EU Administrative Law

29-04-2015

Over the last decades, the European Union has developed a series of ad hoc administrative procedures for the direct implementation of its rules in a number of areas - such as competition policy, trade policy, sate aids, access to EU documents, the EU civil service - , which resulted in a fragmented body of rules, whether in the form of law or soft law. The need to depart from this sector-specific approach to ensure consistent EU administrative procedures has therefore started to be debated in the academic sector as well as within the EU institutions. In this respect, following the entry into force of a new legal basis on administrative law introduced by the Lisbon Treaty the European Parliament has called for the adoption of a single European Administrative Procedure binding on its institutions, bodies, agency and offices including enforceable procedural rights for citizens when dealing with the Union's direct administration.

Over the last decades, the European Union has developed a series of ad hoc administrative procedures for the direct implementation of its rules in a number of areas - such as competition policy, trade policy, sate aids, access to EU documents, the EU civil service - , which resulted in a fragmented body of rules, whether in the form of law or soft law. The need to depart from this sector-specific approach to ensure consistent EU administrative procedures has therefore started to be debated in the academic sector as well as within the EU institutions. In this respect, following the entry into force of a new legal basis on administrative law introduced by the Lisbon Treaty the European Parliament has called for the adoption of a single European Administrative Procedure binding on its institutions, bodies, agency and offices including enforceable procedural rights for citizens when dealing with the Union's direct administration.