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International Agreements in Progress: EU-Singapore trade and investment agreements closer to conclusion

09-10-2018

On 18 April 2018, the European Commission proposed to the Council of the EU to sign and conclude two agreements with Singapore. These agreements were created by dividing the free trade agreement reached between the EU and Singapore (EUSFTA) in 2014, but not ratified, into separate trade and investment protection agreements. When presenting the agreements, the Commission underlined that they demonstrate the commitment of Singapore and the EU to fair trade and open markets. The Council of the EU is ...

On 18 April 2018, the European Commission proposed to the Council of the EU to sign and conclude two agreements with Singapore. These agreements were created by dividing the free trade agreement reached between the EU and Singapore (EUSFTA) in 2014, but not ratified, into separate trade and investment protection agreements. When presenting the agreements, the Commission underlined that they demonstrate the commitment of Singapore and the EU to fair trade and open markets. The Council of the EU is expected to authorise the signature of the agreements in October 2018. The Commission aims to have the trade agreement come into effect before the end of its mandate in 2019, after its approval by the Council and the European Parliament. Singapore will be the first member state of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) to sign bilateral trade and investment agreements with the EU. The EU views bilateral agreements with ASEAN members as steps towards achieving the final objective of a region-to-region trade and investment agreement with ASEAN. Therefore, the EU Singapore agreements are considered a reference as regards the EU's ambition to conclude trade and investment agreements with other ASEAN members. Second edition. The ‘International Agreements in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the process, from initial discussions through to ratification. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 607.255, June 2017.

Free Trade Agreement between the EU and the Republic of Singapore – Analysis

16-03-2018

This study analyses provisions of the EU-Singapore Free Trade Agreement concluded in May 2015 ('EUSFTA'). It compares EUSFTA with other 'new-generation' free trade agreements, such as the EU-Republic of Korea and the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement. Overall, EUSFTA adopts a WTO+ approach and as a result significantly liberalises trade between the EU and Singapore compared to the current trade relationship. The study finds that a number of tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade ...

This study analyses provisions of the EU-Singapore Free Trade Agreement concluded in May 2015 ('EUSFTA'). It compares EUSFTA with other 'new-generation' free trade agreements, such as the EU-Republic of Korea and the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement. Overall, EUSFTA adopts a WTO+ approach and as a result significantly liberalises trade between the EU and Singapore compared to the current trade relationship. The study finds that a number of tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade in goods and services that currently exist between the parties will be reduced or removed on EUSFTA's entry into force. EUSFTA, as with other 'new-generation' FTAs negotiated by the EU, adopts a comprehensive approach, and contains innovative provisions on investment, intellectual property rights, competition and public procurement. It also contains provisions which reflect growing concerns about the impact of global trade, such as those on trade and sustainable development. With regard to EUSFTA's potential impact on trade, the economic modelling estimates an increase of around 10 % in trade volumes and greater volumes of foreign direct investment between the EU and Singapore as a result of the agreement. It also concludes that EUSFTA should lead to small increases of the gross domestic products of the EU and Singapore (0.06 % and 0.35 %, respectively). The responses of a wide-range of EU and Singaporean stakeholder consultation reveal that, in general, EUSFTA is viewed positively and is considered a very ambitious agreement, which will offer new opportunities for trade and investment in the EU and Singapore. However, some concerns have been raised, especially by small and medium-sized enterprises. The implications of the result of the Opinion of the Court of Justice of the EU in case 2/15 of 2017, on whether the EU had exclusive competence to sign and conclude EUSFTA alone, is also analysed in detail. The study recommends, notably, monitoring closely that commitments taken under sustainable development provisions are implemented and used effectively in practice.

Външен автор

Glyn CHAMBERS, Managing Economist Capital Economics, Melanie DEBONO, Economist Capital Economics, Costas FRANGESKIDES, Partner Holman Fenwick Wilan, Jody GALLAGHER, Trainee Solicitor Holman Fenwick Willan, Dr Peter HOLMES, Reader in Economics at Sussex University (project leader), Jeremy KELLY, Associate Holman Fenwick Willan, Eirini ROUSSOU, Senior Associate Holman Fenwick Willan, Cliff STEVENSON, Cliff Stevenson Consulting, Anthony WOOLICH, Partner Holman Fenwick Willan

In Pursuit of an International Investment Court. Recently Negotiated Investment Chapters in EU Comprehensive Free Trade Agreements in Comparative Perspective

04-07-2017

The study compares the revised and signed text of the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with the EU-Vietnam Free Trade Agreement (EUVFTA) and the EU Singapore Free Trade Agreement (EUSFTA) in respect of important procedural aspects relating to investor State dispute settlement. The findings are juxtaposed to the procedural rules governing the preliminary reference procedure and direct action (action for annulment) before the Court of Justice of the European Union as well as the individual ...

The study compares the revised and signed text of the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with the EU-Vietnam Free Trade Agreement (EUVFTA) and the EU Singapore Free Trade Agreement (EUSFTA) in respect of important procedural aspects relating to investor State dispute settlement. The findings are juxtaposed to the procedural rules governing the preliminary reference procedure and direct action (action for annulment) before the Court of Justice of the European Union as well as the individual application before the European Court of Human Rights. In doing so, it provides a tool and manual to evaluate the EU’s todays and future progress in reforming the international investment law regime. By outlining key features of the procedural frameworks governing two international courts, some ‘tried and tested’ concepts as source of inspiration for the possible design of a ‘multilateral investment court’ might be found.

Външен автор

Prof. Dr. Steffen HINDELANG, LL.M., Department of Law, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany and Ass. iur. Teoman M. HAGEMEYER, Dipl. iur. oec., Ph.D. candidate at the Department of Law, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

International Agreements in Progress: EU-Singapore Free Trade Agreement - Stimulus for negotiations in the region

15-06-2017

Singapore is the first member country of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and second Asian economy after South Korea to have concluded a free trade agreement (FTA) with the EU, in October 2014. Moreover, this is the first comprehensive FTA negotiated and finalised by the EU after the Treaty of Lisbon came into effect. As a 'new generation' trade agreement, the EU-Singapore FTA (EUSFTA) in many aspects goes further than current World Trade Organization (WTO) commitments. Moreover ...

Singapore is the first member country of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and second Asian economy after South Korea to have concluded a free trade agreement (FTA) with the EU, in October 2014. Moreover, this is the first comprehensive FTA negotiated and finalised by the EU after the Treaty of Lisbon came into effect. As a 'new generation' trade agreement, the EU-Singapore FTA (EUSFTA) in many aspects goes further than current World Trade Organization (WTO) commitments. Moreover, not only does the agreement provide improved access to the Singaporean market, it is also beneficial for European companies operating from Singapore across the Southeast Asian region. Following the conclusion of the EUSFTA negotiations, the Commission sought an opinion from the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) on the allocation of competences between the EU and the Member States. On 16 May 2017, the CJEU issued its opinion, stating that the EUSFTA also covers shared competences. As the EUSFTA is considered a model for successive new generation EU FTAs, the CJEU’s opinion is extremely relevant for all ongoing FTA negotiations and pending agreements.

CJEU Opinion on the EU-Singapore Agreement

29-05-2017

In 2015, the European Commission requested the opinion of the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) on the competence for conclusion of the EU-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (EUSFTA). The CJEU issued its opinion on 16 May 2017, holding that the EUSFTA covers shared competences with respect to: (i) non-direct foreign investment, (ii) investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS), and (iii) state-to-state dispute settlement relating to provisions regarding portfolio investment and ISDS. In its current form, ...

In 2015, the European Commission requested the opinion of the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) on the competence for conclusion of the EU-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (EUSFTA). The CJEU issued its opinion on 16 May 2017, holding that the EUSFTA covers shared competences with respect to: (i) non-direct foreign investment, (ii) investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS), and (iii) state-to-state dispute settlement relating to provisions regarding portfolio investment and ISDS. In its current form, therefore, the agreement would need to be concluded as a ‘mixed agreement’.

Trans-Pacific Partnership: Geopolitical Implications for EU-US Relations

24-06-2016

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the prospective Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), if enacted, will reshape trade and investment flows between the United States, Asia, and Europe. Together, these agreements encompass more than 60 % of the global economy, including the leading industrial economies of North America, the European Union and Japan. TPP is the economic anchor of the US ‘pivot’ to Asia. TPP is as much a geopolitical project to reinforce US leadership in Asia ...

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the prospective Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), if enacted, will reshape trade and investment flows between the United States, Asia, and Europe. Together, these agreements encompass more than 60 % of the global economy, including the leading industrial economies of North America, the European Union and Japan. TPP is the economic anchor of the US ‘pivot’ to Asia. TPP is as much a geopolitical project to reinforce US leadership in Asia as it is a deal driven by an economic logic of spurring new sources of trade and investment. The EU has concluded or is negotiating a series of bilateral trade and investment agreements, including with Singapore, Vietnam, Australia, Japan, Malaysia, and New Zealand. But Europe as a whole needs to take a more strategic and coherent approach to Asia, beyond commerce and investment ties, and particularly to unify its approach to China. This is a compelling requirement given both China’s enormous economic power and the risks its ascendancy poses to the liberal international order. Beyond the politics around both trade deals, however, lies a conviction among trade liberalisers in both the Atlantic and Pacific theatres that the agreements could provide a positive shock to a global economy badly in need of new engines of growth.

Външен автор

Daniel TWINING? Hans KUNDNANI and Peter SPARDING

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP): Potential regional and global impacts

12-05-2016

On 4 February 2016, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement was signed by 12 countries: Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States and Vietnam. It encompasses about 800 million people, and the participating countries account for roughly a quarter of global trade and approximately 40% of the world's GDP. The TPP – described by US President Barack Obama as 'a regional agreement that will have broad-based membership and the high standards ...

On 4 February 2016, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement was signed by 12 countries: Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States and Vietnam. It encompasses about 800 million people, and the participating countries account for roughly a quarter of global trade and approximately 40% of the world's GDP. The TPP – described by US President Barack Obama as 'a regional agreement that will have broad-based membership and the high standards worthy of a 21st century trade agreement' – provides deeper liberalisation for trade in goods and services and introduces a set of common rules in a number of fields, going beyond current WTO plus commitments in existing free trade agreements. It is highly probable that the TPP, although yet to be ratified, will influence the way that regional free trade agreements, including the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), develop. Alongside China's growing stature and the increase in intraregional economic relations in the Asia-Pacific region, the TPP could adversely affect the interests of the EU. It remains to be seen how quickly the forthcoming ratification and implementation process can be completed, what the ultimate economic significance of the TPP will be, and whether other countries will be able to join the partnership.

Proceedings of the Workshop on "Trade and Economic Relations with Asia"

07-03-2016

This publication consists of the proceedings and of three studies which were presented during the workshop on trade and economic relations with Asia: - Asia as a new global engine: foreign trade and regional cooperation ; - EU external trade strategy vis-à-vis Asia ; - Implementation of the EU-Republic of Korea FTA.

This publication consists of the proceedings and of three studies which were presented during the workshop on trade and economic relations with Asia: - Asia as a new global engine: foreign trade and regional cooperation ; - EU external trade strategy vis-à-vis Asia ; - Implementation of the EU-Republic of Korea FTA.

TTIP: Technical Barriers to Trade, Including Standards - Study in Focus

16-11-2015

The study TTIP: Opportunities and Challenges in the area of Technical Barriers to Trade, including Standards concentrates on the horizontal TBT chapter in TTIP, with links to the regulatory cooperation chapter and the nine sectorial chapters This is a short overview of this study. Link to the original document: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2015/542225/IPOL_STU(2015)542225_EN.pdf

The study TTIP: Opportunities and Challenges in the area of Technical Barriers to Trade, including Standards concentrates on the horizontal TBT chapter in TTIP, with links to the regulatory cooperation chapter and the nine sectorial chapters This is a short overview of this study. Link to the original document: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2015/542225/IPOL_STU(2015)542225_EN.pdf

TTIP: Engineering, Including Machinery - Study in Focus

16-11-2015

The study TTIP: Engineering including Machinery explores how TTIP could effectively address the causes of costly market access to the US in the Engineering sector, such as stubborn TBTs. The case is made why TTIP offers the potential to lower the TBTs to the US engineering market significantly, via three complementary routes in TTIP. The study sets out the overall and specific EU offensive interests, one crucial defensive interest (the integrity of the single market) and some opportunities and challenges ...

The study TTIP: Engineering including Machinery explores how TTIP could effectively address the causes of costly market access to the US in the Engineering sector, such as stubborn TBTs. The case is made why TTIP offers the potential to lower the TBTs to the US engineering market significantly, via three complementary routes in TTIP. The study sets out the overall and specific EU offensive interests, one crucial defensive interest (the integrity of the single market) and some opportunities and challenges. This is a short overview of this study. Link to the original document: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2015/542233/IPOL_STU(2015)542233_EN.pdf

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