21

resultat(er)

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Erasmus 2021-2027

15-11-2018

The focus of the new Erasmus programme 2021-2027 is on inclusiveness and on better reach of young people with fewer opportunities. The priorities and action steps of the new programme are described in the impact assessment in detail, however, no description is given on the actual operation of these actions in practice.

The focus of the new Erasmus programme 2021-2027 is on inclusiveness and on better reach of young people with fewer opportunities. The priorities and action steps of the new programme are described in the impact assessment in detail, however, no description is given on the actual operation of these actions in practice.

Erasmus 2021-2027: The Union programme for education, training, youth and sport

06-11-2018

The Erasmus 2021-2027 proposal was published on 30 May 2018. Establishing a new programme would ensure the continuation of the Erasmus+ funding programme for education, training, youth and sport. The Commission claims its proposal would double the funds available to €30 000 million in current prices, from €14 712 million dedicated to Erasmus+. The proposal would also triple the number of participants. While Erasmus+ offered mobility opportunities to more than 4 million people, the new programming ...

The Erasmus 2021-2027 proposal was published on 30 May 2018. Establishing a new programme would ensure the continuation of the Erasmus+ funding programme for education, training, youth and sport. The Commission claims its proposal would double the funds available to €30 000 million in current prices, from €14 712 million dedicated to Erasmus+. The proposal would also triple the number of participants. While Erasmus+ offered mobility opportunities to more than 4 million people, the new programming period aims to reach up to 12 million participants. The new proposal also aims at greater simplification for end-users, incorporates sports in the main structure of the programme, expands the use of digitalisation, supports new areas of knowledge and introduces Discover EU, a new mobility initiative. Stakeholders agreed that the current programme is highly beneficial but lessons need to be learnt to help the next generation programme run more efficiently and effectively.

Research for CULT Committee - ESIF and culture, education, youth & sport – the use of European Structural and Investment Funds in policy areas of the Committee on Culture & Education

15-05-2018

The study examines the nature and extent of ESIF funding for education and training, culture, sport and youth, including the legal base for such support. Much activity in these areas is hidden in official data, under other headings, but all of the areas are already making a significant contribution to economic and social development. The study concludes with a recommendation that there be greater recognition in the future of the human contribution of these areas to cohesion policy.

The study examines the nature and extent of ESIF funding for education and training, culture, sport and youth, including the legal base for such support. Much activity in these areas is hidden in official data, under other headings, but all of the areas are already making a significant contribution to economic and social development. The study concludes with a recommendation that there be greater recognition in the future of the human contribution of these areas to cohesion policy.

Ekstern forfatter

The Centre for Strategy & Evaluation Services LLP (CSES): Mike Coyne, Malin Carlberg, Caroline Chandler, Eugenie Lale-Demoz

EU summer-time arrangements under Directive 2000/84/EC: Ex-post Impact Assessment

25-10-2017

The purpose of summer time is to capitalise on natural daylight. By turning the clock one hour forward as the days get longer in spring, sunset is delayed by this same hour, until the clock is set back again in autumn. This practice is applied in over 60 countries worldwide. In the EU, Member States draw on a long tradition of daylight saving time (DST), and many have developed their own DST schemes. Harmonisation attempts began in the 1970s, to facilitate the effective operation of the internal ...

The purpose of summer time is to capitalise on natural daylight. By turning the clock one hour forward as the days get longer in spring, sunset is delayed by this same hour, until the clock is set back again in autumn. This practice is applied in over 60 countries worldwide. In the EU, Member States draw on a long tradition of daylight saving time (DST), and many have developed their own DST schemes. Harmonisation attempts began in the 1970s, to facilitate the effective operation of the internal market. Today, the uniform EU-wide application of DST is governed by Directive 2000/84/EC; most European third countries have aligned their summer-time schemes with that of the EU. Much academic research has been invested in examining the benefits and inconveniences of DST. It appears that: - summer time benefits the internal market (notably the transport sector) and outdoor leisure activities, and it also generates marginal savings in energy consumption; - the impact on other economic sectors remains largely inconclusive; - with regard to inconveniences, health research associates DST with disruption to the human biorhythm ('circadian rhythm').

State aid in sport: Striking a difficult balance

07-06-2017

Under the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, a measure constitutes state aid if it grants a selective economic advantage to one or more enterprises through state resources, thus distorting or threatening to distort competition. However, not all forms of state aid are prohibited. Indeed, under certain conditions the European Commission may consider the state aid acceptable. This is notably the case when the support measures pursue a common objective or underpin the general interest. ...

Under the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, a measure constitutes state aid if it grants a selective economic advantage to one or more enterprises through state resources, thus distorting or threatening to distort competition. However, not all forms of state aid are prohibited. Indeed, under certain conditions the European Commission may consider the state aid acceptable. This is notably the case when the support measures pursue a common objective or underpin the general interest. The Commission has developed a methodology to determine the compatibility of support measures with the Treaty provisions. It includes a 'balancing test', which is based on various questions aimed at analysing the negative effects of the aid measure and weighing them against its positive effects in reaching the objective of common interest. The decisions on state aid for sports infrastructure adopted up until recently revealed a consistent and favourable approach on the part of the Commission towards aid measures for sports infrastructure. In the process, the Commission translated some recurring general principles into operational exemption criteria. Building on those principles, in 2014, the Commission’s General Block Exemption Regulation clarified the types of sports infrastructure investment that should be considered exempt from the EU’s general laws on state aid. The European Commission has not yet articulated sector-specific rules regarding support measures granted to individual professional sports clubs. However, prompted by complaints from individual citizens, the case law on the Commission’s discretion in handling complaints, and the impact of the European Ombudsman’s recommendations, the Commission has substantially increased the number of in-depth investigations into various public support measures in favour of certain professional football clubs in the last few years.

Tackling childhood obesity

10-03-2017

Childhood obesity remains a considerable public health problem in the European Union (EU). While multiple factors play a role, the global increase in overweight children is mainly linked to a shift in diet towards foods that are high in fat, salt and sugar, paired with a decline in physical activity. Essentially, children today are growing up in an environment that is conducive to weight gain and obesity. Excess weight in children is associated with a number of serious health consequences. These ...

Childhood obesity remains a considerable public health problem in the European Union (EU). While multiple factors play a role, the global increase in overweight children is mainly linked to a shift in diet towards foods that are high in fat, salt and sugar, paired with a decline in physical activity. Essentially, children today are growing up in an environment that is conducive to weight gain and obesity. Excess weight in children is associated with a number of serious health consequences. These include early onset of obesity-related chronic conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases and diabetes, as well as psychosocial complications. The European Commission supports Member States' efforts to take on childhood obesity in a number of ways, including the EU action plan on childhood obesity 2014-2020, which is up for review this year. The current Maltese Presidency of the Council of the EU has identified tackling childhood obesity among its priorities for health, and intends to present draft Council conclusions on the issue. A technical report on public procurement of food for health in schools, jointly drafted with the Commission, has just been released.

Implementation of Erasmus+

26-01-2017

Following two and a half years of implementation, the European Commission will submit a mid-term evaluation of the new umbrella programme Erasmus+ at the end of 2017. Parliament is preparing its contribution, with an own-initiative report on the implementation of Erasmus+ to be discussed in plenary in February.

Following two and a half years of implementation, the European Commission will submit a mid-term evaluation of the new umbrella programme Erasmus+ at the end of 2017. Parliament is preparing its contribution, with an own-initiative report on the implementation of Erasmus+ to be discussed in plenary in February.

Good governance in sport

23-01-2017

Historically, sports organisations have enjoyed considerable autonomy in running and regulating sport. This autonomy, strongly defended by sports authorities as a means to safeguard the inherent sporting values from external influence is increasingly being challenged, and made conditional on compliance with good governance principles, including those of democracy, transparency, accountability in decision-making, and representative inclusiveness. While sport organisations have taken steps to enhance ...

Historically, sports organisations have enjoyed considerable autonomy in running and regulating sport. This autonomy, strongly defended by sports authorities as a means to safeguard the inherent sporting values from external influence is increasingly being challenged, and made conditional on compliance with good governance principles, including those of democracy, transparency, accountability in decision-making, and representative inclusiveness. While sport organisations have taken steps to enhance their governance standards, independent reports suggest that much remains to be done. The European Union’s action for good governance in sport, mainly taking the form of recommendations and financial support for specific initiatives, has delivered some concrete outcomes, including the development of a set of principles applicable to organisations across the whole sport movement. A pledge to implement good governance in European sport, to which 32 federations and organisations have committed so far, was launched during the September 2016 European week of sport. The European Parliament is actively working on the topic of good governance, one of the three pillars of its ongoing own-initiative report on ‘An integrated approach to sport policy’. The text is due to be presented to Parliament’s first February plenary session, ahead of the drafting of the next EU work plan for sport for the 2017-2020 period, to be negotiated under the Maltese Presidency of the Council. A trend towards cooperative approaches to good governance in sport can be seen, including examples such as the future 'international sport integrity partnership'.

The Geo-Blocking Proposal: Internal Market, Competition Law and Regulatory Aspects

16-01-2017

This Study analyses the Commission’s May 2016 Proposal for a Regulation addressing geo-blocking and other forms of customer discrimination based on customers' nationality, place of residence or place of establishment within the internal market. The study assesses the Commission’s proposal under the Internal Market, Competition law and sector-specific rules and provides for policy recommendations and specific amendments to the proposal. This document was prepared for Policy Department A at the request ...

This Study analyses the Commission’s May 2016 Proposal for a Regulation addressing geo-blocking and other forms of customer discrimination based on customers' nationality, place of residence or place of establishment within the internal market. The study assesses the Commission’s proposal under the Internal Market, Competition law and sector-specific rules and provides for policy recommendations and specific amendments to the proposal. This document was prepared for Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection.

Ekstern forfatter

Miguel POIARES MADURO (European University Institute), Giorgio MONTI (European University Institute) and Gonçalo COELHO (World Bank / Luís Morais, Associados)

The Fight against Cancer Is a Team Sport: The Role of Education and Sport

09-12-2016

This document summarises the presentations and discussions taking place at the workshop organised by Policy Department A on the role of education and sport in the fight against cancer, held at the European Parliament in Brussels in July 2016. The aim of the workshop for the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety was to provide background information and highlight ways in which sport and physical activity can be promoted to help reduce the overall impact of cancer. Firstly the scientific ...

This document summarises the presentations and discussions taking place at the workshop organised by Policy Department A on the role of education and sport in the fight against cancer, held at the European Parliament in Brussels in July 2016. The aim of the workshop for the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety was to provide background information and highlight ways in which sport and physical activity can be promoted to help reduce the overall impact of cancer. Firstly the scientific evidence for the link between physical (in)activity and cancer was presented. Risk reductions were discussed, as well as the risks of inactivity, followed by recommendations on improving activity levels. The evidence so far is strong for colon, breast and endometrial cancers. Secondly the focus was on policy initiatives to fight against cancer through education, sport, and physical activity, with discussions on strategies and actions of the European Commission and the WHO. Finally, presentations were given by organisations set up to promote activity during or after cancer treatments, along with recommendations to prevent cancer.

Ekstern forfatter

Alojz PETERLE (MEP, EP), Michael LEITZMANN (University of Regensburg, DE), Margo MOUNTJOY (International Olympic Committee), Yves Le LOSTECQUE (DG EAC, European Commission), Susanna KUGELBERG (World Health Organisation), Wendy YARED (European Cancer Leagues), Jaka JAKOPIČ (Ambassador of Movember Movement, SI), Olivier LAPLANCHE (CAMI, FR) and Petra THALLER (Outdoor against Cancer)

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