Procedure : 2007/2120(INI)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A6-0494/2007

Texts tabled :

A6-0494/2007

Debates :

PV 14/01/2008 - 14
CRE 14/01/2008 - 14

Votes :

PV 15/01/2008 - 8.7
Explanations of votes
Explanations of votes

Texts adopted :

P6_TA(2008)0007

REPORT     
PDF 362kWORD 273k
4 December 2007
PE 391.934v02-00 A6-0494/2007

on CARS 21: A Competitive Automotive Regulatory Framework

(2007/2120(INI))

Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

Rapporteur: Jorgo Chatzimarkakis

Draftswoman(*):

Rebecca Harms, Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety

(*) Procedure with associated committees - Rule 47 of the Rules of Procedure

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION
 EXPLANATORY STATEMENT
 OPINION of the Committee on International Trade
 OPINION of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs
 OPINION of the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs
 OPINION of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (*)
 OPINION of the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection
 OPINION of the Committee on Transport and Tourism
 OPINION of the Committee on Legal Affairs
 RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION

on CARS 21: A Competitive Automotive Regulatory Framework

(2007/2120(INI))

The European Parliament,

–   having regard to the Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament and Council entitled A Competitive Automotive Regulatory Framework for the 21st Century: Commission's position on the CARS 21 High Level Group Final Report - A contribution to the EU's Growth and Jobs Strategy (COM(2007)0022),

–   having regard to the Presidency Conclusions of the Competitiveness Council of 21 and 22 May 2007,

–   having regard to the final report of the High Level Group entitled Competitive Automotive Regulatory System for the 21st century (CARS21),

–   having regard to Rule 45 of its Rules of Procedure,

–   having regard to the report of the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy and the opinions of the Committee on International Trade, the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs, the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety, the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection, the Committee on Transport and Tourism and the Committee on Legal Affairs (A6-0494/2007),

A. whereas the Commission has responded to the report of the CARS 21 High Level Group, a group which brought together all stakeholders in order to examine the main policy areas having an effect on the automotive industry in the European Union and to make recommendations for a future regulatory framework,

B.  whereas the European Union's automotive industry is one of its most important economic sectors, producing 19 million vehicles yearly and providing 2,3 million jobs directly and a further 10 million in ancillary sectors,

C. whereas the multi-brand market in vehicle spare parts, and the markets for servicing and repairing vehicles play a vital role in providing affordable mobility, in improving the consumer choices of the Union's 270 million drivers in the aftersale care of their vehicles, in keeping the vehicles on Europe’s roads safe and clean and, lastly, by employing 3,5 million people in small and medium-sized enterprises, in maintaining a sound SME landscape in Europe,

D. whereas the Commission is promoting an integrated strategy to ensure that companies in the European Union continue to be competitive within a growing global environment, and whereas that strategy is laid out in its Communications to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions entitled, first, Global Europe: Competing in the World (COM(2006)0567), second, Global Europe: A stronger Partnership to deliver market access for European Exporters (SEC(2007)0452) and, third, Global Europe: Europe's trade defence instruments in a changing global economy – A Green Paper for public consultation (COM(2006)0763),

E.   whereas the strategy set out in those Communications is currently being implemented in negotiations relating to several bilateral and regional free trade agreements,

F.   whereas the automotive industry differs significantly from one Member State to the next in terms of strategies, structures and global outreach, and whereas those differences must be taken fully into consideration in developing a new and more globally oriented trade strategy,

G.  whereas in 2006 the automotive industry in the European Union exported about 70% of its output and in 2004 exports of motor vehicles and of parts and accessories for motor vehicles accounted for 8,7% and 2,8% respectively of the EU's industrial exports, an indication of how particularly sensitive to export conditions the automotive industry is, and whereas in 2004 the extra-EU trade surplus in respect of transport equipment was valued at EUR 60,2 billion; whereas the European Union's global pre-eminence is due, in particular, to the fact that it is the world’s largest producer of cars and the second largest producer of lorries, and also to the size and degree of consolidation of the internal market, the growing internationalisation of the motor vehicle sector, the reputation of European brands and the quality of European services, the strong export position which European manufacturers have managed to achieve and their substantial presence on markets with high growth potential;

1.  Welcomes the final report of the CARS21 High Level Group and the Commission's Communication outlining the direction of future automotive policy;

2.  Hopes that the parliaments of the Member States and their regions will wish to be associated with the outcome of the CARS 21 process; suggests that an inter-parliamentary network for the purpose of considering automotive issues, coordinated by the European Parliament, would bring real benefits in terms of road safety, environmental protection, innovation and competitiveness;

Completing the internal market for cars

3.  Calls upon Member State authorities to work closely with the Commission in implementing the CARS 21 recommendations; notes, in particular, the need to ensure that new regulations affecting the automotive sector are introduced in a coordinated manner, avoiding distortions in the internal market;

4.  Emphasises the need to perfect the EU system for type-approval, covering all motor vehicles;

5.  Confirms its support for an effective type approval process, as pointed out in its recommendation for second reading of a proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council establishing a framework for the approval of motor vehicles and their trailers, and of systems, components and separate technical units intended for such vehicles, adopted on 10 May 2007(1);

6.  Calls on the Commission to report annually to the European Parliament on the operation of type approval procedures and on its monitoring of the comitology process;

7.  Calls on the Commission to ensure the proper implementation of Regulation (EC) No 1400/2002 on motor vehicle distribution throughout the EU (the Block Exemption Regulation); further believes that when that Regulation is reviewed, the Commission Directorate-General for Competition should consider itself part of the integrated approach to legislation in the sector;

8.  Proposes that, in order to boost the competitiveness of the motor vehicle industry in the European Union, the review of the Block Exemption Regulation should be tied to the mid-term review of CARS 21, thus facilitating cooperation between sector operators, preventing State aid from being misappropriated and promoting competition policy at international level;

9.  Calls on the Commission to propose measures guaranteeing a registration-procedure, which will allow easier cross-border sales especially for used cars; endorses the Commission's views on procedures for the registration of motor vehicles(2) and the problems that some national rules present for the functioning of the internal market; notes the impact of these national rules on economic sectors such as vehicle leasing and rental; calls on the Member States to implement the necessary changes to their rules as soon as possible;

A competitive automotive after market

10. Draws attention to recently enacted legislative provisions concerning after-market parts that affect safety and environmental performance, and notes that the implementation of these provisions will establish a single market in such parts;

11. Welcomes the insertion of provisions in Regulation (EC) No 1715/2007 of the European Parliament and the Council of 20 June 2007 on type approval of motor vehicles with respect to emissions from light passenger and commercial vehicles (Euro 5 and Euro 6) and on access to vehicle repair information and in Regulation (EC) No 1400/2002, requiring unrestricted access to appropriate technical repair information, and invites the Commission to continue its efforts to enforce throughout the Community the provisions of competition law that apply to the motor vehicle sector ;

12. Calls upon the Commission to continue promoting effective competition in the automotive after-sales market by addressing consumer choice and effective access for independent market operators to technical information, training, spare parts, multi-brand diagnostic tools and test equipment in its future automotive policy and in any successor legislation to Regulation (EC) No 1400/2002, which will expire on 31 May 2010;

13. Notes the importance to consumers of in-service reliability and durability information based on comprehensive consumer surveys; notes that public authorities could facilitate these surveys by allowing registration authorities to provide contact details of vehicle owners who agree to participate in them.

14. Urges the Commission to properly address the issue of the ‘open reparability’ of vehicles in all new legislative initiatives, involving all relevant Directorates- General, in order to ensure consumer choice and competition in the after-sales market; believes that this should also be applied in the forthcoming measures relating to the promotion of new vehicle information and communication technologies and intelligent transport systems;

15. Urges the Commission to submit proposals for the creation of an internal market for custom and tuning parts, such as special tyres, wheels and other tuning parts and spare parts, as the current diversity of national regulations obstructs the further development of this sector, which consequently would benefit from Community harmonising legislation and appropriate protection of intellectual property;

16. Calls on the Commission to step up its efforts to combat the import of counterfeit spare parts;

Better lawmaking and internationalising the regulatory environment

17. Stresses the importance of cutting unnecessary red-tape, including the duplication of regulations due to the existence of international conventions;

18. Emphasises the crucial role played by the better regulation principles (i.e. proper impact assessment, cost-effectiveness principle, appropriate lead-times, etc.) in creating a competitive regulatory framework for the automotive industry, as endorsed in the CARS21 process; recalls that the regulatory roadmap is an integral part of the final CARS21 report and should be respected;

19. Recognises that better designed, transparent rules that are in line with current social and environmental needs, applied without exceptions and integrated into the international automotive regulatory environment can contribute to greater competitiveness and fair competition in the industry;

20. Believes that strategic standardisation is an essential driver of competitiveness; therefore requests the Commission to work on having European standards recognised throughout the world;

21. Welcomes the Commission's plan to replace 38 Community regulations with existing UN/ECE Regulations, as well as to introduce the possibility of self- or virtual testing, and calls upon the Commission to continue the process of legislative simplification; insists that its support for these proposals is conditional on it being clearly understood that Parliament reserves the right to call for legislation independently from the UN/ECE system where it believes that this is required to meet EU obligations;

22. Welcomes the Commission's proposal to submit an annual paper to Parliament on the progress being made at the UN/ECE and in the comitology process;

23. Welcomes the Commission’s wish to introduce a revision and review mechanism, given the technology and development-intensive nature of the motor vehicle industry; also considers, however, that greater use should be made of 'sunset clauses' in legislation, so as to ensure that legislation does not hinder or counteract the technological advances that R&D and market forces are constantly bringing about;

24. Calls on the Commission to begin the process of simplifying Directives 71/127/EEC(3), 74/297/EEC(4), 76/115/EEC(5) and 78/932/EEC(6) as well as UN/ECE Regulation No 122 as soon as possible;

Adopting environmental standards for the 21st century

25. Notes that Community law regulates a market in which between 17 and 18 million vehicles are sold every year, which is equivalent to the passenger car market in the United States; expects that an ambitious emissions reduction policy will have a positive influence worldwide in terms of reducing transport emissions;

26. Believes that individual mobility is one the greatest achievements of the last century; believes that mobility and environmental protection are not necessarily mutually exclusive and that future car technology will have to contribute to reconciling the two; indeed, believes that the challenge of climate change in particular presents opportunities for technological advances and innovation;

27. Is conscious of the importance of vehicles for the mobility of elderly people, especially in the countryside, and of disabled people;

28. Calls on the Commission to create an environment that ensures that road transport is environmentally sustainable, that is favourable to the flexibility of production systems and that raises the skill levels of the EU's workforce;

29. Believes that pollutant emissions standards have been truly successful and have already lead to very clean passenger cars; stresses the importance of achieving this same success with heavy-duty vehicles; believes that the benefits of EU environmental regulation in the automotive sector could spread well beyond the EU market;

30.     Welcomes the rapid introduction of the Euro-5 and Euro-6 standards for the reduction of emissions of pollutants from private cars; urges the Commission, without delay, to adopt an ambitious proposal for a EURO-VI standard for heavy goods vehicles;

31. Considers that improved air quality can be achieved only by a speedier renewal of the automobile fleet, in addition to the introduction of less polluting vehicles; considers that financial measures need to be put in place to induce consumers to replace their old cars with less polluting vehicles;

32. Welcomes the proposal for revision of the Fuel Quality Directive to take into account life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions of road transport fuels;

33. In the context of Community legislation, calls on the Commission to begin the process of reassessing and revising emissions testing procedures to better reflect real life conditions of use, without prejudice to the ongoing discussion on CO2 emissions from cars;

34. Is very concerned at the non-harmonised implementation of the End-of-Life Vehicles Directive(7); regards that Directive as not ambitious enough;

Reducing CO2 emissions substantially

35. Welcomes the Commission's plans to reduce the CO2 emissions of passenger cars; believes that an integrated approach, taking into account all possibilities to reduce CO2 emissions, such as infrastructure, driver behaviour, a system of incentives for people to use cleaner cars, biofuels and vehicle technology, to be the most appropriate; encourages the Commission to consider developing a common framework for a coordinated application of technology-neutral and possibly harmonised CO2 related fiscal incentives that have a significant CO2 reduction potential, while avoid distortions of competition;urges the Council to reach an agreement on the Commission proposal to relate taxes on passenger cars to their polluting emissions such as CO2 in order to avoid further internal market fragmentation arising from varying application by Member States;

36. Urges the Commission to set ambitious but realistic targets, taking into account the real situation on the EU market where the fleet renewal rate is currently below 10% per annum; therefore emphasises the fact that the affordability of new cars plays a crucial role in achieving the Community target; stresses that the more ambitious the mandatory targets for CO2 emissions are, the more time should be granted to the automotive industry to adapt;

37. Reminds the Commission of the fact that the development of new types of passenger cars takes between five and seven years; believes that mandatory targets should allow sufficient time for the automotive industry to react; therefore requests the Commission not to set any final mandatory targets for CO2 emissions for any date before 2015;

38. Believes that an average target of 125g/km of CO2 emissions for new passenger cars for 2015 should be achievable; stresses that the Commission should work on more ambitious long-term reduction targets for CO2 emissions in the automotive sector; considers it crucial in this connection that the target values should be graduated according to the weight of the vehicle;

39. Welcomes the Commission's plan to set a binding bio-fuels target of 10% by 2020, provided that sustainability criteria are observed and encouragement is given for the use of second-generation technology; calls for certification to be developed for sustainably produced biofuels; calls on the Commission in its forthcoming legislative proposal on biofuels to permit only certified sustainable biofuels to be taken into account in achieving the target; stresses that second-generation biofuels from plants or parts of plants not in direct competition with food plants and offer greater efficiency must be developed and promoted still further;

40. Notes that, in order to achieve the aim of increasing the use of biofuels and hydrogen to maximise environmental performance, it is vital to promote the necessary local networks to enable citizens to obtain supplies;

41. Takes the view that measures to reduce CO2 emissions should place greater emphasis on raising driver awareness of economical driving techniques and of how best to make use of new technologies;

42. Believes that increasing consumer awareness through better labelling of fuel efficiency and better data on polluting emissions will contribute to achieving CO2 reductions; therefore calls for a revision of Directive 1999/94/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council relating to the availability of consumer information on fuel economy and CO2 emissions in respect of the marketing of new passenger cars, taking into account best practices currently achieved;

43. Recalls the fact that the reduction of CO2 emissions from cars can most easily be achieved by restructuring public transport systems;

44. Recognises the leading role played by the Federation Internationale d’Automobile (FIA) at the forefront of innovative environmental technology changes that offer potential CO2 reduction and efficiency saving spin-offs for all new cars;

45. Urges the FIA to further intensify its efforts to promote innovative road relevant research designed, inter alia, to improve the energy efficiency of cars;

46. Recognises the role motor sport can play in changing attitudes and customer behaviour towards environmentally friendly technology; therefore asks the FIA and others involved in Formula 1 to change their rules accordingly, so that environmentally friendly technologies like bio-fuels, four-cylinder engines or hybrid can be more easily applied;

47. Calls for a study to be drawn up for the purpose of recording the additional non-technical measures which have been implemented in order to reduce CO2 in the EU;

Making road transport even safer

48. Welcomes the Commission's efforts to reduce road transport casualties, including important new technologies; urges the Commission to ensure that any vehicle safety equipment requirements be introduced in accordance with the better regulation principles agreed by the CARS21 High-Level Group; stresses the need for an integrated approach incorporating vehicle technology improvements, infrastructure measures and education, information and enforcement to achieve the road safety objectives in a cost-effective way;

49. Acknowledges the catalytic role of the premium market in which new technologies are generally first introduced; points out however that additional security systems might further increase the weight of passenger cars, thus leading to increased CO2 emissions;

50. Is concerned at the negative impact on road safety resulting from increases in the speed of vehicles; in this connection, recommends the implementation of recommendations of the Study for Future Options for Roadworthiness Enforcement in the European Union published by the International Motor Vehicle Inspection Committee (CITA) in 2007; recommends support for a campaign for safe "tuning" and moves to phase in electronic stability control systems (ESC) as standard equipment as quickly as possible;

51. Calls on the Commission to improve the road safety system by requiring Member States to tighten up learner-driver training requirements, expand compulsory training and introduce rules providing for the periodic training of professional drivers;

52. Calls on the Commission to carry out the announced 2007-2009 assessment of the environment required for measures to reduce the number of road accident victims;

53. Requests the Commission to develop a system allowing car manufacturers to without penalty to produce vehicles that emit extra CO2 if these additional emissions result from legally binding safety measures taken at Community level;

54. Does not believe that day time running lights should be obligatory throughout the EU;

55. Calls on the Commission to improve the regime for the cross-border inspection of vehicles and the cross-border enforcement of fines imposed for the infringement of traffic rules in a foreign Member State as a matter of priority;

Bringing fair-play to automotive trade relations

56. Submits that the EU automotive industry is one of the most competitive industries in the world; believes however that unfair competition and the infringement of intellectual property rights threaten this position;

57. Stresses the importance of the WTO for the automotive industry in an increasingly global trading environment; considers it highly important that the current negotiations in the Doha Development Round make third country markets as accessible as possible for automobile manufacturers, especially potentially large, emerging third country markets;

58. Stresses the importance of the WTO dispute settlement mechanism in resolving problems relating to exports to third countries; recalls the positive outcome of the disputes brought before the WTO in the cases of Canada, India and Indonesia;

59. Calls for caution in the Commission's efforts to revise trade defence instruments in principle; recalls that the automotive industry may be subject to anti-competitive practices by third countries and urges the Commission to safeguard the basic philosophy of trade defence instruments in defending EU industry from unfair practices;

60. Recalls that the successful conclusion of multilateral trade negotiations should remain a priority for the EU; nevertheless supports the Commission's will to negotiate new bilateral trade agreements, primarily in Asia, in order to improve market access conditions; stresses that Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) should always aim at a high level of access to the market of the partner country; insists that EU policy must safeguard the competitiveness of EU automobile manufacturers operating in the EU and in non-EU countries; is convinced of the importance for the automotive industry of concluding bilateral agreements between the EU and ASEAN, India and Mercosur;

61. Urges the Commission, in the framework of the current EU-Korea FTA negotiations, to make sure that Korea abolishes all existing tariff and non-tariff barriers and does not create new ones, and that it will implement more UN/ECE regulations; requests that the Commission considers a strategy of phasing out EU import tariffs with safeguards and, therefore, recommends that this phasing out be connected to the lifting of non-tariff barriers on the Korean side;

62. Reiterates that Korea has signed and ratified the 1958 UN/ECE Agreement and has thus committed itself to implementing the UN/ECE regulations; urges the Commission to stress this during future negotiations and to insist on rapid implementation; notes that an FTA should in any case clearly provide that Korea must permit cars imported from the EU that meet UN/ECE standards to be placed on the Korean market;

63. Calls on the Commission to evaluate the possibility of setting up an Autos Working Group and a special expedited dispute settlement procedure in relation to automobile-related measures, as was introduced in the US-Korea FTA;

64. Emphasises the importance of a close partnership with China in the development of a regulatory framework offering a level playing field; states that effective protection of IPR is a precondition for such a partnership;

65. Disagrees with the Commission's proposal to abolish design protection rights, as this might have a negative effect on the automotive sector in the EU while not guaranteeing any customer benefits; calls on the Commission to respect the existing level playing-field in relation to Japan and certain US States, where very high standards are in force;

66. Welcomes the Commission's request for the establishment of a WTO panel to resolve outstanding issues relating to the treatment of imported vehicle parts by China, which the Commission argues is inconsistent with several articles of different WTO agreements;

67. Supports the Commission’s efforts in matters relating to the Chinese regulatory environment aimed at ensuring that EU industries operating in this market enjoy fair regulations and legal certainty;

68. Points to the EU tyre industry as an important contributor to a successful European automotive sector; therefore calls on the Commission to examine closely the issue of unjustified technical trade barriers, such as local technical regulations, which the tyre industry is facing in key Asian emerging markets;

Research and Development in the automotive sector

69. Is encouraged by what has already been achieved with the help of Community R&D funding and cooperation under programmes such as FP7, CIP and i2010; encourages the Commission to gear the work programmes more specifically towards the needs of the automotive sector arising from future legislation or mandatory targets;

70. Calls on the Commission to adopt before 2012 a strategy to increase significantly and sufficiently the R&D funding for the automotive sector, paying particular attention to supply industries;

71. Urges the Member States to make any increase in future R&D funding for the automotive sector conditional on the binding nature of the CO2 emission targets;

72. Emphasises the importance of a shift in car use in cities; considers that, along with more fuel-efficient cars, the introduction of electric city cars is essential; therefore calls for support for research and development of the necessary technologies;

73. Calls on all the Member States and the EU institutions to give all necessary support to the research and development of break-through technologies, such as hydrogen motors, fuel cells or hybrids;

74. Stresses the potential that ICT offers for avoiding adverse effects on the environment and public health, accidents and waste of energy, when used on an EU-wide basis in intelligent traffic control and management systems designed to ensure the smooth flow of traffic; is of the opinion that, in the interests of ensuring effective vehicle-to-infrastructure communications in all Member States, communication devices should comply with an EU standard;

75. Is of the opinion that the Intelligent Car Initiative(8), Galileo and other instruments contributing to an intelligent transport system are of the utmost importance; therefore calls on the Commission to strongly support these developments;

76. Strongly supports the continuation of research and development of ICT based innovations; considers that new technological developments could be introduced under the Intelligent Car Initiative in order to help rationalise traffic flows so that, by making it easier for drivers to make the right decision and choose the fastest path to their destination, traffic will become more energy friendly; calls on all stakeholders, particularly the Member States, to make the necessary provisions for the implementation of eCall;

77. Regards work on Intelligent Transport Systems as key to a successful motor vehicle industry and to successful efforts to reduce the industry’s environmental impact; considers that Galileo should be cited as an example, and therefore finding a solution for the funding of Galileo within a consortium where interested members make their commitments to development of the project must be a priority;

78. Believes that one of the first Knowledge and Innovation Communities of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology should be dedicated to CO2 reduction in vehicle technology;

Restructuring policies and the way forward

79. Considers it necessary to establish general conditions to make the automotive industry in the EU sustainable and enable it to remain in the forefront of technological, ecological, and social innovation with the support of a highly skilled labour force;

80. Recognises that both manufacturers and suppliers in the automobile industry in the EU have a highly skilled labour force, a factor which has played a large part in the high level of performance of the automobile industry in the EU;

81. Points to the importance of the car industry for employment, growth, innovation and competitiveness; believes that, although the car industry will have to undergo substantial change, policy adjustments also need to be made in order to ensure that Community regulations do not lead to job losses;

82. Maintains that Community environmental, road safety, and energy efficiency legislation implies a need for proper education and vocational training for workers to enable them to adapt more easily to changes, both of a technical nature and as regards regulation, and to enjoy the same or better job prospects;

83. Calls on the Commission to coordinate the efficient use of the Structural Funds and the European Globalisation Adjustment Fund where the automotive industry is concerned;

84. Calls for Community support to be withheld from companies which, having received such aid in a Member State, transfer their production operations to another country without completely fulfilling the agreements entered into with the Member State concerned;

85. Stresses that, as regards future restructuring processes, the EU and the Member States also need to focus on ways of assisting restructuring and cushioning its effects, and of offering new possibilities for workers;

86. Calls on the social partners to implement appropriate policies for those who are threatened by restructuring in the industry;

87. Calls for better information for, and consultation with, workers in the process of adapting the industry to the new challenges arising from the design and production of more environmentally friendly vehicles;

88. Points to the need to review the present relationship between manufacturers and dealers, whose impact on the competitiveness of the automotive industry in the EU is severely damaging many SMEs in the sector; believes that collaboration in the areas of R&D and industrial strategies needs to be encouraged on a more stable footing; urges the Commission and the Member States, to that end, to adopt the necessary policies or establish the framework required to stabilise the above relationship and overcome the inherent difficulties;

89. Points to the importance of making more systematic use of EIB resources in order to support SMEs in the automotive sector and help them gain access to venture capital;

90. Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council and Commission.

(1)

              Texts adopted, P6_TA(2007)0176.

(2)

             Commission interpretative communication on procedures for the registration of motor vehicles originating in another Member State (2007 C 68/04 (OJ C 68, 24.3.2007, p. 15)..

(3)

Council Directive 71/127/EEC (OJ L 68, 22.3.1971, p. 1).

(4)

Council Directive 74/297/EEC (OJ L 165, 20.6.1974, p. 16).

(5)

Council Directive 76/115/EEC (OJ L 24, 30.1.1976, p. 6).

(6)

Council Directive 78/932/EEC (OJ L 325, 20.11.1978, p. 1).

(7)

Directive 2000/53/EC (OJ L 269, 21.10.2000, p. 34).

(8)

COM(2006)0059.


EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

The European automotive industry, representing around 3% of EU's GDP and 7% of the Union's total manufacturing output, is one of the EU's most important economic sectors, producing about 19 million vehicles every year, about one third of total global production. It is also one of EU's leading export sectors, generating a € 35 billion trade surplus per year, and has a high rate of innovation, with an annual R&D investment of 4% of its turnover. The sector is one of the most important employers on the continent, with more than 2 million direct jobs and a further 10 million indirect jobs in both large companies and SMEs. In short, the automotive sector is a key factor in economic, social and cultural life in Europe.

The sector is currently facing considerable challenges in its operating environment. Rapid technological change, coupled with fierce international competition, forces the sector to change rapidly. Furthermore, the sector is being subject to significant societal demands, particularly in terms of the environment and road safety. This close interaction between the industry and policy areas, such as environment, energy and transport, results in one of the most regulated areas in the EU, covered by approximately 80 Directives and 115 UN/ECE regulations. The biggest challenge for the sector is to respond to a multitude of regulatory initiatives, while at the same time to seek to maintain and improve its competitiveness.

The aim of the High Level Groups on CARS 21, which brought together the most important stakeholders, was to design a regulatory framework which takes into account the industry's competitiveness on the one hand and the requirements of public policy on the other. This new coordinated regulatory framework would pave the path for future policy. Some of the main recommendations of the CARS21 High Level Group were the need for a coherent interaction between the different policy areas, predictability and the necessity to protect public interests while reducing the regulatory burden on industry.

Your Rapporteur welcomes the work of the CARS21 High Level Group and the Commission's position on it. However, per specific field, your Rapporteur would like to stress certain points.

Completing the internal market for cars

At the outset of CARS 21, industry raised concerns about the high cumulative cost of legislation. The review conducted in CARS 21 concluded that the current type-approval system was effective, should be maintained and that most of the legislation was necessary and useful in the interest of protecting health, safety, consumers and the environment.

Your Rapporteur believes that a true internal market for cars, used cars and spare parts is of the utmost importance. He underlines the necessity of establishing an EU system for type-approval, covering all motor-vehicles and asks the Commission to propose measures guaranteeing a registration-procedure, which would allow easier cross-border sales especially for used cars. Furthermore the Commission is requested to help create a common market for tuning and spare parts, as national regulations especially in the tuning sector currently obstruct the further development of this sector.

Internationalizing the regulatory environment

Your Rapporteur stresses the importance of cutting unnecessary red-tape, including doubling of regulations due to international conventions. As the automobile sector is not any more limited to national borders or even to one continent, the future of the automotive regulation can only be seen in the framework of international rules and standards. These rules must ensure that export and import of cars and spare parts to and from other regions of the world are not obstructed by different norms. Therefore your Rapporteur asks the Commission to work on recognizing European standards in the world, especially in the market for premium cars, since Europe is a market leader in that segment and strategic standardization is an essential driver of competitiveness. Also, the plans of the Commission are welcomed to replace 38 EC directives with international UNECE regulations. Furthermore, the identification of 25 directives and UNECE regulations, for which self- or virtual testing can be introduced is welcomed. Your Rapporteur strongly urges the Commission to begin simplifying the current regulation as soon as possible. Your Rapporteur expresses major concerns about the non-harmonised implementation of the End-of-Life Vehicles Directive and considers the Commission's intention to address this problem hampering the common market only after 2009 as not ambitious enough.

Adopting environmental standards for the 21st century

In the area of the environment, the Communication endorses the further limiting of pollutant emissions. Furthermore, it describes the key elements of a future strategy to reduce CO2 emissions from cars. This future strategy will be based on an integrated approach to achieving the EU objective of 120 g/km CO2 by 2012 through a combination of EU and Member States action. The Commission intends to propose legislation, focusing on mandatory reductions of the emissions of CO2 to reach the objective of 130 g/km for the average new car fleet by means of improvements in vehicle motor technology, and a further reduction of 10 g/km of CO2 by other technological improvements and by an increased use of bio-fuels.

Your Rapporteur believes that individual mobility is one the greatest achievements of the last century, offering trillions of possibilities in every day life, employment and tourism. This achievement can and should in no case be rolled back, although it has to be adapted to necessary environmental standards. The Culture of Mobility is part of the European way of life. Furthermore, it is his strong belief that mobility and protecting the environment do not exclude each other and that future cars will pave the way for a new life style of reconciling environment and mobility.

Your Rapporteur agrees that reducing greenhouse gas emissions is a major goal of all EU politics and that the targets of reducing CO2 emissions by 20% in 2020, as stated in the European Council conclusions of 8-9 March 2007, form the framework in which all policy decisions need to be taken. Your Rapporteur invites the automotive sector to contribute to CO2 reduction, but warns against burdening the sector with unrealistic targets in order to counterbalance failures in other industrial sectors. Your Rapporteur is asking the Commission to bear in mind the importance of the European car industry for European employment, growth and innovation.

Your Rapporteur believes that an integrated approach is the most appropriate form to lower CO2 emissions from passenger cars significantly. This integrated approach should take all possibilities to reduce CO2 emissions into account, such as infrastructure, drivers' behaviour, biofuels and vehicle technology.

Your Rapporteur would like to urge the Commission to set up ambitious but also realistic targets. In his view, the more ambitious the mandatory limits for CO2 emissions are, the longer should be the time-span for the automotive industry to adapt. In this respect, he would like to recall that the development of new types of passenger cars takes approximately 7 years. A mandatory reduction from 2012 on would entail a dangerous risk for the automotive industry as they lack time to react to this new legislation. As legally binding targets will probably not come into force before the end of 2009, the time until 2012 is definitively too short to allow the automotive industry the necessary time to restructure. Therefore, mandatory targets for CO2 emissions by vehicle technology should not be set before 2015.

Your Rapporteur believes that an average target of 120g/km of CO2 emissions for new passenger cars from 2015 on should be achievable, if additional measures (such as eco-driving, infrastructure, bio-fuels, adaptive cruise control) are integrated. If only motor technology is considered, 135g/km of CO2 is still an ambitious but realistic target. Finally, your Rapporteur would like to call on the Commission not to propose any new mandatory targets for CO2 emissions before the upcoming mandatory targets have become legally binding.

The Commission's plan to set out a binding bio-fuels target by 2012 is welcomed. However, your Rapporteur believes that this target is by far not ambitious enough.

Making road transport even safer

The Communication stresses the need to adopt a holistic approach to road safety involving vehicle features, infrastructure and road users.

Your Rapporteur welcomes the Commission's efforts to reduce casualties in road transport, including important measures such as eCall, mandatory isofix child restraint systems, electronic stability control, seat-belt reminders, pedestrian protection, emergency braking systems and daytime running lights. Your Rapporteur acknowledges the catalytic role of the premium car market in introducing these new technologies first.

However, it should also be noted that additional security systems will further increase the weight of passenger cars leading to more CO2 emissions. Therefore, your Rapporteur would like a system to be developed allowing car manufacturers to produce additional CO2 emissions, if they result from safety measures. In such a system, heavy cars with a bad safety balance (like the Chinese Brilliance) would be penalized for carrying useless weight.

Bringing fair-play to automotive trade relations

In the Communication the main concerns of the automotive sector to trade policy are stipulated. Proposals are being made to assess the potential of using bi-lateral trade agreements (particularly in the Asian region), to improve market access and to enforce intellectual property rights (IPR) globally.

Even if the European automotive industry is one of the most competitive industries in the world, threats to this are likely to occur when unfair competition such as dumping, disrespect of IPR or state-aid is used. Your Rapporteur believes that especially the CO2-balance of cars imported to the EU have to be taken into account under WTO rules.

Furthermore your Rapporteur would like to draw attention to two countries: Regarding South-Korea, the Commission is asked to put negotiations on a free-trade agreement on hold, unless Korea's state-aid to car manufacturers is fully clarified and it complies with standards allowing a fair trade. If no other solution is possible, cars should even be excluded from the free-trade agreement.

Regarding China, your Rapporteur underlines the importance of a close partnership in order to develop a regulatory framework offering level-playing field. Accepting IPR is a conditio sine qua non to such a partnership with China.

Research and Development in the automotive sector

In the area of research and development, the Communication identifies clean renewable fuels and intelligent vehicles and roads as core research priorities. It adopts a forward-looking approach and outlines the Commission’s intention to set up a Joint Technology Initiative on hydrogen and fuel cells as well as to put forward a regulation on vehicles which use hydrogen as a fuel.

Your Rappporteur welcomes the efforts of European R&D funding and cooperation already achieved in several programmes like FP7, CIP or i2010. He encourages the Commission to head in the specific working programmes more concretely towards the special needs of the automotive sector due to new legislation or foreseen mandatory targets.

Your Rapporteur requests the Commission to adopt plans for a substantial increase in R&D funding for the automotive sector when CO2 emission targets or obligatory alternative engines become binding over the next years. The increase of EU funding R&D in the automotive sector should be not less than 300% by 2012. Furthermore, there should be a clear link between the raise in public R&D funding in the automotive sector and the binding character of CO2-targets.

Finally, your Rapporteur would like to suggest that in the upcoming European Institute of Technology one of the first Knowledge and Innovation Community should be dedicated to CO2 reduction in vehicle technology.


OPINION of the Committee on International Trade (14.9.2007)

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on CARS 21: A competitive Automotive Regulatory Framework

(2007/2120(INI))

Draftswoman: Erika Mann

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on International Trade calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

A.  whereas the European automotive industry is one of the most competitive and innovative industries in the world and whereas it will be crucial to understand fully the implications arising from multilateral and bilateral agreements for this industry as a whole; whereas it is essential to create the right conditions in Europe and worldwide in order to sustain this competitiveness in an increasingly global environment,

B.   whereas the Commission is promoting an integrated strategy to ensure that European companies will continue to be competitive within a growing global environment, and whereas that strategy is laid out in its Communications to Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions entitled, first, “Global Europe: Competing in the World” (COM(2006)0567), second, “Global Europe: A stronger Partnership to deliver market access for European Exporters” (SEC(2007)0452) and, third, “Global Europe: Europe's trade defence instruments in a changing global economy – A Green Paper for public consultation" (COM(2006)0763),

C.  whereas the strategy set out in those Communications is currently being implemented in negotiations on several bilateral and regional free trade agreements,

D.  whereas the automotive industry in Europe differs significantly from one Member State to the next in terms of strategies, structures and global outreach, and whereas those differences must therefore be taken fully into consideration in developing a new and more globally oriented trade strategy,

E.   whereas it will be crucial to maintain and create a policy space in Europe and internationally in order to support the environmental performance of the automotive industry in Europe; whereas; therefore; it is essential that international technical standards be respected and upheld throughout the world,

F.   whereas in 2006 the European automotive industry exported around 70% of its produced units; whereas in 2004 the export of motor vehicles and of parts and accessories for motor vehicles accounted respectively for 8.7% and 2.8% of the EU's industrial exports and is therefore particularly sensitive to export conditions, and whereas in 2004 the extra-EU trade surplus in respect of transport equipment was valued at EUR 60.2 billion,

G.  whereas around 12 million jobs in the EU arise from the European automotive industry; whereas this industry invests around 4% of its turnover in research and is thus the biggest industrial investor in research and development (R&D) in Europe and whereas in 2005 it contributed to state income taxes of EUR 360 billion (3.5% of EU GDP),

H.  whereas it is vital for the Council and the European Central Bank finally to pursue an exchange rate policy that will encourage the development of jobs in industry within EU territory, since the under-valuation of the dollar and yen compared to the euro is currently leading to the loss of countless jobs and a sharp decline in salaries and working conditions in the European automotive sector,

I.    whereas in recent years the international automotive sector has undergone significant change and is facing further challenges, primarily because of increasing global competition, and whereas the risk of relocations of production plants must therefore be taken into serious consideration in the reshaping of the European regulatory and trading environment,

J.    whereas the High Level Group CARS 21 has developed and agreed on a 10 year roadmap with recommendations aimed at enhancing the automotive industry’s global competitiveness and improving the employment situation; whereas that roadmap is an integral part of its CARS 21 final report, and whereas, therefore, Parliament advocates that those recommendations be reconsidered,

Multilateral approach

1.   Stresses the importance of the WTO system for the automotive industry in an increasingly global trading environment; considers it highly important that the current Doha Development Round achieve real and ambitious market access for automobile manufacturers to third countries, in particular to large emerging countries in this sector;

2.   Regards the international harmonisation of standards as an absolute necessity for ensuring a level playing field; highlights that it is very important that all Members of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29) implement as many standards as possible under the UNECE 1958 and 1998 Agreements;

3.   Stresses the importance of the WTO dispute settlement mechanism in resolving problems concerning export to third countries; recalls the positive outcome of the disputes brought before the WTO in the cases of Canada - Certain Measures Affecting the Automotive Industry, India - Measures Affecting the Automotive Sector and Indonesia - Certain Measures Affecting the Automobile Industry;

4.   Welcomes the Commission's request for the establishment of a WTO panel to resolve outstanding issues related to the treatment of imported vehicle parts by China, which the Commission argues is inconsistent with several articles of different WTO agreements;

Bilateral approach

5.   Recalls that the successful conclusion of multilateral trade negotiations should remain a priority of the EU; understands and supports, nevertheless, the Commission's will to negotiate new bilateral trade agreements in order to improve market access conditions; insists that EU policy must safeguard the competitiveness of European automobile manufacturers in Europe and in non-EU countries; is convinced of the importance for the automotive industry of concluding bilateral agreements between the EU and Mercosur, ASEAN, India and , following their accession to the WTO, Ukraine and Russia;

6.   Demands that, in those bilateral agreements, existing non-tariff barriers be removed; insists that proper implementation of the agreements in the partner countries in this respect be guaranteed, requests , therefore, that consideration be given to including dispute settlement systems as part of those agreements;

7.   Is concerned about the delay in resuming discussions with Mercosur within the framework of an Association Agreement; criticises in this context the announced Strategic Partnership with Brazil; calls on the Commission to report to Parliament on the consequences which this will have for the automotive and fuel industry;

8.   Emphasises that the currently negotiated EU-Korea Free-Trade Agreement (FTA) is of particular importance to the automotive sector in Europe; requests that the Commission consider a strategy of phasing out EU import tariffs with safeguards and, therefore, recommends that it be connected to the lifting of non-tariff barriers on the Korean side; stresses the importance of carrying out an impact assessment before a bilateral agreement is considered; regrets that this has not been the case for the EU-Korea FTA; calls on the Commission to negotiate a comprehensive agreement which is more driven by the objective of reaching a balanced deal than by meeting time constraints;

9.   Reiterates that Korea has signed and ratified the 1958 UNECE Agreement and has thus committed itself to implementing the standard regulations; urges the Commission to stress this during negotiations and to insist on rapid implementation; notes that a FTA should in any case clearly state that Korea allows European cars that live up to UNECE standards to be given real access to the Korean market;

10. Calls on the Commission to evaluate the possibility of a special expedited dispute settlement on auto-related measures, as introduced in the US-Korea Free Trade Agreement, whereby the complaining party may suspend its tariff concessions on passenger cars and assess duties at the prevailing most-favoured-nation rate, if a panel finds a violation of an auto-related commitment or the nullification/impairment of expected benefits to be an option, which the Commission could likewise consider integrating in the EU's FTAs;

11. Calls on the Commission to evaluate the possibility of setting up an Autos Working Group, as has been done pursuant to the US-Korea Free Trade Agreement, which will provide a specialised early warning system to address regulatory issues that may develop in the future and promote good regulatory practices; is convinced that such a group should also be established in the context of the EU-Korea Free Trade Agreement, and should possibly be considered in other free trade agreements where the European automotive industry has specific interests;

12. Calls on the Commission to substantially improve access to the Chinese market by eliminating trade-distorting non-tariff barriers, regulatory barriers and investment restrictions; also requests that the Commission pay special attention to this in the future negotiations of the EU-China Partnership and Cooperation Agreement;

13. Refers to the European tyre industry as an important contributor to a successful European automotive sector; therefore calls on the Commission to look closely into the issue of unjustified technical trade barriers, such as local technical regulations, which the tyre industry is facing in key Asian emerging markets;

14. States that technical regulations are partly responsible for a strong negative trade balance in the tyre sector between the EU and key Asian markets;

Biofuels

15. Emphasises the importance of investment in second generation biofuels; points out that this is of particular significance with regard to the already existing competition between first generation biofuels and some staple crops; considers that investment in R&D in the field of second generation biofuels must be given high priority within the 7th Research Framework Programme;

16. Stresses that the further development of capacities and innovation with respect to biofuels in Europe must be secured and promoted by European policies; notes that a worldwide strategy will be essential in order to develop standards and technologies for sustainable second generation biofuels;

Raw materials

17. Regards access to raw materials as a key component for the automotive sector; calls on the Commission and the Member States to give high priority to access and import strategies for raw materials vis-à-vis key third country actors;

Foreign direct investment and establishments

18. Notes that foreign direct investment and establishments are an essential component for today's global automotive industry; nevertheless insists that the conditions in Europe for a vibrant automotive sector must continue to exist;

19. Points out that European companies establishing themselves in countries outside the EU should respect the principles of corporate social responsibility, as well as international social standards, such as the ILO norms and the principles pertaining to decent work; recommends that the design of the Labour Affairs Council, as provided for in the US-Korea FTA, be closely looked into; stresses that specific attention should be given to implementation of those rules in so-called special economic zones, where the rights of workers and trade unions are often neglected;

Intellectual Property Rights

20. Notes that the European automotive industry is devoting large funds to R&D; is, therefore, deeply concerned at the lack of enforcement of IPRs in large emerging countries; urges the Chinese Government in particular to ensure implementation and enforcement of the TRIPS agreement and international IPR rules in order to fight effectively against counterfeiting and piracy; urges the Commission to pay special attention to the problem of IPR protection in upcoming bilateral agreements and to include provisions on protection of advanced technology;

21. Disagrees with the Commission's proposal to abolish design protection rights, as this may have a negative effect on Europe's automotive sector while not guaranteeing that customers benefit; calls on the Commission to respect the existing level playing-field in relation to Japan and certain US States, where very high standards are in force;

22. Disagrees with the current proposal by the Commission to change the existing origin marking system in the EU, stressing that the automotive industry is particularly dependent on customer confidence in its brands; points out that the marking of cars or components as provided for in the Commission's proposal would have a negative impact on the producer, burdening it with additional non-tariff barriers;

Creating the right conditions for trade and setting up the right defence instruments

23.   Calls for caution in the Commission's effort to revise trade defence instruments in principle; recalls that the automotive industry may be subject to anti-competitive practices by third countries and urges the Commission to safeguard the basic philosophy of trade defence instruments in defending EU industry from unfair practices;

24. Calls on the Commission to step up its efforts to combat the import of counterfeit spare parts;

Environment and trade

25. Supports the EU objective of reducing CO2 emissions to 120g/km by 2012; calls on the Commission to encourage similar initiatives through its Partnership and Cooperation Agreement and bilateral FTAs; stresses that the automotive industry plays a significant role in the reduction of emissions globally; stresses that only a holistic and international approach will significantly lower CO2 emissions; believes, however, that the benefits of EU environmental regulations in the automotive sector would spread well beyond EU markets; stresses that research into second generation biofuels and alternative fuels, road safety performance, the setting of international standards and incentives to retire most polluting vehicles must be factored into the EU strategy;

26. Stresses that a significant reduction in CO2 emissions cannot be achieved unless additional efforts are made by other actors, including drivers, infrastructure providers, the fuel industry and those involved in city and road management systems; recommends that experiences be shared with third country trading partners in this area, for example with Japan.

RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

Date adopted

12.9.2007

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

25

1

4

Members present for the final vote

Kader Arif, Francisco Assis, Graham Booth, Daniel Caspary, Françoise Castex, Glyn Ford, Eduard Raul Hellvig, Jacky Henin, Syed Kamall, Sajjad Karim, Alain Lipietz, Caroline Lucas, Marusya Ivanova Lyubcheva, Erika Mann, Helmuth Markov, Cristiana Muscardini, Vural Öger, Georgios Papastamkos, Godelieve Quisthoudt-Rowohl, Tokia Saïfi, Peter Šťastný, Robert Sturdy, Gianluca Susta, Daniel Varela Suanzes-Carpegna, Corien Wortmann-Kool, Zbigniew Zaleski

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Małgorzata Handzlik, Pia Elda Locatelli, Eugenijus Maldeikis, Javier Moreno Sánchez

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2)
present for the final vote

 


OPINION of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (4.10.2007)

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on CARS 21: A competitive automotive regulatory framework

(2007/2120(INI))

Draftsman: Antolín Sánchez Presedo

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.  Points to the macroeconomic importance of the motor vehicle industry, which accounts for 3 % of Europe’s GDP and 7 % of its industrial employment, provides 8 % of the Member States’ total budget revenue, devotes more resources to R&D than any other industry, and attracts a sixth of European household spending; notes that Europe’s global prominence is due, in particular, to the fact that it is the world’s largest producer of cars and the second largest producer of lorries, and to the size and degree of consolidation of the internal market, the growing internationalisation of the motor vehicle sector, the reputation of European brands and the quality of European services, and the strong export position which European manufacturers have managed to achieve and their substantial presence on markets with high growth potential;

2.  Welcomes the Commission communication on CARS 21 in that it applies the Lisbon Strategy of boosting growth and employment to the motor vehicle industry, one of the pillars of the European and world economies; believes that it is essential to draw up recommendations and establish a Europe-wide framework to promote productivity increases and the sector's innovation capacity so as to enable the sector to develop into an environment open to free trade and international competition and respond in a sustainable way to needs and demand as regards mobility and transport;

3.  Expresses its determination to participate actively at every stage of this initiative, in keeping with its responsibilities, in order to enhance the legitimacy, impact, and effectiveness of the action taken to achieve the proposed aims; likewise maintains that the various stakeholder institutions in the Member States should be involved as closely as possible;

4.  Urges that the Lisbon Strategy’s sustainable growth and employment objectives be genuinely pursued by avoiding measures which would increase pressure to cut jobs in the motor vehicle industry in Europe and jeopardise Europe's international competitiveness;

5.  Emphasises that improving environmental performance in the whole lifecycle of vehicles is crucial for future competitiveness of European motor vehicle industry; considers that ambitious environmental regulation will speed up the process of introducing innovations to the market;

6.  Supports an integrated strategy that lays down policy aims and enables a flexible response to be made in line with the principles of better lawmaking and cost-effectiveness; endorses the international harmonisation of regulation under the aegis of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), with a view to simplifying and streamlining regulation in the area; points out, however, that that international harmonisation process should not prevent the European Union from legislating independently from the UNECE system where this is required to meet EU objectives as regards health, safety, consumers and the environment;

7.  Points to the essential need to speed up the process of improving the European motor vehicle fleet, with vehicles being replaced at affordable prices; draws attention to the special responsibility of the public sector in this field;

8.  Points out that the motor vehicle industry has failed to make the emissions reductions it promised under the voluntary approach employed hitherto;

9.  Welcomes the prospect of a revision of Directive 2000/53/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 September 2000 on end-of-life vehicles(1) and calls on the Commission not only to bring about improvements in Member States’ implementation practice, but also to create an incentive for the renewal of European car fleets; considers that tax reform promoting fleet renewal and the withdrawal of older cars would be an appropriate instrument by which to achieve that objective;

10. Points out that consumer protection is a priority of European policy; considers that European motor vehicles should remain affordable for the broad mass of consumers in Europe and calls for the avoidance of measures which would cause more expensive car prices at the expense of the consumer;

11. Notes, in the light of the Lisbon Objectives of economic growth and employment in the European Union, that the relocation of motor vehicle plants to third countries with a view to relieving price pressure cannot have been intended and urges that regulatory measures which encourage such relocations should therefore be avoided;

12. Stresses that competition among European motor vehicle manufacturers can be preserved and promoted only if segment-specific upper and lower CO2 emissions limits are set, since average fleet values fail to take account of the differing priorities of European manufacturers’ product ranges and undermine competition;

13. Advocates the adoption of a simple taxation policy that is in keeping with the objectives of the European Union; endorses the abolition of vehicle registration tax, the refund of tax paid twice on cross-border transactions, the introduction of elements based directly on CO2 emissions and the establishment of a European framework for tax incentives for innovative safety and environmental technologies; regrets in this context that the proposal for a directive on passenger car taxation, aiming at reducing CO2 emissions, has still not been adopted by the Council; urges that that directive is speedily adopted and implemented;

14. Points out that the principle of fair reward for intellectual property right holders is compatible with efforts to boost competition and improve the internal market; calls for international protection and enforcement of intellectual property rights to be promoted;

15. Welcomes the Commission’s intention to stimulate R&D; intends, within the overall framework of the budget, to allocate more appropriations to R&D in the motor vehicle industry;

16. Stresses the need to enhance competition with independent after-sales services and in the spare-parts market; considers that a choice of high-quality services and equivalent spare parts must be offered in order to ensure that buyers of vehicles will also be able to maintain them at affordable prices during their useful life;

17. Proposes that, to boost the competitiveness of the European motor vehicle industry, the review of the motor vehicle sector exemption should be tied to the mid-term review of CARS 21, facilitating cooperation between sector operators, preventing public aid from being misappropriated and promoting competition policy at international level;

18. Welcomes the Commission’s wish to introduce a revision and review mechanism, given the technology and development-intensive nature of the motor vehicle industry; also considers, however, that greater use should be made of 'sunset clauses' in legislation so as to ensure that it does not hinder or counteract the technological advances that R&D and market forces are constantly bringing about;

19. Regards work on Intelligent Transport System as key to a successful motor vehicle industry and to successful efforts to reduce the industry’s environmental impact; considers that Galileo should be cited as an example, and therefore finding a solution for the funding of Galileo within a consortium where interested members make their commitments to development of the project must be a priority issue;

20. Welcomes the Commission’s intention to simplify and internationalise legislation; stresses the importance of repealing rules which are superfluous because they overlap with international conventions.

RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

Date adopted

3.10.2007

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

32

2

0

Members present for the final vote

Mariela Velichkova Baeva, Pervenche Berès, Zsolt László Becsey, Sharon Bowles, Udo Bullmann, Ieke van den Burg, David Casa, Jean-Paul Gauzès, Robert Goebbels, Dariusz Maciej Grabowski, Gunnar Hökmark, Karsten Friedrich Hoppenstedt, Othmar Karas, Piia-Noora Kauppi, Wolf Klinz, Guntars Krasts, Astrid Lulling, Gay Mitchell, Cristobal Montoro Romero, John Purvis, Alexander Radwan, Bernhard Rapkay, Heide Rühle, Antolín Sánchez Presedo, Manuel António dos Santos, Olle Schmidt, Cristian Stănescu, Margarita Starkevičiūtė, Sahra Wagenknecht.

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Katerina Batzeli, Harald Ettl, Thomas Mann, Bilyana Ilieva Raeva, Donato Tommaso Veraldi.

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2)
present for the final vote

 

(1)

OJ L 269, 21.10.2000, p. 34.


OPINION of the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs (28.6.2007)

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on CARS 21: A competitive Automotive Regulatory Framework

(2007/2120(INI))

Draftswoman: Ona Juknevičienė

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Employment and Social Affairs calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.   Acknowledges that, despite restructuring, within the EU 27 the industry still holds around 2 million direct jobs (7% of manufacturing employment) and is supporting an additional 10 to 12 million jobs;

2.   Recognises that both manufacturers and suppliers in the European automobile industry have a high skilled labour force, which has played a large part in the high level of performance of the European automobile industry;

3.   Recognises that better designed, transparent rules in line with current social and environmental needs - that are applied without exceptions and integrated within the international automotive regulatory environment - can contribute to greater competitiveness and fair competition conditions in the industry;

4.   Calls for Community support to be withheld from companies which, having received such aid in a Member State, transfer their production operations to another country without completely fulfilling the agreements entered into with the Member State concerned;

5.   Stresses that, as regards future restructuring processes, the EU and the Member States also need to focus on ways of assisting restructuring and cushioning its effects, and of offering new possibilities for workers;

6.   Calls on Member States to further implement the modernisations needed within the Lisbon strategy for more and better jobs to support European competitiveness on a global level with regard to the latest scientific knowledge and strengthen European socio-economic structures;

7.   Considers that, in order to maintain employment while increasing competitiveness, the EU and the Member States should further invest in research, technology, education and training;  

8.   Recognises that EU funds (i.e. Social Fund, Globalisation Adjustment Fund (EGF) ) and financing by the Member States should be used to a full extent to limit the consequences of the ongoing transitions in the industry and further to promote continuing education and training for workers in the sector;

9.   Calls on social partners to implement appropriate policies for those who are threatened by the restructuring of the industry;

10. Stresses that, given the ongoing restructurings, reallocations and job losses, it is important, especially in cases where decision-making affects their lives, that employees are properly consulted and informed of the decision taken by the multinationals, thus ensuring that change can be anticipated and managed to better effect; in this light, further efforts are needed either to better implement the Directive on the establishment of a European Works Council or to understand what changes to the Directive might be appropriate to improve its implementation.

Explanatory Memorandum

This opinion focuses on the consequences for employment regarding the automotive regulatory framework(1).

The car manufacturing industry is facing a transition period due to market forces.

Examples of trends in the industry are:

1. Existing overcapacities in certain Member States are pushing manufacturers to close existing plants.

2. Also, aggressive price competition between manufacturers is pushing manufacturers to relocate their plants in countries with cheaper labour force. Within Europe, car manufacturers producing in the EU 15 tend to favour outsourcing to new Member states such as Czech Republic or Slovakia for the supply of the European market. It has led to a shift from the EU15 to the EU10, for instance, between 2000 and 2005, the manufacture of motor vehicles was among the top five employment growth sectors in the Czech Republic.

3. Also globalisation has its effects. When it comes to the production aimed at external market, many car manufacturers now tend to favour building their manufacturing plants in the heart of the big markets they are aiming at (for example China, Brazil). This transition has an impact on the employment in this sector within the world.

Despite the overcapacity problem and the pressures from globalisation, car production within Europe (including EU-15) still has advantages (high-skilled work force, good infrastructures, common market, proximity of a big market, network of suppliers). EU 27 as a whole therefore remains the world's largest vehicle producer and the car industry still holds around 2 million direct jobs in the manufacturing of vehicles and components (7% of all manufacturing employment in the EU). It is also supporting an additional 10 to 12 million jobs in the EU. When it comes to the EU 15, employment in the car sector has declined but car manufacturing remains very important. In 2005, more than 13 million cars were produced in EU 15.

Active policy tools can therefore be relevant and they should be used in order to strengthen European socio-economic structures in a way to reinforce Europe's added value on the world market and maintain employment in the car industry. For example, the EU and the Member States should further invest in education and training (implementation of Lifelong Learning Program, positive use of EU funds such as the ESF to promote projects aiming at the improvement of production methods and employment).

At the same time, considering that further restructuring will occur despite efforts in adapting the car manufacturing industry in Europe, the EU and the Member States also need to focus on the smoothening of restructuring and the offering of new possibilities for automobile workers. For example, EU funds (Social fund, ERDF) should be used to a full extent for the support of the ongoing car manufacturing transition. The Globalisation Adjustment Fund is a good example of fund helping the workers affected by globalisation-related redundancies in all kinds of industries. Also, directives on information and consultation of workers and other collective redundancies should be fully respected when transitions occur. Therefore efforts are needed either to better implement the Directive on the establishment of a European Works Council or to understand what changes to the Directive might be appropriate to improve its implementation.

PROCEDURE

Title

CARS 21: A competitive Automotive Regulatory Framework

Procedure number

2007/2120(INI)

Committee responsible

ITRE

Opinion by
  Date announced in plenary

EMPL
6.6.2007

Enhanced cooperation – date announced in plenary

 

Drafts(wo)man
  Date appointed

Ona Juknevičienė
28.2.2007

Previous drafts(wo)man

 

Discussed in committee

7.6.2007

26.6.2007

 

 

 

Date adopted

27.6.2007

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

28

1

0

Members present for the final vote

Jan Andersson, Alexandru Athanasiu, Edit Bauer, Jean-Luc Bennahmias, Emine Bozkurt, Iles Braghetto, Philip Bushill-Matthews, Derek Roland Clark, Luigi Cocilovo, Jean Louis Cottigny, Richard Falbr, Carlo Fatuzzo, Ilda Figueiredo, Roger Helmer, Karin Jöns, Ona Juknevičienė, Raymond Langendries, Elizabeth Lynne, Mary Lou McDonald, Thomas Mann, Jiří Maštálka, Maria Matsouka, Csaba Őry, Elisabeth Schroedter, José Albino Silva Peneda, Gabriele Stauner, Gabriele Zimmer

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Rumiana Jeleva, Magda Kósáné Kovács, Sepp Kusstatscher, Jamila Madeira, Glenis Willmott

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2) present for the final vote

Manolis Mavrommatis

Comments (available in one language only)

...

(1)

COM(2007) 0022.


OPINION of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety (*) (16.10.2007)

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on CARS 21: A Competitive Automotive Regulatory Framework

(2007/2120(INI))

Draftswoman (*): Rebecca Harms

(*) Procedure with associated committees - Rule 47 of the Rules of Procedure

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.   Emphasises that improving environmental performance in the lifecycle of vehicles is crucial for competitiveness of the European car industry; therefore calls on the Commission to set up a regulatory framework for all cars sold in the EU which is conducive to environmental innovation and leadership on the market for environmentally best performing vehicles;

2.   Believes that vehicle manufacturers have had ample time to improve the lifecycle environmental performance of vehicles and that a strong signal must be given to them to speed up the abovementioned improvements;

3.   Recalls Parliament's resolution of 5 July 2005 on Stimulating Technologies for Sustainable development: An Environmental technologies action Plan for the European Union(1), emphasising that sufficient demand for bringing innovations to the market can only be created by clear and ambitious environmental policy targets, such as for example the legislation to reduce average CO2 emissions from passenger cars and light commercial vehicles to 120g CO2/km by 2012;

4.   Conscious of the scale of greenhouse gas reductions needed in Europe and globally to prevent dangerous effects of climate change, insists that urgent measures be introduced to significantly improve fuel efficiency in the automotive sector;

5.   Aware of the large number of persons killed or injured in road traffic accidents, urges the automotive industry to place even greater emphasis on developing and implementing more innovative and effective technological measures to improve, as far as cars are concerned, the safety of road users;

6.   Is concerned about the significant negative environmental, social and climate impacts linked to plant fuel production without a reliable environmental regulatory framework; stresses the need to achieve a sustainable policy towards biofuels in the European Union and in the production of biofuels destined for the European Union market in the territories of its trading partners; calls for the development of certification of sustainably produced biofuels; calls on the Commission, in its legislative proposal for reducing CO2 emissions from cars, to make it possible only for biofuels which have been certified as sustainable to be taken into account in attaining the value of 120g CO2 /km; stresses that second-generation biofuels obtained from plants or plant components which do not compete directly with food uses and which afford greater efficiency must be further developed and receive even more support; considers that for biofuels to be able to play any sustainable part in reducing the climate impact of transport or reduce oil-dependency, vehicle efficiency must be considerably improved;

7.   Is further concerned that increased global demand for transport fuels could lead to the exploitation of unconventional oil sources such as tar sands or coal-to-liquid fuels with substantial negative environmental impacts; welcomes in this context the proposal for revision of the Fuel Quality Directive to take into account life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions from road transport fuels; believes that the benefits of strict EU environmental regulation in the automotive sector would spread well beyond the EU market;

8.   Welcomes the rapid introduction of the Euro-5 and Euro-6 standards for the reduction of emissions of pollutants from private cars; urges the Commission, without delay, to adopt an ambitious proposal for a EURO-VI standard for heavy goods vehicles;

9.   Supports the replacement of European Directives by international regulations and self testing, when this does not entail negative effects on the protection of health, safety or the environment; calls for adequate provisions to ensure transparency and public access to testing data;

10. In the context of European legislation, calls on the Commission to start the reassessment and revision of emissions testing procedures to better reflect real life use conditions, without prejudice to the ongoing discussion on CO2 from cars;

11. Welcomes an integrated approach to policymaking as long as it is not implemented at the expense of source-based measures on which EU Member States rely for the fulfilment of their environmental obligations;

12. Calls for better information and consultation of employees in the process of adapting industry to the new challenges presented by the design and production of environmentally sounder vehicles;

13. Calls for appropriate vocational training of employees, to enable them to adjust to technological and regulatory change;

14. Points out that the overall aim of the more efficient cars, i.e. lower consumption and better environmental performance, requires a change in approach; in addition, the introduction of technologies to facilitate more environmentally friendly driving should be among the priorities;

15. Stresses that innovation and new technology are important, and at the same time recalls that there is also a need to renew the European motor vehicle fleet so that technical improvements are applied;

16. Emphasises the importance of introducing proper financial incentives, such as tax reductions for cars meeting environmental and safety goals;

17. Emphasises the importance of a shift in car-use in cities; considers that, along with more fuel-efficient cars, the introduction of electric city cars is essential; therefore calls for support for research and development of the necessary technologies;

18. Recalls the fact that the reduction of CO2 emissions from cars can most easily be achieved by restructuring public transport systems;

19. Is conscious of the importance of vehicles for the mobility of elderly people, especially in the countryside, or of disabled people;

20. Calls on all Member States and the EU to give all necessary support to the research and development of break-through technologies, such as hydrogen motors, fuel cells or hybrids;

21. Strongly supports the continuation of research and development of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) based innovations; considers that new technological developments could be introduced under the Intelligent Car Initiative in order to help rationalise the traffic so that, by making it easier for drivers to make the right decision and choose the fastest path to their destination, the traffic will become more energy friendly.

RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

Date adopted

2.10.2007

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

42

1

1

Members present for the final vote

Adamos Adamou, Liam Aylward, Pilar Ayuso, Johannes Blokland, John Bowis, Frieda Brepoels, Dorette Corbey, Chris Davies, Avril Doyle, Jill Evans, Anne Ferreira, Matthias Groote, Satu Hassi, Gyula Hegyi, Jens Holm, Marie Anne Isler Béguin, Caroline Jackson, Eija-Riitta Korhola, Urszula Krupa, Linda McAvan, Roberto Musacchio, Riitta Myller, Péter Olajos, Miroslav Ouzký, Vladko Todorov Panayotov, Vittorio Prodi, Guido Sacconi, Amalia Sartori, Karin Scheele, Richard Seeber, Bogusław Sonik, María Sornosa Martínez, Antonios Trakatellis, Thomas Ulmer, Anja Weisgerber

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Iles Braghetto, Rebecca Harms, Karin Jöns, Caroline Lucas, Miroslav Mikolášik, Eluned Morgan, Bart Staes

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2)
present for the final vote

Pier Antonio Panzeri, Willi Piecyk

(1)

OJ C 157 E, 6.7.2006, p. 77.


OPINION of the Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (13.9.2007)

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on CARS 21: a competitive automotive regulatory framework

(2007/2120(INI))

Draftsman:

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.  Welcomes the Commission's initiative in setting up the CARS 21(1) High Level Group in 2005, and in bringing together stakeholders to agree to an integrated legislative approach in a sector which is critical for the EU's technological and industrial base and its global manufacturing competitiveness;

2.  Welcomes the Commission's response(2) to findings of the CARS 21 High Level Group final report(3) and urges it to adopt its recommendations in accordance with the ten-year regulatory roadmap, which forms an integral part of the CARS 21 final report;

3.  Underlines the Member States' key role in meeting the Union's political and internal market objectives and their responsibility in achieving an integrated approach in the implementation of legislation in the automotive sector and welcomes, therefore, the fact that Member States were represented in the High Level Group at Cabinet Minister level;

4.  Calls upon the Member States' administrations to work closely with the Commission in implementing the CARS 21 recommendations; notes, in particular, the need to ensure that new regulations affecting the automotive sector are introduced in a coordinated manner, avoiding distortions within the internal market;

5.  Endorses the proposals from the Commission on procedures for the registration of motor vehicles(4) and the problems that some national rules present to the operation of the internal market; notes the impact of these national rules on economic sectors such as vehicle leasing and rental; calls on Member States to implement the necessary changes to their rules as soon as possible;

6.  Hopes that parliaments of Member States and their regions will wish to be associated with the outcome of the CARS 21 process; suggests that an inter-parliamentary network on automotive issues, coordinated by the European Parliament, would bring real benefits for road safety, environmental protection, innovation and competitiveness;

7.  Stresses the key role of better regulation principles, in particular cost-effectiveness, affordability and thorough impact assessments, in designing a competitive regulatory framework within which industry can compete, continue to support jobs and economic growth, and at the same time help to deliver EU environmental and safety objectives;

8.  Clearly endorses the report's recommendation to replace 38 Community directives with corresponding UN/ECE (The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe) regulations without any lowering of the level of safety and environmental protection;

9.  Reaffirms its support for the intelligent car initiative, in particular eCall, by calling on all stakeholders, particularly Member States, to make the necessary provisions for its implementation;

10. Reminds the Commission of its formal commitment to issue an annual report to the European Parliament on progress being made in the UN/ECE process as a safeguard of transparency and good governance in this process of internationalisation;

11. Confirms its support for an effective type approval process, as pointed out in its recommendation for second reading adopted on 10 May 2007(5);

12. In particular, draws attention to the new provisions for after-market parts that impact on safety and environmental performance, and notes that these provisions will establish a single market in such components;

13. Notes the importance of the CARS 21 regulatory road map in setting out a planned approach to the introduction of enhanced environmental and safety equipment; strongly supports, in particular, moves to phase in electronic stability control systems (ESC) as standard fitment as quickly as possible;

14. Calls on the Commission to report to the European Parliament on the operation of type approval procedures and on the monitoring of the comitology process in the annual report referred to above;

15. Confirms its support for a strategic approach to planning and implementing legislation that secures social and environmental objectives, and notes that the automotive industry must be given sufficient time to design, tool up and manufacture new car models to meet these goals;

16. Calls on the Commission to ensure the proper implementation of Regulation (EC) No 1400/2002 on motor vehicle distribution throughout the EU; further believes that when that Regulation is reviewed, the Commission Directorate-General for competition should consider itself part of the integrated approach to legislation in the sector;

17. Recalls Articles 6 to 8 of the Euro 5 and 6 Regulation (EC/../), under which all vehicle repairers in the Community shall have access to appropriate technical repairs information;

18. Stresses the potential of ICT offers for avoiding adverse effects on the environment and public health, accidents and waste of energy, when used on an EU-wide basis in intelligent traffic control and management systems which are aimed at permitting the smooth flow of traffic; is of the opinion that, in the interests of ensuring effective vehicle-to-infrastructure communications in all Member States, communication devices should comply with a uniform European standard;

19. Notes the importance to consumers of in-service reliability and durability information based on comprehensive consumer surveys; notes that public authorities could facilitate the work behind these surveys by allowing registration authorities to provide contact details of vehicle owners who agree to participate in them.

RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

Date adopted

13.9.2007

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

35

0

0

Members present for the final vote

Charlotte Cederschiöld, Corina Creţu, Mia De Vits, Janelly Fourtou, Evelyne Gebhardt, Małgorzata Handzlik, Daniel Hannan, Malcolm Harbour, Edit Herczog, Iliana Malinova Iotova, Pierre Jonckheer, Kurt Lechner, Arlene McCarthy, Nickolay Mladenov, Catherine Neris, Bill Newton Dunn, Zita Pleštinská, Guido Podestà, Zuzana Roithová, Luisa Fernanda Rudi Ubeda, Heide Rühle, Leopold Józef Rutowicz, Christel Schaldemose, Andreas Schwab, Eva-Britt Svensson, Marianne Thyssen, Jacques Toubon, Bernadette Vergnaud

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

André Brie, Wolfgang Bulfon, Giovanna Corda, Joel Hasse Ferreira, Christopher Heaton-Harris, Othmar Karas, Olle Schmidt, Gary Titley

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2)
present for the final vote

 

(1)

A Competitive Automotive Regulatory System for the 21st Century.

(2)

COM(2007)0022.

(3)

The High Level Group adopted its final report on 12 December 2005, putting forward a number of recommendations to improve the competitiveness of the European automotive sector.

(4)

Commission 2007/C 68/04 of 4/2/2007 Interpretative communication on procedures for the registration of motor vehicles originating in another member state.

(5)

Texts adopted, P6_TA(2007)0176.


OPINION of the Committee on Transport and Tourism (11.10.2007)

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on CARS 21: A Competitive Automotive Regulatory Framework

(2007/2120(INI))

Draftsman: Luca Romagnoli

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Transport and Tourism calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.   Agrees that one of the main reasons for the Commission communication entitled 'A Competitive Automotive Regulatory Framework for the 21st Century' (COM(2007)0022) is the determination to make a contribution to the EU’s growth and jobs strategy and that the intention is also to do more, by adapting vehicles and infrastructure and applying technological innovation, to make European roads safer;

2.       Urges the Commission, the Council and the Member States to integrate the EU’s obligations to reduce CO2 emissions from cars by at least 8% by 2012 and 20% by 2020;

3.   Believes that key aspects of the final report by the CARS 21 Group have not been taken properly into account in the above-mentioned communication, and in particular deplores the failure to emphasise the policies needed to attain the accepted cost-benefit principle;

4.   Welcomes the Commission’s intention to promote measures on energy saving and CO2 emissions reduction, such as installing fuel-consumption meters and CO2 emission indicators in cars, in order to encourage drivers to drive in a more sustainable manner

5.   Welcomes the proposals aimed at reducing noxious emissions and improving vehicles from the road safety point of view, but maintains that the integrated approach, as proposed by the CARS 21 Group in its report, has not been sufficiently pursued;

6.   Notes that, in order to achieve the aim of increasing the use of biofuels and hydrogen to maximise environmental performance, it is vital to promote the necessary locally based facility network enabling citizens to obtain supplies;

7.   Notes that the emphasis on the technical safety of vehicles will lead to an increase in their weight and hence reduce their energy efficiency; and consequently hopes that judicious approaches will be taken to ensure that the cost of technological adaptation to enhance energy efficiency and safety can be met on a level playing field guaranteeing free competition and genuine competitiveness within the EU;

8.   Calls for the integrated approach to make greater allowance for the fact that the motor industry has, to a certain extent, already developed and applied emission-reducing systems; is of the opinion that in any future European legislation aimed at lowering noxious emissions from cars, the technical possibilities for further cuts should be viewed over time and the cost-benefit principle properly complied with.

RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

Date adopted

9.10.2007

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

25

3

11

Members present for the final vote

Gabriele Albertini, Inés Ayala Sender, Etelka Barsi-Pataky, Paolo Costa, Arūnas Degutis, Saïd El Khadraoui, Robert Evans, Emanuel Jardim Fernandes, Francesco Ferrari, Luis de Grandes Pascual, Mathieu Grosch, Stanisław Jałowiecki, Georg Jarzembowski, Dieter-Lebrecht Koch, Jaromír Kohlíček, Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou, Sepp Kusstatscher, Jörg Leichtfried, Eva Lichtenberger, Erik Meijer, Robert Navarro, Luís Queiró, Reinhard Rack, Luca Romagnoli, Gilles Savary, Brian Simpson, Renate Sommer, Dirk Sterckx, Ulrich Stockmann, Georgios Toussas, Yannick Vaugrenard, Roberts Zīle;

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Philip Bradbourn, Joost Lagendijk, Ioan Mircea Paşcu, Leopold Józef Rutowicz

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2)
present for the final vote

Ovidiu Victor Ganţ, Bilyana Ilieva Raeva, Olle Schmidt


OPINION of the Committee on Legal Affairs (5.10.2007)

for the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

on CARS 21: A Competitive Automotive Regulatory Framework

(2007/2120(INI))

Draftsman: Titley

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Legal Affairs calls on the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions in its motion for a resolution:

1.   Welcomes the Commission's response to the findings of the CARS 21 High Level Group Final Report and, in general, supports its recommendations;

2.   Welcomes the proposal to simplify and internationalise the regulatory burden on the industry; endorses, in particular, the proposal to replace 38 EC directives with corresponding UN/ECE regulations and invites the Commission to bring forward the necessary technical provisions for using self- and virtual testing in 25 EC directives and UN/ECE regulations;

3.   Insists that its support for these proposals is conditional on it being clearly understood that Parliament reserves the right to call for legislation independently from the UN/ECE system where it believes that this is required to meet EU obligations;

4.   Welcomes the Commission proposal to submit an annual paper to Parliament on the progress being made at the UN/ECE and in the comitology process;

5.   Supports the Commission's endorsement of an integrated approach to achieving key objectives in the fields of environment and safety and therefore underlines the Member States' role in this;

6.   Supports the Commission's proposal to address the issue of non-harmonised implementation of the End-of-Life Vehicles Directive(1);

7.   Calls on the Commission to improve the cross-border inspection of vehicles regime and the cross-border enforcement of fines imposed for infringement of traffic rules in another Member State as a matter of priority;

8.   Urges the Commission to adopt more specific and effective measures to ensure the transparency and enforcement of intellectual property rights in all parts of the world, particularly China;

9.   Supports the Commission’s efforts in matters relating to the Chinese regulatory environment aimed at ensuring that European industries operating in this market enjoy fair regulations and legal certainty;

10. Confirms its support for an effective type-approval process as indicated in its position of 10 May 2007(2);

11. Calls on the Commission to ensure the proper implementation of the Regulation on motor vehicle distribution throughout the EU(3);

12. Welcomes the adoption of Regulation (EC) No 715/2007(4) aimed at ensuring that all vehicle repairers in the Community have access to the appropriate technical repair information.

13. Supports the Commission’s proposal to the European Parliament and the Council that a directive on the taxation of private cars be adopted as soon as possible.

RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

Date adopted

4.10.2007

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

25

0

0

Members present for the final vote

Carlo Casini, Bert Doorn, Cristian Dumitrescu, Monica Frassoni, Giuseppe Gargani, Lidia Joanna Geringer de Oedenberg, Katalin Lévai, Hans-Peter Mayer, Manuel Medina Ortega, Aloyzas Sakalas, Francesco Enrico Speroni, Gary Titley, Diana Wallis, Rainer Wieland, Jaroslav Zvěřina, Tadeusz Zwiefka

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Mogens N.J. Camre, Charlotte Cederschiöld, Kurt Lechner, Eva Lichtenberger, Marie Panayotopoulos-Cassiotou, József Szájer, Jacques Toubon

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2)
present for the final vote

Iles Braghetto, Michael Cashman, Genowefa Grabowska, Lily Jacobs

(1)

Directive 2006/40/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 May 2006 relating to emissions from air conditioning systems in motor vehicles (OJ L 161, 14.06.2006, p. 12).

(2)

Texts Adopted, P6_TA(2007)0176.

(3)

Commission Regulation (EC) No 1400/2002 of 31 July 2002 on the application of Article 81(3) of the Treaty to categories of vertical agreements and concerted practices in the motor vehicle sector (OJ L 203, 1.8.2002, p. 30).

(4)

Regulation (EC) No 715/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 June 2007 on type approval of motor vehicles with respect to emissions from light passenger and commercial vehicles (Euro 5 and Euro 6) and on access to vehicle repair and maintenance information (OJ L 171, 29.6.2007, p. 1).


RESULT OF FINAL VOTE IN COMMITTEE

Date adopted

22.11.2007

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

36

3

0

Members present for the final vote

Jan Březina, Jerzy Buzek, Pilar del Castillo Vera, Jorgo Chatzimarkakis, Giles Chichester, Den Dover, Nicole Fontaine, Adam Gierek, Norbert Glante, András Gyürk, David Hammerstein, Erna Hennicot-Schoepges, Ján Hudacký, Romana Jordan Cizelj, Werner Langen, Anne Laperrouze, Eluned Morgan, Angelika Niebler, Reino Paasilinna, Miloslav Ransdorf, Vladimír Remek, Herbert Reul, Teresa Riera Madurell, Paul Rübig, Andres Tarand, Britta Thomsen, Radu Ţîrle, Patrizia Toia, Catherine Trautmann, Claude Turmes, Nikolaos Vakalis, Alejo Vidal-Quadras

Substitute(s) present for the final vote

Pilar Ayuso, Joan Calabuig Rull, Neena Gill, Lambert van Nistelrooij

Substitute(s) under Rule 178(2)
present for the final vote

Holger Krahmer, Umberto Pirilli, Carl Schlyter

Last updated: 3 January 2008Legal notice