10

resultat(er)

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gas
Dato

New rules on security of gas supply

10-11-2017

In February 2016, the European Commission proposed a new regulation on security of gas supply in order to develop a stronger collective response to future supply risks. Major innovations in the Commission proposal include a solidarity principle that prioritises households and essential social services during an emergency situation; mandatory regional preventive action and emergency plans based on new templates; fewer exemptions on bidirectional capacity, in order to facilitate reverse gas flows; ...

In February 2016, the European Commission proposed a new regulation on security of gas supply in order to develop a stronger collective response to future supply risks. Major innovations in the Commission proposal include a solidarity principle that prioritises households and essential social services during an emergency situation; mandatory regional preventive action and emergency plans based on new templates; fewer exemptions on bidirectional capacity, in order to facilitate reverse gas flows; an increase in the scope of contractual information relating to security of supply that is provided to the Commission and national authorities; and further involvement of the contracting parties of the Energy Community in security of gas supply measures. The ITRE Committee approved its report in October 2016, the Council adopted a general approach in December 2016. Trilogue negotiations began in February 2017 and agreement was reached in April 2017. The agreed text was formally endorsed by the Parliament in September and by the Council in October 2017), and entered into force on 1 November 2017. This updates an earlier edition, of June 2017: PE 607.271.

New rules on security of gas supply

05-09-2017

In February 2016, the Commission adopted a proposal to revise the 2010 regulation on security of gas supply. Trilogue negotiations in early 2017 produced an agreed text that was endorsed by the Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) committee in May 2017. The Parliament is due to vote on this text during the September 2017 plenary.

In February 2016, the Commission adopted a proposal to revise the 2010 regulation on security of gas supply. Trilogue negotiations in early 2017 produced an agreed text that was endorsed by the Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE) committee in May 2017. The Parliament is due to vote on this text during the September 2017 plenary.

New rules on security of gas supply

23-06-2017

In February 2016, the European Commission proposed a new regulation on security of gas supply as part of its sustainable energy security package, in order to develop a stronger collective response to future supply risks. Major innovations in the Commission proposal include a solidarity principle that prioritises households and essential social services during an emergency situation; mandatory regional preventive action and emergency plans based on new templates; fewer exemptions on bidirectional ...

In February 2016, the European Commission proposed a new regulation on security of gas supply as part of its sustainable energy security package, in order to develop a stronger collective response to future supply risks. Major innovations in the Commission proposal include a solidarity principle that prioritises households and essential social services during an emergency situation; mandatory regional preventive action and emergency plans based on new templates; fewer exemptions on bidirectional capacity, in order to facilitate reverse gas flows; an increase in the scope of contractual information relating to security of supply that is provided to the Commission and national authorities; and further involvement of the contracting parties of the Energy Community in security of gas supply measures. The ITRE Committee approved its report in October 2016, while the Council adopted a general approach in December 2016. Trilogue negotiations started in February 2017 and agreement was reached in April. The agreed text was approved by the ITRE committee on 30 May and is scheduled for a vote in the September 2017 plenary. "A more recent edition of this document is available. Find it by searching by the document title at this address: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/home.html"

New rules on security of gas supply

22-02-2017

On 16 February 2016 the European Commission proposed a new regulation on security of gas supply as part of its sustainable energy security package, in order to develop a stronger collective response to future supply risks. The Commission proposal would replace and repeal an existing regulation on the subject, in force since December 2010. The Commission proposal seeks to improve rather than overhaul the existing regulation, and keeps many of its key features intact. Major innovations include a solidarity ...

On 16 February 2016 the European Commission proposed a new regulation on security of gas supply as part of its sustainable energy security package, in order to develop a stronger collective response to future supply risks. The Commission proposal would replace and repeal an existing regulation on the subject, in force since December 2010. The Commission proposal seeks to improve rather than overhaul the existing regulation, and keeps many of its key features intact. Major innovations include a solidarity principle that prioritises households and essential social services during an emergency situation; mandatory regional preventive action and emergency plans based on new templates; fewer exemptions on bidirectional capacity in order to facilitate reverse gas flows; an increase in the scope of contractual information relating to security of supply that is provided to the Commission; and involving the contracting parties of the Energy Community further in security of gas supply measures. On 13 October 2016 the ITRE Committee approved a report on the regulation. On 5 December 2016 the Council held a policy debate on the regulation and reached agreement on a general approach. Trilogue negotiations started on 6 February 2017.

Recent Trends in Energy Prices

15-12-2015

After a dramatic fall in 2014, oil and fuel prices in euro terms increased in the first part of 2015, before decreasing again and since mid-2015 to record low levels, similar to early 2015. However, retail gas and electricity prices - which traditionally follow similar trends with some delay stabilized or in some cases even increased, in large part due to higher taxes. Large differences persist amongst EU Member States and commodities. Conversely, most experts claim that fossil fuel prices can be ...

After a dramatic fall in 2014, oil and fuel prices in euro terms increased in the first part of 2015, before decreasing again and since mid-2015 to record low levels, similar to early 2015. However, retail gas and electricity prices - which traditionally follow similar trends with some delay stabilized or in some cases even increased, in large part due to higher taxes. Large differences persist amongst EU Member States and commodities. Conversely, most experts claim that fossil fuel prices can be expected to stay “low for long.” Notwithstanding important recent progress in developing renewable fuel sources, low fossil fuel prices could discourage innovation in and adoption of cleaner energy technologies. This paper was prepared by Policy Department A for the Industry, Research and Energy Committee (ITRE).

Smart electricity grids and meters in the EU Member States

11-09-2015

Smart electricity grids feature in the European Commission's Energy Union package and constitute a priority for the EU in the energy field. Proponents of smart grids argue they can contribute to a more efficient use of energy, increasing the share of renewables in the energy mix, reducing the infrastructure required to supply electricity, and curbing overall energy consumption. Smart grids can also empower consumers, making them more aware of their energy use and able to adjust it in response to ...

Smart electricity grids feature in the European Commission's Energy Union package and constitute a priority for the EU in the energy field. Proponents of smart grids argue they can contribute to a more efficient use of energy, increasing the share of renewables in the energy mix, reducing the infrastructure required to supply electricity, and curbing overall energy consumption. Smart grids can also empower consumers, making them more aware of their energy use and able to adjust it in response to price signals. To facilitate the development of smart grids, the Commission encourages the deployment of smart metering across EU Member States, in line with the recommendations of the 2009 gas and electricity packages. Yet in practice significant variations exist among Member States in their deployment of smart metering, the precise energy cost savings are uncertain and there remain concerns about security and data protection. Energy producers tend to be most supportive of smart metering, and have successfully pushed for full-scale deployment in several member states. The European Parliament is generally supportive of the development of smart grids and metering, but asks that this process takes full account of consumer concerns, particularly in terms of costs and security.

A Cold Winter to Come? The EU Seeks Alternatives to Russian Gas

24-10-2014

The crisis in Ukraine has led to seven rounds of sanctions between Russia and the EU – and may well lead to more. Energy is the most alarming casualty in this clash, with the EU and Russia largely interdependent in the domain. The level of dependency among EU Member States varies greatly, as does their ability to respond to Russian warnings and actions. Ukraine's gas situation is also at stake. The Russian gas exporter Gazprom ceased exporting to Ukraine in June. In late September, gas cuts were ...

The crisis in Ukraine has led to seven rounds of sanctions between Russia and the EU – and may well lead to more. Energy is the most alarming casualty in this clash, with the EU and Russia largely interdependent in the domain. The level of dependency among EU Member States varies greatly, as does their ability to respond to Russian warnings and actions. Ukraine's gas situation is also at stake. The Russian gas exporter Gazprom ceased exporting to Ukraine in June. In late September, gas cuts were registered in Slovakia, Austria, Poland and Romania – in some cases to prevent Russian gas from being diverted to Ukraine. A provisional solution for Ukraine's winter supplies was reached in Berlin on 26 September, but has yet to be completely endorsed by Moscow and Kiev. However, the risk of gas shortages for the rest of Europe has not been averted. Military and political tensions have obliged the EU to boost its energy security mechanisms and seek alternatives to Russian gas. The European Commission has just concluded a stress test on the EU gas system to assess the impact of a potential gas crisis. Several studies have suggested that, in the short term, the EU could substitute Algerian, Norwegian and Qatari supplies for Russian gas, although this would cost more and require new gas terminals. The Union’s reserves – at present 90 % full – will also help, but for how long depends on the coming winter. In the longer term, gas supplies from Azerbaijan, the United States, Iran, Mozambique, Australia, Israel and Turkmenistan could also supply the thirsty European market. EU energy policies (on renewable sources, greater efficiency, shale gas and interconnection of energy grids) could also play a role in reducing – if not completely eliminating – Europe’s dependence on Russian gas.

EU Energy Strategy in the South Mediterranean

06-06-2011

The study provides an overview of energy policies of South Mediterranean countries in and outside of the EU and describes the state of play regarding the development of energy routes and infrastructure. The study also offers recommendations on (external) energy policy and provides advice on fostering regional integration and the interconnection of energy networks of Mediterranean countries.

The study provides an overview of energy policies of South Mediterranean countries in and outside of the EU and describes the state of play regarding the development of energy routes and infrastructure. The study also offers recommendations on (external) energy policy and provides advice on fostering regional integration and the interconnection of energy networks of Mediterranean countries.

Ekstern forfatter

Bernard Duhamel (SOFRECO) and Henri Beaussant (SOFRECO)

The Russian Economy More than Just Energy ?

29-01-2009

Executive summary Russia has enjoyed a decade of high economic growth because of the eventually successful market reforms in the 1990s but also an oil boom. For the last six years, however, the Russian economy has become increasingly dysfunctional because the authorities have done nothing to impede corruption. The energy sector has been a generator of corrupt revenues, and its renationalization has concentrated these corrupt incomes in the hands of the security police elite. Russia depends on the ...

Executive summary Russia has enjoyed a decade of high economic growth because of the eventually successful market reforms in the 1990s but also an oil boom. For the last six years, however, the Russian economy has become increasingly dysfunctional because the authorities have done nothing to impede corruption. The energy sector has been a generator of corrupt revenues, and its renationalization has concentrated these corrupt incomes in the hands of the security police elite. Russia depends on the European Union for most of its exports and imports, but no free trade agreement is even on the horizon. Investments, by contrast, are relatively well secured through international conventions. In global governance, Russia has changed its attitude from being a joiner to becoming a spoiler. The disruption of supplies of Russian gas to Europe in January 2009 displayed all the shortfalls both of the Russian and Ukrainian gas sectors and of EU policy. The EU needs to play a more active role. It should monitor gas supplies, production, and storage. It should demand the exclusion of corrupt intermediaries in its gas trade. It should demand that Russia and Ukraine conclude a long-term transit and supply agreement. The EU should form a proper energy policy with energy conservation, diversification, unbundling, and increased storage. This is a good time to persuade Russia to ratify the Energy Charter. The EU should also demand that Ukraine undertake a market-oriented and transparent energy sector reform.

Ekstern forfatter

Anders Åslund (Institute for International Economics, Washington, USA)

Directory of the Most Important Community Legislative Measures in Energy Policy

01-05-1999

This study seeks to give an overview on legislation on energy policy. The full legal text has not been reproduced, but only a selection of those elements which may be of use in daily parliament work. The full references, however, make it possible for the reader to consult the complete legal text without difficulty.

This study seeks to give an overview on legislation on energy policy. The full legal text has not been reproduced, but only a selection of those elements which may be of use in daily parliament work. The full references, however, make it possible for the reader to consult the complete legal text without difficulty.

Ekstern forfatter

Marion de Barbeyrac and Marinella Castellucci

Kommende begivenheder

05-11-2019
The Art and Craft of Political Speech-writing: A conversation with Eric Schnure
Anden begivenhed -
EPRS
06-11-2019
Where next for the global and European economies? The 2019 IMF Economic Outlook
Anden begivenhed -
EPRS
06-11-2019
EPRS Annual Lecture: Clash of Cultures: Transnational governance in post-war Europe
Anden begivenhed -
EPRS

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