Studies and Options Briefs

 
14 results
 
Horizon scanning and analysis of techno-scientific trends: Scientific Foresight Study07-2017
Reference
Author

Michael Baumgartner, Bijan Farsijani (Augmented Intelligence Institute; http://www.augmento.ai)

Summary

This horizon scan has identified eight major technological trends relevant for STOA. First, a scan was conducted to measure controversy on social media, and this constituted an initial controversy ranking. After more detailed analysis of the main technology trends identified, a set of STOA-relevant areas were selected, which have not yet been investigated by STOA so far. These are big data, gene technology, electric vehicles, autonomous cars and impact of algorithms. A number of additional trend areas with high potential impact on society were identified for analysis: screen addiction, fake news and bioterrorism. Within the eight topics selected for detailed analysis from the initial horizon scanning process, keywords, subtopics, and sentiments have been detected and analysed from social media and news articles. These eight technologies are areas for discussion amongst the STOA Panel members when considering new project activities to be undertaken.

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Study : Horizon scanning and analysis of techno-scientific trends: Scientific Foresight Study
Cybersecurity in the EU Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP): Challenges and risks for the EU05-2017
Reference
Author

Panagiotis Trimintzios, Georgios Chatzichristos, Silvia Portesi, Prokopios Drogkaris, Lauri Palkmets, Dimitra Liveri and Andrea Dufkova.

Summary

This report is the result of a study conducted by the European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA) for the European Parliament’s Science and Technology Options Assessment (STOA) Panel with the aim of identifying risks, challenges and opportunities for cyber-defence in the context of the EU Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP). Acceptance of cyber as an independent domain calls for the investigation of its integration with the EU’s current and future policies and capabilities. ENISA analysed the related literature and work on cybersecurity, including its own publications, to form the basis for this study. In addition, a number of stakeholders, experts and practitioners, from academia, EU institutions and international organisations, were consulted in order to ensure the study is well-founded and comprehensive. The study revolves around three thematic areas, namely: policies, capacity building, and the integration of cyber in the CSDP missions, with the last one being the main focus of the study. For each thematic area, we compile a set of policy options, covering different levels, starting from the EU’s political/strategic level and progressing down to the operational and even tactical/technical levels of the CSDP’s supporting mechanisms. These policy options are summarised in a separate options briefing document accompanying this study.

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Study : Cybersecurity in the EU Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP): Challenges and risks for the EU
Precision Agriculture and the Future of Farming in Europe12-2016
Reference
Summary

This study resulted in the identification of four main future opportunities and concerns regarding precision agriculture (PA), or precision farming, in the EU, on which the European Parliament could take anticipatory action now: 1.  PA can actively contribute to food security and safety; 2.  PA supports sustainable farming; 3.  PA will trigger societal changes along with its uptake; 4.  PA requires new skills to be learned. The wide diversity of agriculture throughout the EU, regarding particularly farm size, types of farming, farming practices, output and employment, presents a challenge for European policy-makers. European policy measures therefore should differentiate between Member States, taking into account that the opportunities and concerns vary highly from one country to another.

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Study : Precision Agriculture and the Future of Farming in Europe
Annex 01: Annex I
Annex 2: Annex I
The Collaborative Economy12-2015
Reference
Author

External authors: Steve Robertshaw (editor), Nick Achilleopoulos, Johan E. Bengtsson, Patrick Crehan, Angele Giuliano, John Soldatos (AcrossLimits Ltd, Malta)

Summary

Ever since its appearance, Internet has allowed us to collaborate with other people remotely. In the 80's, email was the breakthrough that enabled exchange of digital materials. In the 90's, the World Wide Web opened collaboration on web sites. After 2000, social media and e-meeting technologies enabled face-to-face interaction with others via the Internet. New modes of collaboration, such as crowd sourcing, crowd funding, co-creation or open design are reaching mainstream use. Advances in technologies related to Collaborative Internet, Big/Open Data, Crypto Currency and Additive Manufacturing are bringing the Collaborative Economy ever closer to us. This study reveals a wide range of opportunities and threats associated with these technologies,as well as social, political, economic, moral and ethical issues related to this new way of working. Policy options are presented, in order to help policy makers anticipate developments with effective policies that will nurture the positive impacts of collaborative Internet and avoid the negative ones.

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Study : The Collaborative Economy
Learning and teaching technology options03-2015
Reference
Author

Rafael Rivera Pastor, Carlota Tarín Quirós (Iclaves)

Summary

Educational technology encompasses a wide array of technologies and methodologies that are shaped by stakeholders’ behaviours and affected by contextual factors that, if adequately mixed, can contribute to students and teachers better achieving their goals. Such a wide and complex task cannot be addressed by a simple and single intervention. Comprehensive on-going policies are required, covering technology, methodology, economic and regulatory aspects; in addition,  such policies are dependent on strong stakeholder engagement. This is a new process where we must learn by doing; therefore, carefully assessing the results of the different interventions is crucial to ensuring success.

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Study : Learning and teaching technology options
Mass Surveillance - Part 2: Technology foresight, options for longer term security and privacy improvements01-2015
Reference
Author

Company: Capgemini Consulting Authors: M. van den Berg P. de Graaf (editor) P.O. Kwant T. Slewe

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Annex 1: Mass Surveillance - Part 2: Technology foresight, options for longer term security and privacy improvements
Potential and Impacts of Cloud Computing Services and Social Network Websites01-2014
Reference
Author

Timo Leimbach (Project Leader), Dara Hallinan and Daniel Bachlechner (Fraunhofer ISI) ; Arnd Weber, Maggie Jaglo and Leonhard Hennen (ITAS) ; Rasmus Øjvind Nielsen (DBT) ; Michael Nentwich and Stefan Strauß (ITA) ; Theo Lynn and Graham Hunt (DCU/IC4)

Summary

The opportunities of using powerful computing resources on demand via the web are considered as a possible driver for the growth of the European economy. While the market for Social Network Sites has already experienced a consolidation, the market for Cloud Computing is still in an early stage, but with considerable growth rates. In addition the recent massive surveillances actions and the rise of cyber-crime showed the need for a more secure basis of future computing. As a result it is necessary to support the development of highly secure IT solutions. By modernizing the data protection regime Europe could not only ensure the better protection of citizens, but also serve as a model and partner for emerging markets. In order to encourage this evolution the digital life of citizens and business needs legal certainty to ensure new ideas are taken up. As well as this it is abundantly clear that a crucial precondition for a competitive ICT industry is an inspiring surrounding ecosystem.

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Study : Potential and Impacts of Cloud Computing Services and Social Network Websites
Eco-Efficient Transport04-2013
Reference
Author

Jens Schippl (Project leader), Markus Edelman, Maike Puhe and Max Reichenbach (Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis - ITAS , Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT)

Summary

An affordable, efficient and clean transport system is a basic pillar for economic growth and the quality of life in European countries. However, transport is still accompanied by a broad range of negative impacts on human health and the environment. It is still using huge amounts of finite resources. Congestion is increasingly hampering the efficiency of the system. Transport volumes are expected to further grow in the future. So, a transition to a more eco-efficient transport system is needed to cope with recent challenges and anticipated future developments in the transport sector. Against this background, the STOA Project on “Eco-Efficient Transport” aimed at assessing to what extent different concepts and approaches can help to increase the eco-efficiency of the transport system. To allow the required systemic perspective, the assessment was supported by scenario building. The feasibility and desirability of the scenarios and their elements was the subject of a stakeholder consultation. This report is the final report (Deliverable 5) of the project. It summarises the previous phases of the project and draws conclusions on that basis. The previous reports, Deliverables 2, 2b, 3, and 4, are available online on the STOA homepage at: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/stoa/cms/home/publications/studies

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Study : Eco-Efficient Transport
Making Perfect Life: European Governance Challenges in 21st Century Bio-engineering (Study, Summary and Options Brief)09-2012
Reference
Author

Rinie van Est (Rathenau Instituut), Dirk Stemerding (Rathenau Instituut), Piret Kukk (Fraunhofer ISI), Bärbel Hüsing (Fraunhofer ISI), Ira van Keulen (Rathenau Instituut), Mirjam Schuijff (Rathenau Instituut), Knud Böhle (ITAS), Christopher Coenen (ITAS), Michael Decker (ITAS), Michael Rader (ITAS), Helge Torgersen (ITAS) and Markus Schmidt (Biofaction)

Summary

The report describes four fields of bio-engineering: engineering of living artefacts (chapter 2), engineering of the body (chapter 3), engineering of the brain (chapter 4), and engineering of intelligent artefacts (chapter 5). Each chapter describes the state of the art of these bio-engineering fields, and whether the concepts “biology becoming technology” and “technology becoming biology” are helpful in describing and understanding, from an engineering perspective, what is going on in each R&D terrain. Next, every chapter analyses to what extent the various research strands within each field of bio-engineering are stimulated by the European Commission, i.e., are part and parcel of the European Framework program. Finally, each chapter provides an overview of the social, ethical and legal questions that are raised by the various scientific and technological activities involved. The report’s final chapter discusses to what extent the trends “biology becoming technology” and vice versa capture many of the developments that are going on in the four bio-engineering fields we have mapped. The report also reflects on the social, ethical and legal issues that are raised by the two bioengineering megatrends that constitute a new technology wave.

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Study : Making Perfect Life: European Governance Challenges in 21st Century Bio-engineering (Study, Summary and Options Brief)
Policy Options for the Improvement of the European Patent System09-2007
Reference
Author

Robin COWAN (BETA, Université Louis Pasteur and UNU-MERIT, Universteit Maastricht, the Netherlands) ; Wim Van der EIJK (International Legal Affairs and Patent law, EPO, München, Germany) ; Francesco LISSONI (University of Brescia, Italy) ; Peter LOTZ (Copenhagen Business School, Denmark) ; Geertrui Van OVERWALLE (University of Leuven, Belgium) and Jens SCHOVSBO (University of Copenhagen, Denmark)

Summary

This report is based on an independent, policy-oriented investigation of the current European patent system. The central premise of the report is that the patent system has so far been a positive factor in promoting innovation and the diffusion of knowledge, and thus that the system is contributing in a constructive way to economic and social welfare objectives. In acknowledging the importance of the patent system in relation to many aspects of society, it is also essential to continually evaluate whether the system is working as effectively as it could be. In addition, because of some of the influences coming to bear upon the system at the moment, as well as the various ways in which it has been operating, the workings of the European patent system especially merits close public attention.

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Study : Policy Options for the Improvement of the European Patent System
 
 
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