Procedure : 2017/2083(INI)
Document stages in plenary
Document selected : A8-0334/2017

Texts tabled :

A8-0334/2017

Debates :

PV 14/11/2017 - 16
CRE 14/11/2017 - 16

Votes :

PV 16/11/2017 - 7.7

Texts adopted :


REPORT     
PDF 455kWORD 96k
24 October 2017
PE 606.307v02-00 A8-0334/2017

on the EU-Africa Strategy: a boost for development

(2017/2083(INI))

Committee on Development

Rapporteur: Maurice Ponga

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION
 OPINION of the Committee on Foreign Affairs
 OPINION of the Committee on International Trade
 OPINION of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs
 INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE
 FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

MOTION FOR A EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION

on the EU-Africa Strategy: a boost for development

(2017/2083(INI))

The European Parliament,

–  having regard to Article 21 of the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and Article 208 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU),

–  having regard to the ‘Global Strategy for the European Union’s Foreign and Security Policy – Shared Vision, Common Action: a stronger Europe’ presented to the European Council at its meeting of 28 and 29 June 2016,

–  having regard to the joint statement of 7 June 2017 by Parliament, the Council and the representatives of the governments of the Member States meeting within the Council, and the Commission on the New European Consensus on Development – Our World, Our Dignity, Our Future,

–  having regard to the United Nations Summit on Sustainable Development and the outcome document adopted by the UN General Assembly on 25 September 2015, entitled ‘Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development’, and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs),

–  having regard to the Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems that were developed in the Committee on World Food Security (CFS-RAI) in order to contribute to the attainment of SDGs one and two,

–  having regard to the Addis Ababa Action Agenda on Financing for Development of 2015,

–  having regard to the Paris Agreement on climate change of 2015,

–  having regard to the Africa Action Summit which took place on 16 November 2016, consolidating the African dimension of COP 22,

–  having regard to the Commission Communication of 26 February 2016 on the EU Action Plan against Wildlife Trafficking (COM(2016)0087),

–  having regard to the Partnership agreement between the members of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States of the one part, and the European Community and its Member States, of the other part, signed in Cotonou on 23 June 2000 (the Cotonou Agreement)(1), and to its revisions of 2005 and 2010,

–  having regard to the Joint Africa-EU Strategy (JAES) adopted by African and European Heads of State and of Government at the Lisbon summit of 9 December 2007, and the two action plans adopted in Accra in October 2007 (for the period 2008-2010) and Tripoli in November 2010 (for the period 2011-2013),

–  having regard to the conclusions of the 4th EU-Africa summit held in Brussels on 2 and 3 April 2014, the roadmap for the format of the meetings (Cairo format) and the areas of cooperation between the two continents for the period 2014-2017 and the EU-Africa declaration on migration and mobility,

–  having regard to the Agenda 2063 of the African Union (AU) adopted in May 2014,

–  having regard to the report on the draft recommendations on the institutional reform of the African Union, prepared by H.E. Paul Kagamé, with the title ‘The Imperative to Strengthen our Union’,

–  having regard to the 3rd Civil Society Intercontinental Forum which took place in Tunis from 11 to 13 July 2017, calling for greater engagement of civil society organisations and for individuals from civil society to be placed at the centre of the EU-Africa strategy,

–  having regard to the joint communication from the Commission and the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy of 7 June 2017 entitled ‘A Strategic Approach to Resilience in the EU’s external action’ (JOIN(2017)0021),

–  having regard to Regulation (EU) 2017/1601 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 September 2017 establishing the European Fund for Sustainable Development (EFSD), the EFSD Guarantee and the EFSD Guarantee Fund(2),

–  having regard to the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 July 2016 amending Regulation (EU) No 230/214 establishing an instrument contributing to stability and peace,

–  having regard to the joint communication from the Commission and the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy of 22 November 2016 entitled ‘A renewed partnership with the countries of Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific (ACP)’ (JOIN(2016)0052),

–  having regard to the various communications from the Commission on relations between the EU and Africa, particularly that of 27 June 2007 entitled ‘From Cairo to Lisbon - The EU-Africa Strategic Partnership’ (COM(2007)0357), that of 17 October 2008 entitled ‘One year after Lisbon: The Africa-EU partnership at work’ (COM(2008)0617) and that of 10 November 2010 on the consolidation of EU Africa relations: 1.5 billion inhabitants, 80 countries, two continents, one future (COM(2010)0634),

–  having regard to the joint communication to the European Parliament and the Council from the Commission and the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy of 5 May 2017 entitled ‘A renewed impetus for the Africa-EU partnership’ (JOIN(2017)0017), and the Council conclusions of 19 June 2017 on the subject,

–  having regard to its previous resolutions on relations between the Union and Africa and the ACP countries, and particularly that of 4 October 2016 on the future of ACP-EU relations beyond 2020(3),

–  having regard to its resolution of 13 September 2016 on the EU Trust Fund for Africa: implications for development and humanitarian aid(4),

–  having regard to its resolution of 7 June 2016 on the 2015 Report on policy coherence for development(5),

–  having regard to its resolution of 22 November 2016 on increasing the effectiveness of development cooperation(6),

–  having regard to Rule 52 of its Rules of Procedure,

–  having regard to the report of the Committee on Development and the opinions of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Committee on International Trade and the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (A8-0334/2017),

A.  whereas the ties between the European Union (EU) and African countries are historic and their destinies are intimately linked; whereas the EU is Africa’s main partner in the fields of economic activity and trade as well as development, humanitarian aid and security;

B.  whereas there is a need to provide the Africa-EU partnership with a new vision that reflects the evolution of the political, economic, environmental and social situations of both continents; whereas there is a need to adapt to new players on the international scene – including China – and to move towards an enhanced, modernised and more political partnership, with a focus on defending our key common interests;

C.  whereas relations between the EU and Africa must be guided by the principles of mutual interest and understanding and by shared common values within the framework of a reciprocal partnership;

D.  whereas relations between the EU and the continent of Africa are based on various legal instruments and political strategies and whereas it is important to step up synergies and coherence between them in order to make the partnership more effective and sustainable;

E.  whereas the Cotonou Agreement with the EU, to which 79 ACP States are parties, including 48 in sub-Saharan Africa, governs the main partnership between the EU and Africa; whereas the EU has also established relations with African countries that are not parties to the Cotonou Agreement; whereas the EU-ACP partnership was established at a time when ACP countries had not yet formed their current regional or continental cooperation structures; whereas the emergence of the AU in 2003 and of the JAES in 2007 makes it essential to streamline the various policy frameworks between the EU and Africa; whereas the objective to ‘treat Africa as one’ is clearly stated in the preamble of the JAES;

F.  whereas the EU is engaged with the African countries in a political and institutional dialogue advanced through the EU-Africa summits, the intergovernmental organisation the ‘Union for the Mediterranean’ (UfM) and the ACP-EU cooperation bodies, including at parliamentary level via the ACP-EU Joint Parliamentary Assembly, the EU Delegation to the UfM Parliamentary Assembly and with the Pan-African Parliament;

G.  whereas the 11th European Development Fund (EDF) has a budget of EUR 30.5 billion, of which EUR 900 million are reserved for the African Peace Facility, and whereas EUR 1.4 billion of the EDF will be used for the EU Trust Fund for Africa; whereas more than EUR 5 billion have been spent on the needs of African countries in the context of the European Neighbourhood Instrument (ENI), and whereas EUR 845 million have been allocated to the Pan-African Programme under the Development Cooperation Instrument (DCI) to implement the JAES;

H.  whereas the next Africa-EU Summit, which will take place in Abidjan on 29 and 30 November 2017 on the topic of ‘Investing in Youth’, is an opportunity to create, support and develop economic conditions of true equality between partners wishing to defend key common interests;

I.  whereas the new JAES must be included in the future post-Cotonou agreement;

J.  whereas the EU is a long-standing partner and a major guarantor of the security of the continent of Africa, which is a subject of the utmost importance; whereas the security and sustainable growth of the European continent closely and immediately depend on the stability and development of the African continent and vice versa;

K.  whereas constant support for the effective implementation of the African Peace and Security Architecture and the commitment of the EU, the AU and other international players present in Africa are essential for the development and stability of the African continent;

L.  whereas migration features prominently in the EU global strategy on foreign and security policy and constitutes a priority topic in the EU’s external relations, including its relations with Africa; whereas Africa and Europe have a shared interest and responsibility when it comes to migration and mobility, including in the fight against human trafficking and smuggling, and whereas managing migration calls for global solutions based on solidarity, the sharing of responsibility, respect for migrant rights and international law, as well as the effective use of development cooperation instruments;

M.  whereas more than 218 million people live in extreme poverty in Africa; whereas the share of the population living in extreme poverty in sub-Saharan Africa has fallen from 56 % in 1990 to 43 % in 2012; whereas 33 of the 47 least developed countries are in Africa, which makes the EU-Africa partnership a vital tool for the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the attainment of the sustainable development goals, particularly the eradication of poverty;

N.  whereas, in Africa, infrastructure requirements are estimated at EUR 75 billion annually, the value of the consumer market is likely to reach USD 1 000 billion in 2020, foreign direct investment is set to increase steadily to an estimated USD 144 billion in 2020, and the population is currently 1 billion;

O.  whereas exports from Africa are still dominated by unprocessed products, and whereas a high proportion of these exports are covered by trade preference arrangements; whereas free market access for most African products increases the capacities of African countries and enhances their competitiveness and participation in global markets when accompanied, among other things, by policies aimed at lasting sustainable industrialisation and rural productivity as key paths for development;

P.  whereas demographic trends will have to be taken into account, bearing in mind that by 2050, according to some estimates, Africa could have a population of 2.5 billion, most of them young people, while Europe is expected to have a significantly older population; whereas it is therefore crucial to generate millions of jobs and to help with and support the empowerment of women and young people, particularly by means of education, access to healthcare and training on the African continent;

Intensifying the political dialogue between the EU and Africa: a precondition for a renewed strategic partnership

1.  Takes note of the new communication entitled ‘For a Renewed Impetus of the Africa-EU Partnership’ which aims to lend fresh impetus to the Africa-EU partnership in order to broaden and intensify it, gearing it to prosperity and stability on the two continents in accordance with the commitments undertaken by subscribing to the SDGs, the New European Consensus for Development, which serves as a set of guidelines for European development policy, the EU Global Strategy on Foreign and Security Policy and Agenda 2063;

2.  Recalls that Africa is a key strategic partner for the EU and considers it vital to intensify relations between the EU and the AU via a revised and broadened dialogue, which includes the principles of transparency and good governance, in order to establish a ‘win-win’ situation, and equal and sustainable cooperation to respond to shared challenges and secure common benefits, while ensuring the principle of ownership and taking into account the specific circumstances and level of development of each partner country;

3.  Invites the future partnership to focus on the priority areas identified by both the AU and the EU, such as:

  economic development (via trade, Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs), enhanced regional integration, economic diversification, sustainable industrialisation and the creation of quality jobs),

•  good governance, including human rights,

•  human development via public services covering basic needs, such as education, health, access to water and sanitation, gender equality, science, technology and innovation,

•  security and the fight against terrorism,

•  migration and mobility,

•  environment – including climate change;

4.  Recalls that budget support is the best way to carry out appropriation, providing governments with the means to determine their needs and priorities; recalls that general or sector-specific budget support enables development policies to be supported and ensures maximised take-up;

5.  Welcomes the fact that the main topic of the 5th EU-Africa Summit, which will take place in Côte d’Ivoire in November 2017, is youth, given its importance for the future of both continents;

6.  Recalls the importance and effectiveness of ACP-EU cooperation and the results achieved in the field of development; stresses that this legally binding framework must be maintained after 2020; stresses the need to step up this cooperation, while developing its regional dimension, including by means of increased cooperation with the AU, the regional economic communities and other regional organisations; calls for a more strategic, pragmatic, comprehensive and structured approach to political dialogue within the framework of negotiations for the post-Cotonou agreement;

7.  Calls for the parliamentary dimension of the ACP-EU to be stepped up; stresses that the ACP-EU Joint Parliamentary Assembly is a unique platform for interaction and plays a key role in strengthening democracy, the rule of law and respect for human rights;

8.  Stresses that the European neighbourhood policy (ENP) review provides opportunities for improving the coordination of neighbourhood policy and policy on other African states through the creation of extended cooperation frameworks on regional issues such as security, energy, and even migration;

9.  Reaffirms the need to adopt, within the Africa-EU partnership, an approach coordinated among the EU Member States themselves, and between the EU and its Member States, as provided for by Article 210 TFEU; recalls, likewise, that respect for the EU principle of policy coherence for development is necessary in European and African policies and initiatives alike in order to attain the SDGs;

10.  Calls for the principle of policy coherence for development to be fully incorporated into the EU’s trade relationship with Africa, which entails the inclusion of enforceable Trade and Sustainable Development (TSD) clauses in all EU trade agreements with African countries, in line with the commitment undertaken by the Commission in the ‘Trade for All’ strategy;

11.  Reiterates the importance of the Member States fulfilling their commitment to directing 0.7 % of their GDP to official development assistance to strengthen cooperation with Africa;

12.  Endorses the stated desire to intensify alliances between the EU and Africa to tackle global governance issues; stresses, in this context, the need to step up the dialogue with the AU and the importance of ensuring its financial autonomy, in accordance with the Kigali Decision on Financing, by reducing its dependence on external financing; takes note of the proposals put forward in the report drawn up by Paul Kagamé which aims at strengthening the AU in order to give impetus to the process of political African integration;

13.  Stresses the role played by civil society – including NGOs, faith-based organisations, youth and women’s rights organisations, the private sector, trade unions, parliamentary assemblies, local authorities and the diaspora, each one of them with its own specific features – in consolidating the political dialogue between the EU and Africa to ensure a people-focused partnership;

14.  Stresses the need to increase the participation of civil society in the Africa-EU Partnership, promoting the reinforcement of its capacities, especially by transferring expertise and ensuring its involvement in the design and implementation of relevant reforms and policies; considers that the engagement of civil society organisations (CSOs) is essential for public accountability; supports the various platforms established to make civil society a key actor in the partnership, particularly the Joint Annual Forum (JAF), whose aim is to implement the EU-Africa roadmap; regrets, nonetheless, the fact that the JAF has never been held and calls for the EU and the AU to immediately put in place the financial and political means needed to ensure the meaningful participation of all stakeholders in the partnership, including in the framework of this 5th AU-EU Summit;

Building more resilient states and societies for the benefit of all people, particularly young people, in order to attain the SDGs

15.  Considers it necessary to make resilience – in all its five dimensions – a major component of the new EU-Africa strategy;

Political resilience

16.  Emphasises the need to promote good governance, democracy, the rule of law and respect for human rights, but also to undertake efforts to combat corruption on both continents, as they are indispensable elements of sustainable development;

17.  Calls, therefore, for a frank and inclusive dialogue, based on mutual respect, making these values and principles a major component of cooperation, particularly by extending the conditionality of development aid to their strict respect;

18.  Stresses that addressing governance challenges in both continents with greater determination is of paramount importance for building fairer, more stable and more secure societies; underlines the need to continue to uphold and promote human rights and governance on the basis of existing international legal instruments, laws, principles and mechanisms, including those of African regional governance bodies such as the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights and its protocols, the African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance, the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights and the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights, so as to strengthen ownership;

19.  Recalls the importance of the role of the International Criminal Court in tackling impunity and in upholding the values of peace, security, equality, fairness, justice and compensation that it serves as a vehicle for; calls for the European Union and African states to continue supporting the Rome Statute and the International Criminal Court; urges all signatories of the Rome Statute to ratify it as soon as possible;

20.  Supports the organisation of a joint high-level AU-EU conference on electoral processes, democracy and governance in Africa and Europe, and calls for the European Parliament, the Pan African Parliament, the ACP-EU Joint Parliamentary Assembly and the Euro-Mediterranean Parliamentary Assembly (PA-UfM) to be fully involved in it; calls for the links between the different assemblies to be strengthened with a view to fostering synergies and the consistency of joint measures;

Security resilience

21.  Reiterates the close interlinkage between security and development; points out the need to better integrate security concerns and development aims to address the specific problems of fragile states and to foster more resilient states and societies; notes that this should be done through specific instruments and additional funding;

22.  Calls for stronger cooperation between the EU and Africa in the field of security and justice in respect of the international legal framework in order to take a holistic approach to tackling problems and to better combat organised crime, human trafficking and smuggling particularly in relation to children, and terrorism; considers that EU action should be in synergy with the strategies adopted by African countries, particularly those related to peace and security expressed in Agenda 2063;

23.  Stresses the need for cooperation between the EU, AU, regional organisations and other relevant political players in Africa in the field of security in order to increase the capacities of developing countries, to reform their security sectors, to support activities in the field of disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration (DDR) of former combatants;

24.  Recalls that terrorism is a global threat affecting regional peace and stability, sustainable development and internal security, which needs to be tackled in a coordinated effort by national governments, regional and international organisations, and European Agencies; calls for enhanced cooperation within the EU-Africa Strategy aimed at preventing impunity, promoting the rule of law and the expansion of police and judicial capacities in order to facilitate the exchange of information and best practices, and preventing, countering, and combating the financing of terrorism as well as prosecuting it; notes that anti-terrorism strategy should also include measures for promoting interfaith dialogue and preventing radicalisation in Africa and Europe, especially among young people, which leads to violent extremism;

25.  Reiterates the importance of the various EU missions and operations deployed in Africa; welcomes the creation of the Group of Five Sahel joint force; calls for European peace and security actions to be stepped up in cooperation with African and international partners and for support for the full operationalisation of the African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA); calls for an initial EU contribution to the AU Peace Fund for activities under the ‘mediation and diplomacy’ window;

Environmental resilience

26.  Recalls that Africa is particularly vulnerable to the impact of climate change; considers it essential for the EU to develop a strategic approach to building climate resilience and to support African countries, in particular the least developed countries (LDCs), in their efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt; stresses the importance of climate change as a risk multiplier for conflict, drought, famine and migration, as exemplified in the recent outbreak of famine in South Sudan, Nigeria and Somalia; recalls, in this context, that it is vital to promote and respect the commitment given in Paris in 2015 to allocate USD 100 billion to developing countries by 2020; calls for new kinds of EU-Africa collaboration to lower the barriers to funding and technology transfer;

27.  Stresses that Africa has a rich and diverse natural environment; calls for the protection of biodiversity to be put at the core of the AU-EU political agenda; calls for the EU-Africa strategy to work in conjunction with the priorities of the EU Action Plan against Wildlife Trafficking and to protect natural heritage and, in particular, nature parks;

28.   Encourages greater investment in the fields of renewable energy and the circular economy in order to further stimulate actions which contribute to respect for the environment and create job opportunities; recalls that ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all is crucial for the satisfaction of basic human needs, is essential for virtually all kinds of economic activity and is a key driver of development; calls for continued EU support for the Africa Renewable Energy Initiative (AREI) and welcomes the Commission’s proposal to launch a new EU-Africa Research and Innovation Partnership on climate change and sustainable energy;

29.  Calls on the Africa-EU partnership to focus on agriculture and food security in a long-term perspective and to promote synergies between food security and climate measures; urges the EU,  in this context, to scale up its assistance to sustainable agriculture, agro-forestry and agro-ecological practices respecting traditional land use, and ensuring access to land, water and open source seeds; calls, in addition, on the EU to support small-scale producers/farmers and pastoralists to attain food security through building up and investing in infrastructure in line with the Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems of the CFS, and to support the establishment of cooperatives; underlines also the capacity and experience that CSOs have gained at community level in relation to sustainable agriculture;

30.  Welcomes the EU initiatives demanding better management of, and more transparent trade in, natural resources; believes that the sustainable management of and trade in natural resources, such as minerals, timber and wildlife, would allow resource-rich countries and their populations to further benefit from them; recalls the need, under EU legislation on conflict minerals, to introduce accompanying measures following an integrated approach that encourages the application of international standards on due diligence, as defined by the OECD Guidance; calls for a joint EU-Africa charter on sustainable management of natural resources to be drawn up;

Economic resilience

31.  Considers that a stable regulatory and institutional environment and a healthy economy are essential elements for ensuring competitiveness, investments, job creation, a higher standard of living and sustainable growth; stresses, in this context, the need to increase the online accessibility of corporate law information; recalls that economic growth without an impartial state does not systematically guarantee social development or progress and insists on the need to assure the redistribution of wealth, the provision of services for citizens and to improve equal opportunities;

32.  Calls for increased cooperation between the European and African private sectors and for the concentration of investment, particularly by means of public-private partnerships, based on a strict ethical code and on the principles of social responsibility, in key sectors such as:

–  sustainable energy including electricity access for all,

–  basic infrastructure, notably in the transport sector, including maritime transport,

–  sustainable use of natural resources,

–  sustainable agriculture,

–  the ‘blue economy’ – including the maritime industry,

–  research, science, technology and innovation, both around subjects of common interest and around those which particularly affect one of the continents, such as poverty-related and neglected diseases,

–  digitalisation as a key factor in ensuring the development of the African economy, but also in connecting people;

33.  Stresses the fact that regional integration drives economic development and is a necessity in a globalised world; calls for support for South-South Cooperation which reflects the gradual transformation of the African continent; supports the establishment of a continental free trade area in Africa as well as the goal of increasing intra-African trade to 50 % by 2050; recalls also the development prospects offered by Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) and trade agreements between the EU and African countries, which allow the promotion of sustainable development, human rights and fair and ethical trade; stresses the need to provide for development-supportive rules of origin, effective safeguard clauses, asymmetrical liberalisation schedules, protection for infant industries, and the simplification and transparency of customs procedures; recalls that EPAs are intended to help the ACP countries to expand their markets, to encourage trade in goods and to boost investment and that they anticipate a slow, gradual and asymmetric opening up of trade in goods between the EU and the ACP countries;

34.  Calls for transparency in trade agreements and for the full participation of all relevant stakeholders, including the civil societies of the countries concerned, through formal consultations, in future negotiations and in the implementation of agreements currently under negotiation;

35.  Calls for the EU and its Member States to better coordinate their aid for trade programmes and to boost synergies with their Africa investment policies; calls, furthermore, for an increase in their financial commitments to Aid For Trade as well as technical assistance and capacity-building initiatives, which are essential for African countries, in particular in LDCs;

36.  Considers that the private sector, from micro to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), to cooperatives and multinational companies, plays a decisive role in job creation and the development process, and that it helps to finance the latter; stresses the specific role of SMEs and small family-run establishments, and calls for support for individual initiative; welcomes in this regard the establishment of the European Fund for Sustainable Development, which should aim to support the private sector in African countries, particularly local business and SMEs in fragile countries, and thus promote investment and the creation of sustainable jobs, particularly for women and young people;

37.  Recalls the obligations that the private sector is required to fulfil under the United Nations and OECD Guidelines, and reiterates its call on EU and AU Member States to constructively participate in the UN intergovernmental working group on transnational corporations and other business enterprises with respect to human rights to work towards the setting-up of an international binding treaty, based on the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, on the way corporations comply with human rights obligations and obligations with respect to social, labour and environmental standards;

38.  Underlines the necessity of creating decent jobs and of linking them to investment, both of which should be done within the framework of the Africa-EU partnership; calls for compliance with ILO standards in this regard; stresses the importance of interaction between social, economic and institutional persons and calls for the role of social partners to be strengthened by boosting the effectiveness of social dialogue at all relevant levels, which is conducive to collective bargaining;

39.  Deplores the fact that, each year, some USD 50 billion is drained out of Africa in the form of illicit financial flows, which exceeds the total annual amount of Official Development Assistance (ODA) and undermines efforts in the field of domestic revenue mobilisation; calls, therefore, on both parties to:

–  create effective tools to combat tax evasion, tax fraud and corruption, including public transparency on ultimate beneficial ownership of legal entities, trusts and similar arrangements,

–  promote the UN-supported Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI),

–  support initiatives to increase the efficiency and transparency of public financial management systems;

40.  Calls, moreover, for the effective implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Debt and Human Rights and the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) Principles on Promoting Responsible Sovereign Lending and Borrowing; welcomes the UN’s work towards an international sovereign debt workout mechanism;

41.  Calls for greater financial inclusion in Africa, including that of women, through the development of electronic banking in order to fight against the polarisation of African society; recalls that remittances make up a larger flow of money to developing countries than the total of ODA and can significantly contribute to achieving the 2030 Agenda; calls, therefore, on the EU to further support the AU’s efforts in improving remittance mechanisms;

Social resilience

42.  Recognises the importance of demographic dynamics in Africa, which necessitate a long-term strategic vision for developing sustainable, inclusive and participatory societies; stresses, equally, the need to ensure non-discrimination against vulnerable groups, including persons with disabilities and indigenous peoples; recognises that the increasing population in Africa is both a challenge for the local economy and an opportunity for the continent; calls, therefore, on the EU to show commitment in promoting appropriate public policies and investments in education and health, including sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), to ensure that young people are equipped to make informed decisions about their SRH, gender equality and children’s rights without which social, economic and environmental resilience cannot be reached;

43.  Emphasises that the urbanisation rate in Africa is on the rise and poses social, economic and environmental challenges; calls for solutions to relieve this urban pressure and to alleviate the problems of uncontrolled urbanisation;

44.  Calls for the EU and the AU to strengthen African national education systems, including the capacity of its administrative structure, by investing at least 20 % of their national budgets in education and by scaling up the EU’s support for the global partnership for education (GPE) and the Education Cannot Wait (ECW) fund;

45.   Stresses the need for universal, inclusive, equitable and long-term access to high-quality education at all levels, from early childhood onwards and for all, with a special focus on girls, and including in emergency and crisis situations;

46.  Stresses the need to invest in human capital and for young people to be connected to global realities and to have skills which meet the current and future needs of the job market by strengthening educational and vocational learning systems – both formal and informal – self-employment and entrepreneurship;

47.  Considers it important to support African countries in establishing effective public health systems and ensuring affordable access to quality health services for all, while, in particular, breaking down the barriers faced by women and other vulnerable groups, including children, people with disabilities and LGBTI people;

48.  Calls for the introduction of minimum universal coverage by setting up horizontal national health systems; underlines the need to train an additional one million skilled health professionals than originally planned on the basis of current trends to meet the minimum WHO standard by 2030;

49.  Stresses that infectious diseases pose a significant threat to social resilience; calls on the Commission to step up scientific and medical cooperation efforts between the two continents, such as the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership, EDCTP2, and to invest in science, technology and innovation (STI) to tackle the still huge burden of poverty-related and neglected diseases (PRNDs) through its development cooperation;

50.  Recalls the need for greater investment in access to maternal healthcare and sexual and reproductive health in order to reduce maternal and infant mortality and to tackle traditional practices, such as female genital mutilation and forced and/or child marriage;

51.  Emphasises the importance of gender equality and women’s empowerment in EU-Africa cooperation; stresses the positive role and participation of women in the political and economic spheres, as well as in conflict prevention and building sustainable peace;

52.  Notes that culture is both an enabler and an important component of development and may facilitate social inclusion, freedom of expression, identity building, civil empowerment and conflict prevention while strengthening economic growth; calls, therefore, on the EU and the AU to promote intercultural political dialogue and cultural diversity and to support strategies protecting culture and heritage; stresses that democracy is a universal value which can be part of any culture; acknowledges, equally, the role of sport as a source and driver of social inclusion and gender equality;

Establishing a strategy for mobility and migration which contribute to the development of the two continents

53.  Recalls that migration and mobility between and within Europe and Africa have an economic, social, environmental and political impact, and that this challenge must be tackled in a coordinated and holistic manner between the two continents and in cooperation with countries of origin, transit and destination, maximising synergies and making use of the relevant EU policies, instruments and tools, based on solidarity, responsibility sharing, respect and human dignity; recalls, in this context, that it is desirable to step up the Africa-EU dialogue in advance of the negotiations on the two global compacts on migration and refugees, respectively, to be drawn up by 2018 under the auspices of the United Nations in order to identify shared priorities, where possible;

54.   Recalls the need to enhance the positive impact of migration and mobility so that these phenomena are seen as reciprocal development tools for the two continents; stresses that this requires a carefully designed, balanced, evidence-based and sustainable policy response with a long-term strategy which takes into account demographic perspectives and the root causes of migration;

55.   Recognises that violent conflicts, persecution, inequality, infringements of human rights, weak governance, corruption, terrorism, repressive regimes, natural disasters, climate change, unemployment and chronic poverty have led to population movements and an increase in migration to Europe in recent years; recalls, nevertheless, that more than 85 % of African people leaving their country remain within the continent itself;

56.  Supports the various initiatives adopted at European level to tackle the underlying causes of irregular migration: migration partnerships, trust funds for Africa and the European Fund for Sustainable Development; calls for their implementation to be ensured and continued in a flexible, efficient, coherent and transparent manner while enhancing possible synergies among different instruments, programmes and activities, both in internal and external action; highlights the need for increased cooperation in the field of border management;

57.  Reiterates its call for the promotion of legal migration, in line with the recommendations of the Valletta Action Plan; stresses, further, that development aid should not be made conditional on cooperation in migration matters;

58.  Calls on the Member States to offer their resettlement places to a significant number of refugees; calls, in this context, for the establishment of a European resettlement framework which can easily be acted upon by Member States; calls, in addition, for the EU and its Member States to cooperate with and provide assistance to African countries that are faced with movements of refugees or prolonged crises, with a view to increasing their asylum capacities and protection systems;

59.  Urges Member States to step up their financial contribution to trust funds and other instruments aiming to foster inclusive and sustainable growth and stimulate job creation thus contributing to addressing the root causes of migration; also asks for a stronger scrutiny role of the European Parliament to ensure that migration partnerships and funding tools are compatible with EU legal basis, principles and commitments;

60.  Calls for the EU and the AU to promote exchanges between students, teachers, entrepreneurs and researchers between the two continents; welcomes the Commission’s proposal to launch an African Youth Facility, expanding the scope of Erasmus+, and an EU vocational education and training facility; calls for a discussion on the recognition by the EU of certificates and diplomas issued by African schools and universities; notes that ensuring circular migration is essential for sustainable development; and for preventing a brain drain from Africa;

61.  Recognises the special position of the diaspora in both the receiving countries and the countries of origin in sending considerable funds and as a development partner at national and regional levels; expresses its wish that the diaspora might act as a source of information tailored to respond to the real needs of the people, addressing the dangers linked to irregular migration, as well as the challenges linked to integration in host countries;

°

°  °

62.  Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission, the Vice-President of the Commission / High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, the Commission of the African Union, the ACP Council, the Pan-African Parliament and the Bureau of the ACP-EU Joint Parliamentary Assembly.

(1)

OJ L 317, 15.12.2000, p. 3.

(2)

OJ L 249, 27.9.2017, p. 1.

(3)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0371.

(4)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0337.

(5)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0246.

(6)

Texts adopted, P8_TA(2016)0437.


OPINION of the Committee on Foreign Affairs (5.9.2017)

for the Committee on Development

on the EU-Africa Strategy: a boost for development

(2017/2083(INI))

Rapporteur: Fabio Massimo Castaldo

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Foreign Affairs calls on the Committee on Development, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

1.  Stresses the increasing importance of political, security and economic relations between the EU and Africa at a time when both are experiencing profound changes, and recognises the contribution made by the Joint Africa-EU Strategy to building a stronger partnership over the past 10 years; emphasises the need to build on these achievements and work towards the development of an equal, sustainable and mutually beneficial relationship with Africa, in a spirit of shared ownership and responsibility, while at the same time respecting the independence and sovereignty of African countries; salutes, in this regard, the active involvement and engagement of African states with the EU in recent international fora, such as the negotiations for the Paris Agreement at the 2015 UN Climate Change Conference (COP 21);

2.  Stresses that today the EU collectively is Africa’s main foreign investor, trading partner, source of remittances and partner in development and humanitarian assistance, and a key security provider on the continent; expects the upcoming AU-EU Summit to provide fresh impetus and new ideas for adapting the strategy to a fast-changing environment, given the pivotal importance of African developments for the EU and its strategic interests;

3.  Underlines the need for a stronger and more political partnership between the EU and Africa, based on shared values and interests, in order to foster peace, tackle global issues such as climate change, food insecurity, access to water, environmental degradation, the unsustainable exploitation of natural resources, population growth, the urbanisation of large cities, youth unemployment, impunity, the attainment of the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs), terrorism, radicalisation, organised crime, and migratory flows, while building on our joint principles of the rule of law, the social market economy, good governance and respect for human rights, and promote a rule-based global order based on a strong UN;

4.  Welcomes the fact that the focus of the upcoming AU-EU Summit is on youth, as the demographic dynamics of both continents place the topic at the heart of relations between Africa and the EU; points out that according to projections, sub-Saharan Africa will need to create 18 million new jobs each year up to 2035 to absorb new labour market entrants and thus prevent serious consequences for social stability; stresses the need to prioritise job creation and economic development across societies more generally and to harness the role of the private sector on the African continent;

5.  Welcomes the Commission’s proposal to launch an African Youth Facility expanding the scope of Erasmus+ and an EU vocational education and training (VET) facility to help target countries bridge the gap between the needs and opportunities of the labour market and the qualifications of graduates, while at the same time promoting the inclusion of vulnerable groups;

6.  Calls for increased support for quality education at all levels, especially for girls, through improved bilateral programmes, and continued support for global initiatives such as the Global Partnership for Education; stresses the importance of investing more heavily in schools, universities and research, promoting mobility partnerships, tackling the brain drain phenomenon, supporting programmes such as Erasmus+ and harmonising higher education through cross-border programmes and the recognition of qualifications;

7.  Recalls that never before have EU security interests been so intertwined with Africa; calls for stronger EU support to African partners and regional organisations in the area of peace and security and conflict prevention, including through specific instruments such as common security and defence policy (CSDP) operations, European military and police contributions to UN missions, EU measures to implement UN Security Council resolution 1325, and the African Peace Facility, providing the assistance and aid required in the global fight against jihadist terrorism and fostering peace and security for the affected populations; highlights the important role of past and current CSDP missions in, for example, combating piracy, fostering capacity building and strengthening maritime security and border assistance in Africa; calls on the European External Action Service (EEAS) and the Council to ensure that CSDP missions in Africa can continue to operate effectively;

8.  Highlights the importance of fostering security and stability by helping our partners to build more resilient states and societies, including through capacity building and security sector reforms, with a particular focus on good governance in the sector, parliamentary oversight and accountability, and boosting activities in the field of disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration (DDR) of former combatants;

9.  Calls for continued EU support for the increasingly proactive approach taken by the African Union (AU) and relevant regional organisations towards the full operationalisation of the African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA); calls for an initial EU contribution to the AU Peace Fund for activities under the ‘mediation and diplomacy’ window;

10.  Points out the need to better integrate security concerns and development aims to address the specific problems of fragile states and to foster more resilient states and societies, including through capacity building for food security, notably in small-scale farming, climate change adaptation, the creation of more and better jobs, especially for young people, the empowerment of women and the support of education;

11.  Stresses that addressing governance challenges in Africa with greater determination is of paramount importance for building fairer, more stable and more secure societies, and calls for efforts to tackle the state capture phenomenon, characterised by oligarchic control and extractive practices by sections of state bureaucracies, which lies at the root of many of Africa’s socio-economic problems and political conflicts;

12.  Stresses that the pursuit of common interests and cooperation on security must be totally consistent with international law, the EU’s fundamental values and the objectives of supporting democracy and good governance and promoting human rights and the rule of law; believes that these objectives should be pursued, as far as possible, in synergy with and with the coherent commitment of other relevant economic and political players in Africa, such as China and India;

13.  Stresses that respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms constitutes an invariable element of the EU’s engagement with third-country partners; calls for the EU to strengthen its support for democracy, the promotion of human rights, the rule of law, media freedom and accountable, transparent and responsive governance, which are vital elements for ensuring a stable and inclusive political, social and economic environment in Africa; calls for the EU to step up its support for Africa’s own human rights instruments, such as the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights and the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights;

14.  Calls for a more strategic, pragmatic, comprehensive and structured approach to political dialogue under the Cotonou Partnership Agreement, with the greater involvement of civil society and a stronger people-to-people dimension; underlines the importance of political dialogue under Article 8 of the agreement, of the inclusion as essential elements of the agreement of respect for human rights, democratic principles and the rule of law under Article 9, and of the ‘appropriate measures clause’ under Article 96; calls on the Commission, within the framework of the negotiations for the post-Cotonou agreement, to adopt a more structured and strategic approach to human rights dialogues by establishing permanent interparliamentary committees, following the example of those included in the EU’s association agreements, with a mandate to monitor the implementation of the essential element clauses in order to move beyond an emergency approach and engage in a more comprehensive and systematic dialogue;

15.  Stresses the importance of fostering dialogue, information exchange and cooperation in a number of fields, such as public finance management, fair and efficient tax systems, the fight against corruption, transparent and accountable public administration, the participation of civil society and citizens in decision-making processes, and the sustainable management of natural resources;

16.  Deems an effective Africa-EU partnership essential for addressing the common challenges of fighting terrorism, extremism and radicalisation; recalls that trade in illegal arms, drugs and people is often a primary source of income for radical and terror organisations in the region; stresses the devastating impact of terrorist groups such as Daesh and Boko Haram on local populations and long-term economic development; highlights the need, therefore, to boost long-term cooperation in the field of security and to increase investment in education and rehabilitation programmes; stresses that a well-functioning democracy enhances stability and constitutes a powerful tool against terrorism;

17.  Stresses the need to counter the root causes of radicalisation, such as social exclusion, poverty and the lack of education, and to conduct targeted security and counter-terrorism dialogues with African partners to jointly address grassroots issues that may lead to radicalisation and acts of terrorism; highlights the importance of improving interfaith dialogue, supporting initiatives aimed at integrating young people into society, countering terrorist propaganda while taking into account the role of the internet and social media in radicalisation processes, countering the financing of terrorism and reinforcing judicial cooperation;

18.  Stresses that the European neighbourhood policy (ENP) review provides opportunities for improving the coordination of neighbourhood policy and policy on other African states through the creation of extended cooperation frameworks; calls, therefore, for these thematic frameworks to be set up to boost cooperation between the EU, the Southern Neighbourhood partner countries and third countries in Africa on regional issues such as security, energy, and even migration;

19.  Recalls the importance of the effective implementation of external EU policies that are able to address the real root causes of migration and to better fight criminal organisations involved in human trafficking; calls for increased joint efforts to implement the Valetta Action Plan based on a fair and true partnership with third countries of origin and transit; recalls the importance of a balanced and holistic approach in the new partnership framework and underlines, in this connection, the importance of democratic scrutiny by Parliament; stresses that the new partnership framework with third countries must not become the only pillar of EU action on migration and should extend beyond a narrow focus on border management, to include, for example, fairer trade relations, the fight against climate change and illegal financial transfers from Africa, the establishment of safe and legal channels for migration, and the introduction of initiatives to render the transfer of remittances easier and less costly;

20.  Recalls that the root causes of migration include conflicts, weak governance, governmental instability, the violation of human rights, corruption, the lack of the rule of law, impunity, inequality, unemployment or underemployment, the lack of livelihoods and resources, and climate change;

21.  Considers that Africa and Europe have a shared interest and responsibility when it comes to migration and that the crisis calls for global solutions based on solidarity, the sharing of responsibility, respect for migrant rights, the principle of non-refoulement, and the fulfilment of the obligations of states to properly manage migration flows throughout their territory, to welcome back their citizens and to grant them their full constitutional rights if they are unable to achieve legal resident status abroad;

22.  Stresses that strong cooperation between African countries and the EU, and in particular between countries on either side of the Mediterranean, is key to combating the trafficking of human beings and the smuggling of migrants; supports, in this regard, the implementation of comprehensive policy and legal frameworks based on the UN Convention against Transnational Organised Crime and its protocols;

23.  Notes that Member State contributions to the Emergency Trust Fund for Africa remain low; expects the European External Investment Plan (EIP) to deliver on its commitments to mobilise investment in Africa, support inclusive and sustainable growth and stimulate job creation, thereby helping to address the root causes of migration;

24.  Notes with great concern the lack of central state authority in parts of the African continent, in particular when it comes to border management, and recalls the negative repercussions this has on the fight against terrorism and drug trafficking; highlights the need, therefore, for increased cooperation in the field of border management and migration policy;

25.  Recognises the importance, the significant potential and the transformative power of regional, trans-regional and continental integration for growth and development in Africa and the need to avoid constructing new barriers to trade, mobility and security cooperation; considers an AU encompassing the entirety of the African continent a very positive step in the direction of pan-African integration and welcomes the renaming of the ‘Africa-EU Summit’ to the ‘AU-EU Summit’;

26.  Notes the need for the EU to support the strengthening of intra-African trade and sustainable investment, where possible in local currency, and the cross-regional, continental and global dimension of projects and programmes in fields ranging from sustainable agriculture and the environment to higher education, ICT, research, and physical infrastructure networks;

27.  Takes the view that regional integration projects, such as those in Southern, West or East Africa, must be supported in a way that complements and strengthens pan-African integration processes in the framework of the AU; contends that the EU should also pursue strategic bilateral ties, based on respect for human rights and the rule of law, with pivotal African states as leaders and enablers of the respective integration projects; underscores, in addition, the need to revive the Union for the Mediterranean as a vehicle for the pursuit of shared security and prosperity in North Africa;

28.  Acknowledges the importance of interparliamentary relations and encourages African partners to continue to make interparliamentary cooperation at bilateral, regional and international level a political priority; highlights the constructive role of interparliamentary delegations and regional assemblies in advancing the Africa-EU Partnership, promoting common interests and a genuine dialogue between equals, and proposes working more closely with African parliaments to strengthen them in their key democratic role;

29.  Recalls the important role of responsible investment and trade, a responsible private sector that fulfils international health, safety, labour and environmental standards, and a favourable business environment in the creation of long-term economic development; calls on the Commission and the Member States to foster cooperation with international partners to prevent, investigate and halt non-compliance with those standards or cases in which European companies cause or contribute to human rights violations and infringe upon the rights of vulnerable groups, such as minorities, indigenous people, women and children; calls on the EU and the AU member states to participate actively and work towards the productive outcome of the negotiations on the draft Treaty on transnational corporations and human rights at the UN Human Rights Council;

30.  Calls for increased EU support for Africa in the area of debt reduction and debt sustainability and underlines the need for international legislation and the creation of debt auditing commissions on cases of odious debt; calls for Member States to implement effectively the UN Guiding Principles on foreign debt and human rights and the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) Principles on Promoting Responsible Sovereign Lending and Borrowing by making them legally binding;

31.  Emphasises the added value of transport infrastructures in boosting the economy and trade between the EU and Africa; underlines the strategic importance of ports, harbours and airports;

32.  Recognises that Africa suffers from a massive energy shortfall as 645 million people do not have access to affordable electricity; takes the view that sustainable solutions based on renewable energies and mini-grid and off-grid systems should be prioritised, and calls for the EU to assist its African partners in overcoming the financial, technical and political challenges of this process; recognises the need for improvements to governance in the energy sector and to stimulate public and private investment, whether internal or cross-border, in renewable energy at all levels, and believes that the new EIP could represent an outstanding opportunity in this regard; calls for continued EU support for the Africa Renewable Energy Initiative (AREI) and welcomes the Commission proposal to launch a new EU-Africa Research and Innovation Partnership on climate change and sustainable energy;

33.  Underlines the importance of small-scale development projects, which have a direct effect on people’s lives; urges the Commission to continue supporting them;

34.  Calls on the Commission to present a legislative proposal on accompanying measures for the Conflict Minerals Regulation (Regulation (EU) 2017/821)(1) in line with the relevant Joint Communication (JOIN(2014)0008);

35.  Recognises the importance of effective systems of social protection for human security, conflict prevention and mitigating the impact of protracted conflicts and forced displacement; points out the disproportionate impact of violent conflict and forced displacement on women and children;

36.  Emphasises the fundamental role of women in development and considers that women’s participation in governance constitutes a precondition for socio-economic progress, social cohesion and equitable democratic governance; calls for positive measures to be taken to ensure progress towards the equal participation of women in society, including in decision-making positions at all levels; calls, at the same time, on African countries to encourage and support increased female participation in the labour market and to take all necessary measures to prevent gender discrimination in the workplace;

37.  Urges the Commission to devote special attention to the sexual and reproductive rights of women and girls in its external development programmes;

38.  Calls on the EEAS to continue raising the issue of LGBTI people in its human rights and political dialogue with African countries and to provide support for LGBTI rights defenders through the appropriate instruments;

39.  Reiterates its support for the commitment of the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the EU to full cooperation on the prevention of serious crimes falling under the jurisdiction of the court; calls for the EU to remain open to constructive discussion where concerns are raised within the framework of the Rome Statute and to keep supporting African countries transitioning from conflicts in their fight against impunity and in ensuring accountability for international crimes;

40.  Stresses that the upcoming AU-EU Summit will provide an opportunity to stress the EU’s priorities for EU-Africa relations in the post-Cotonou process;

41.  Considers that Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific are very different regions with specific interests and challenges that cannot easily be accommodated under the overarching Cotonou structure; takes the view, therefore, that future cooperation with Africa should be based on existing regional and sub-regional organisations, the AU in particular.

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

30.8.2017

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

54

7

5

Members present for the final vote

Lars Adaktusson, Petras Auštrevičius, Mario Borghezio, Klaus Buchner, James Carver, Fabio Massimo Castaldo, Lorenzo Cesa, Andi Cristea, Georgios Epitideios, Knut Fleckenstein, Anna Elżbieta Fotyga, Eugen Freund, Michael Gahler, Iveta Grigule, Sandra Kalniete, Manolis Kefalogiannis, Tunne Kelam, Janusz Korwin-Mikke, Andrey Kovatchev, Ilhan Kyuchyuk, Ryszard Antoni Legutko, Barbara Lochbihler, Sabine Lösing, Andrejs Mamikins, Alex Mayer, David McAllister, Tamás Meszerics, Francisco José Millán Mon, Javier Nart, Pier Antonio Panzeri, Demetris Papadakis, Ioan Mircea Paşcu, Alojz Peterle, Julia Pitera, Cristian Dan Preda, Jozo Radoš, Sofia Sakorafa, Alyn Smith, Jordi Solé, Jaromír Štětina, Dubravka Šuica, Charles Tannock, Ivo Vajgl, Elena Valenciano, Hilde Vautmans, Anders Primdahl Vistisen, Boris Zala

Substitutes present for the final vote

Elisabetta Gardini, Neena Gill, Ana Gomes, András Gyürk, Takis Hadjigeorgiou, Liisa Jaakonsaari, Marek Jurek, Urmas Paet, Mirosław Piotrowski, Miroslav Poche, José Ignacio Salafranca Sánchez-Neyra, Bodil Valero, Marie-Christine Vergiat, Janusz Zemke, Željana Zovko

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Seb Dance, Jean-Luc Schaffhauser, Marie-Pierre Vieu, Ivan Štefanec

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

54

+

ALDE

Petras Auštrevičius, Iveta Grigule, Ilhan Kyuchyuk, Javier Nart, Urmas Paet, Jozo Radoš, Ivo Vajgl, Hilde Vautmans

ECR

Anna Elżbieta Fotyga, Ryszard Antoni Legutko, Charles Tannock, Anders Primdahl Vistisen

EFDD

Fabio Massimo Castaldo

PPE

Lars Adaktusson, Lorenzo Cesa, Michael Gahler, Elisabetta Gardini, András Gyürk, Sandra Kalniete, Manolis Kefalogiannis, Tunne Kelam, Andrey Kovatchev, David McAllister, Francisco José Millán Mon, Alojz Peterle, Julia Pitera, Cristian Dan Preda, José Ignacio Salafranca Sánchez-Neyra, Željana Zovko, Ivan Štefanec, Jaromír Štětina, Dubravka Šuica

S&D

Andi Cristea, Seb Dance, Knut Fleckenstein, Eugen Freund, Neena Gill, Ana Gomes, Liisa Jaakonsaari, Andrejs Mamikins, Alex Mayer, Pier Antonio Panzeri, Demetris Papadakis, Ioan Mircea Paşcu, Miroslav Poche, Elena Valenciano, Boris Zala, Janusz Zemke

Verts/ALE

Klaus Buchner, Barbara Lochbihler, Tamás Meszerics, Alyn Smith, Jordi Solé, Bodil Valero

7

-

EFDD

James Carver

GUE/NGL

Takis Hadjigeorgiou, Sabine Lösing, Marie-Christine Vergiat, Marie-Pierre Vieu

NI

Georgios Epitideios, Janusz Korwin-Mikke

5

0

ECR

Marek Jurek, Mirosław Piotrowski

ENF

Mario Borghezio, Jean-Luc Schaffhauser

GUE/NGL

Sofia Sakorafa

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention

(1)

OJ L 130, 19.5.2017, p. 1.


OPINION of the Committee on International Trade (27.9.2017)

for the Committee on Development

on the EU-Africa Strategy: a boost for development

(2017/2083(INI))

Rapporteur: Maria Arena

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on International Trade calls on the Committee on Development, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

A.  whereas in Africa, infrastructure requirements are estimated at EUR 75 billion annually, the value of the consumer market is likely to reach USD 1 000 billion in 2020, foreign direct investment is set to increase steadily to an estimated USD 144 billion in 2020, and the population is currently 1 billion;

B.  whereas the economic security and prosperity of Europe and Africa are linked, and whereas these two continents must face their shared challenges and opportunities together;

C.  whereas there is a need to create an environment which is conducive to investment and which prioritises improvements in health and education above all else;

D.  whereas the share of the population living in extreme poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa has fallen from 56 % in 1990 to 43 % in 2012;

E.  whereas there are large disparities in the economic development and growth of African countries, and whereas, according to the United Nations, 33 of the 47 least developed countries are in Africa; whereas more than 218 million people live in extreme poverty in Africa;

F.  whereas exports from Africa are still dominated by unprocessed products, and whereas a high proportion of these exports are covered by trade preference arrangements; whereas free market access for most African products increases the capacities of African countries and enhances their competitiveness and participation in global markets when accompanied, among other things, by policies aimed at lasting sustainable industrialisation and rural productivity as key paths for development;

G.  whereas preferential access to the EU market has provided scope to enhance the export performance of African beneficiary countries depending on their ability to actually take advantage of such preferences;

H.  whereas good governance and transparency cut the cost of trade and boost commerce, investment and economic development; whereas fair and responsible trade and investments play an essential role in development and could help create more than the 18 million new sustainable jobs per year needed in Africa to absorb the growing labour force, which is also beneficial for the EU;

I.  whereas sustainable and responsible management of raw materials and natural resources should be at the heart of the EU-Africa strategy, and should be a priority in cooperation between the European Union and the African Union in particular to contribute to tackling and dismantling the resource curse; whereas Europeans and Africans should take a strong, united stance on this matter at the relevant international fora and summits such as the G20, the United Nations General Assembly or the WTO;

J.  whereas universal access to electricity is a major development issue for Africa;

K.  whereas, hitherto, actions have failed to fully integrate Africa into world trade and have also failed to bring about the eradication of poverty or a reduction in inequality in African countries, and whereas most African countries still stand to gain a lot from fuller participation in world trade and its potential benefits;

L.  whereas the 2015 ‘Trade for All’ strategy sets out the EU’s commitment to binding and enforceable trade and sustainable development (TSD);

1.  Calls for the EU to support sustainable and inclusive development in Africa and to focus on supporting projects which will have a real and positive impact on the creation of decent jobs for men and women, the fight against poverty, promotion of human development, and protection of the environment, while having a positive impact on sustainable economic growth, beneficial value- and rules-based trade in goods and services, industrialisation and capacity-building, a high-quality and predictable business climate, the management of public finances to enhance tax justice, transparency in the management of natural resources (in particular in mining and energy production), and the fight against corruption and illegal capital flows away from the continent, as well as the promotion of human rights, gender equality, good governance and the rule of law, and while helping to create stability and security; stresses, in particular, EU initiatives focused on mobilising the private sector which accounts for 90 % of jobs in developing economies;

2.  Calls for the EU to reinforce its development-oriented trade policy and to increase its financial commitment to Aid For Trade and technical assistance and capacity building initiatives, which is essential for African countries, in particular in LDCs, to take full advantage of the EU’s trade preferences; asks furthermore that the Commission and Member States coordinate the implementation of their programmes in order to maximise the effectiveness of Aid for Trade; welcomes, in this respect, the entry into force in February 2017 of the WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement which should facilitate customs procedures, thereby decreasing trade costs;

3.  Calls for the EU and its Member States to better coordinate their aid for trade programmes and further boost synergies with their investment policies for Africa;

4.  Considers that Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs), largely supported by the parliaments of the countries concerned, if properly implemented and accompanied by appropriate structural measures, have the potential to be an important tool to promote regional development and the inclusion of the continent into world trade;

5.  Stresses that EU-Africa relations must be articulated on a fair and balanced framework among equal partners and based on mutual respect and recognition of interests aimed at the promotion of human rights and the realisation of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals;

6.  Calls on the Commission to support the integration of African countries into global and regional trade through building critical infrastructures, access to energy, financial services and business training;

7.  Calls on the Commission to help African countries develop and integrate into the world economy, including through global and regional value chains, to allow different countries to contribute to production through intermediate and finalised products; calls, in this context, on the EU to give greater support to the ambitions in Africa to create a continental free-trade zone favouring the reduction of local income inequalities, to assist with economic diversification and technology transfer and to contribute to greater African participation in international trade, and to further cooperate with the countries concerned with a view to achieving this objective; acknowledges that, although the EU’s policies are crucial in assisting them in pursuing such objectives, the political commitment of African countries is, of course, essential;

8.  Urges the EU to always take account of the different levels of development among African countries and regions as well as their varying expectations when defining and implementing its trade polices vis-à-vis Africa, and to therefore adopt targeted and specific trade preferences or measures which enhance production and processing capacity, regional integration and foster small-scale and sustainable agriculture, by promoting local food on local markets; stresses also the need for any trade agreement or unilateral trade arrangement between the EU and African countries or regional groupings to provide for sufficiently asymmetrical liberalisation schedules, protections for infant industries, development-supportive rules of origin and effective safeguard clauses;

9.  Takes the view that effective implementation of the WTO trade facilitation agreement and the simplification and transparency of customs procedures will help to boost trade between Europe and Africa, which will particularly benefit SMEs and innovation;

10.  Calls on the EU to focus, by means of its commercial and investment policies, on the growth of the private sector, support for innovation, competitiveness and entrepreneurship in Europe and Africa, and to conduct its affairs with Africa in accordance with the principles of sustainability and social responsibility;

11.  Takes the view that ‘public-private partnerships’ have a fundamental role to play in economic development, insofar as they make the private sector more dynamic and boost synergies between institutions and economic operators, and that they should therefore be supported in this strategy;

12.  Calls for European development and investment projects in Africa to be guided by the principle of ownership, so that beneficiary countries can take charge of their own development models;

13.  Expects the EU to make strategic plans for cooperation in a dialogue with Africa in the future;

14.  Calls on the EIB and the Commission, in particular via the External Investment Plan (EIP), to invest in projects with high job-creation potential and in the priority areas of clean energy, infrastructure, health and medical research;

15.  Stresses that support for investment projects should be made conditional on economic effectiveness and expected economic outcomes, in an effort to boost trade on the African market and with third countries and regions, and to boost the processing capacity of industries in African countries;

16.  Recalls that EU investment policy, especially when involving public money, must contribute to the realisation of the Sustainable Development Goals; recalls the need to enhance transparency and accountability of development finance institutions (DFIs) and public-private partnerships (PPPs) to effectively track and monitor the money flows, debt sustainability and the added value for the sustainable development of their projects;

17.  Takes the view that digital development could lead to growth opportunities in Africa – via e-commerce or telephone payments, for example – and that the development policies of the EU and Africa should help to improve access to electricity and the internet in Africa;

18.  Calls for transparency in trade agreements and for the full participation of all relevant stakeholders including the civil societies of the countries concerned, through formal consultations, in future negotiations and the implementation of agreements currently under negotiation;

19.  Calls for the principles of policy coherence for development to be fully incorporated in the EU’s trade relationship with Africa, which entails the inclusion of enforceable TSD clauses in all EU trade agreements with African countries, in line with the commitment undertaken by the Commission in the ‘Trade for All’ strategy;

20.  Welcomes the efforts made by the EU in recent years aimed at promoting social corporate accountability; calls on the EU to continue taking steps in order to ensure that companies are fully accountable for human rights violations and environmental crimes; shares, in this regard, the view that the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights should be part of any future agreements between African countries and the EU, and asks both sides to include them in any revisions; calls, in addition, for the EU to effectively promote due diligence obligations to ensure global supply chains sustainability;

21.  Expects in addition the development of a strategy for the fight against corruption and illegal capital flight from Africa and insists that the development of the regional African markets is taken into consideration in the future;

22.  Takes the view that it is essential for the EU-Africa strategy to take account of the importance of the role of women in economic development and the resilience of societies both in Europe and in Africa, and that projects should be set up with that in mind.

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

25.9.2017

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

32

2

0

Members present for the final vote

William (The Earl of) Dartmouth, Laima Liucija Andrikienė, Maria Arena, Tiziana Beghin, Santiago Fisas Ayxelà, Eleonora Forenza, Karoline Graswander-Hainz, Heidi Hautala, France Jamet, Bernd Lange, David Martin, Emma McClarkin, Anne-Marie Mineur, Sorin Moisă, Alessia Maria Mosca, Franck Proust, Godelieve Quisthoudt-Rowohl, Viviane Reding, Inmaculada Rodríguez-Piñero Fernández, Tokia Saïfi, Helmut Scholz, Adam Szejnfeld, Hannu Takkula, Iuliu Winkler, Jan Zahradil

Substitutes present for the final vote

Klaus Buchner, Edouard Ferrand, Agnes Jongerius, Sajjad Karim, Sander Loones, Paul Rübig, Jarosław Wałęsa

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Massimiliano Salini, Bogdan Brunon Wenta

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

32

+

ALDE

Hannu Takkula

ECR

Emma McClarkin, Jan Zahradil, Sajjad Karim. Sander Loones

EFDD

Tiziana Beghin, William (The Earl of) Dartmouth

GUE/NGL

Anne-Marie Mineur, Eleonora Forenza, Helmut Scholz

PPE

Adam Szejnfeld, Bogdan Brunon Wenta, Franck Proust, Godelieve Quisthoudt-Rowohl, Iuliu Winkler, Jarosław Wałęsa, Laima Liucija Andrikienė, Massimiliano Salini, Paul Rübig, Santiago Fisas Ayxelà, Tokia Saïfi, Viviane Reding

S&D

Agnes Jongerius, Alessia Maria Mosca, Bernd Lange, David Martin, Inmaculada Rodríguez-Piñero Fernández, Karoline Graswander-Hainz, Maria Arena, Sorin Moisă

Verts/ALE

Heidi Hautala, Klaus Buchner

2

-

ENF

Edouard Ferrand, France Jamet

0

0

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention


OPINION of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (29.9.2017)

for the Committee on Development

on the EU-Africa Strategy: a boost for development

(2017/2083(INI))

Rapporteur: Cécile Kashetu Kyenge

SUGGESTIONS

The Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs calls on the Committee on Development, as the committee responsible, to incorporate the following suggestions into its motion for a resolution:

A.  whereas Africa and the EU are linked by issues of migration and mobility and face common challenges with regard to security and measures to tackle organised and cross-border crime; whereas these issues must be tackled together and in a practical way;

1.  Stresses that, once implemented, the EU-Africa strategy should address all aspects of migration, international protection and forced displacement, with a focus on the principles of solidarity, partnership and shared responsibility, and mutual accountability in respect of human rights;

2.  Observes that the climate of insecurity linked to the conflicts raging in Africa is detracting from good governance and creates an environment that is not conducive to growth, employment, investment and development; emphasises that democratic and transparent state structures, the rule of law, respect for human rights, gender equality and good governance are crucial elements for the development of African countries; considers Africa to be a key partner on the international scene and takes the view that the EU should step up its cooperation and political dialogue with that continent, empowering its African partners through mutual confidence; emphasises that EU development funding and aid should foster the sustainable development and good governance of African countries; calls for a stronger and more political partnership between the EU and Africa and a specific financial framework to tackle these issues;

3.  Emphasises that the Africa-EU strategy must be able to take into account the considerable diversity of African countries and therefore to adapt to the specific circumstances of each partner country;

4.  Recognises the disparities in development among the various countries in Africa; encourages the EU to cooperate with strategic partners and leading countries which, politically, economically and socially, can create in Africa a climate conducive to growth and development, particularly by means of bilateral agreements and regional strategies, thus making it possible to combat the underlying causes of migration between Africa and Europe;

5.  Considers that, while the Africa-EU Partnership should be a central element in our development aid policies and action taken in Africa, it is the African countries and their leaders that remain primarily responsible for the future of their own continent; considers, therefore, that the EU should support efforts by African leaders to promote a stable and prosperous environment in Africa and cooperation based on our shared interests in peace, security and good governance;

6.  Points out that migration and mobility within Africa and between Africa and the EU are beneficial to both continents, and that a holistic approach to migration and mobility is paramount for boosting sustainable development and promoting democracy, the rule of law, good governance and human rights; encourages the Commission to develop new mobility and migration partnerships with African partner countries;

7.  Recognises that Africa’s population is projected to reach 2.4 billion by 2050 and will consist predominantly of young people(1); welcomes the willingness to place the emphasis on youth within the Africa-EU Partnership; encourages the EU to further identify and support initiatives inspired by young people that promote democracy, the rule of law and human rights, and to step up its cooperation with African countries to combat child militarisation, female genital mutilation, forced marriage and any other breaches of children’s rights; recalls that one mobile student in ten worldwide is African, of whom half come to Europe; stresses the importance of emphasising the exchange of knowledge, in order to prevent, under all circumstances, a brain drain from Africa;

8.  Calls, in particular, for the implementation of Directive (EU) 2016/801 on the conditions of entry and residence of third-country nationals for the purposes of research, studies, training, voluntary service, pupil exchange schemes or educational projects and au pairing for the benefit of African students;

9.  Recognises that violent conflicts, persecution, inequality, infringements of human rights, terrorism, repressive regimes, natural disasters, climate change and chronic poverty have led to population movements and an increase in migration to Europe in recent years; recalls nevertheless that, in Africa, international migration concerns fewer than 35 million people and that more than 85 % of migration occurs within Africa itself; stresses that refugees and migrants have the same universal human rights and fundamental freedoms;

10.  Recalls that the majority of refugees and migrants find refuge in developing countries and that population movements primarily take place within and between those countries; stresses that those countries’ aid systems face major challenges, which have the potential to seriously compromise the protection of a growing displaced population;

11.  Highlights, in particular, violence against and the persecution of people on grounds of race, ethnicity, religion/beliefs, sexual orientation, gender identity and sex characteristics, which violate international human rights obligations and fundamental freedoms, hinder development and lead to the large-scale movement of refugees and migrants;

12.  Considers terrorism a global threat to regional peace and stability, sustainable development and internal security, that needs to be tackled in a coordinated manner by national governments, regional and international organisations and EU agencies; recalls that organised crime, money laundering, drug and wildlife trafficking and piracy have an undeniable impact on African countries; calls for enhanced cooperation within the EU-Africa Strategy with a view to preventing impunity, promoting the rule of law and the expansion of police and judicial capacities in order to facilitate the exchange of information and best practices, and preventing, countering, combating the financing of and prosecuting terrorism and organised crime; believes that the anti-terrorism strategy should also include measures for the prevention of radicalisation leading to violent extremism in Africa and Europe, among young people in particular;

13.  Draws attention to the fact that the Africa-EU Migration and Mobility Dialogue should facilitate mobility and the free movement of people, not only the highly skilled, in Africa and between Africa and the EU on the basis of a well-managed rights-based approach, including the strengthening of safe and legal channels for migration; calls on the EU and its Member States to facilitate family reunification;

14.  Reiterates its call for the reinforcement of legal channels for people who need international protection; urges the Member States to offer their resettlement places to a significant number of refugees, considering the overall number of refugees hosted in African countries; calls, in this context, for the establishment of an EU resettlement framework that can easily be acted upon by Member States and that encourages the EU and its Member States to play a crucial and exemplary role with regard to resettlement worldwide; reminds the Member States to make all the necessary facilities available and a plan to open new and safe routes for asylum seekers, particularly for vulnerable persons, at EU embassies and consular offices in countries of origin or transit countries;

15.  Calls, in addition, on the EU and its Member States to cooperate with and provide assistance to African countries that are faced with movements of refugees or prolonged crises, with a view to increasing their asylum capacities and protection systems; recalls that all cooperation with regard to migration and asylum must have the aim of promoting respect for the principles concerning fundamental rights that govern the EU’s migration and asylum policies;

16.  Recalls the importance of providing the maximum amount of information to potential migrants regarding the dangers inherent in irregular migration routes, but also their prospects within the EU, particularly in the fields of employment and training;

17.  Recalls that two global compacts, for migration and refugees respectively, are to be drawn up by 2018 under the auspices of the UN following the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants adopted by the UN General Assembly on 19 September 2016, and that dialogue between Africa and the EU should be stepped up in advance in order to identify shared priorities, where possible;

18.  Emphasises that returns can only take place after the assessment of each individual case in full respect of the rights of those concerned, and that any attempt at the refoulement of migrants is contrary to EU and international law; believes that the return of migrants should only be carried out safely, that voluntary return should be prioritised over forced return and that the reintegration of migrants should be addressed systematically;

19.  Calls for effective, strengthened and systematic cooperation with African countries, including a strong and real resettlement policy and financial investigation, in the fight against trafficking in migrants and the smuggling of human beings; calls on the EU and African countries to step up their cooperation and efforts to put an end to the trafficking and smuggling of human beings between the two continents;

20.  Recognises the strategic potential of African diasporas worldwide in terms of both financial remittances and non-financial value, as regards the capacity to build and promote peace, democracy, good governance and social stability; draws attention to the importance of engaging with those diasporas and linking them with development projects, so as to ensure that they contribute to the effectiveness of development policies;

21.  Recalls that African leaders made a pledge to accelerate growth, development, prosperity and good governance on the African continent by 2063; calls on the EU and its Member States to support developing countries so that they can adopt long-term policies that respect the right to freedom of movement, education, health and employment; stresses the need for the EU and its Member States in particular to support the least developed countries (LDCs) in their efforts to combat climate change, so as to avoid aggravating poverty in those countries;

22.  Recommends further efforts to implement the Valletta Action Plan for humane and sustainable management of migration on both sides of the Mediterranean; recalls the importance of initiatives to increase dialogue and cooperation on migration issues, such as the Rabat Process and the Khartoum Process;

23.  Calls for greater parliamentary scrutiny of working arrangements agreed with third countries and the external cooperation activities of the relevant EU agencies.

INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

Date adopted

28.9.2017

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

41

2

6

Members present for the final vote

Jan Philipp Albrecht, Heinz K. Becker, Malin Björk, Michał Boni, Caterina Chinnici, Rachida Dati, Agustín Díaz de Mera García Consuegra, Frank Engel, Cornelia Ernst, Tanja Fajon, Laura Ferrara, Lorenzo Fontana, Kinga Gál, Ana Gomes, Nathalie Griesbeck, Sylvie Guillaume, Monika Hohlmeier, Brice Hortefeux, Sophia in ‘t Veld, Dietmar Köster, Barbara Kudrycka, Cécile Kashetu Kyenge, Marju Lauristin, Juan Fernando López Aguilar, Roberta Metsola, Louis Michel, Péter Niedermüller, Soraya Post, Judith Sargentini, Birgit Sippel, Branislav Škripek, Helga Stevens, Traian Ungureanu, Marie-Christine Vergiat, Josef Weidenholzer, Cecilia Wikström

Substitutes present for the final vote

Marina Albiol Guzmán, Anna Hedh, Lívia Járóka, Sylvia-Yvonne Kaufmann, Jean Lambert, Gilles Lebreton, Angelika Mlinar, Emil Radev, Christine Revault d’Allonnes Bonnefoy, Jaromír Štětina

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

Andrea Bocskor, Maurice Ponga, Cristian Dan Preda

FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE ASKED FOR OPINION

41

+

ALDE

Nathalie Griesbeck, Sophia in ‘t Veld, Louis Michel, Angelika Mlinar, Cecilia Wikström

ECR

Branislav Škripek, Helga Stevens

EFDD

Laura Ferrara

PPE

Heinz K. Becker, Andrea Bocskor, Michał Boni, Rachida Dati, Agustín Díaz de Mera García Consuegra, Frank Engel, Kinga Gál, Monika Hohlmeier, Brice Hortefeux, Lívia Járóka, Barbara Kudrycka, Roberta Metsola, Maurice Ponga, Cristian Dan Preda, Jaromír Štětina, Traian Ungureanu

S&D

Caterina Chinnici, Tanja Fajon, Ana Gomes, Sylvie Guillaume, Anna Hedh, Sylvia-Yvonne Kaufmann, Cécile Kashetu Kyenge, Marju Lauristin, Juan Fernando López Aguilar, Péter Niedermüller, Soraya Post, Christine Revault d’Allonnes Bonnefoy, Birgit Sippel, Josef Weidenholzer

VERTS/ALE

Jan Philipp Albrecht, Jean Lambert, Judith Sargentini

2

-

ENF

Lorenzo Fontana, Gilles Lebreton

6

0

GUE/NGL

Marina Albiol Guzmán, Malin Björk, Cornelia Ernst, Marie-Christine Vergiat

PPE

Emil Radev

S&D

Dietmar Köster

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention

(1)

UN, World population prospects, 2015.


INFORMATION ON ADOPTION IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

Date adopted

10.10.2017

 

 

 

Result of final vote

+:

–:

0:

19

5

3

Members present for the final vote

Beatriz Becerra Basterrechea, Ignazio Corrao, Nirj Deva, Doru-Claudian Frunzulică, Enrique Guerrero Salom, Maria Heubuch, György Hölvényi, Teresa Jiménez-Becerril Barrio, Arne Lietz, Linda McAvan, Norbert Neuser, Vincent Peillon, Maurice Ponga, Lola Sánchez Caldentey, Eleftherios Synadinos, Eleni Theocharous, Paavo Väyrynen, Bogdan Brunon Wenta, Anna Záborská, Joachim Zeller, Željana Zovko

Substitutes present for the final vote

Marina Albiol Guzmán, Thierry Cornillet, Brian Hayes, Cécile Kashetu Kyenge, Florent Marcellesi

Substitutes under Rule 200(2) present for the final vote

France Jamet


FINAL VOTE BY ROLL CALL IN COMMITTEE RESPONSIBLE

19

+

ALDE

Beatriz Becerra Basterrechea, Thierry Cornillet, Paavo Väyrynen

ECR

Nirj Deva, Eleni Theocharous

PPE

Brian Hayes, György Hölvényi, Teresa Jiménez-Becerril Barrio, Maurice Ponga, Bogdan Brunon Wenta, Joachim Zeller, Željana Zovko

S&D

Doru-Claudian Frunzulică, Enrique Guerrero Salom, Cécile Kashetu Kyenge, Arne Lietz, Linda McAvan, Norbert Neuser, Vincent Peillon

5

-

EFDD

Ignazio Corrao

ENF

France Jamet

GUE/NGL

Marina Albiol Guzmán, Lola Sánchez Caldentey

NI

Eleftherios Synadinos

3

0

PPE

Anna Záborská

Verts/ALE

Maria Heubuch, Florent Marcellesi

Key to symbols:

+  :  in favour

-  :  against

0  :  abstention

Last updated: 31 October 2017Legal notice