Studies and Options Briefs

 
145 results
 
Ethical Aspects of Cyber-Physical Systems 06-2016
Reference
Summary

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are intelligent robotics systems, linked with the Internet of Things, or technical systems of networked computers, robots and artificial intelligence that interact with the physical world.The project 'Ethical aspects of CPS' aims to provide insights into the potential ethical concerns and related unintended impacts of the possible evolution of CPS technology by 2050. The overarching purpose is to support the European Parliament, the parliamentary bodies, and the individual Members in their anticipation of possible future concerns regarding developments in CPS, robotics and artificial intelligence.The Scientific Foresight study was conducted in three phases:1. A 'technical horizon scan', in the form of briefing papers describing the technical trends and their possible societal, ethical, economic, environmental, political/legal and demographic impacts, and this in seven application domains. 2. The 'soft impact and scenario phase', which analysed soft impacts of CPS, on the basis of the technical horizon scan, for pointing out possible future public concerns via an envisioning exercise and using exploratory scenarios.3. The 'legal backcasting' phase, which resulted in a briefing for the European Parliament identifying the legal instruments that may need to be modified or reviewed, including — where appropriate — areas identified for anticipatory parliamentary work, in accordance with the conclusions reached within the project.The outcome of the study is a policy briefing for MEPs describing legal instruments to anticipate impacts of future developments in the area of cyber-physical systems, such as intelligent robotics systems, linked with the Internet of Things. It is important to note that not all impacts of CPS are easily translated into legislation, as it is often contested whether they are in effect harmful, who is to be held accountable, and to what extent these impacts constitute a public rather than a private concern.

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Study : Ethical Aspects of Cyber-Physical Systems
Annex : Developments in the area of cyber-physical systems and their implications for the EU legislative agenda
What if we could make ourselves invisible to others?06-2016
Reference
Summary

Through developments in the field of metamaterials, we may be able to create products with surprising capabilities, from making DNA visible to making buildings invisible, but have we considered the risks, as well as the benefits?  

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At a glance : What if we could make ourselves invisible to others?
Science and Technology Options Assessment: Annual Report 201504-2016
Reference
Summary

In 2015, STOA Panel membership has grown from 15 MEPs to 24, including representatives of two more parliament committees: Culture & Education (CULT) and Legal Affairs (JURI). Furthermore, STOA has established its capacity to generate proactive anticipatory expertise through scientific foresight studies. These will support Members of Parliament, and many others, to prepare for the long-term (20-50 year) impacts of science and technology on European society. In 2015 STOA has delivered projects on mass surveillance, technology options for deep-seabed exploitation, learning and teaching technologies, the collaborative economy and Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the developing world. Additionally, STOA hosted 11 workshops, providing crucial fora for interaction between policy-makers, researchers and the public, and oversaw the 4th edition of the MEP-Scientist Pairing Scheme, enabling 31 partnerships between parliamentarians and active researchers. Celebrating the end of a successful year, STOA welcomed Professor Serge HAROCHE – co-winner of the 2012 Nobel Prize for Physics - to deliver its Annual Lecture to an audience of hundreds, including MEPs, scientists and other citizens. The subject, aligned with the United Nations (UN) International Year of Light, was 'A Discovery Tour in the World of Quantum Optics'.

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Study : Science and Technology Options Assessment: Annual Report 2015
What if others could read your mind?04-2016
Reference
Summary

Brain-computer interface technology has been advancing rapidly and will continue to do so as our knowledge of how the brain works increases. Could this transform our understanding of life as we know it? A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device. This technology can be used to restore motor and sensory capacities which may have been lost through trauma, disease or congenital conditions. For example, combined with limb-replacement technology, BCI may allow patients not only to move prosthetic limbs, but also to feel the sensation of touch. The technology can either be implanted (invasive) or used externally (non-invasive). Invasive BCIs, including neuroprosthetics and brain implants, are devices which connect directly to the brain and are placed on its surface or attached to the cortex. A key application area for contemporary brain implant research is the development of biomedical prostheses to circumvent areas of the brain that have become dysfunctional after a stroke or other trauma. With deep brain stimulation, a 'brain pacemaker' sends electrical impulses to specific parts of the brain for the treatment of disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia and major depression. Non-invasive BCIs consist of a range of technological devices which provide a similar interface between the brain and other machines without the need for surgery. There are several technologies capable of measuring and recording brain activity, although the signal quality may be weaker than is possible with implanted devices. Nonetheless, non-invasive BCIs have been used effectively, for example to control prosthetic hands.

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At a glance : What if others could read your mind?
ICT in the developing world12-2015
Reference
Author

External authors: Laura Delponte (lead author), Matteo Grigolini, Andrea Moroni and Silvia Vignetti (Centre for Industrial Studies - CSIL, Milan, Italy). Massimiliano Claps and Nino Giguashvili (International Data Corporation - IDC, Milan, Italy).

Summary

Over recent years, there have been increasing opportunities for inhabitants of low and middle-income countries (LMICs) to use information and communication technologies (ICT). ICT can potentially help LMICs tackle a wide range of health, social and economic problems.By improving access to information and enabling communication, ICT can play a role in achieving millennium development goals (MDGs) such as the elimination of extreme poverty, combating serious diseases, and accomplishing universal primary education. This study is aimed at examining the nature and extent of impact of ICT on poverty reduction in LMICs. A specific focus is developed for the health sector, elucidating which support ICT may provide to reduce inequalities and strengthen health systems in LMICs. In addition, present EU actions in the area of improving ICT diffusion in LMICs are assessed.  Building on three literature reviews, the study first describes the conditions hampering or facilitating the support of ICT to poverty reduction in LMICs, then focuses on the specific opportunities and obstacles in the use of ICT in the healthcare sector and, finally, it illustrates the EU policy approach for promoting ICT in LMICs. Evidence from desk analysis is complemented by the opinions of 145 surveyed experts, ten of which were also interviewed.  Experts’ opinions confirm the evidence of desk analysis pointing to health and education as the main areas in which ICT can play a significant role in LMICs development.  Building upon the evidence collected, the study provides policy options for future action which the EU could undertake to help LMICs profit from all the opportunities that ICT offer.

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Study : ICT in the developing world
Annex : Executive summary
Annex 1: Options brief
The Collaborative Economy12-2015
Reference
Author

External authors: Steve Robertshaw (editor), Nick Achilleopoulos, Johan E. Bengtsson, Patrick Crehan, Angele Giuliano, John Soldatos (AcrossLimits Ltd, Malta)

Summary

Ever since its appearance, Internet has allowed us to collaborate with other people remotely. In the 80's, email was the breakthrough that enabled exchange of digital materials. In the 90's, the World Wide Web opened collaboration on web sites. After 2000, social media and e-meeting technologies enabled face-to-face interaction with others via the Internet. New modes of collaboration, such as crowd sourcing, crowd funding, co-creation or open design are reaching mainstream use. Advances in technologies related to Collaborative Internet, Big/Open Data, Crypto Currency and Additive Manufacturing are bringing the Collaborative Economy ever closer to us. This study reveals a wide range of opportunities and threats associated with these technologies,as well as social, political, economic, moral and ethical issues related to this new way of working. Policy options are presented, in order to help policy makers anticipate developments with effective policies that will nurture the positive impacts of collaborative Internet and avoid the negative ones.

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Study : The Collaborative Economy
Annex : Options brief
What if injections weren't needed anymore?11-2015
Reference
Summary

Synthetic biology is expected to design, construct and develop artificial (i.e. man-made) biological systems that mimic or even go beyond naturally-occurring biological systems. What are the benefits of this emerging field? Are there any ethical and social issues arising from this engineering approach to biology?

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At a glance : What if injections weren't needed anymore?
What if your shopping were delivered by drones?05-2015
Reference
Summary

Known as Remotely Piloted Air Systems (RPAS) or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), drones have become increasingly present due to a sharp drop in production costs, as a consequence of recent innovations in light-weight materials, on-board computers, batteries and fuel tanks. Since their inception, drones have been developed for military purposes, with the inclusion of weapons in them, as well as for surveillance and policing efforts. Recently, however, other uses have proliferated, in the fields of climate data collection, scientific exploration, 3-D mapping, infrastructure maintenance, logistics and delivery services, professional photography and filmmaking, entertainment, wildlife protection and agriculture. The increasing diversity and affordability of drones will surely lead to their widespread use amongst corporations, governmental institutions and common citizens. Thus, the legal and ethical issues already associated with drones will most likely become more prominent and require the attention of European policy makers.

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At a glance : What if your shopping were delivered by drones?
Science and Technology Options Assessment - Annual Report 201405-2015
Reference
Summary

STOA is tasked with providing scientific evidence for decision-making in the European Parliament by conducting projects and organising workshops. In 2014 STOA completed projects on measuring scientific performance, methanol-fueled transport, e-ticketing systems, cloud computing and social networks, and mass surveillance of IT users. A number of workshops was held on the following topics: energy storage, governance of science and technologies, improving health programmes in developing countries, educational technologies, climate change, and the effect of technologies on our behaviours, relationships, norms and values. A new STOA Panel was formed in 2014, following the European elections.

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Study : Science and Technology Options Assessment - Annual Report 2014
Learning and teaching technology options: Study03-2015
Reference
Author

Rafael Rivera Pastor, Carlota Tarín Quirós (Iclaves)

Summary

Educational technology encompasses a wide array of technologies and methodologies that are shaped by stakeholders’ behaviours and affected by contextual factors that, if adequately mixed, can contribute to students and teachers better achieving their goals. Such a wide and complex task cannot be addressed by a simple and single intervention. Comprehensive on-going policies are required, covering technology, methodology, economic and regulatory aspects; in addition, such policies are dependent on strong stakeholder engagement. This is a new process where we must learn by doing; therefore, carefully assessing the results of the different interventions is crucial to ensuring success.

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Study : Learning and teaching technology options: Study
Executive Summary : Learning and teaching technology options: In-Depth Analysis
Annex : Learning and Teaching Technology Options: STOA Options Brief
 
 
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