Your results 

Showing 1-10 of 12 results  
Publication type 
Policy area 
Author 
Keyword 
Date
Between (01-07-2000) 
Error:
and (20-07-2018) 
Error:

Your results 

Showing 1-10 of 12 results  

In-Depth Analysis

3D bio-printing is defined here as the use of 3D printing technology for applications related to the body, whether the products themselves include biological material or not, and whether or not their purpose is medical. It includes any application for rehabilitating, supporting or augmenting any kind of biological functionality. The impacts of 3D bio-printing are uncertain, and it is not clear which actions may be required to foster responsible development of the technology. A STOA study, 'Additive ...

At a Glance

Organoids are artificially grown organs that mimic the properties of real organs. What new possibilities for treating diseases, drug development, and personalised and regenerative medicine do organoids provide?

At a Glance

Synthetic biology is expected to begin to design, construct and develop artificial (i.e. man-made) biological systems that mimic or even go beyond naturally occurring biological systems. Applications of synthetic biology in the healthcare domain hold great promise, but also raise a number of questions. What are the benefits and challenges of this emerging field? What ethical and social issues arise from this engineering approach to biology?

At a Glance

Brain-computer interface technology has been advancing rapidly and will continue to do so as our knowledge of how the brain works increases. Could this transform our understanding of life as we know it? A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device. This technology can be used to restore motor and sensory capacities which may have been lost through trauma, disease or congenital conditions. For example, combined with limb-replacement ...

Study

The report describes four fields of bio-engineering: engineering of living artefacts (chapter 2), engineering of the body (chapter 3), engineering of the brain (chapter 4), and engineering of intelligent artefacts (chapter 5). Each chapter describes the state of the art of these bio-engineering fields, and whether the concepts “biology becoming technology” and “technology becoming biology” are helpful in describing and understanding, from an engineering perspective, what is going on in each R&D terrain ...

Study

The report describes four fields of bio-engineering: engineering of living artefacts (chapter 2), engineering of the body (chapter 3), engineering of the brain (chapter 4), and engineering of intelligent artefacts (chapter 5). Each chapter describes the state of the art of these bio-engineering fields, and whether the concepts “biology becoming technology” and “technology becoming biology” are helpful in describing and understanding, from an engineering perspective, what is going on in each R&D terrain ...

Study

This publication is the result of a project commissioned by STOA under Framework Contract IP/A/STOA/FWC/2005-28 on "Future Development of Cancer Therapy". It contains contributions and discussions arising from a workshop that took place at the European Parliament in Brussels in February 2007 under the title "Gene, Vaccine and Immunotherapies against Cancer: New Approaches to an Old Problem".

Study

This document contains deliverable no. 3 of the project on Antibiotic Resistance. The report draws on discussions with a range of experts at an extended working group meeting in Copenhagen on June 27th 2006 and a workshop at the European Parliament on September 13th 2006.