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CETA and public services

10-02-2017

EU-Canada negotiations for a Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) began in May 2009 and concluded in September 2014. Signed in October 2016, the agreement's overall aim is to increase flows of goods, services and investment. This publication analyses the extent to which public services are protected in CETA. The trade agreement takes the public sector into account by means of a (general) public sector carve-out and specific reservations introduced by the EU and the Member States in the ...

EU-Canada negotiations for a Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) began in May 2009 and concluded in September 2014. Signed in October 2016, the agreement's overall aim is to increase flows of goods, services and investment. This publication analyses the extent to which public services are protected in CETA. The trade agreement takes the public sector into account by means of a (general) public sector carve-out and specific reservations introduced by the EU and the Member States in the annexes to the agreement. These reservations apply specifically to health services, education services, social services, and environmental, energy and transport services. National reservations introduced by the EU Member States to complement EU-wide reservations vary greatly. To a large extent this is the result of the widely varying levels of liberalisation of certain services among Member States, leading some of them to see a greater need to protect particular sectors from foreign competition than others.

Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with Canada

07-02-2017

CETA was signed by the European Union (EU) and Canada on 30 October 2016, after long discussions. Hence, a total of 38 statements and declarations as well as a Joint Interpretative Instrument accompany the Council decision on signing CETA. Parliament has launched the consent procedure, with the vote in plenary planned for the February II session.

CETA was signed by the European Union (EU) and Canada on 30 October 2016, after long discussions. Hence, a total of 38 statements and declarations as well as a Joint Interpretative Instrument accompany the Council decision on signing CETA. Parliament has launched the consent procedure, with the vote in plenary planned for the February II session.

International Agreements in Progress: Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with Canada

20-01-2017

EU-Canada negotiations for a Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) started in May 2009 and were declared concluded at the EU-Canada Summit on 26 September 2014. The agreement's overall aim is to increase flows of goods, services and investment to the benefit of both partners. For the EU, CETA represents the first comprehensive economic agreement with a highly industrialised Western economy. Except for a few sensitive agricultural products, the agreement would remove practically all tariffs ...

EU-Canada negotiations for a Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) started in May 2009 and were declared concluded at the EU-Canada Summit on 26 September 2014. The agreement's overall aim is to increase flows of goods, services and investment to the benefit of both partners. For the EU, CETA represents the first comprehensive economic agreement with a highly industrialised Western economy. Except for a few sensitive agricultural products, the agreement would remove practically all tariffs on goods exchanged between the two partners. Canada would substantially open up its public procurement at both federal and sub-federal level, thereby eliminating a major asymmetry in access to each other's public procurement markets. The EU succeeded in securing protection for a large number of European Geographical Indications (GIs) on the Canadian market. Provisions on sustainable development should ensure that trade and investment do not develop to the detriment of, but rather support, environmental protection and social development. CETA was signed by the EU and Canada on 30 October 2016. The Council decision on signature was only reached after difficult discussions, so that a total of 38 statements and declarations by Member States, the Commission and the Council, as well as a Joint Interpretative Instrument accompany that Council decision. The European Parliament has launched the consent procedure, with Artis Pabriks (EPP, Latvia) as rapporteur. The vote in the Committee on International Trade (INTA) is scheduled for 24 January 2017, and the vote in plenary for the February part-session in Strasbourg (13 to 16 February). Second edition. The ‘International Agreements in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the process, from initial discussions through to ratification. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 593.491, 26 October 2016.

International Agreements in Progress: Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with Canada

26-10-2016

EU-Canada negotiations for a Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) started in May 2009 and were declared concluded at the EU-Canada Summit on 26 September 2014. The agreement's overall aim is to increase flows of goods, services and investment to the benefit of both partners. For the EU, CETA represents the first comprehensive economic agreement with a highly industrialised Western economy. Except for a few sensitive agricultural products, the agreement would remove practically all tariffs ...

EU-Canada negotiations for a Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) started in May 2009 and were declared concluded at the EU-Canada Summit on 26 September 2014. The agreement's overall aim is to increase flows of goods, services and investment to the benefit of both partners. For the EU, CETA represents the first comprehensive economic agreement with a highly industrialised Western economy. Except for a few sensitive agricultural products, the agreement would remove practically all tariffs on goods exchanged between the two partners. Canada would substantially open up its public procurement at both federal and sub-federal level, thereby eliminating a major asymmetry in access to each other's public procurement markets. The EU succeeded in securing protection for a large number of European Geographical Indications (GIs) on the Canadian market. Provisions on sustainable development should ensure that trade and investment do not develop to the detriment of, but rather support, environmental protection and social development. On 5 July 2016, the Commission made three proposals for a Council decision with respect to CETA: to sign the agreement, on provisional application, and on conclusion. The Council and Member States have had difficult discussions on the conditions under which CETA can be signed. The consent procedure can be launched once the proposal to conclude the agreement has officially reached the European Parliament. First edition. The ‘International Agreements in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the process, from initial discussions through to ratification. A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html

Is CETA a mixed agreement?

01-07-2016

The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with Canada is currently being translated into the EU’s official languages. Once the translations are available, the European Commission can propose that the Council sign and conclude the agreement on behalf of the European Union. It is not yet decided whether the agreement in its entirety would fall under the exclusive competence of the European Union or would also touch upon Member States' competences. In the latter case, ratification by the ...

The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with Canada is currently being translated into the EU’s official languages. Once the translations are available, the European Commission can propose that the Council sign and conclude the agreement on behalf of the European Union. It is not yet decided whether the agreement in its entirety would fall under the exclusive competence of the European Union or would also touch upon Member States' competences. In the latter case, ratification by the Member States would also be necessary for the agreement to come into force. The Commission’s proposal is expected on 5 July 2016. If the Commission presents a proposal for an ‘EU-only’ agreement, the Council would need unanimity to change this.

TiSA: Recommendations for the negotiations

26-01-2016

The Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA), currently under negotiation in Geneva, is a plurilateral agreement involving 50 members of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The aim is to liberalise trade in services among those countries, but the EU and others hope to make it part of the WTO rulebook at a later stage. The European Union is the world's largest importer and exporter of services and therefore has a vital interest in both supporting and building a sound regulatory basis for international trade ...

The Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA), currently under negotiation in Geneva, is a plurilateral agreement involving 50 members of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The aim is to liberalise trade in services among those countries, but the EU and others hope to make it part of the WTO rulebook at a later stage. The European Union is the world's largest importer and exporter of services and therefore has a vital interest in both supporting and building a sound regulatory basis for international trade in services. The European Parliament has actively followed TiSA negotiations since the start of the negotiations in spring 2013. During its February plenary session, the EP is due to vote on recommendations setting out for the Commission, as the EU negotiator, the Parliament's priorities for the remainder of the negotiations.

EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement

19-01-2016

EU-Canada negotiations for a Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) were declared concluded in September 2014. Except for a few sensitive agricultural products, CETA would remove practically all tariffs on goods exchanged between the two partners, and create important new market opportunities in, among others, financial services, telecommunications, energy and maritime transport, while reserving the parties' right to regulate their internal public affairs. Canada would substantially open ...

EU-Canada negotiations for a Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) were declared concluded in September 2014. Except for a few sensitive agricultural products, CETA would remove practically all tariffs on goods exchanged between the two partners, and create important new market opportunities in, among others, financial services, telecommunications, energy and maritime transport, while reserving the parties' right to regulate their internal public affairs. Canada would substantially open up its public procurement, at both federal and sub-federal level, thereby eliminating a major asymmetry in access to each other's public procurement markets. The consolidated CETA text is currently undergoing legal-linguistic review. Once this 'legal scrubbing' and the translation into all official EU languages are completed, the Commission can submit it to the Council and the European Parliament for approval. It is still to be decided whether the agreement in its entirety falls under exclusive competence of the European Union or would also touch upon Member States' competences. In the latter case, ratification by the Member States would also be necessary for the agreement to come into force. CETA brings forward a number of innovations to reform and reshape investment protection provisions in general and the investor-state-dispute settlement (ISDS) mechanism in particular. Nevertheless, persistent opposition to investment protection, and ISDS in particular, has given rise to proposals to incorporate (elements of) the new investment court system (ICS) into CETA. The Commission is reportedly not pressing for including its entire ICS proposal into CETA; however, it intends to 'fine-tune' the agreement within the process of legal scrubbing. Working towards including (elements of) the ICS system into CETA could then be envisaged via the use of review clauses.

Ratifying the WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement

02-09-2015

Behind its rather formal title, the 'Protocol amending the Marrakesh Agreement establishing the WTO' deals with something very practical: modernising customs and other procedures so that international trade can operate more smoothly. Conclusion by the EU would be a big step forward towards enabling the agreement to come into force.

Behind its rather formal title, the 'Protocol amending the Marrakesh Agreement establishing the WTO' deals with something very practical: modernising customs and other procedures so that international trade can operate more smoothly. Conclusion by the EU would be a big step forward towards enabling the agreement to come into force.

Economic significance of trade in services: Background to negotiations on a Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA)

18-02-2015

Fifty-one members of the World Trade Organization (WTO): Australia, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Costa Rica, Hong Kong, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Liechtenstein, Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Korea, Switzerland, Turkey and the United States, together with the European Union and its 28 Member States – have been trying to find a way to break the deadlock in the Doha Round on liberalising trade in services since March 2013. These countries together represent ...

Fifty-one members of the World Trade Organization (WTO): Australia, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Costa Rica, Hong Kong, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Liechtenstein, Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Korea, Switzerland, Turkey and the United States, together with the European Union and its 28 Member States – have been trying to find a way to break the deadlock in the Doha Round on liberalising trade in services since March 2013. These countries together represent over two thirds of global trade in services. The services sector accounts for more than 70% of GDP in the EU and in other developed economies, as well as for a substantial share of GDP in emerging economies. The sector is also the largest employer in the EU and other advanced economies. Yet the proportion of services trade in total international trade lags well behind its importance in overall economic activity. Reasons for the low share of services in overall trade include lower tradability of (some) services, under-reporting of the importance of services for overall trade in the balance of payments, and barriers to trade in services. Policy-makers intervene in the services trade to enhance consumer protection, counter market failures and secure a beneficial equity position. At the same time, government-imposed barriers to trade can reduce the efficiency and range of services provided. As services are instrumental in ensuring the smooth running of the economy, and play an increasing role in facilitating international trade in goods, restrictions imposed on the services trade may lower the international competitiveness of an economy. Calculating equivalent tariffs for non-tariff measures and compiling indices on the restrictiveness of the services trade help to enable comparison of non-tariff measures across countries and serve as a reference point for governments and negotiators when considering renegotiating the framework governing international trade in services.

Cuba's international trade

09-02-2015

Cuba's main imports are machinery, food and fuel products, while its major exports are refined fuels, sugar, tobacco, nickel and pharmaceuticals. In addition to merchandise exports, Cuba pays for much-needed imports through the export of services (tourism, medical personnel working abroad), remittances from Cubans living out of the country and finance from outside benefactors. The island recently reformed its foreign investment law and opened a Chinese-style 'special economic zone' around the new ...

Cuba's main imports are machinery, food and fuel products, while its major exports are refined fuels, sugar, tobacco, nickel and pharmaceuticals. In addition to merchandise exports, Cuba pays for much-needed imports through the export of services (tourism, medical personnel working abroad), remittances from Cubans living out of the country and finance from outside benefactors. The island recently reformed its foreign investment law and opened a Chinese-style 'special economic zone' around the new container terminal in Mariel with the aim of attracting additional foreign direct investment. President Obama's new policy on Cuba does not amount to lifting the US embargo as such, but rather expands and facilitates a specific range of possibilities for commercial and private exchange.

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