to facilitate adequate follow-up to demarches, and the evaluation of the impact of action taken on behalf on individuals, by creating a central database in respect of EU demarches;

74.    Stresses that the EU needs to increase the level of awareness among all EU actors in Brussels, in capitals and at mission level about the existence, purpose, content and operational application of the guidelines; recognises that internal awareness-raising should aim at creating a deeper understanding of the work of human rights defenders; calls on the Commission and on Member States to organise training workshops for regional departments as well as staff in delegations, embassies and consulates on the application of those guidelines, with human rights defenders participating at an early stage, as well as exchanges of good practice regarding the provision of financial and non-financial support to human rights defenders; considers that the idea of issuing visas for human rights defenders in grave danger, as recommended by the Council, should be an important priority;

75.    Emphasises the importance of making the handbook for the implementation of the guidelines available to human rights defenders on the ground; encourages COHOM to disseminate translations of the EU Guidelines for Human Rights Defenders in EU languages that are the lingua franca in third countries and in key non-EU languages amongst regional desks and embassies/delegations; stresses that EU missions need to reach out to local human rights defenders in a more proactive manner;

76.    Calls on the Council and the Commission to raise the situation of human rights defenders systematically in all political dialogues including bilateral dialogues with EU Member States; calls on the Council to inform Parliament systematically about the implementation of the guidelines on the ground and to involve it fully in the process of evaluating them; welcomes the fact that one of the priorities of the EIDHR is the protection of human rights defenders, which includes the introduction of urgent protection measures by the EU; welcomes also the initiative of the global EU campaign in support of women human rights defenders; notes the reports and recommendations of the UN Special Representative on Human Rights Defenders;

Guidelines on human rights dialogues and recognised consultations with third countries

77.    Stresses that the European Union global strategy for the promotion of human rights and democracy cannot be based solely on bilateral or multilateral relations between States, but must involve and encompass as far as possible non-governmental actors, including parliamentarians, academics, intellectuals, journalists, the defenders of democratic values, activists, NGO leaders and opinion makers;

78.    Welcomes the fact that the Council has drawn up a document providing an overview of human rights dialogues and consultations; asks the Council to take into consideration Parliament's own-initiative report, currently being drafted, on the evaluation of human rights dialogues and consultations with third countries; in this context, regrets that the Council's evaluation was declared confidential and asks the Council to respond favourably to the invitation to develop, together with Parliament, a system whereby selected Members of the European Parliament can be kept informed about classified activities; suggests once again that such a scheme could be modelled on the system for informing selected MEPs about classified material regarding security and defence; takes the view that, in general, dialogue concerning human rights should be planned and conducted transparently, with appropriate means being sought to attain that purpose;

79.    Emphasises the need to strengthen and improve the EU-China human rights dialogue considerably; recognises that China has now decided to have all death penalty cases reviewed by the Supreme Court, but remains concerned that China still carries out the majority of executions worldwide; stresses that China's human rights record remains a matter of serious concern; calls on the Council to provide a more detailed briefing to Parliament in public session following discussions; stresses the importance of reiterating points that were raised in previous dialogues; supports the Commission and the Council in their current reflections on ways of improving the dialogue; notes that, despite significant economic reforms, political and human rights concerns still persist regarding such matters as political imprisonment, forced labour, freedom of expression and religion, rights of religious and ethnic minorities, the Laogai camp system and allegations of organ harvesting; notes that such concerns should receive more focus in the build-up to the Beijing Olympic games; urges the EU to ensure that its trading relationship with China is contingent upon human rights reforms and calls in this regard on the Council to make a comprehensive evaluation of the human rights situation before finalising any new Partnership and Cooperation Framework Agreement; calls on the Council and the Commission to raise the issue of Tibet and to actively support the strengthening of the dialogue between the Chinese Government and envoys of the Dalai Lama;

80.    Is very concerned that the human rights dialogue with Iran has been interrupted since 2004 due to a lack of cooperation from Iran; regrets that, according to the Council, no progress had been made; urges Iran to re-engage in the dialogue and, drawing on input from the EU, to define benchmarks aimed at real improvements in the field; calls on the Commission to implement all actions required within the framework of the European Initiative for Democracy and Human Rights, so as to promote contacts and cooperation with Iranian civil society and to further support democracy and human rights; expresses its deep concern regarding the deterioration of the human rights situation in Iran and points out, in particular, the intensification of the repression directed against human rights defenders; at the same time, deplores the fact that Iran continues to apply the death penalty under conditions which violate international standards, and denounces in particular the executions of juvenile offenders; calls on the Council to express concern about the human rights situation in the country in all its contacts with the Iranian government and to concentrate its efforts on protecting human rights defenders, and especially women, as well as to persuade Iran to adopt an immediate moratorium on executions as a first step towards abolition;

81.    Notes the continuation of the EU human rights consultations with Russia; supports the Council in its aim of developing those consultations into a frank and genuine EU-Russia human rights dialogue and calls for the involvement of the European Parliament and of European and Russian NGOs in such a process; regrets that the EU has had only limited success in bringing about policy change as a result of raising difficult issues such as the situation in Chechnya, impunity and the independence of the judiciary, the treatment of human rights defenders, the independence of the media and freedom of expression, the treatment of ethnic minorities, respect for the rule of law and human rights protection in the armed forces, discrimination based on sexual orientation as well as other issues; is concerned about Russian legislation limiting the activities of NGOs; deplores the fact that journalists and human rights defenders have been threatened and remains appalled at the murder of Anna Politkowskaja; expects that Russia will take further measures to protect freedom of expression and the security of journalists and human rights defenders; considers, in this regard, that Russian cooperation with UN human rights mechanisms as well as the ratification of all relevant human rights conventions should be regarded as a priority by the EU; is concerned about allegations that the Russian government is behind the poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko, who died in November 2006 in London; expresses concern at new allegations being brought against Mikhail Khodorkovsky, the former Yukos chief detained in 2003, and is equally concerned about his alleged treatment while in detention; urges the Commission and the Council to raise such cases with Russian authorities at the highest level and in the new Partnership and Cooperation Agreement with Russia; urges the Commission to lay down clearer obligations and establish more efficient monitoring mechanisms, in addition to the human rights clause, in order to achieve a real improvement in the human rights situation;

82.    Welcomes the efforts made so far by the Council, the Commission and the European Parliament to combat human rights abuses in Belarus; stresses that this policy should be continued, with particular emphasis on violations of freedom of speech and of the rights of peaceful assembly and association, as well as violations of the rights of national minorities; points to the need to support the political opposition, which is a target of repression;

83.    Urges the Commission and the Council to set up human rights subcommittees with all neighbourhood countries aimed at the promotion of human rights and democracy, as has been the case for Morocco and Jordan and as is presently envisaged for Egypt, Tunisia and Lebanon; reiterates its call for Parliament to be associated with the preparation of these meetings and to be duly informed of their outcome;

84.    Recognises attempts to set up a human rights dialogue with Uzbekistan, but notes that this has not been possible due to the inability of Uzbekistan to approach such a dialogue in a constructive way; considers, in this regard, that engaging in a human rights dialogue with Uzbekistan should not lead to the lifting of sanctions imposed on that country if no progress is made in the area of human rights and democracy; consequently, calls on the Council to make a comprehensive evaluation of the human rights situation before taking any decision;

85.    Is confident that recent progress in the Six-Party Talks will contribute to a more favourable political climate in which the human rights dialogue with the Democratic People's Republic of Korea might be re-opened; calls on the Commission and the Council to vigorously pursue that objective in the course of contacts and negotiations with the DPRK;

86.    Notes the negotiations by the Commission and the Council in relation to Turkey's road to accession and the problems that have been encountered; is concerned about the limited progress achieved to date and the need for greater focus on human rights issues in Turkey, especially as regards freedom of religion for all religious communities and full enjoyment of their property rights, protection of minorities, freedom of expression and human rights concerns relating to the population of Kurdish origin in the south-east of the country; condemns the tragic murder of journalist Hrant Dink in January 2007, which exemplifies a nationalistic feeling amongst certain sections of Turkish society, but was encouraged by the strong condemnation of the murder across the country including by the government and the swift apprehension of the perpetrators; encourages the Turkish government to change Article 301 of the Turkish Penal Code, which clearly limits freedom of expression in the media;

87.    Asks the Council and the Commission, particularly in post-conflict situations, including situations in which the rape of women and girls has been used as a weapon of war, and in which violence against women is still widespread, to take into account efforts of partner countries to address past human rights violations as evidence of current commitments to human rights issues;

88.    Underlines that, during human rights dialogues and consultations, EU institutions should raise all concerns relating to violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms as well as cases of discrimination; stresses the importance of such dialogues and consultations when violations are widespread and/or systematic and recognises that international pressure can play a role in preventing further violations;

89.    Notes with concern that the participation of Parliament is not always as comprehensive as it should be in human rights dialogues and consultations, and encourages the Council and the Commission to open up the dialogues to increased participation by Members of the European Parliament;

General scrutiny of Council and Commission activities including the performances of the two Presidencies

90.    Commends the cooperation between the Finnish and Austrian Presidencies aimed at ensuring a consistency of approach towards human rights and democracy issues; looks forward to the German, Portuguese and Slovene Presidencies' continuation of this process of collaboration;

91.    Supports the Council and the Commission in their stance against the ongoing human rights and democracy violations in Burma/Myanmar and the EU's commitment to attaining its stated objectives, namely to see the establishment of a legitimate, democratically elected civilian government which respects the human rights of its people and restores normal relations with the international community; urges the Commission and the Council to strengthen the EU's common position by adopting more effective and targeted sanctions in light of the reality that the situation in Burma/Myanmar continues to deteriorate; encourages the Council and the Commission – as part of the common position on Burma/Myanmar – to engage more proactively with ASEAN countries and neighbouring states to urge them to use their influence responsibly so as to bring about positive change; calls for a proactive initiative to be taken by the UN Human Rights Council, which could take the form of a special session on this matter; encourages the Council and the Commission to urge China, India and other countries which continue to supply weaponry and other support to the military junta to desist from this and to join the international community in its efforts to bring about change for the better in Burma/Myanmar; notes the efforts made to date at UN Security Council level in recognition of the continuing humanitarian crisis; urges the Council and the Commission to seek a consensus with China, Russia and South Africa on a binding resolution, requiring meaningful tripartite dialogue between the State Peace and Development Council, the National League for Democracy and the ethnic nationalities, and the release of all political prisoners, including Aung San Suu Kyi;

92.    Regrets that the Council and the Commission have failed to take any decisive action to persuade the Ethiopian Government to immediately and unconditionally release all elected Members of Parliament and other political prisoners and to fulfil its obligations with respect to human rights, democratic principles and the rule of law; recalls the several European Parliament resolutions on Ethiopia, adopted since the 2005 Ethiopian elections observed by the EU, and especially the most recent of these, adopted on 16 November 2006(15);

93.    Invites the Council and the Commission to encourage and support the government of Senegal in its efforts to facilitate the extradition of Hissène Habré to Belgium to answer to judicial charges of massive violations of human rights;

94.    Recognises the significant human rights consequences of the ongoing war in Iraq and the complex nature of the current fragile political situation; notes the reports and resolutions adopted by Parliament on Iraq and the recommendations contained within them; urges the Council and the Commission to constantly assess how the EU could play a more constructive role in bringing about stability in Iraq; notes with total stupefaction the provisional suspension by ECHO of humanitarian aid for Iraq, notwithstanding the disastrous situation afflicting the suffering Iraqi people and Iraqi refugees;

95.    Commends the Commission for raising the profile of the problem of human trafficking in the EU and urges that the necessary measures be taken to combat the trafficking of human beings, in particular women and children; urges the Commission to continue to hold to account Member States which have not complied with agreed anti-trafficking conventions and directives, particularly Council Directive 2004/81/EC of 29 April 2004 on the residence permit issued to third-country nationals who are victims of trafficking in human beings or who have been the subject of an action to facilitate illegal immigration, who cooperate with the competent authorities(16); also emphasises that in the fight against trafficking in human beings a human rights approach with respect to the victims of trafficking should be adopted; praises the Austrian Presidency in particular for organising a number of anti-trafficking initiatives including an EU expert conference in June 2006 on the implementation of the EU Plan on Trafficking in Human Beings, and notes the conclusions and recommendations resulting from that two-day event;

96.    Regrets that the Finnish Presidency did not organise a fourth meeting of the EU Network of contact points in respect of persons responsible for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, which represents an invaluable means of strengthening cooperation among EU Member States in investigations and prosecutions of international crimes at national level; draws attention to the commitment in the Council’s conclusions on the EU Network to hold one meeting during each Presidency, and calls for effective implementation of the conclusions of previous EU Network meetings; asks each Presidency to make this a standard point in its programme;

97.    Welcomes the communication from the Commission entitled “Towards an EU Strategy on the Rights of the Child” (COM(2006)0367); hopes that the Commission is thereby providing a solid basis for more effective and comprehensive policies designed to protect the most fundamental rights of the child; is concerned, however, at the increasing lack of respect for the rights of the child being shown at international level;

98.    Deplores the fact that the violence in Darfur has continued unchecked, and that the Sudanese government has not been held accountable for its repeated failures to comply with international demands and protect its citizens from violence, while welcoming the recent indictments issued by the ICC; regrets that the EU has not taken more unilateral action regarding the crisis in Darfur and has not tried harder to persuade the government of Sudan to accept an international peacekeeping force; stresses that persistent diplomatic pressure is needed to demonstrate to the government of Sudan that its verbal commitments must be followed by comprehensive and sustained efforts aimed at halting the violence in Darfur, and that the international community will not accept further neglect by Sudan of its commitments and its responsibility to protect its citizens; urges the Council to agree a plan of specific, targeted sanctions to be imposed on the Khartoum regime, in accordance with a clear timetable, in the event of non-compliance with the demands of the international community; urges the EU to contribute (and to put pressure on others to also contribute) to an international peacekeeping force and the enforcement of the no-fly zone over Darfur, and to ensure that the African Union is adequately resourced and assisted to fulfil its mandate; asks that the EU push for a UN peacekeeping mission in Chad with a strong civilian protection mandate; implores the Member States, the Council and the Commission to assume their responsibilities and to provide effective protection for the people of Darfur from a humanitarian disaster;

99.    Calls for the adoption of a code of conduct on the standards to be adhered to by military and civilian peacekeeping and humanitarian personnel while on mission in areas of armed conflict, to include sanctions for non-compliance with the high standards of conduct expected, especially in relation to any form of gender-based violence;

100.  Welcomes the fact that five Member States have appointed special Ambassadors for Human Rights in order to conduct outreach activities, specifically in the human rights area, to third countries and notes the ongoing work in this area; asks other Member States to consider taking the same step;

101.  Requests from the Commission and the Council an overview of countries which have not issued standing invitations to all Special Mechanisms, Special Rapporteurs and Special Representatives of the United Nations;

102.  Welcomes the use of the new instrument of an EU list of “prisoners/detainees of concern” in respect of a few individual countries; reiterates its request that the Council should establish EU lists of “prisoners/detainees of concern” for each third country where there are human rights concerns and that it should raise the relevant list at each political dialogue meeting; asks the Commission to inform Parliament about all such existing lists;

103.  Welcomes the fact that the Commission and the Council now establish and regularly update lists of “focus countries” in relation to specific issues, notably the list of countries “on the cusp” for the death penalty, “focus countries” in relation to torture and countries where the situation of human rights defenders is particularly distressing;

104.  Is surprised that the Council Secretariat has so far not adhered to the decisions of the General Affairs Council of 12 December 2005 adopting the provision that the Council's updated EU human rights fact sheets are to be made available to all EU institutions(17); looks forward to receiving the current version of those fact sheets as soon as possible;

105.  Welcomes the recognition by the Council that the newly adopted International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities will further enable the EU to turn its attention outward in the promotion and protection of disability rights and, in the context of that new Convention, requests that the EU more effectively monitor the human rights situation of persons with disabilities in third countries with a view to reporting on key findings by 2009-2010;

106.  Insists that all human rights and democracy discussions with third countries, instruments, documents and reports including the Annual Reports need to address explicitly discrimination issues including the issues of ethnic minorities, religious freedoms including discriminatory practices towards minority religions, and explicitly the protection and promotion of the rights of ethnic and national minorities, the human rights of women, the rights of children, the rights of indigenous peoples, disabled people including people with intellectual disabilities, and people of all sexual orientations, fully involving their organisations, both within the EU and in third countries, where appropriate;

107.  Takes the view that an active policy to promote human rights cannot be confined to the cases attracting greatest public notice; points out that serious violations of rights occur on the fringe of public scrutiny, in closed institutions, for children, the elderly and the sick, and in prisons; points to the need for the Union to bring expert scrutiny to bear on the life of those institutions;

108.  Asks the Council to reassess the procedure for listing terrorist groups and also to consider a clear method for taking groups off the list if they deserve to be removed therefrom (taking into account their attitude, history and practice);

109.  Considers that a clear, efficient and harmonised common arms export control policy, anchored in a legally binding code of conduct, can play a decisive role in the fight against terrorism, in conflict prevention, in regional stability and in the promotion of human rights, and calls on the EU Presidency, the Council, the Commission and Member States to continue to be supportive of an International Arms Trade Treaty;

110.  Underlines that, at this stage when it is not possible for the EU to offer Belarus full participation in the neighbourhood policy, the EU should still make every effort to find appropriate ways to prevent further anti-democratic developments and human rights violations in that country, which is a direct neighbour of the EU; therefore calls on the Council and the Commission to monitor closely the situation in Belarus and to increase their support for the activities of civil society, non-governmental organisations and the political opposition;

The Commission's external assistance programmes

The European Instrument for Democracy and Human Rights (EIDHR)

111.  Welcomes the fact that the Commission and the Council agreed with Parliament, at the latter's insistence, that a special financing instrument (the EIDHR) was needed for the promotion of democracy and human rights worldwide;

112.  Welcomes the consultations carried out by the Commission with NGOs and civil society in relation to the implementation of the new EIDHR; calls for complete transparency regarding the ways in which money is spent and projects are chosen and assessed under that instrument;

113.  Welcomes the adoption, under the EIDHR, of a new measure (among the ad hoc measures recently introduced under this initiative), making it possible to take urgent action for the protection of human rights defenders without the need for a tendering procedure; calls on the Commission to implement this new measure rapidly and effectively;

114.  Notes that EIDHR funds used for European Union election observation missions in 2006 amounted to 23% of the total EIDHR funds used (EUR 35 176 103) and that such missions were conducted to 13 countries including Aceh, Fiji and the Democratic Republic of Congo;

115.  Notes that a large proportion (49%) of the total EIDHR funding for projects contracted in 2006 went to big thematic projects and only a small proportion (24%) to micro projects implemented by EC delegations; expects that the new financial instrument will enable the Commission to finance those NGOs which play a key role in the promotion of human rights and democracy in their countries but which are not legally recognised by the authorities in those countries;

116.  Remains concerned that the administrative burden on civil society organisations as recipients of funding must be reduced and flexibility in the disbursement of funds increased by allowing re-granting, smaller grants for grassroots organisations and funding for unregistered NGOs;

117.  Recommends that the Commission draft clear guidelines in order that potential recipients of funding understand the objectives and qualifying criteria;

Assistance programmes in general

118.  Welcomes the fact that the Commission has begun to mainstream issues related to respect for human rights, democratic principles, the rule of law and good governance into programming meetings and documents when developing legal bases for instruments, country strategies, national indicative programmes, sectoral programmes, individual projects and evaluations; welcomes the fact that officers preparing projects or programmes have guidelines on how to mainstream such issues;

119.  Welcomes the fact that the Commission (DG EuropeAid) is in the process of commissioning a study on how to mainstream into its activities a number of governance areas such as democratisation, the promotion and protection of human rights, reinforcement of the rule of law and the administration of justice, empowerment of civil society, public administration reform including anti-corruption, decentralisation and local governance; supports the Commission's work in developing this study into a practical tool to be used for the mainstreaming of governance into EC development cooperation for the benefit of programme managers in delegations and at headquarters level and consultants involved in the design or implementation of EC programmes; looks forward to receiving the study once it has been finalised;

120.  Welcomes the fact that the Commission is in the process of drafting governance profiles for all ACP countries in the context of the 10th European Development Fund programme; calls, however, for greater transparency in the process of developing the governance profiles, to involve real and effective consultation with all stakeholders, including ACP partners and civil society organisations; calls on the Commission to include, in the section on social governance, government performance in the provision of basic social services to their entire populations;

121.  Welcomes the fact that the Instrument for Economic Cooperation and Development Cooperation (ECDCI) has been split into two in such a manner that developing countries are now separated from industrialised ones; remains concerned, however, that no instrument now appears to cover conflict prevention;

Implementation of human rights and democracy clauses in external agreements

122.  Recalls its above-mentioned resolution of 14 February 2006 regarding future EU policy on the application of human rights clauses in all EU agreements; notes as a first reaction that the Commission outlined several measures to improve the application of the clause, such as gradually extending human rights committees to more third countries; points out that the Council has not yet given a specific reply to the above-mentioned resolution, preferring continued implementation of the clause in the more general foreign policy context; welcomes the fact that heads of Commission delegations in third countries are required, as part of their mandate, to emphasise human rights more specifically; is concerned, however, by the recent Commission proposal to exempt India from the rule that all EU agreements must include a human rights and democracy clause, in the context of the negotiations for the EU-India Free Trade Agreement; considers that such a move would be a retrograde step and could set a worrying precedent for future negotiations on trade agreements; requests, therefore, that the Commission and the Council adopt a clear position on the detailed proposals contained in the resolution of 14 February 2006; stresses in particular the need to introduce a monitoring mechanism, regular assessment of compliance with human rights obligations and a progressive system of penalties for non-compliance in order to ensure proper implementation of the human rights and democracy clause contained in agreements concluded by the EU with third countries;

123.  Notes that the Commission intends to draft new measures to improve implementation of the democratic clause, such as the progressive extension of human rights committees to encompass a larger number of third countries, or the invitation to the “EU heads of delegation” throughout the world to place greater emphasis on human rights; observes, however, that it is necessary for the Commission to table a strategic political plan together with a specific legislative initiative for the comprehensive reform of the democratic clause as indicated by Parliament, this being a strategic problem concerning the general approach of the European Union to the issue of human rights;

124.  Draws the attention of the Council and the Commission to, in particular, the need to systematically include a human rights clause in all new-generation sector-based agreements such as trade agreements so as to further foster the promotion, protection and realisation of human rights within the aims of those agreements;

Mainstreaming of human rights

125.  Continues to support the Council in its efforts to mainstream human rights and democracy throughout the EU's work, in particular by focusing on the regular review and implementation of a particular set of EU human rights guidelines;

126.  Points out that numerous internal policies, particularly those relating to asylum, immigration and anti-terrorist measures, are having a major impact on respect for human rights in third countries; considers that greater efforts must be made to ensure that the internal policies in question comply with human rights and internal humanitarian law; observes that, under the body of case-law established by the European Court of Human Rights, European States may under no circumstances return individuals to States where they are in danger of being subjected to torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment;

127.  Welcomes the ongoing work that the Council and the Commission are undertaking in order to strengthen the coherence between the EU's human rights policy and other international policies; considers it vital for the pursuit of a credible EU human rights policy that such coherence be reinforced; considers it necessary for Europe in future to speak with one voice; approves of the central theme of the EU Human Rights Forum (organised by the Finnish Presidency and the Commission in Helsinki in December 2006) entitled “Mainstreaming Human Rights and Democracy into European Union Policies”;

128.  Calls on the Commission to continue to monitor closely the granting of GSP+ benefits to countries which have shown serious flaws in the implementation of the eight ILO conventions relating to core labour standards, on account of breaches of civil and political rights or the use of prison labour; asks the Commission to develop criteria for when the GSP should be withdrawn on human rights grounds;

129.  Condemns unconditionally all forms of exploitation of children, whether in the form of sexual exploitation, including child pornography and child sex tourism, or compulsory labour, together with all forms of human trafficking; notes with indignation the absence of any real reduction in the sexual exploitation of children, particularly as a result of internet use; takes the view that serious criminal offences are hereby being committed which must be prosecuted and punished;

130.  Urges the Commission to continue to promote corporate social responsibility with European and local companies; asks the Council to report back to Parliament on any feedback from the UN Special Representative on Business and Human Rights clarifying standards of corporate responsibility and accountability for transnational corporations and other business enterprises with regard to human rights;

131.  Welcomes the conclusions of the General Affairs Council of 13 November 2006 regarding gender equality and gender mainstreaming in crisis management;

132.  Recognises that immigration policy has become a priority on the Union’s internal and external policy agenda and that in its texts the Union has been attempting to link immigration and development and ensure that the fundamental rights of immigrants are respected; maintains, however, that the reality on the ground gives the lie to those texts; expresses particular disquiet at the fact that agreements for the readmission of illegal immigrants are being concluded with third countries that do not have the legal and institutional machinery needed in order to handle the readmission of nationals and protect their rights; calls on the Council and the Commission to brief it on the progress made in this area since the publication, in 2005, of the first annual monitoring and evaluation report on cooperation by third countries to combat illegal migration; recommends that Parliament be involved from the outset when readmission agreements are to be negotiated and concluded; and maintains, in short, that any migration policy has to be a common policy and, above all, preventive rather than punitive;

133.  Reiterates the importance of EU internal policy promoting adherence to international human rights law and the need for Member States to legislate in a way consistent with, inter alia, the obligations arising out of the Geneva Conventions, the Convention against Torture, the Genocide Convention and the Rome Statute of the ICC; welcomes the progress made in the application of universal jurisdiction in some Member States; in pursuit of greater coherence of internal and external policies, encourages the Council, the Commission and the Member States to incorporate the fight against impunity for serious international crimes in the development of a common EU area of freedom, security and justice;

Effectiveness of the European Parliament's interventions in human rights cases

134.  Welcomes Parliament’s important role in the human rights sphere, and in safeguarding commitments to improving human rights and democracy throughout the world by scrutinising the activities of other institutions and, in particular, through the Sakharov Prize;

135.  Asks the Council and the Commission to note the study by the European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation entitled “Beyond Activism: The impact of the resolutions and other activities of the European Parliament in the field of human rights outside the European Union”, finalised in October 2006;

136.  Welcomes the activities of its Subcommittee on Human Rights within the Foreign Affairs Committee, including regular reports by the Presidency, the Commission and the Personal Representative for Human Rights, exchanges of views (notably with UN Special Rapporteurs and independent experts), numerous hearings, expert testimony and studies; suggests that the impact of its work could be enhanced by systematic association with other committees such as the Committees on Development, International Trade, Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs, Women's Rights and Gender Equality and Budgets;

137.  Recognises that its subcommittee has continued to be committed to evaluating the implementation of the EU instruments in the fields of human rights and democracy, with special focus on the EU guidelines on torture, to making the Commission and the Council accountable for their actions in this field, to setting up a constant dialogue with international institutions on human rights issues, to providing a platform of expertise and, at the same time, an input on human rights and democracy aspects in response to reports from the Foreign Affairs Committee, to drafting own-initiative reports on specific human rights instruments, to mainstreaming human rights issues throughout the different bodies of the Parliament (committees and delegations), to organising and preparing the Sakharov Prize award procedure and to providing a platform for a permanent dialogue with civil society representatives;

138.  Stresses the importance of enhanced cooperation with national parliamentarians with a view to coordinating the monitoring of human rights policies; considers that the Subcommittee on Human Rights should seek to open channels of communication and organise meetings with analogous committees of the national parliaments of EU Member States as well as of the third countries;

139.  Calls for a more constructive role for the Subcommittee on Human Rights in the development of consistent and transparent criteria for the selection of urgency topics so as to ensure that parliamentary interventions are timely and have maximum impact; suggests that debates and voting time on urgency resolutions should be reorganised so that the Council may participate;

140.  Recommends full implementation of the guidelines for Parliament delegations on visits to third countries;

141.  Recommends translating resolutions and other key documents relating to human rights issues into the language spoken in the targeted countries;

142.  Welcomes the active role played by the Subcommittee on Human Rights, the Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Committee on Development and the President of Parliament in standing up to cases of injustice around the world, especially through the award of the Sakharov Prize; considers that Parliament should aim at conferring more than a momentary visibility and that it should better fulfil the expectations raised, e.g. through systematic liaison with former laureates and sustained support; takes the view that the European Parliament should facilitate the establishment of a network of Sakharov Prize laureates, with regular meetings being held in the European Parliament so that the Sakharov Prize laureates may associate themselves with Parliament's activities in the field of human rights; strongly regrets the response of the Burmese and Cuban authorities to Parliament's request for their agreement to the sending of a delegation to visit former Sakharov Prize laureates;

143.  Asks the Subcommittee on Human Rights to raise the profile of public hearings by improving attendance by MEPs and media visibility; calls on the Subcommittee to continue to invite prominent experts and key actors to attend, and to consider extending invitations to third country representatives and heads of EU missions; asks the Subcommittee to draw operational conclusions from all its meetings and exchanges of views with a view to following up on commitments and information obtained and on policy options devised;

144.  Welcomes the resolutions passed by Parliament calling for the closure of the Guantánamo Bay detention centre and the contributions that Parliament has made to raising the profile of that centre and its human rights concerns relating thereto; calls on the Council and the Commission to urge the United States Government to find a mechanism that will facilitate the charging or releasing of detainees in accordance with international law; is concerned that the very existence of the Guantánamo Bay detention centre continues to send out a negative signal as to how the fight against terrorism is being pursued;

145.  Considers that the effectiveness of Parliament's work on human rights and democracy could be enhanced by establishing priorities for its actions, notably by focusing on issues where it is possible to reach a broad political consensus; considers that its Subcommittee should set up small working groups to follow each of the human rights guidelines; considers that existing formal powers should be better used to promote human rights, in particular the budgetary powers and the right to give assent;

146.Suggests that different policy areas within the European Parliament could be better linked through the work of the committees in charge of human rights, budgets and international trade, in such a way as to improve the integration of budgetary and trade issues in the articulation of human rights concerns, so as to make the latter more realistic in terms of achievement and better attuned to the formal powers of the European Parliament;

147.  Calls on the Council systematically to invite MEPs to attend preparatory and de-briefing sessions, such as those organised with NGOs, for human rights dialogues with third countries as well as European Neighbourhood Policy subcommittees on human rights;

148.  Regards it as a priority to continue to work closely with the United Nations, in particular the UN Human Rights Council, and with Council of Europe representatives and bodies; considers that it is also important to establish closer working relations with the ACP, EMPA and EUROLAT parliamentary assemblies in order to exchange specialist knowledge and ensure greater coherence with regard to activities in the field of human rights and democracy;

149.  Acknowledges the work of its Temporary Committee on the alleged use of European countries by the CIA for the transport and illegal detention of prisoners, and the report of that Committee adopted on 14 February 2007(18); welcomes the efforts to collect information, examine the allegations and establish the facts in that regard and to raise the profile of extraordinary rendition and the use of EU countries by CIA aircraft to transport victims as a breach of human rights and a violation of international law; notes the criticism, as well as the recommendations, addressed to the Council, its Secretary General/High Representative and Member States; notes the role of its competent committees in ensuring the appropriate political follow-up to the above-mentioned report; requests the EU and Member States to work together at all levels to denounce the practice of extraordinary rendition now and in the future;

150.  Welcomes the adoption of its resolution of 1 February 2007 on the human rights situation of the Dalits in India(19);

Resources devoted to human rights work

151.  Welcomes the fact that the Commission now gives greater prominence to human rights in the mandate of heads of Commission delegations in third countries;

152.  Welcomes the fact that, in the ongoing process of renewing the mandates of the EU Special Representatives, a reference to human rights has been added to all the mandates;

153.  Advocates that increased human resources in the human rights area be made available to all Special Representatives appointed by the Council;

°

°         °

154.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission, the governments and parliaments of the Member States and the candidate countries, the United Nations, the Council of Europe, the OSCE, the governments of the countries mentioned in this resolution, and the offices of the main human rights NGOs based in the EU.

(1)

Council document 13522/1/06.

(2)

See the Annex to this report.

(3)

OJ C 379, 7.12.1998, p. 265; OJ C 262, 18.9.2001, p. 262; OJ C 293 E, 28.11.2002, p. 88; OJ C 271 E, 12.11.2003, p. 576.

(4)

OJ C 311, 9.12.2005, p. 1.

(5)

OJ C 364, 18.12.2000, p. 1.

(6)

OJ L 317, 15.12.2000, p. 3; OJ L 209, 11.8.2005, p. 27.

(7)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2006)0097.

(8)

OJ C 290 E, 29.11.2006, p. 107.

(9)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2007)0018.

(10)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2007)0008.

(11)

OJ C 327, 23.12.2005, p. 4.

(12)

OJ L 150, 18.6.2003, p. 67.

(13)

As at 7 February 2007, France, Italy, Latvia, Poland and Spain had signed but not ratified Protocol No. 13 to the ECHR, concerning the abolition of the death penalty in all circumstances.

(14)

Signed but not yet ratified (as of January 2007): Austria (2003), Belgium (2005), Cyprus (2004), Finland (2003), France (2005), Germany (2006), Italy (2003), Luxembourg (2005), the Netherlands (2005), Portugal (2006) and Romania (2007). Signed and ratified: the Czech Republic, Denmark, Poland, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Malta, Estonia and Slovenia. Therefore, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania and Slovakia have so far neither signed nor ratified the OPCAT.

(15)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2006)0501.

(16)

OJ L 261, 6.8.2004, p. 19.

(17)

Council Conclusions of 12 December 2005, 15293/1/05 REV 1, Annex, p. 14.

(18)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2007)0032.

(19)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2007)0016.


ANNEX I

ANNEX I - INDIVIDUAL CASES RAISED BY THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT

FOLLOW-UP OF CASES RAISED BY THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT BETWEEN 2000 AND APRIL 2006

PEOPLE RELEASED

Algeria

Ahmed Benaoum

Head of the Erraï Elarm press group, acquitted by a court in Oran on 19 June 2005.

 

Mohamed Benchicou

Editor of “Le Matin”, he was sentenced to two years of imprisonment on 14 June 2004 for infringement of the law concerning exchange control and capital movements, while his newspaper went into compulsory liquidation in June 2004. He was released on 14 June 2006.

Belarus

Paval Mazhejka

Journalists from the newspapers “Pahonia”and “Rabočy”; all sentenced to between 6 and 9 months in prison. Mr Mazhejka is currently working as a press officer for Mr Milinkevitch, laureate of the Sakharov Prize 2006.

 

Mikola Markievic

Viktar Ivaskievic

Valery Levonesky

Promoters of a demonstration on 1 May 2004, sentenced for defamation and insult of the president in a satirical leaflet.

The European Parliament called on the Belarussian authorities to immediately release them and all other imprisoned political opponents of the regime in its resolutions adopted on 16 September 2004 and on 10 March 2005.

Alexander Vacilyev

Belarus (continued)

Mikhail Marynich

A prominent opposition activist, former Minister for External Economic Relations, Ambassador and presidential candidate in 2001, released on parole on 14 April 2006 after almost two years of imprisonment .

The European Parliament in its resolutions adopted on 10 March and on 16 February 2006 considered that he in fact was convicted for political reasons rather than for committing a crime.

Cambodia

Sam Rainsy

A politician, accused of libel and slander. The National Assembly overturned his immunity and he was convicted. He was pardoned by King Norodom on 5 February 2006 and returned to Cambodia on 10 February 2006.

In its resolution of 10 March 2005, the European Parliament focused on the case of three parliamentarians of the liberal Sam Rainsy Party, whose immunity was lifted on 3 February 2005 by the National Assembly of Cambodia. The European Parliament called upon the government of Cambodia for the immediate and unconditional release of Cheam Chany and re-imposition of the immunity of the members of the opposition parties.

Cheam Channy

Member of the Sam Rainsy Party, he was stripped off his immunity and convicted. He was pardoned by King Norodom on 5 February 2006 and released on 6 February 2006.

Chea Poch

Member of the Sam Rainsy Party, stripped off his immunity and convicted. He returned home in August 2005; he is said to be hiding, but his true fate remains unknown.

China

Mgr Francis An Shuxin

Auxiliary bishop of the diocese of Baoding, Hebei, aged 54; released in August 2006 after 10 years of arbitrary detention.

The European Parliament demanded in its resolution of 8 September 2005, the unconditional release of all Chinese catholics incarcerated because of their religious convictions, and the immediate cessation of all kinds of violence towards them. Francis An Shuxin was the only one released.

Cuba

Oscar Espinsa Chepe

Political prisoner, released on 30 November 2004.

The imprisonment of dissidents in Cuba gave special rise of concern to the European Parliament, which sharply denounced the ongoing breach of fundamental rights by the local regime, for instance in its resolution adopted on 17 November 2004.

Paul Riveiro

Political prisoner, poet, released on 30 November 2004.

Edel Jose Garcia

Political prisoner, journalist, released on 30 November 2004.

Indonesia/Aceh

Muhammad Nazar

Human rights activist, released in August 2005

 

Iran

Leyla Mafi

Girl aged about 20, charged with acts contrary to chastity; released in February 2006.

 

Akbar Ganji

Journalist, sentenced to six years of imprisonment in July 2001, released on 17 March 2006.

Both President Borrell and the chair of the Delegation for Relations with Iran sent letters to the Ambassador of Iran concerning the situation of Ganji. During its visit to Teheran on 21-24 April 2005, the Bureau of the EP Delegation was not allowed to visit him. Akbar Ganji was released on 17 March 2006.

Hanif Mazroi

Journalist, released on 11 November 2004.

In resolutions adopted on 28 October 2004 and on 13 January 2005 the European Parliament expressed its concerns on the fundamental rights of journalists in Iran.

Rozbeh Ebrahimi

Journalist, released on 26 November 2004.

Hassan Yuseffi Eshkevari

Journalist, released in February 2005 after serving about two thirds of his prison sentence.

Saleh Kamrani

Iranian Azerbaijani lawyer and human rights defender, released on 18 September 2006.

With regard to the situation of Iranian minorities, the European Parliament adopted a resolution on 15 November 2006, in which the Iranian authorities were called upon to eliminate all forms of discrimination based on religious or ethnic grounds or against persons belonging to minorities.

Masoud Bastani

Journalist, released on 22 January 2006.

In its resolution adopted on 15 November 2006, the European Parliament raised concerns regarding various human rights violations in Iran and among others called for the release of all imprisoned journalists and webloggers, including Masoud Bastani.

Iran (continued)

Omid Memariam

Blogger journalists. They were detained without being formally charged and their access to lawyers and to their family members was refused. They were arrested in a crackdown on news websites and spent several months in prison in 2004; later they were released on bail.

The European Parliament in resolutions adopted on 13 January 2005, on 28 October 2004 and on 12 February 2004 repeatedly expressed its concerns on the situation of fundamental rights of journalists in Iran. In its resolutions of 28 October 2004 and 13 January 2005 it demanded the Iranian Parliament to repeal all criminal provisions dealing with the peaceful expression of opinions and provisions affecting the press. The European Parliament also called upon the authorities to release all prisoners prosecuted or sentenced for press- and opinion-related offences. The European Parliament urged in particular the release of online journalists who allegedly contributed to the content of reformist orientated Internet sites.

Javad Ghoam Tamayomi

Sharam Rafihzadeh

Rozbeh Ebrahimi

Iraq

Simona Torretta

Italian aid workers, released on 16 September 2004.

The European Parliament was concerned about the constant threat of abduction of aid workers and journalists, as reflected also by its resolution adopted on 16 September 2004.

Simona Pari

Christian Chesnot

French journalists, kidnapped on 20 August 2004, released in December 2004.

Both hostages were released on 21 December 2004, as a result of media pressure and public protests.

Georges Malbrunot

Maldives

Mohamed Nasheed

Member of the Parliament, released on 22 September 2006.

He was among those prominent political leaders who were mentioned by a resolution of the European Parliament of 16 September 2004, which criticised the Maldives for the large-scale incommunicado detention practices and demanded the release of pro-democracy reformers. This resolution also called for reforms to give way to democratisation and the respect of human rights.

Sudan

Dr Mudawi Ibrahim Adam

The Chairperson of the Sudanese Social Development Organisazion (SUDO), he was arrested several times, the last time shortly before he was due to travel to Ireland to receive Front Line's Human Rights Defender award from the President of Ireland. He was released on 16 May 2006 after two weeks of detention.

The European Parliament condemned his arrest and called on the Sudanese authorities to release him and others without delay in its resolution adopted on 12 May 2005.

Syria

Hasan Zeino

Civil activist, arrested in July 2005 for his membership to the unlicensed National Democratic Gathering. He was released at the end of 2006 following a presidential amnesty.

On 8 October 2005 the European Parliament passed a resolution on several individual cases in Syria, with mention to these persons.

Yassin al-Hamwi

Civil activist, arrested in July 2005 after funding the Committee of the Families of Prisoners of Opinion and Conscience in Syria. He was released in August 2005 and convicted on 27 September 2006 to ten days in prison.

Muhammad Ali al-Abdullah

The civil activist was arrested and released at the same time at with the same circumstances as Yassin al-Hamwi.

Haytham Al-Hamwi

Civil activist, arrested in 2003 and sentenced to four years imprisonment after an allegedly unfair trial. He was released in November 2005, following a presidential amnesty.

Muhammad Ali Al-Abdullah

The civil activist was arrested and released at the same time than Yassin al-Hamwi and in the same circumstances.

Khalil Hussein

Civil society activists, arrested and tortured in May 2006 after signing a petition for improved Syrian-Lebanese relations. Khalil Hussein and Suleyman Shummar were released on 25 September 2006. They still are believed to be in imminent danger of arrest on the same or similar charges. Fateh Jamous was released on 12 October 2006. Dr Sawafan Tayfour, Nidal Derwiche and Ghalem Amer were also released on 28 July 2006.

In a resolution adopted on 15 June 2006, the European Parliament urged the Syrian authorities to release immediately all activists still detained on grounds of signing the referred petition.

Dr Safawan Tayfour

Fateh Jamous

Nidal Derwiche

Suleiman Shummar

CASES OF CONCERN

Algeria

Farid Alilat

Journalists working for a privately owned French language newspaper sentenced for violating the media law.

The European Parliament in its resolution adopted on 9 June 2005 called on the Algerian authorities to release the journalists sentenced to imprisonment for libel without delay and to end judicial persecution of the Algerian private media for their opinions, also to halt the legal proceedings initiated against the Algerian private media.

Fouad Boughanem

Haakim Laâlam

Abla Cheérif

Hassane Zerrouky

Youssef Rezzoug

Yasmine Ferroukhi

Hafnaoui Ghoul

Belarus

Vieronika Cherkasova

Journalist, stabbed to death in her home in Minsk on 20 October 2004. Despite all the evidence suggested that she was assassinated because of her professional activity, the authorities accused her son and her stepfather.

In its resolution of 28 October 2004, the European Parliament urged the Belarussian authorities to investigate thoroughly her murder. In its resolution adopted on 7 July 2005 furthermore, the European Parliament strongly condemned the Belarussian regime’s indiscriminate attacks on the media, journalists, members of the opposition, human rights activists, and on any other person who criticises the President and the regime; Ms Cherkasova was mentioned in this resolution as well.

Mikola Statkievic

Leader of the Belarussian Social Democratic Party; sentenced to three years of corrective labour on 31 May 2005; later the sentence was shortened to two years.

Both political leaders were arrested together with about 50 other demonstrators and freed after strong criticism from of the European Parliament on 1 and 4 November 2004 respectively. The European Parliament reiterated its call on the Belarussian authorities for their immediate release in its resolution of 10 March 2005. None of them were released and they will probably serve their full term.

Paval Seviarynec

Leader of the Malady Front; sentenced to three years of corrective labour on 31 May 2005, which sentence later was shortened to two years

Yuri Zakharenko

Former Minister of Interior, disappeared.

The European Parliament called for an independent inquiry to their disappearance in its resolution of 10 March 2005. Their present situation still remains unknown.

Victor Gonchar

Deputy chairman of the 13th Supreme Soviet of Belarus, disappeared

Dmitry Zavadski

Camera-man of the Russian Television Channel ORT, disappeared.

Anatoly Krasovsky

Businessman, disappeared.

Burma (Myanmar)

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi

Sakharov Prize laureate of 1990, has been under house arrest since 31 May 2003. She spent 10 of the last 16 years in detention without trial. In May 2006, her detention order was extended by one year.In December 2005, the NLD submitted an appeal to the junta, claiming her house arrest was legally flawed.

The European Parliament in its resolutions of 11 March 2004, of 16 September 2004 and of 12 May 2005, continued to urge for the release and for ensuring full freedom of movement and expression for Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and other leading NLD members as well as for other political prisoners held by the ruling junta. Heavy pressure from the European Union and the US government lead to reopening constitutional talks in February 2005. On 14 December 2006, the European Parliament adopted a resolution on the situation in Burma, demanding her immediate and unconditional release as well as of all the other political prisoners. On 17 January 2007, the Presidency made a declaration on behalf of the European Union on the release of five student leaders and the situation of Suu Kyi. The Parliament's planned ad-hoc delegation to Burma to hand over the Sakharov Prize to her, was informed that the Burmese authorities would allow for a visit to the country, but not to meet with Suu Kyi. Therefore the visit of the delegation is pending.

Hkun Htun Oo

Chair of the Shan Nationalities League for Democracy, held in prison since February 2005 and sentenced to 90 years of imprisonment.

The European Parliament in a resolution adopted on 17 November 2005 demanded the immediate release and full freedom of movement and of expression for all political prisoners held by the State Peace and Development Council.

General Hso Hten

President of the Shan State Peace Council, held in prison since February 2005 and sentenced to 109 years of imprisonment.

Cambodia

Kem Sokha

President of the Cambodian Centre for Human Rights (CCHR).

On 3 February 2006, the government lawyers officially withdrew criminal complaints against them. The European Parliament in resolutions adopted on 13 January 2005, on 10 March 2005 and on 19 January 2006 reiterated its strong condemnation of the human rights situation in Cambodia.

Pa Nguon Teang

Acting Director of the Cambodian Centre for Human Rights and Radio Director.

Rong Chhung

President of the Cambodian Independent Teachers´ Association.

Cambodia (continued)

Mam Sonando

Director of the Beehive Radio.

 

Prince Sisowath Thomico

Secretary to former King Sihanouk.

Chea Mony

President of the Free Trade Union of Workers.

Ea Channa

Deputy Secretary General of the Student’s Movement for Democracy Criminal. Crimial charges remained pending against him. He has been in exile in Northern countries since the beginning of 2006.

The European Parliament in its resolutions of 13 January 2005, of 10 March 2005 and of 19 January 2006, reiterated its strong condemnation of the human rights situation in Cambodia, where in the recent years human rights activists, journalists, trade unionists and opposition supporters have been intimidated, arrested and killed, creating a climate of political violence in the country.

Men Nath

President of the Cambodian Independent Civil Servant’s Association. He has been in exile in Northern countries since the beginning of 2006.

Say Bory

Advisor to the former Prime Minister, King Sihanouk. He is free to carry out his activities in Cambodia, although criminal charges remain pending against him.

China

James Su Zimin

Bishop of the diocese of Baoding, Hebei, aged 74, disappeared in 1997. Later on he was seen in a hospital in 2003 being watched by policemen.

The European Parliament in its resolution of 8 September 2005 demanded the unconditional release of all Chinese catholics imprisoned because of their religious convictions and the immediate cessation of all kinds of violence against them. The resolution also mentioned the disappeared and arrested clergy members.

Han Dingxian

Diocese of Yongnian/Handan, Hebei, aged 67; disappeared in January 2006 after being held in house arrest.

Cosma Shi Enxiang

Diocese of Yixian, Hebei, aged 83; disappeared in 2001.

Philip Zhao Zhendong

Diocese of Xuanhua, Hebei, 86; had been detained between 2000 and June 2004 and was arrested again in December 2004; his fate remains unknown

Paul Huo Junlong

Administrator of the diocese of Baoding, aged 50; arrested in August 2004 and has been under house arrest since January 2006.

Zhang Zhenquan

Diocese of Baoding, Hebei.

Ma Wuyong

China (continued)

Fr Li Wenfeng

Diocese of Shijiazhuang, Hebei; arrested in October 2003.

The European Parliament in its resolution of 8 September 2005 demanded the unconditional release of all Chinese catholics imprisoned because of their religious convictions and the immediate cessation of all kinds of violence against them. The resolution also mentioned the disappeared and arrested clergy members.

Fr Liu Heng

Fr Dou Shengxia

Fr Chi Huitian

Diocese of Baoding, Hebei.

Fr Kang Fuuliang

Diocese of Baoding, Hebei; arrested in July 2003.

Chen Guozhen

Pang Guangzhao

Yin Ruose

Li Shunjun

Fr Lu Xiaozhou

Diocese of Wenzhou, Zhejiang; arrested in June 2003.

Fr Lin Daoming

Diocese of Fuzhou, Fujian; arrested in May 2003.

Fr Zheng Ruipin

Diocese of Fuzhou, Fujian; arrested in April 2003, imprisoned at an undisclosed location.

Fr Pang Yongxing

Diocese of Baoding, Hebei.

Fr Ma Shunbao

Fr Wang Limao

Fr Liu Deli

Convicted to six years of imprisonment in 2001.

Pastor Zhang Rongliang

One of the founders of the China for Christ church; convicted to seven and a half years of imprisonment in 2006; currently he is in a very bad health condition.

Cuba

Oswaldo Paya Sardinas

Sakharov Prize laureate of 2002, author of the Manifesto ‘Todos Unidos’, which is the origin of the Varela Project calling for a referendum on open elections and for the freedom of speech, for freedom for political prisoners and for free enterprise. He has been systematically denied to leave Cuba and to accept the invitations issued by the European Parliament and by other European Union institutions. In January 2007, he appealed to the EU to support a resolution at the UNHCR demanding the Cuban government to liberate all Cuban political prisoners. Mr. Oswaldo Payá is up to this day subjected to close surveillance by the intelligence services and by members of the communist organizations in Havana.

The European Parliament planned an ad-hoc delegation to Cuba, which would hand over the Sakharov Prize to Mr Paya Sardinas and to the Ladies In White. The Cuban authorities condemned the interventionist attitude of the Parliament and refused to be subjected to any pressure. With its various resolutions of 17 March 2004, of 22 April 2004, of 28 April 2005, of 2 February 2006, the European Parliament renewed its invitation to Mr Payá and reiterated its call to the Cuban authorities to permit him to travel to Europe in order to visit the Community institutions.

Ladies in White (Damas de Blanco)

Sakharov Prize laureates of 2005. Wives and mothers of the 75 independent journalists and dissidents arrested in March 2003, they continue to demand the immediate release of their relatives. 59 of them whom are still in prison. Many of the Ladies in White suffer severe repression by the authorities, especially those who live in the countryside. Some of them suffered “acts of repudiation”, received threats and were even physically attacked in the past months. The women are usually obstructed from travelling to Havana when a Ladies in White event takes place. On the International Human Rights Day on 10 December 2006, some were forced to travel in secret at night in order to avoid police control.

Egypt

Dr Ayman Nour

Former journalist and lawyer, now leader of Al-Ghad Party and member of the Egyptian Parliament, was sentenced to 5 years of imprisonment on 24 December 2005.

Following the protests of the European Parliament in its resolution of 23 February 2005 and of other international organisation, he was released on bail on 11 March 2005. Ten days later he was formally charged with forging signatures in an effort to obtain formal party status for his Al-Ghad camp.The European Parliament in its resolution of 9 February 2006 strongly urged the Egyptian authorities to ensure that he is not subjected to torture or to other forms of ill-treatment and that he is given prompt, regular and unrestricted access to his lawyers, his doctors (as he is diabetic) and his family. In its resolution of 6 April 2006, the European Parliament renewed its demand on his release and also expressed its concern regarding his trial at the Court of Cassation on 18 May 2006. A letter of concern was sent on 22 May 2006. The European Parliament also proposed an ad hoc delegation to visit him if he remains in prison following the Court hearing.

Ethiopia

Mesfin Woldemariam

Founder and former President of the Ethiopian Human Rights Council, the country’s first independent human rights organisation, arrested in May 2005. His trial resumed in February 2006. Under Ethiopian law, the possible sentence ranges from three years’ imprisonment to the capital punishment. He was nominated to the Sakharov Prize in 2006.

The European Parliament in its resolution of 17 May 2001 raised the cases of eminent human rights activists and political prisoners in Ethiopia and focused on these two cases. In its resolution of 15 November 2006 the European Parliament called on the Ethiopian authorities to refrain from acts of intimidation and harassment and to immediately and unconditionally release all political prisoners.

Berhanu Nega

Well-known economist and the leader of the main opposition Coalition for Unity and Democracy (CUD) party, arrested in May 2005. His rial resumed in February 2006. Under Ethiopian law, his possible sentence ranges from three years of imprisonment to capital punishment.

Iran

Emadeddin Baghi

Iranian writer and critic, subject to a travel ban since 4 October 2004. He tried to travel to France in 2006 to receive a Human Rights prize, but he did not succeed.

The European Parliament urged the authorities in its resolution of 28 October 2004 to immediately lift the travel ban imposed on him.

Hossein Ghazian

Journalists, imprisoned

The European Parliament in its resolution of 28 October 2004, condemned the imprisonment of these prominent journalists, which act clearly obstructs the right to freedom of expression.

Abbas Abdi

Reza Alidjani

Taghi Rahmani

Hoda Rezazadeh-Saber

Ensalfali Hedayat

Zhila Izadi

13 years old girl, initially convicted to death by stoning, which sentence was later reduced to 55 lashes.

In its resolution of 28 October 2004 the European Parliament denounced these two cases of minors sentenced to death and urged the Iranian authorities to respect the provisions of he International Covenant on the Rights of the Child, which Iran is party to. Futhermore the resolution called on Iran to prevent any further application of the death penalty to minors. In addition, the European Parliament called on the Iranian authorities to immediately end all stoning penalties and to provide evidence that they were willing to implement their publicly declared moratorium on stoning.

Bakhtiar Izadi

Her 15 years old brother, convicted to 150 lashes, which sentence was later reduced to 55 lashes.

Kazakhstan

Altynbeck Sarsenbayev

A prominent politician and the co-chairman of the True Ak Zhol opposition party, murdered on 13 February 2006, together with his bodyguard and driver.

In its resolution of 16 March 2006 the European Parliament condemned these murders and expressed its great concerns regarding the imprisonment of opposition activists and journalists for holding a rally on 26 February 2006 in memory of Altynbeck Sarsenbayev. The European Parliament called on the Kazakh authorities to carry out the investigation into the circumstances of his death in a full, independent and transparent manner. According to the International Helsinki Federation of Human Rights, an investigation was carried out by the authorities on this murder and some suspects were found guilty, but the investigation and the trial did not see into the whole truth of this case.

Nurkadilov Zamanbek

Opposition leader, was found shot dead in unexplained circumstances on 12 November 2005. He died after he had accused the government of corruption. The official investigation concluded that he had committed suicide.

Laos

Pa Fue Khang

Local escort of a journalist team.

The Belgian journalist, Thierry Falise and the French camera-man, Vincent Reynaud, were arrested together with their Laotian escorts while producing a report on the Hmong ethnicity, which assembled to the US during the Vietnam war and has a long history of resistance and aspirations to independence vis-à-vis the Laotian government. After the Western reporters were released on 9 July 2003, the escorts of the journalists were subjected to a collective trial, the outcome of which was predetermined and which did not allow for legal representation. Pa Fue Khang and Thao Moua face a 15 and 12 years imprisonment in Samkhe prison, one of most cruel prison of Laos. The third guide arrested managed to escape.

Thao Moua

Local escort of a journalist team.

Maldives

Dr Mohamed Munavvar

Member of the Parliament, former Attorney General

In its resolution adopted of 16 June 2004, the European Parliament sharply criticised the large-scale detention incommunicado used in the Maldives and demanded the release of pro-democracy reformers. The resolution also urged the authorities to give way to democratisation and to the respect of human rights. Following demonstrations on 12 and 13 August 2004 in the capital, Male, which were directed against the slow pace of political reforms of president Gayoom´s government, at least 69 people were detained. On 22 August 2004 the government allegedly released 62 detainees, while hundreds remained to be detained. According to Amnesty International the exact numbers of political prisoners are difficult to assess. An EU delegation visiting the Maldives was denied access. The above mentioned resolution of the European Parliament raised the case of prominent leaders of the Maldives Democratic Party detained in August 2004.

Ali Faiz

Member of the Parliament

Ilyas Hussein

Member of the Parliament

Ahmed Shafeeq

Member of the Parliament

Ahmed Adil

Member of the Parliament

Dr Hussein Rasheed Hassan

Member of the Parliament, member of the National Human Rights Commission

Ibrahim Hussain Zaki

A widely respected diplomat and former secretary-general of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC).

Ibrahim Ismail

Member of the Parliament

Ahmed Athif

Member of the Parliament

Gasim Ibrahim

Member of the Parliament, former President of the SAARC Chamber of Commerce and the pro-reform candidate of Speaker of the Maldivian Parliament.

Husnoo Alsnood

Lawyer and member of the National Human Rights Commission .

Fathimeen Nisreen

 

Mohammed Niyaz

Ahmed Ibrahim Didi

Mohamed Zaki

Ibrahim Zaki

Maria Manike

Jennifer Latheef

Aminath Najeeb

Asad Whaeed

Pakistan

Javed Hashmi

Leader of the opposition Alliance for the Restoration of Democracy, sentenced to 23 years in prison in April 2004. He was convicted for having allegedly prepared a critical letter on the military staff. The supporters of the Alliance reckon the verdict to be politically motivated. He is still imprisoned. He was released on parole for two days in December 2006 to attend the wedding of his daughter.

The European Parliament expressed its concerns on his detention several times, for instance in resolutions adopted on 22 April 2004. It called for his immediate release and stressed that politically motivated trials and sentences could not be accepted.

Philippines

Francisco Larranaga

European citizen, sentenced to death for rape and murder of two sisters. His death sentence was confirmed in July 2005 without further possibilities for appeal. However, on 21 November 2005, the Spanish Defence Minister José Bono received assurances from Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo that Larrañaga would not be executed while she remained in power. He is still imprisoned. At this point it is still unclear whether he would fall under the category of former death row inmates who may get parole at some stage, or he would have to remain in prison indefinitely.

The European Parliament asked the President of the Philippines to exercise her power by granting an absolute pardon to him and securing his immediate release from prison. Furthermore, the European Parliament called for a review of the legal procedure in this case and asked for a fair trial to be held respecting all legal, penal and jurisdictional guarantees. The European Parliament also asked for commuting the death penalty of the prisoners on death row, particularly the 18 child offenders. The death penalty was abolished in the Philippines in June 2006. Mr Larranaga submitted a communication to the United Nations Human Rights Committee, which condemned in September 2006 the violation of the authorities of Philippines of Articles 6, 7 and 14 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

Russia

Stanislav Dmitriyevsky

Chief executive for the Russian-Chechen Friendship Society and editor in chief for the Nizhni Novgorod newspaper “Pravo-zaschita” (“Human Rights Activism”), sentenced to two years suspended imprisonment because he published Aslan Mashkado´s appeal for peace in Chechnya. The Russian-Chechen Friendship Society (RCFS) was deregistered due to a Russian Supreme Court decision in January 2007.

On 19 January 2006, the European Parliament called for dropping all charges against him. Furthermore, the European Parliament urged the Russian authorities to respect the freedom of the media and journalists and recalled its precedent calls on Russia to protect human rights defenders, who were increasingly under attack. The resolution also called for granting access to Chechnya to UN Special Rapporteurs and other international human rights monitors, independent media and international humanitarian organisations and also to provide all the necessary security conditions for carrying out their work.

Sudan

Amouna Mohamed Ahmed

The four girls were attacked on 6 March 2006 outsidethe Al Shareif camp. The aggression lead to the death of the attacker and the police referred the case of the four girls to the Prosecution Attorney with charges of murder. Amouna Mohamed Ahmed should be tried soon. The three other girls were released.

In its resolution adopted on 6 April 2006, the European Parliament called on the Government of Sudan to release the girls. The Parliament also considered that the girls should be given appropriate care as victims of attempted rape in a resolution..

Fayza Ismail Abaker

Houda Ismail Abdel Rahman

Zahra Adam Abdela

Syria

Riad Seif

Member of Parliament, detained

On 8 November 2005, the European Parliament passed a resolution concerning several individual cases in Syria; these persons were also mentioned therein.

Mamoun al-Homsi

Member of Parliament, detained

Riad al-Hamood

Kurdish civil society activists, Arab language teacher and active member of the Committee for Rival of Civil Society, arrested on 4 June 2005. He was sentenced in April 2006 to five years of prison.

 

Tunisia

Maître Mohammed Abbou

Well-known lawyer and human rights defender, sentenced to three and a half years in prison on 28 April 2005 because of publishing critical articles causing “defamation of the judiciary” and “public disorder”. His lawyers reportedly were denied on a number of occasions to visit him in prison.

The European Parliament in its resolution of 29 September 2005 condemned this conviction, who was sentenced for Later the European Parliament adopted a new resolution on his case and on the general situation of human rights in Tunisia on 15 June 2006. A letter of concern was sent on February 2007 expressing preoccupation with regards to the situation of Mr Abbou.

Vietnam

Thich Huyen Quang

Roman catholic priests, held in the Z30A camp for more than 18 years.

In its resolution of 1 December 2005, the European Parliament expressed its concern about the dramatic conditions suffered by prisoners in the Z30A camp in Xuan Loc, in particular by these religious leaders.

Thich Quang Do

Pham Minh Tri

Nguyen Duc Vinh

Ngo Quang Vinh

Member of the Buddhist Hoa Hao sect, aged 87, held in the Z30A camp for more than 18 years.

FOLLOW-UP OF CASES BETWEEN APRIL 2006 AND MARCH 2007

Bangladesh

Salah Uddin Shoaib Choudhury

Journalist and director of the newspaper "Weekly Blitz", which promotes dialogue among the religions and for the recognition of Israel. He was arrested on 29 November 2003. He is in danger of being sentenced to death at his trial for sedition, which was due to open on 13 November 2006.

In its resolution of 15 November 2006, the European Parliament called for the review of his trial and for his release. The charges against him are contrary to all standards of international law and to all conventions on violations of press freedom. The resolution was also deploring recent acts of violence and strongly condemned the physical attacks on journalists, NGO staff, trade unionists and others. The resolution also expressed disapproval regardig the violence related to the forthcoming general elections and the transition.

Cambodia

Hu Vuthy

President of the Free Trade Union of Workers in the Kingdom of Cambodia (FTUWKC) at the Suntex garment factory, was shot dead on 24 February 2007.

The European Parliament adopted a resolution on 15 March 2007, which condemned the killing of Hy Vuthy and all other acts of violence against trade unionists as well as urged the Cambodian authorities to launch an urgent, impartial and effective investigation into these murders.

Chea Vichea

FTUWKC President at the Trinunggal Komara factory, was murdered in May 2004.

Ros Sovannarith

FTUWKC President, was shot dead in January 2004.

Yim Ry

A worker at a garment factory, was killed on 13 June 2003, when the police shot into the crowd of protesting workers.

Bulgaria

Michael Shields

A 18 years-old British citizen, subjected to an unfair trial and sent to prison in Bulgaria, in spite of the fact that another person confessed to the crime in question.

A letter of concern was sent on 13 June 2006.

Guatemala

Eduardo José D'Aubuisson Munguía

Members and the driver of the Central American Parliament (Parlacen). They were brutally murdered as they were driving to the Parlacen plenary session. The alleged murderers were subsequently killed in prison among suspicious circumstances.

These killings were expressly mentioned by the European Parliament resolution on Guatemala adopted on 14 March 2007.

William Rizziery Pichinte Chávez

José Ramón González Rivas

Gerardo Napoleón Ramírez

Ecuador

Mirek Krygier

Polish citizen, imprisoned.

A letter of concern was sent on 15 November 2006.

Iran

Keyvan Ansari

Prisoner of conscience.

In a resolution adopted on 15 November 2006, the European Parliament raised concerns regarding various human rights violations in Iran, including the ill-treatment of political prisoners, the prosecution of juvenile offenders, also concerning the issue of minority rights, freedom of religion and of the press, and women's rights. In the resolution, the Iranian authorities were called on to unconditionally release all prisoners of conscience; these five persons were explicitly mentioned.

Keyvan Rafii

Prisoner of conscience.

Kheirollah Derakhshandi

Prisoner of conscience.

Abolfazl Jahandar

Prisoner of conscience.

Koroush Zaim

Prisoner of conscience.

Abdullah Suleymani

Executed on 19 December 2006

Despite the European Parliament resolution adopted on 15 November 2006 and the exchange of letters between President Borrell and the Iranian embassy in Brussels, the Iranian authorities decided to execute these persons.

Malek Banitamim

Executed on 19 December 2006

Ali Matouri Zaadeh

Executed on 19 December 2006

Mohammad Jaab Pour

Executed on 24 January 2007

Abdulamir Farjallah Jaab

Executed on 24 January 2007

Alireza Asakreh

Executed on 24 January 2007

Khalaf Derhab Khudayrawi

Executed on 24 January 2007

Abdulreza Sanawati Zergani

Executed on 14 February 2007

Qasem Salamat

Executed on 14 February 2007

Majed Alboghubaish

Executed on 14 February 2007

Farshid Yadollahi

Lawyers, imprisoned while defending Sufis in Qom

In its resolution of 15 November 2006, the European Parliament also addressed the freedom of religion and expressed concerns about the arrests of these persons.

Omid Behrouzi

Ayatollah Sayad Hossein Kazemeyni Boroujerdi

He was advocating for years that politics and religion should be separated; he was arrested reportedly with more than 400 of his followers.

 

Motjaba Saminejad

Imprisoned journalist/webblogger.

In tits resolution of 15 November 2006, the European Parliament called for the release of all imprisoned journalists and webloggers.

Ahmad Raza Shiri

Imprisoned journalist/webblogger.

Arash Sigarchi

Imprisoned journalist/webblogger.

Iran (continued)

Akbar Mahdavi Mohammadi

Student activist, died as a result of his hunger strike

The resolution adopted on 15 November 2006 strongly condemned the open call by President Ahmadinejad for a purge of liberal and secular academics in the universities and called for all those expelled to be allowed to return and to teach according to the elementary rights of academic freedom.

Valiollah Feyz

Political prisoner, died as a result of his hunger strike

The European Parliament deeply deplored the death of these two activists.

Manoucher Mohammadi

Student activist, imprisoned

The European Parliament called for his release, requesting that students should not be barred from higher education due to their peaceful political activities.

Mausavi Khoini

 

A letter of concern was sent on 20 October 2006.

Delara Darabi

Sentenced to death and on death row . They were minors (17 years old), when committing the crimes in question.

Regarding their case, a letter of concern was sent on 17 April 2006.

Shahram Pour Mansouri

Kobra Rahmanpoor

Convicted in January 2002 and is still uncertain about when the sentence is to be executed, if at all.

These four women were sentenced to death despite Iran is a party to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, therefore it is obliged under international law to abolish the death penalty. In addition, two of the convicted are minors. A letter of concern was sent on 13 July 2006 regarding their case.

Nazanin Mahabad Fatehi

Convicted in March 2005 for killing one of the three men, who tried to rape her and her cousin. She was released on 15 January 2007, after the court of appeal declared her innocence. However, she still has to pay compensation of € 25.000.

Fatemeh Hagigat Prozheh

 

Delara Darabi

She broke into an house with her partner, allegedly killed the woman, whose house she and her partner broke into. She denied the crime but. She is still imprisoned, on death row. On 20 January she attempted suicide in her cell.

Sa'id Masouri

Sentenced to death and awaiting execution, she has been held in solitary confinement in Section 209 of Evin Prison since late 2004

With regards to their case a letter of concern was sent on 17 May 2006.

Khaled Hardiani

Sentenced to death and on death row, involved in hijacking a plane in 2001

Farhang Pour Mansouri

Sentenced to death and on death row, involved in hijacking a plane in 2001

Shahram Pour Masori

Sentenced to death as a minor and on death row, involved in hijacking a plane in 2001

Israel

Jigo Faust

 

A letter of concern was sent on 29 August 2006

Ziyad Hmeidan

Student and human rights worker, detained in May 2005

A letter of concern was sent on 20 July 2007.

North Korea

Son Jong Nam

He is Christian believer. He was reportedly tortured by the National Security Agency, and was then sentenced to death for alleged reasons without a trial and without procedural safeguards required by the international human rights law.

In a resolution adopted on 15 June 2006, the European Parliament urged the government of the DPRK to provide information on his case and not to proceed with his execution. The European Parliament also called on the government of North Korea to comply with the principles set out in the international human rights treaties it has ratified (such as the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights) and incorporate these principles into domestic law, to abolish the death penalty and to release all people detained or imprisoned for the peaceful exercise of fundamental human rights.

Pakistan

Tahir Hussain

British citizen, released on 17 November 2006 after spending 18 years on death row for the murder of a taxi driver in 1988.

A letter of concern was sent on 20 November 2006.

Russia

Mikhael Khodorkovsky

Russian citizen, convicted after an unfair trial and subjected to difficult prison conditions; detained in a prison in Siberia.

With regards to their case, a letter of concern was sent on 22 November 2006.

Platon Lebedev

Russian citizen convicted after an unfair trial and subjected to difficult prison conditions. Suffers from serious health problems.

Anna Politkovskaya

Journalist, murdered on 7 October 2006. A highly respected investigative reporter, known as the symbol of honest journalism in Russia, she was awarded many prizes, among others the Prize Olof Palme. She courageously stood up defending human life and dignity. She exposed and objectively reported on various forms of crimes against humanity, especially in Chechnya.

In its resolution of October 2006, the European Parliament paid tribute to her work and merits. The European Parliament called on the Russian authorities to conduct an independent and efficient investigation to find and punish those responsible for this cowardly crime. The President of the Parliament also expressed his concerns regarding the issue in a letter of concern. In November 2006, a hearing took place on the Subcommittee on Human Rights on Human rights defenders in Russia. At the EU-Russia Summit, the European Union insisted that Russia must to respect human rights in every field of its cooperation of the EU-Russia cooperation.

Russia (continued)

Galina Kozlova

Board member of Mari Ušem, which is a national organisation for the Mari Finno-Ugric minority in Russia. She is also the editor of the literary magazine Ontšõko. She was attacked on 25 January 2007, which act - according to her - could not be considered as a simple robbery attempt. His husband, Valdimir Kozlov, was nominated to the Sakharov Prize.

In its resolution of 17 March 2007 the European Parliament strongly condemned this attack and also the continuing harassment and assaults on activists, leading cultural figures and independent journalists in Mari El.

Sri Lanka

Lieutenant General Sarath Fonseka

Commander of the Sri Lankan Army, he suffered an assasination attempt on 25 April 2006.

In a resolution adopted on 18 May 2006, the European Parliament severely condemned the renewed campaign of attacks by the LTTE, the high number of human rights violations committed by both sides and the constant breaches of the ceasefire agreement. The Parliament also considered that tensions have been deliberately exacerbated by this assassination attempt, and the attack on the Batticaloa district office of the Sri Lanka Monitoring Mission (SLMM) on 13 January 2006 in a deliberate attempt to undermine the ceasefire agreement.

Lakshman Kadirgamar

Minister of Foreign Affairs, assassinated in August 2005.

Joseph Pararajasingha

Member of the Parliament, assassinated in December 2005.

Syria

Anwar al Bunni

Lawyer

In May 2006 several civil society activists were arrested and tortured because of signing a petition for improving the Syrian-Lebanese relations in view of the UN Security Council Resolution n° 1680,. There were also these persons among them. In its resolution of 15 June 2006, the European Parliament urged Syrian authorities to reconsider all cases of political prisoners and to release immediately all prisoners of conscience. The Parliament also requested that all detained or imprisoned persons are given prompt, regular and unrestricted access to their lawyers, doctors and families. The European Parliament pointed out that respect for human rights constitutes a vital component of any future EU-Syria Association Agreement and called on Syria to respect its commitments within the framework of the Barcelona Process and along the lines of the European Neighbourhood Policy.

Michel Kilo

Writer, released on 19 October 2006, but he was brought before the Criminal Court in Damascus again on 31 October 2006 to face new charges. His trial was postponed, for the second time, to 19 February 2007

Kamal Al-Labwani

Peace activist, he is facing a life sentence for expressing his views.

Mahmoud Issa

Civil society activist, detained for signing the petition.

Professor Suleiman Achmar

Civil society activist, detained for signing the petition.

Muhammad Mahfud

Civil society activist, detained for signing the petition.

Mahmoud Meri'i

Civil society activist, detained for signing the petition.

Yasser Melhem

Civil society activist, detained for signing the petition.

Omar Adlabi

Civil society activist, detained for signing the petition.

Tibet

Kelsang Namtso

Nun, seventeen years old, killed by the Chinese People’s Armed Police Force (PAP). On 30 September 2006 more than 70 Tibetans attempted to cross the glaciated Nangpa Pass in the Himalayan region of Tibet, approximately two hours walk from the Nepalese border, in order to seek refugee status in Nepal. Against the rule of international law, the PAP opened fire to the unarmed Tibetan civilians,including women and children. Video and photo evidence of the incident shows that the Tibetan group was moving slowly away from the Chinese forces firing on them, did not approach the Chinese forces and did not represent a threat to them. There were unconfirmed eyewitness reports of more than one death. A group of Tibetans, including children, was arrested after continuing to flee.

On 25 October 2006, the European Parliament adopted a resolution condemning the excessive use of force by the Chinese People’s Armed Police Force in firing upon unarmed Tibetan civilians, including children. It urged the Chinese authorities to guarantee that the Tibetans detained during the incident would not be ill-treated in detention and that international human rights and humanitarian law standards were being respected. The Parliament also called upon the Chinese authorities to conduct a full investigation into the events at Nangpa Pass and to ensure that those responsible for any crimes committed, were to be brought to justice.

Pancen Lama

 

Regarding their case, a letter of concern was sent on 9 October 2006.

Tanzin Delek

Turkey

Behic Asci

Lawyer, started a hunger strike on 5 April 2005 to show solidarity with the political prisoners subjected to poor Turkish prison conditions. On 22 January 2007, after 293 days, he stopped the strike, but announced his intention to resume it later.

A letter of concern was sent on 15 November 2006.

Michal Majevski

Polish citizen arrested in July 2006. He was a minor when committing the crime and the punishment was disproportionate.

A letter of concern was sent on 28 September 2006.

Jonathan Sugden

Well-known expert on Turkey, detained by Turkish security forces and was subjected to deportation.

A letter of concern was sent on 24 April 2006.

United States of America

Pablo Ibar

Spanish citizen found guilty of murder and condemned to death by the Court of Florida in 2000. On 9 March 2006, the Supreme Court reaffirmed his conviction and refused to grant him a new trial.

A letter of concern was sent on 26 April 2006.

Allen W. Bridgers

Sentenced to death, on death row.

A letter of concern was sent on 6 July 2006.

Yemen

Ali Al-Dailami

 

A letter of concern was sent on 26 October 2006.

Vietnam

Nguyen Van Ly

Catholic priest and co-editor of the underground online magazine Tu do Ngôn luan (Free Speech). He was imprisoned from May 2001 to early 2005. He was arrested again on 19 February 2007 and is currently under house arrest.

 

Nguyen Gia Thieu

Sentenced to 20 years of imprisonment and a fine of 25 million USD.

A letter of concern was sent on 27 July 2006.


ANNEX II

ANNEX II. LIST OF RESOLUTIONS

List of resolutions adopted by the European Parliament between July 1999 and April 2006, and relating directly or indirectly to human rights violations in the world

(http://www.europarl.europa.eu/comparl/afet/droi/others/default.htm)

Country

Date of adoption of resolution

 

AFRICA

 

 

ALGERIA

18.01.2001 / 17.05.2001 /30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 09.06.2005 / 16.02.2006

ANGOLA

17.02.2000 / 15.03.2001 /14.06.2001 / 06.09.2001 / 11.04.2002 / 04.07.2002

BURUNDI

18.11.1999 / 17.02.2000 (UNCHR) / 07.09.2000 / 07.02.2002 (UNCHR) / 23.10.2003 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 15.01.2004 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR)

CAMEROON

20.01.2000 / 17.05.2001 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR)

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

14.06.2001 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR)

CHAD

20.01.2000 / 14.06.2001 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 15.03.2006

COTE D'IVOIRE

20.01.2000 / 16.11.2000 / 14.12.2000 / 10.10.2002 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 18.11.2004 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR)

CONGO (BRAZZAVILLE)

30.01.2003 (UNCHR)

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

17.02.2000 (UNCHR)/ 18.01.2001 (UNCHR) / 15.02.2001 / 13.12.2001 / 07.02.2002 / 07.02.2002 (UNCHR) / 13.06.2002 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) /15.05.2003 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 16.12.2004 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR)

DJIBOUTI

16.12.1999

EQUATORIAL GUINEA

18.05.2000 / 13.06.2002 / 16.01.2003

ERITREA

07.02.2002 / 18.11.2004 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR)

ETHIOPIA

17.05.2001 / 07.07.2005 / 15.12.2005 /16.11.2006

GUINEA

15.02.2001 / 15.02.2007

LIBERIA

04.09.2003 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 14.12.2006

LIBYA

10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 14.04.2005 / 18.01.2007

MADAGASCAR

07.02.2002 / 16.05.2002

MAURITANIA

06.09.2001 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 06.07.2007

MOROCCO

10.02.2004 (UNCHR)

MOZAMBIQUE

14.12.2000

NAMIBIA

05.04.2001

NIGERIA

15.02.2001 / 15.11.2001 / 07.02.2002 (UNCHR) / 11.04.2002 / 05.09.2002 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 13.03.2003 / 05.06.2003 / 22.04.2004

RWANDA

18.11.1999 / 17.02.2000 (UNCHR)

SENEGAL

17.11.2005

SIERRA LEONE

16.12.1999 / 17.02.2000 (UNCHR) / 18.05.2000 / 07.09.2000 / 18.01.2001 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005

SOMALIA

05.04.2001 / 04.07.2002 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 06.07.2006

SOUTH AFRICA

05.07.2001

SUDAN

17.02.2000 (UNCHR) / 18.01.2001(UNCHR) / 21.11.2002 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 16.09.2004 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 12.05.2005 / 06.04.2006 / 28.09.2006 / 15.02.2007

TANZANIA

05.07.2001

TOGO

16.09.1999 / 06.09.2001 / 13.12.2001 / 08.04.2003 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 / 12.05.2005

TUNISIA

15.06.2000 / 14.12.2000 / 14.03.2002 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 29.09.2005 / 15.12.2005 / 15.06.2006

UGANDA

17.02.2000 (UNCHR) / 06.07.2000 / 03.07.2003

WESTERN SAHARA

16.03.2000 / 14.04.2005 / 27.10.2005

ZIMBABWE

13.04.2000 / 18.05.2000 / 06.07.2000 / 15.03.2001 / 06.09.2001 / 13.12.2001 / 07.02.2002 (UNCHR) /14.03.2002 / 16.05.2002 / 04.07.2002 / 05.09.2002 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 13.02.2003 / 05.06.2003 / 15.01.2004 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 16.12.2004 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 07.07.2005 / 07.09.2006

ASIA

 

 

AFGHANISTAN

16.12.1999 / 17.02.2000 (UNCHR)/ 05.10.2000 / 18.01.2001 (UNCHR) / 14.06.2001 / 13.12.2001 / 05.09.2002 / 12.02.2004 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR)

AZERBAIJAN

09.06.2005 / 27.10.2005 / 16.02.2006

BANGLADESH

21.11.2002 / 14.04.2005 / 16.11.2006

BURMA (MYANMAR)

16.09.1999 / 18.05.2000 / 07.09.2000 / 16.11.2000 / 18.01.2001 (UNCHR) / 04.10.2001 / 13.12.2001 / 07.02.2002 (UNCHR) / 11.04.2002 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 13.03.2003 / 05.06.2003 / 04.09.2003 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 11.03.2004 / 16.09.2004 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 12.05.2005 / 17.11.2005 / 14.12.2006

CAMBODIA

17.12.2000 / 18.01.2001 / 06.09.2001 / 07.02.2002 / 11.04.2002 / 13.03.2003 / 03.07.2003 / 12.02.2004 / 13.01.2005 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 10.03.2005 / 01.12.2005 / 19.01.2006 / 15.03.2007

CHINA

 

 

 

 

 

 

20.01.2000 / 17.02.2000 (UNCHR) / 18.01.2001 (UNCHR) / 15.02.2001 / 05.04.2001 (UNCHR) / 07.02.2002(UNCHR)/ 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 07.07.2005 / 08.09.2005 / 07.09.2006 / 15.02.2007

BEIJING'S APPLICATION TO HOST THE 2008 OLYMPIC GAMES

05.07.2001

EAST TIMOR

16.09.1999 / 18.11.1999 / 17.02.2000 (UNCHR)/ 18.01.2001 (UNCHR) / 04.10.2001 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 15.06.2006

FIJI

06.07.2000 / 14.12.2006

GEORGIA

18.12.2003 / 26.10.2006

HONGKONG

19.12.2002 / 15.12.2005

INDIA

16.03.2000 / 07.02.2002 / 16.05.2002 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 16.12.2004 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 01.02.2007

INDONESIA

16.12.1999 / 18.01.2001 (UNCHR) / 13.12.2001 / 07.02.2002 (UNCHR) / 16.05.2002 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 05.06.2003 / 20.11.2003 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR)

KALIMANTAN

15.03.2001

MOLUCCAN ISLANDS

07.10.1999 / 20.01.2000 / 06.07.2000

KASHMIR

16.03.2000 / 17.11.2005

KAZAKHSTAN

13.02.2003 / 23.10.2003 / 16.03.2006

KYRGYZSTAN

14.03.2002 / 23.10.2003 / 12.05.2005

LAOS

15.02.2001 / 15.11.2001 / 03.07.2003 / 01.12.2005

MALAYSIA

14.06.2001 / 13.06.2002

MONGOLIA

07.02.2002 (UNCHR)

MALDIVES

16.04.2004

NEPAL

07.09.2000 / 14.06.2001 / 13.12.2001 / 13.06.2002 / 24.10.2002 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 23.10.2003 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 / 29.09.2005 / 18.05.2006

NORTHERN KOREA

07.02.2002 (UNCHR) / 16.01.2003 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 15.06.2006

PAKISTAN

18.11.1999 / 15.02.2001 / 05.04.2001 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 12.02.2004 / 22.04.2004 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR)

PHILIPPINES

18.05.2000 / 18.12.2003 / 17.11.2005

SOLOMON ISLANDS

06.07.2000

SOUTHERN CAUCASUS

(Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia )

04.10.2001

SRI LANKA

18.05.2000 / 14.03.2002 / 20.11.2003 / 07.09.2006

TAIWAN

13.04.2000 / 15.05.2003 / 07.07.2005 / 18.05.2006

TAJIKISTAN

23.10.2003

TIBET

17.02.2000 (UNCHR) / 13.04.2000 / 06.07.2000 / 18.01.2001 (UNCHR) / 07.02.2002 (UNCHR) / 19.12.2002 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 10.02.2004(UNCHR) / 18.11.2004 / 13.01.2005 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 15.12.2005 / 26.10.2006 / 15.02.2007

TURKMENISTAN and CENTRAL ASIA

15.03.2001 / 23.10.2003 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR)

UZBEKISTAN

04.10.2001 / 23.10.2003 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 09.06.2005 / 27.10.2005 / 26.10.2006

VIETNAM

16.11.2000 / 05.07.2001 / 04.10.2001 / 11.04.2002 / 15.05.2003 / 20.11.2003 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 01.12.2005

AUSTRALIA

 

 

AFGHAN REFUGEES / ASYLUM

06.09.2001

EUROPE

 

 

BELARUS

07.10.1999 / 05.07.2001 / 13.06.2002 / 04.07.2002 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 28.10.2004 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 10.03.2005 / 07.07.2005 / 29.09.2005 / 16.02.2006 / 06.04.2006

BULGARIA

15.12.2005

BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA (Banja Luca)

17.05.2001

CYPRUS

05.04.2001

FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF YUGOSLAVIA

17.02.2000 (UNCHR) / 16.03.2000 / 15.06.2000 / 14.12.2000

FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA (FYROM)

05.10.2000

IRELAND (Immigration)

13.12.2001

KOSOVO

22.07.1999 / 16.09.1999 / 07.10.1999 / 18.11.1999 / 17.02.2000 (UNCHR) / 17.02.2000 / 15.06.2000 / 15.02.2001 / 01.04.2004

MALTA (Refugees camps)

06.04.2006

MOLDOVA

14.03.2002 / 11.04.2002 / 18.12.2003 / 24.02.2005 / 16.03.2006

ROMANIA

15.12.2005 / 05.09.2006

RUSSIA

18.11.1999 / 17.02.2000 (UNCHR) / 18.01.2001 (UNCHR) / 18.01.2001 / 07.02.2002 / 07.02.2002 (UNCHR) / 04.07.2002 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 26.05.2005 / 15.12.2005 / 15.06.2006 / 25.10.2006 / 13.12.2006 / 15.02.2007 / 15.02.2007 / 15.03.2007

RUSSIAN REPUBLIC OF CHECHNYA

07.10.1999 / 18.11.1999 / 20.1.2000 / 17.02.2000 / 17.02.2000 (UNCHR) / 16.03.2000 / 13.04.2000 / 18.01.2001 (UNCHR) / 15.02.2001 / 07.02.2002 (UNCHR) / 16.01.2003 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 03.07.2003 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 19.01.2006

RUSSIAN REPUBLIC OF DAGESTAN

16.09.1999

RUSSIAN REPUBLIC OF MARI EL

12.05.2005

SERBIA AND MONTENEGRO

16.09.2004 / 07.07.2005 / 29.09.2005

TURKEY

22.07.1999 / 13.04.2000 / 07.09.2000 / 18.01.2001 / 13.12.2001 / 15.05.2003 / 22.04.2004 / 28.09.2005 / 16.02.2006 / 27.09.2006

UKRAINE

11.03.2004 / 28.10.2004 / 02.12.2004 / 13.01.2005 / 06.04.2006

AMERICA

 

 

ARGENTINA

04.07.2002

BOLIVIA

23.10.2003 / 09.06.2005

CENTRAL AMERICA

16.11.2000

CHILE

14.12.2000

COLOMBIA

07.09.2000 / 18.01.2001 (UNCHR) / 04.10.2001 / 07.02.2002 (UNCHR) / 14.03.2002 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR)

CUBA

30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 10.04.2003 / 04.09.2003 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 22.04.2004 / 17.11.2004 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 02.02.2006

GUATEMALA

18.05.2000 / 14.06.2001 / 11.04.2002 / 10.04.2003 / 07.07.2005 / 15.03.2007

HAITI

15.01.2004 / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 11.03.2004 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 14.12.2006

MEXICO

05.04.2001

NICARAGUA

16.12.1999

PARAGUAY

15.06.2000

PERU

16.03.2000 / 15.06.2000 / 05.10.2000 / 19.01.2006

UNITED STATES

17.02.2000 / 13.04.2000 / 06.07.2000 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) 22.04.2004 / 15.12.2005 / 16.02.2006 / 13.06.2006 / 14.02.2007 / 14.02.2007

VENEZUELA

13.02.2003 / 11.03.2004

MIDDLE EAST

 

 

EGYPT

20.01.2000 / 14.06.2001 / 04.07.2002 / 05.09.2002 / 10.04.2003 / 19.01.2006 / 16.02.2006 / 06.04.2006

IRAN

16.09.1999 / 17.02.2000 (UNCHR) / 13.04.2000 / 18.05.2000 / 07.02.2002 (UNCHR) / 24.10.2002 / 21.11.2002 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 12.02.2004 / 28.10.2004 / 13.01.2005 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 15.02.2006 / 16.11.2006

IRAQ

20.01.2000 / 13.04.2000 / 06.07.2000 / 07.02.2002 (UNCHR) / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR)/ 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 16.09.2004 / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 06.04.2006 / 15.02.2007

ISRAEL

19.12.2002 / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR)

JORDAN

16.02.2006

KUWAIT

16.12.1999

LEBANON

10.03.2005

PALESTINE

16.11.2006

SAUDI ARABIA

17.02.2000 (UNCHR) / 18.01.2001 (UNCHR) / 07.02.2002 (UNCHR) / 30.01.2003 (UNCHR) / 10.02.2004 (UNCHR) / 24.02.2005 (UNCHR) / 10.03.2005

SYRIA

13.06.2002 / 08.09.2005 / 15.06.2006 / 26.10.2006

MISCELLANEOUS

 

 

UNITED NATIONS

 

EU's rights, priorities and recommendations for the session of the UN Commission on Human Rights in Geneva

17.02.2000 (56th) / 18.01.2001 (57th)/ 07.02.2002 (58th)/ 30.01.2003 (59th) / 10.02.2004 (60th) / 24.02.2005 (61st) /

UN Outcome of the negotiations on the Human Rights Council and on the 62nd session of the UNCHR

16.03.2006

UN World Food Summit

16.05.2002

UN World Day to Overcome Extreme Poverty

04.10.2001

UN Conference on Least Developed Countries

05.04.2001

Reform of the UN

09.06.2005

Reform of the UN, Millennium Development Goals

29.09.2005

Small arms and lights weapons (UN prepcom)

26.05.2005

International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance

1st session, UNHRC, 29.06.2006

The right to development

1st session, UNHRC, 30.06.2006

Human rights and extreme poverty

2nd session, UNHRC, 27.11.2006

Human rights in the occupied Syrian Golan

2nd session, UNHRC, 27.11.2006

Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including East Jerusalem, and in the occupied Syrian Golan

2nd session, UNHRC, 27.11.2006

DEATH PENALTY

 

Death Penalty in the World

 

07.10.1999 / 18.11.1999 / 16.12.1999 /

13.04.2000 / 06.07.2000 / 26.10.2000 /

05.07.2001

Moratorium on capital punishment

01.02.2007

Abolition of Death Penalty in Japan, South Korea and Taiwan

13.06.2002

INTERNATIONAL

CRIMINAL COURT

16.12.1999 / 18.01.2001 / 28.02.2002 /

04.07.2002 / 26.09.2002 / 24.10.2002

CHILDREN

 

Trafficking in Children and Child Soldiers

 

03.07.2003

Forced Child Labour (Africa)

 

17.05.2001 / 17.11.2005

Child Labour in the Production of Sports Equipment

13.06.2002

EU Position for the Session of the UN GA on the Rights of Child

 

11.04.2002

 

UN GA Special Session on the Rights of Child

05.07.2001

 

 

European Parliament resolution on the 10th Anniversary of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child

18.11.1999

Children kidnapped by their parents

15.03.2001

RACISM AND XENOPHOBIA

17.02.2000 / 16.03.2000 (European Union) / 16.03.2000 (Candidate Countries) / 06.07.2000 / 03.10.2001 (World Conference against Racism)

PRESS FREEDOM

17.05.2001

COMBATTING TERRORISM

24.10.2002 / 14.02.2007 (CIA)

Detainees in Guantanamo Bay

07.02.2002 / 10.03.2004/ 28.10.2004 / 16.02.2006 / 13.06.2006

MINES AND BOMBS

 

Review of Ottawa Treaty on anti-personnel mines

22.04.2004

Cluster Bombs

13.12.2001

Landmines

07.07.2005

REFUGEES

 

Refugees - Channel Tunnel

11.04.2002

Refugees (Lampedusa and Western Sahara)

14.04.2005

Sakharov Prize (monitoring)

14.12.2006

WOMEN

 

Women in South-East Europe

22.04.2004

Female Genital Mutilation

20.09.2001

Harassment at the Workplace

20.09.2001

Violence towards Catholic Nuns

05.04.2001

FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION, RESPECT OF RELIGIOUS BELIEFS

16.02.2006

Freedom of expression on the Internet

06.07.2006

Homophobia

19.01.2006

Aung San Suu Kyi and Leyla Zana

(Sakharov Prize Laureates)

13.12.2001

Sport products for the Olympic games

22.04.2004

Mediterranean

20.11.2003 / 12.02.2004 / 23.02.2005


ANNEX III

ANNEX III - BASIC TEXTS

 

INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS INSTRUMENTS

DATE

OF

ADOPTION

 

UNITED NATIONS

http://www.un.org

Human Rights Council : http://www.ohchr.org/english/bodies/hrcouncil/

Charter of the United Nations

24 October 1945

 

Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide

9 December 1948

 

Universal Declaration on Human Rights

10 December 1948

 

 

First Geneva Convention "for the Amelioration of the Condition of the Wounded and Sick in Armed Forces in the Field"

first adopted in 1864, last revision on 12 August 1949

 

Second Geneva Convention "for the Amelioration of the Condition of Wounded, Sick and Shipwrecked Members of Armed Forces at Sea"

12 August 1949

 

Third Geneva Convention "relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War"

first adopted in 1929, last revision on 12 August 1949

 

Fourth Geneva Convention "relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War"

12 August 1949

 

International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights

16 December 1966

 

Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights

16 December 1966

 

Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, aiming at the abolition of the death penalty

15 December 1989

 

International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

16 December 1966

 

International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination

21 December 1965

 

Protocol Additional I to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, and relating to the Protection of Victims of Non-International Armed Conflicts

8 June 1977

 

Protocol Additional II to the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949, and relating to the Protection of Victims of Non-International Armed Conflicts

8 June 1977

 

Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women

18 December 1979

 

Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women

6 October 1999

 

Convention on the Rights of the Child

20 November 1989

 

Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflicts

25 May 2000

 

Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography

25 May 2000

 

Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment

10 December 1984

 

Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment

18 December 2002

 

UN Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief

25 November 1981

 

UN Declaration on the Right and Responsibility of Individuals, Groups and Organs of Society to Promote and Protect Universally Recognised Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms

9 December 1998

 

UN Declaration on Human Rights Defenders

9 December 1998

 

United Nations Millennium Declaration

8 September 2000

 

International Convention Against Enforced Disappearances

20 December 2006

 

UNITED NATIONS CONFERENCES

World Conference on Human Rights (Vienna)

Declaration and Programme of Action

25 June 1993

 

World Conference on Women and Development (Beijing)

Declaration and Platform for Action

September 1995

 

World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance (Durban)

Declaration and Programme of Action

8 September 2001

 

 

 

 

ROME STATUTE OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT

http://www.ohchr.org/english/law/criminalcourt.htm

1 July 2002

 

 

 

 

INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANISATION

http://ilolex.ilo.ch

 

 

Minimum Age Convention

26 June 1973

 

Convention on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples

27 June 1989

 

Convention to eliminate the Worst Forms of Child Labour

17 June 1999

 

 

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/comparl/afet/droi/others/default.htm

Annual Human Rights Reports

1983 - 2005

 

Resolution on the communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament on the European Union's role in promoting human rights and democratisation in third countries (COM (2001) 252)

25 April 2002

 

Resolution on the Commission communication on EU election assistance and observation (COM (2000) 191 - C5-0259/2000)

15 March 2001

 

Resolution on countering racism and xenophobia in the European Union, on the Commission communication: "Countering racism, xenophobia and anti-Semitism in the candidate countries" (COM (1999) 256 – C5-0094/1999), and on the World Conference against Racism

16 March 2000

 

Resolution on the communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament on “The European Union and the external dimension of human rights policy: from Rome to Maastricht and beyond” (COM (1995) 567 – C4-0568/1995)

17 December 1998

 

Resolution on the report from the Commission on the implementation of measures intended to promote observance of human rights and democratic principles (for 1995) (COM (1996) 672 - C4-0095/1997)

19 December 1997

 

Resolution on setting up a single co-ordinating structure within the Commission, responsible for human rights and democratisation

19 December 1997

 

Resolution on the communication from the Commission on the inclusion of respect for democratic principles and human rights in agreements between the Community and third countries (COM (1995) 216 – C4-0197/1995)

20 September 1996

 

 

Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union

 

 

European Parliament resolution on the human rights and democracy clause in European Union agreements

14 February 2006

 

 

 

COUNCIL

 

http://ue.eu.int/cms3_fo/showPage.asp?id=822&lang=en&mode=g

http://www.europa.eu.int/pol/rights/index_de.htm

Guidelines for EU policy towards third countries on the death penalty of 29 June 1998

29 June 1998

 

Regulations (EC) No 975/1999 and (EC) No 976/1999 on the development and consolidation of democracy and the rule of law and respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms

Official Journal L 120 , 08/05/1999 P. 0001 - 0014

29 April 1999

 

Cotonou Agreement

23 June 2000

 

Guidelines for EU policy towards third countries on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment

9 April 2001

 

Conclusions on the communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament on the European Union's role in promoting human rights and democratisation in third countries (COM (2001) 252)

25 June 2001

 

EU guidelines on Human rights dialogues

13 December 2001

 

Action Plan to follow-up on the Common Position of 22 January 2001 on the International Criminal Court

27 May 2002

 

Common Position amending Common Position of 22 January 2001 on the International Criminal Court

20 June 2002

 

Conclusions on human rights and democratisation in third countries, together with practical measures endorsed for the implementation of the Council's conclusions of 25 June 2001

10 December 2002

 

EU Common Position on the International Criminal Court

16 June 2003

 

EU Guidelines on Children in Armed Conflicts

8 December 2003

 

EU Guidelines on Promoting Compliance with International Humanitarian Law

23 December 2005

 

 

COMMISSION

http://europa.eu.int/comm/external_relations/human_rights/doc/eidhr02_04.htm

 

 

 

COUNCIL OF EUROPE

http://conventions.coe.int

 

 

Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms

Protocol No. 13 to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, concerning the abolition of the death penalty in all circumstances

4 November 1950

3 May 2002

 


PROCEDURE

Title

Annual Report on Human Rights in the World 2006 and the EU's policy on the matter

Procedure number

2007/2020(INI)

Committee responsible
  Date authorisation announced in plenary

AFET
12.2.2007

Committee(s) asked for opinion(s)
  Date announced in plenary

 

 

 

 

 

Not delivering opinion(s)
  Date of decision

 

 

 

 

 

Enhanced cooperation
  Date announced in plenary

 

 

 

 

 

Rapporteur(s)
  Date appointed

Simon Coveney
28.11.2006

 

Previous rapporteur(s)

 

 

Discussed in committee

25.1.2007

28.2.2007

19.3.2007

22.3.2007

 

Date adopted

27.3.2007

Result of final vote

+

-

0

52

4

2

Members present for the final vote

Roberta Alma Anastase, Robert Atkins, Christopher Beazley, Panagiotis Beglitis, Bastiaan Belder, Vito Bonsignore, Elmar Brok, Marco Cappato, Simon Coveney, Véronique De Keyser, Giorgos Dimitrakopoulos, Hélène Flautre, Hanna Foltyn-Kubicka, Michael Gahler, Jas Gawronski, Bronisław Geremek, Maciej Marian Giertych, Ana Maria Gomes, Alfred Gomolka, Richard Howitt, Jana Hybášková, Anna Ibrisagic, Ioannis Kasoulides, Helmut Kuhne, Vytautas Landsbergis, Willy Meyer Pleite, Francisco José Millán Mon, Philippe Morillon, Pasqualina Napoletano, Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne, Vural Öger, Ioan Mircea Paşcu, Alojz Peterle, João de Deus Pinheiro, Bernd Posselt, Michel Rocard, Raül Romeva i Rueda, Libor Rouček, Katrin Saks, José Ignacio Salafranca Sánchez-Neyra, Jacek Saryusz-Wolski, György Schöpflin, Hannes Swoboda, István Szent-Iványi, Antonio Tajani, Charles Tannock, Inese Vaidere, Kristian Vigenin, Josef Zieleniec

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Laima Liucija Andrikienė, Alexandra Dobolyi, Árpád Duka-Zólyomi, Kinga Gál, Milan Horáček, Anneli Jäätteenmäki, Gisela Kallenbach, Tunne Kelam, Jaromír Kohlíček, Aloyzas Sakalas

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

 

Date tabled

10.4.2007

Comments
(available in one language only)

 

Last updated: 16 April 2007Legal notice