60

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Public country-by-country reporting by multinational enterprises

26-04-2019

Tax transparency has gained particular importance as a tool in the fight against tax avoidance and tax evasion, particularly in the field of corporate income tax and aggressive tax planning. Cooperation between tax authorities aims at allowing them to obtain information covering the global business of multinational enterprises (MNEs), and progress has already been made in this area. A further step in tax transparency would be to broaden it by providing publicly available information relating to tax ...

Tax transparency has gained particular importance as a tool in the fight against tax avoidance and tax evasion, particularly in the field of corporate income tax and aggressive tax planning. Cooperation between tax authorities aims at allowing them to obtain information covering the global business of multinational enterprises (MNEs), and progress has already been made in this area. A further step in tax transparency would be to broaden it by providing publicly available information relating to tax paid at the place where profits are actually made. Public country-by-country reporting (CBCR) is the publication of a defined set of facts and figures by large MNEs, thereby providing the public with a global picture of the taxes MNEs pay on their corporate income. The proposal is being considered by the European Parliament (EP) and the Council. In the EP, the amendments put forward by the ECON and JURI committees were voted on 4 July 2017. In the absence of a Council position enabling negotiations on the proposal, the Parliament adopted its position at first reading in plenary on 27 March 2019. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Corporate taxation of a significant digital presence

07-12-2018

Despite achieving unprecedented growth and profit rates, the digital economy seems to be relatively undertaxed when compared to more traditional 'bricks and mortar' companies. The current rules are based on the physical presence of taxpayers and assets, and there is a general understanding that they are not suited to taxing a digital economy characterised by reliance on intangible assets and ubiquitous services whose location is often hard to determine. International bodies are currently working ...

Despite achieving unprecedented growth and profit rates, the digital economy seems to be relatively undertaxed when compared to more traditional 'bricks and mortar' companies. The current rules are based on the physical presence of taxpayers and assets, and there is a general understanding that they are not suited to taxing a digital economy characterised by reliance on intangible assets and ubiquitous services whose location is often hard to determine. International bodies are currently working on how to adapt tax rules to the digital reality. The European Commission adopted a proposal in March 2018. It would allow taxation on the basis of digital rather than physical presence linked with the EU, for digital activities generating turnover of over €7 million, and with more than 100 000 users or 3 000 business-to-business contracts annually. The proposal has met with mixed reactions from stakeholders. Although there is growing recognition that digital companies should pay similar tax rates to traditional companies, some consider the initiative to be premature given the ongoing search for a compromise at the level of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which is thought of as the permanent solution. The report by Parliament’s Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON) proposes to widen the scope and reach of the tax, and increase clarity for tax authorities and companies. The plenary vote on the report is expected during the December session. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Interim digital services tax on revenues from certain digital services

07-12-2018

According to the European Commission the digital economy is relatively under-taxed when compared with traditional businesses. Certain inherent characteristics such as reliance on cross-border provision of services without physical presence, easy transfers of intangible assets, and novel ways to create value make it particularly easy for enterprises to limit their tax liabilities. In order to provide a solution to this problem, in March 2018 the Commission adopted the 'fair taxation of the digital ...

According to the European Commission the digital economy is relatively under-taxed when compared with traditional businesses. Certain inherent characteristics such as reliance on cross-border provision of services without physical presence, easy transfers of intangible assets, and novel ways to create value make it particularly easy for enterprises to limit their tax liabilities. In order to provide a solution to this problem, in March 2018 the Commission adopted the 'fair taxation of the digital economy' package, comprised of two proposals. One concerns a permanent reform of corporate tax regime while the second is a proposal for a directive on the common system of a digital services tax on revenues resulting from the provision of certain digital services, which would apply as an interim measure until the permanent reform has been implemented. The tax is to cover businesses above two thresholds: total annual worldwide revenues exceeding €750 million and annual revenues in the EU exceeding €50 million. The proposed single rate is at 3 %, levied on gross revenues resulting from the provision of certain digital services where user value creation is essential. Parliament’s Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs (ECON) adopted a report proposing to widen the scope and reach of the tax. The plenary vote is expected during the December session. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Common corporate tax base (CCTB)

15-06-2018

The European Commission has decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB) project in a two-step approach, with the publication on 25 October 2016 of two new interconnected proposals on a common corporate tax base (CCTB) and a common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB). The 2016 CCTB provides for the determination of a single set of rules for calculation of the corporate tax base. Companies operating across borders in the EU would no longer have to deal with 28 different ...

The European Commission has decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB) project in a two-step approach, with the publication on 25 October 2016 of two new interconnected proposals on a common corporate tax base (CCTB) and a common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB). The 2016 CCTB provides for the determination of a single set of rules for calculation of the corporate tax base. Companies operating across borders in the EU would no longer have to deal with 28 different sets of national rules when calculating their taxable profits. The intention is that the proposed CCTB is a step on the way towards re-establishing the link between taxation and the place where profits are made, via an apportionment formula to be introduced through the new CCCTB proposal. The legislative proposal falls under the consultation procedure. In the European Parliament, it was assigned to the Economic and Monetary Affairs Committee. The committee adopted its report on 21 February 2018. Parliament adopted its opinion in plenary on 15 March 2018. The proposal is now in the hands of the Council. Third edition, based on an original briefing by Gustaf Gimdal. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB)

15-06-2018

The European Commission has decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB) project in a two-step approach, with the publication on 25 October 2016 of two new interconnected proposals: on a common corporate tax base (CCTB), and on a common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB). Building on the 2016 CCTB proposal, the 2016 CCCTB proposal introduces the consolidation aspect of this double initiative. Companies operating across borders in the EU would no longer have to deal ...

The European Commission has decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB) project in a two-step approach, with the publication on 25 October 2016 of two new interconnected proposals: on a common corporate tax base (CCTB), and on a common consolidated corporate tax base (CCCTB). Building on the 2016 CCTB proposal, the 2016 CCCTB proposal introduces the consolidation aspect of this double initiative. Companies operating across borders in the EU would no longer have to deal with 28 different sets of national rules when calculating their taxable profits. Consolidation means that there would be a ‘one-stop-shop’ – the principal tax authority – where one of the companies of a group, that is, the principal taxpayer, would file a tax return. To distribute the tax base among Member States concerned, a formulary apportionment system is introduced. The legislative proposal falls under the consultation procedure. The report was adopted in the ECON committee on 21 February and Parliament’s opinion in plenary on 15 March 2018. the proposal is thus now in the hands of the Council. Third edition, based on an original briefing by Gustaf Gimdal. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Common (consolidated) corporate tax base

06-03-2018

In 2016, the Commission decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base proposal, but this time in a two-step approach, with two interconnected proposals. Parliament, which is only consulted, is due to vote on the proposals during its March plenary session.

In 2016, the Commission decided to re-launch the common consolidated corporate tax base proposal, but this time in a two-step approach, with two interconnected proposals. Parliament, which is only consulted, is due to vote on the proposals during its March plenary session.

Direkte beskatning: Person- og selskabsbeskatning

01-02-2018

Direkte beskatning er ikke direkte reguleret i EU-lovgivningen. Alligevel fastlægger flere direktiver og EU-Domstolens retspraksis harmoniserede standarder for selskabsskat og beskatning af privatpersoner. Desuden er der truffet foranstaltninger med henblik på at forhindre skattesvig og dobbeltbeskatning i EU.

Direkte beskatning er ikke direkte reguleret i EU-lovgivningen. Alligevel fastlægger flere direktiver og EU-Domstolens retspraksis harmoniserede standarder for selskabsskat og beskatning af privatpersoner. Desuden er der truffet foranstaltninger med henblik på at forhindre skattesvig og dobbeltbeskatning i EU.

Double taxation dispute resolution mechanisms in the European Union

26-01-2018

Double taxation happens when two (or more) tax jurisdictions impose comparable taxes on the same cross-border taxable event. This can happen since taxation is a sovereign right for individual countries. The proposal for a directive on double taxation dispute resolution mechanisms in the European Union is instrumental to reducing compliance costs and administrative burdens. It contributes to the broader objective of building a deeper and fairer internal market as well as a fair and efficient corporate ...

Double taxation happens when two (or more) tax jurisdictions impose comparable taxes on the same cross-border taxable event. This can happen since taxation is a sovereign right for individual countries. The proposal for a directive on double taxation dispute resolution mechanisms in the European Union is instrumental to reducing compliance costs and administrative burdens. It contributes to the broader objective of building a deeper and fairer internal market as well as a fair and efficient corporate tax system in the European Union. The proposal builds on the Union Arbitration Convention, which needs to be updated to improve the existing mechanisms and make them fit the current global tax environment better. This will be done by adding a limited number of rules, and ensuring coordination within the European Union. As this is a tax measure, the Parliament is only consulted. The directive was adopted by the Council on 10 October 2017.

Mapping the Cost of Non-Europe, 2014-19 - Fourth edition

07-12-2017

This study brings together work in progress on a long-term project to identify and analyse the 'cost of non-Europe' in a number of policy fields. This concept, first pioneered by the European Parliament in the 1980s, is used here to quantify the potential efficiency gains in today's European economy through pursuing a series of policy initiatives recently advocated by Parliament – from a wider and deeper digital single market to more systematic coordination of national and European defence policies ...

This study brings together work in progress on a long-term project to identify and analyse the 'cost of non-Europe' in a number of policy fields. This concept, first pioneered by the European Parliament in the 1980s, is used here to quantify the potential efficiency gains in today's European economy through pursuing a series of policy initiatives recently advocated by Parliament – from a wider and deeper digital single market to more systematic coordination of national and European defence policies or increased cooperation to fight corporate tax avoidance. The benefits are measured principally in additional GDP generated or more rational use of public resources. The latest analysis suggests that the European economy could be boosted by €1.75 trillion per year – or 12 % of EU-28 GDP (2016) – by such measures over time. The study is intended to make a contribution to the on-going discussion about the European Union's policy priorities over the current five-year institutional cycle, running from 2014 to 2019.

Priority dossiers under the Bulgarian EU Council Presidency

06-12-2017

Bulgaria will hold the EU Council Presidency from January to June 2018. This will be the first time Bulgaria has held the rotating presidency since it joined the EU in 2007. Its Presidency is part of the Trio Presidency composed of Estonia, Bulgaria and Austria. It is to be noted that a new Joint Declaration is being prepared and will be negotiated by the three Presidents in early December 2017. It is likely that the new Joint Declaration will cover January 2018-May 2019, to coincide with the legislative ...

Bulgaria will hold the EU Council Presidency from January to June 2018. This will be the first time Bulgaria has held the rotating presidency since it joined the EU in 2007. Its Presidency is part of the Trio Presidency composed of Estonia, Bulgaria and Austria. It is to be noted that a new Joint Declaration is being prepared and will be negotiated by the three Presidents in early December 2017. It is likely that the new Joint Declaration will cover January 2018-May 2019, to coincide with the legislative cycle of the European Parliament. Taking into account the need for active dialogue with EU citizens, Bulgaria will strive to achieve progress in the field of security, employment, sustainable growth and ensuring a stronger EU presence on the world stage. In particular, it tasks itself with focusing on youth questions and security issues as horizontal priorities. The Bulgarian government has announced three broad messages for its programme: Consensus, Competitiveness and Cohesion.

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