ThinkTank logo Dokumenty, které pomáhají utvářet nové předpisy EU

Nejnovější zveřejněné dokumenty

Zveřejněno na 20-05-2019

Judicial cooperation in criminal matters achievements during the legislative term 2014-2019: the role of the European Parliament

13-05-2019

Judicial cooperation in criminal matters is based on the principle of mutual recognition of judgments and judicial decisions, and includes measures to approximate the laws of the Member States in several areas. It includes minimum rules concerning the definition of criminal offences and sanctions in the areas of particularly serious crime with a cross-border dimension: terrorism, trafficking in human beings and sexual exploitation of women and children, illicit drug trafficking, illicit arms trafficking ...

Judicial cooperation in criminal matters is based on the principle of mutual recognition of judgments and judicial decisions, and includes measures to approximate the laws of the Member States in several areas. It includes minimum rules concerning the definition of criminal offences and sanctions in the areas of particularly serious crime with a cross-border dimension: terrorism, trafficking in human beings and sexual exploitation of women and children, illicit drug trafficking, illicit arms trafficking, money laundering, corruption, counterfeiting of means of payment, computer crime and organised crime. Considerable progress was made in developing the judicial cooperation in criminal matters in all these areas during the legislative term 2014-2019. Most importantly, the new Eurojust Regulation will take effect in December 2019 and the European Public Prosecutor’s Office is expected to start operating from late 2020 or early 2021 onwards. In Parliament, the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE Committee) is responsible for measures relating to police and judicial cooperation in criminal matters, including terrorism, and substantive and procedural measures relating to the development of a more coherent Union approach to criminal law, according to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure.

Briefing on the achievements of the FEMM committee in the area of gender equality during the 2014-2019 term (Briefing + Annex)

15-05-2019

Promoting equal economic independence for women, closing the gender pay gap, advancing gender balance in decision-making, ending gender-based violence and promoting gender equality belong to the aims of the European Union. When compared with the rest of the world, the position of women in the EU can serve as a positive example especially because it strives to constantly improve its policies and legislation relating to women’s rights and gender equality. The European Parliament, and its Committee ...

Promoting equal economic independence for women, closing the gender pay gap, advancing gender balance in decision-making, ending gender-based violence and promoting gender equality belong to the aims of the European Union. When compared with the rest of the world, the position of women in the EU can serve as a positive example especially because it strives to constantly improve its policies and legislation relating to women’s rights and gender equality. The European Parliament, and its Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality (FEMM), has played a very active role in promoting those rights. This briefing looks into the past legislative term (2014-2019) and takes stock of FEMM activities aiming to contribute to gender balance in different spheres of life.

Free movement of services and freedom of establishment: European Public Procurement - Delivering improved rights for European citizens and businesses

15-05-2019

This study discusses European legal policy to ensure freedom to provide services and freedom of establishment since 2009, ex-amines the market-opening effects of enacted acts and pro-posals, and identifies legislative challenges that the Union insti-tutions should address in the coming legislative period. It also addresses the specific Brexit-related issues for the freedom to provide services. This document was provided by Policy Department A, in collab-oration with IMCO Secretariat, at the request ...

This study discusses European legal policy to ensure freedom to provide services and freedom of establishment since 2009, ex-amines the market-opening effects of enacted acts and pro-posals, and identifies legislative challenges that the Union insti-tutions should address in the coming legislative period. It also addresses the specific Brexit-related issues for the freedom to provide services. This document was provided by Policy Department A, in collab-oration with IMCO Secretariat, at the request of the IMCO Committee.

Externí autor

Prof. Dr. Friedmann KAINER

Contributing to Growth: European Digital Single - Market Delivering improved rights for citizens and businesses

15-05-2019

TThis study reviews all the rules adopted during the 8th Parliamentary legislature (2014-2019) to strengthen the Digital Single Market. On that basis, the report analyses the rights and obligations as well as the institutions and procedures created or improved in the main policy fields of the Digital Single Market (e-commerce and online platforms, e-government, data and AI, cybersecurity, consumer protection and electronic communications networks and services). Finally, the report identifies remaining ...

TThis study reviews all the rules adopted during the 8th Parliamentary legislature (2014-2019) to strengthen the Digital Single Market. On that basis, the report analyses the rights and obligations as well as the institutions and procedures created or improved in the main policy fields of the Digital Single Market (e-commerce and online platforms, e-government, data and AI, cybersecurity, consumer protection and electronic communications networks and services). Finally, the report identifies remaining gaps and possible actions for the forthcoming Parliament’s legislature. This study has been prepared for the IMCO Committee at the request of the Policy Department A of the European Parliament.

Externí autor

Prof. Alexandre de STREEL, University of Namur and CERRE (Centre on Regulation in Europe) Christian HOCEPIED, University of Namur With the assistance of Michael LOGNOUL and Zorana ROSIC, University of Namurl

Zveřejněno na 17-05-2019

Banking resolution challenges ahead in the Banking Union

16-05-2019

This note presents the summaries of three papers requested by the ECON Committee to external authors, to give a topical assessment of the Single Resolution Board’s past performance and a view on future priorities or areas that would call for increased attention.

This note presents the summaries of three papers requested by the ECON Committee to external authors, to give a topical assessment of the Single Resolution Board’s past performance and a view on future priorities or areas that would call for increased attention.

Banking Supervisory challenges ahead in the Banking Union

16-05-2019

This note presents the summaries of four papers requested by the ECON Committee to external authors on ”The next SSM term: Supervisory challenges ahead", given the recent appointment of Andrea Enria as Chair of the Single Supervisory Mechansim (SSM). The experts were asked to briefly look back at how the SSM (part of the ECB) has over the past years performed against the main goals it was supposed to accomplish; look forward at the supervisory challenges ahead; and to reflect upon which modified ...

This note presents the summaries of four papers requested by the ECON Committee to external authors on ”The next SSM term: Supervisory challenges ahead", given the recent appointment of Andrea Enria as Chair of the Single Supervisory Mechansim (SSM). The experts were asked to briefly look back at how the SSM (part of the ECB) has over the past years performed against the main goals it was supposed to accomplish; look forward at the supervisory challenges ahead; and to reflect upon which modified supervisory practices would facilitate the Parliament’s scrutiny work.

Regional inequalities in the EU

17-05-2019

The issue of inequality has gained increasing importance in the public and political agenda in the aftermath of the financial and economic crisis, and in the context of political movements representing the 'places left behind'. Inequality may relate to income and wealth, but also to a variety of aspects such as access to basic services, education and infrastructure. In the context of regional disparities, it may also refer to differing levels of socio-economic development. Common inequality measures ...

The issue of inequality has gained increasing importance in the public and political agenda in the aftermath of the financial and economic crisis, and in the context of political movements representing the 'places left behind'. Inequality may relate to income and wealth, but also to a variety of aspects such as access to basic services, education and infrastructure. In the context of regional disparities, it may also refer to differing levels of socio-economic development. Common inequality measures have revealed that, while regional disparities have been decreasing when considering the EU as a whole, they have been increasing within some countries. A number of persistently low-growth regions exist in southern Europe, as do many low-income regions in eastern Europe. Every Member State has a number of 'inner peripheries', which are habitually located in post-industrial or rural areas and often characterised by high levels of unemployment, poor infrastructure, lack of skilled workforce and hampered accessibility. Strengthening social, economic and territorial cohesion, and reducing regional disparities is the main goal of EU cohesion policy. As a major EU tool to address regional inequalities, this policy provides a wide range of support for businesses and activities in areas such as research, environment, transport, employment, social inclusion, education and institutional capacity-building. Such support is crucial for addressing the underlying problems of many lagging regions, helping them create better living conditions, retain and attract talent, encourage investment, improve productivity and develop regional innovation systems. Together with economic governance frameworks and EU support for structural reform, EU cohesion policy can play an important role in reducing inequality, in a comprehensive and multidimensional way. While traditionally, GDP per capita has been used to assess regional convergence, a variety of new indicators tracking progress on issues correlated with inequality are available for this purpose today. Moreover, the proposals for the EU's post-2020 policy framework include new additional funding allocation criteria such as youth unemployment, education levels, climate change, and the reception and integration of migrants. These changes possibly indicate a shift towards a more comprehensive view of territorial convergence in the EU.

Zveřejněno na 16-05-2019

LGBTI in Africa: Widespread discrimination against people with non-conforming sexual orientations and gender identities

16-05-2019

Three out of five African countries have laws criminalising homosexuality and the public expression of sexual or gender behaviour that does not conform with heterosexual norms. These same laws even sometimes punish LGBTI (lesbian, gay, trans, intersex) rights advocacy. Some African countries have partly decriminalised LGBTI persons or given them better protection. However, across the continent – with the notable exception of South Africa – such persons are still far from fully enjoying the same rights ...

Three out of five African countries have laws criminalising homosexuality and the public expression of sexual or gender behaviour that does not conform with heterosexual norms. These same laws even sometimes punish LGBTI (lesbian, gay, trans, intersex) rights advocacy. Some African countries have partly decriminalised LGBTI persons or given them better protection. However, across the continent – with the notable exception of South Africa – such persons are still far from fully enjoying the same rights as other citizens. Furthermore, recent years have seen the emergence of a worrying trend: the adoption of tougher legislation coupled with clampdowns on homosexuals. An argument frequently used in support of discriminatory legislative and other measures targeting LGBTI persons is that non-conforming sexual orientations and gender identities were brought to Africa by Western colonisers and are contrary to the 'African values'. This claim has long been proven false by academic research, but tolerance for LGBTI is still very low in most African countries, and LGBTI people are all too often exposed to discrimination and violence. Against this backdrop, the EU institutions and Member States have a difficult task: on the one hand, they are committed under the Treaties to promote the EU core values in their external relations, and to monitor and tackle abuses in their partner countries. On the other hand, their actions and declarations in this area risk reinforcing the perception that the EU is trying to impose non-African values on Africa, all the more so since the notion of sexual orientation and gender identity as grounds for discrimination is contested by African countries in the multilateral arena.

The rights of LGBTI people in the European Union

16-05-2019

The prohibition of discrimination, and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as grounds of discrimination. However, the scope of the provisions dealing with this issue is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare ...

The prohibition of discrimination, and the protection of human rights are important elements of the EU legal order. Nevertheless, discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) persons persists throughout the EU, taking various forms including verbal abuse and physical violence. Sexual orientation is now recognised in EU law as grounds of discrimination. However, the scope of the provisions dealing with this issue is limited and does not cover social protection, healthcare, education and access to goods and services, leaving LGBTI people particularly vulnerable in these areas. Moreover, EU competence does not extend to recognition of marital or family status. In this area, national regulations vary, with some Member States offering same-sex couples the right to marry, others allowing alternative forms of registration, and yet others not providing any legal status for same-sex couples. Same-sex couples may or may not have the right to adopt children and to access assisted reproduction. These divergent legal statuses have implications, for instance, for partners from two Member States with different standards who want to formalise/legalise their relationship, or for same-sex couples and their families wishing to move to another Member State. Combating discrimination has become part of EU internal and external policies, and the subject of numerous resolutions of the European Parliament. However, action in this area remains problematic when it touches on issues pertaining to areas traditionally reserved to Member States, such as marital status and family law. This is a further updated version of a Briefing originally drafted by Piotr Bakowski. The previous edition was published in June 2018.

Zveřejněno na 13-05-2019

Outcome of the informal meeting of EU-27 leaders on 9 May 2019 in Sibiu

13-05-2019

EU-27 Heads of State or Government met on 9 May 2019 in the Romanian city of Sibiu, to discuss the Union’s common future. They adopted the Sibiu Declaration, recalling the achievements and values of the European Union. EU leaders reaffirmed their unity, and recognised the role they have to play to make the EU stronger and the future brighter. They also discussed the forthcoming Strategic Agenda for 2019-2024, which will outline policy priorities for the next five years. The European Council President ...

EU-27 Heads of State or Government met on 9 May 2019 in the Romanian city of Sibiu, to discuss the Union’s common future. They adopted the Sibiu Declaration, recalling the achievements and values of the European Union. EU leaders reaffirmed their unity, and recognised the role they have to play to make the EU stronger and the future brighter. They also discussed the forthcoming Strategic Agenda for 2019-2024, which will outline policy priorities for the next five years. The European Council President, Donald Tusk, suggested a process for the forthcoming appointments to a set of high-level EU positions, and called a special summit for 28 May.

Chystané akce

25-06-2019
Meeting EU energy and climate goals: Energy storage for grids and low-carbon mobility
Další akce -
EPRS

Infografiky

Zůstaňte připojeni

email update imageSystém aktualizace e-mailem

Informace o komkoliv či čemkoliv souvisejícím s Parlamentem můžete získávat pomocí systému aktualizací e-mailem, který zašle aktualizace přímo do Vaší e-mailové schránky. Aktualizace se týkají nejčerstvějších informací o poslancích EP, výborech, zpravodajských službách či stránce expertní skupiny (Think Tank).

Do systému můžete vstoupit z kterékoliv internetové stránky Parlamentu. K registraci a získávání informací o obsahu stránky Think Tank stačí jen zadat svou e-mailovou adresu, zvolit téma, které Vás zajímá, uvést, jak často chcete být informováni (denně, týdně či měsíčně), a potvrdit registraci kliknutím na odkaz, který Vám bude zaslán e-mailem.

RSS imageKanál RSS

Sledujte zprávy a aktuální informace z naší internetové stránky za použití kanálu RSS.

Ke konfiguraci vlastního kanálu klikněte na tento odkaz.

Publikace Think Tanku

Veškeré dokumenty zveřejněné na internetových stránkách Think Tanku jsou výlučnou zodpovědností autora a názory v nich vyjádřené nemusí nutně představovat oficiální postoj Evropského parlamentu. Je určen poslancům a pracovníkům EP a pro potřeby jejich parlamentní činnosti.

Think Tank je v provozu...