33

resultat(er)

Ord
Type af publikation
Politikområde
Forfatter
Dato

Land use in the EU 2030 climate and energy framework

19-07-2018

On 20 July 2016, the European Commission proposed a regulation regarding the inclusion of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and removals from land use and forestry in the EU 2030 climate and energy framework. This would be the first time that the land-use sector is formally included in EU climate policy. The regulation would require Member States to balance emissions and removals from the land-use sector over two five-year periods between 2021 and 2030. It sets out accounting rules and allows for certain ...

On 20 July 2016, the European Commission proposed a regulation regarding the inclusion of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and removals from land use and forestry in the EU 2030 climate and energy framework. This would be the first time that the land-use sector is formally included in EU climate policy. The regulation would require Member States to balance emissions and removals from the land-use sector over two five-year periods between 2021 and 2030. It sets out accounting rules and allows for certain flexibilities. The new regulation is part of the EU’s efforts to reduce its GHG emissions by 40% below 1990 levels by 2030. This target was set by the European Council in October 2014, and is also the EU’s international commitment under the Paris Agreement on climate change. After completion of the legislative procedure, the final act was signed on 30 May 2018. The regulation entered into force on 9 July 2018. Fifth edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Research for AGRI Committee - Urban and peri-urban Agriculture in the EU

16-04-2018

This study presents a state of the art overview on urban agriculture and peri-urban agriculture (UPUA), the diversity of phenomena, motivations, distinctive features, benefits and limitations. UPUA is contextualized in relation to societal and economic transformations, EU strategic objectives, policies and regional food system approaches. Using best practice examples, the study demonstrates the need for an improved integration of UPUA into the policy agenda across sectors, domains and governance ...

This study presents a state of the art overview on urban agriculture and peri-urban agriculture (UPUA), the diversity of phenomena, motivations, distinctive features, benefits and limitations. UPUA is contextualized in relation to societal and economic transformations, EU strategic objectives, policies and regional food system approaches. Using best practice examples, the study demonstrates the need for an improved integration of UPUA into the policy agenda across sectors, domains and governance levels.

Ekstern forfatter

A. Piorr, I. Zasada, A. Doernberg, F. Zoll, W. Ramme (Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF)

Palm oil: economic and environmental impacts

16-02-2018

Economical and versatile, palm oil has become the world's most widely used vegetable oil. However, its production comes at a heavy environmental cost, especially in Indonesia and Malaysia, the two main producers. Efforts to make its production more sustainable still have a long way to go.

Economical and versatile, palm oil has become the world's most widely used vegetable oil. However, its production comes at a heavy environmental cost, especially in Indonesia and Malaysia, the two main producers. Efforts to make its production more sustainable still have a long way to go.

EU sustainability criteria for bioenergy

29-08-2017

Bioenergy, which is generally produced from plants such as agricultural crops or trees, comes in various forms. Wood and other solid biomass are commonly used for heating and electricity generation. Liquid biofuels for transport and other purposes are mainly made from food and feed crops, but can also be produced from waste and residues. Bioenergy can also be delivered in the form of gas. Bioenergy is a renewable but finite energy source, and considered as climate-friendly because the carbon which ...

Bioenergy, which is generally produced from plants such as agricultural crops or trees, comes in various forms. Wood and other solid biomass are commonly used for heating and electricity generation. Liquid biofuels for transport and other purposes are mainly made from food and feed crops, but can also be produced from waste and residues. Bioenergy can also be delivered in the form of gas. Bioenergy is a renewable but finite energy source, and considered as climate-friendly because the carbon which is emitted during combustion was removed from the atmosphere during growth of the biomass and will be removed again after some time if new plants are grown. However, its production and use has environmental impacts and the climate benefits may vary. The existing Renewable Energy Directive sets mandatory sustainability and greenhouse gas saving criteria for biofuels. For forest biomass, the Commission issued recommendations, but these are not uniformly implemented in the Member States. In November 2016, the Commission proposed a revised Renewable Energy Directive which includes mandatory sustainability criteria for both biofuels and biomass. The European Parliament supports sustainability criteria for bioenergy, and highlighted the sustainability issues of forest biomass in its June 2016 resolution on renewable energy. Stakeholder reactions to the Commission proposal have been mixed. While environmental NGOs called for stricter criteria, the bioenergy industries warned that tighter limits on conventional biofuels hinder the decarbonisation of the transport sector. Farmers and forest owners expressed concern about additional economic and administrative burden and stressed the principle of subsidiarity in forest policies.

Transparent and Accountable Management of Natural Resources in Developing Countries: The Case of Forests

31-05-2017

This study reviewed the state of transparency and accountability in the forestry sector in developing countries focusing on contributions of EU actions and provisions on the same. The study was based on review of literature, policies and reports on forest governance, using three FLEGT-VPA case study countries, namely Cameroon, Ghana and Tanzania. More than 200 million Euros have been invested into FLEGT-VPA and related activities around Africa with positive impacts on transparency, accountability ...

This study reviewed the state of transparency and accountability in the forestry sector in developing countries focusing on contributions of EU actions and provisions on the same. The study was based on review of literature, policies and reports on forest governance, using three FLEGT-VPA case study countries, namely Cameroon, Ghana and Tanzania. More than 200 million Euros have been invested into FLEGT-VPA and related activities around Africa with positive impacts on transparency, accountability and overall governance. Less impact is elicited regarding benefits to local people and FLEGT interactions with other mechanisms such as REDD+. More importantly, little evidence exists on direct evidence of FLEGT-VPA processes incentivizing sustainable forest management even though there is some evidence of growth in legal timber export numbers. Recommendations for improving FLEGT –VPA include, expanding the definition of “legality” to include safeguards that ensure community rights and benefits; strengthening EU-China FLEGT-VPA initiatives to enable comparable standards for African timber; including small scale and agroforestry-based domestic timber into the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR); increasing capacity building and synergy with other mechanisms such as REDD+. Opportunities for new EU policies and actions include FLEGT-type monitoring for forest-related SDGs and incentives for actions in the New York Declaration on Forests.

Ekstern forfatter

- Peter MINANG, Principal Scientist, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and ASB Partnership for The Tropical Forest Margins), Kenya; - Lalisa DUGUMA, Scientist, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and ASB Partnership for The Tropical Forest Margins), Kenya; - Florence BERNARD, Associate scientist, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), Kenya and - Judith NZYOKA, Assistant Scientist, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and ASB Partnership for The Tropical Forest Margins), Kenya

Bridging the rural-urban divide: Rural-urban partnerships in the EU

05-01-2016

In today's Europe, the traditional rural-urban dichotomy seems no longer relevant from a territorial development point of view. The boundaries of both rural and urban regions are becoming increasingly blurred, and traditional geographic definitions no longer fully reflect the reality of areas connected by a range of complex socio-economic linkages. At the European level, statistical methods have been refined to better reflect this complexity and provide a clearer view of the European Union's territory ...

In today's Europe, the traditional rural-urban dichotomy seems no longer relevant from a territorial development point of view. The boundaries of both rural and urban regions are becoming increasingly blurred, and traditional geographic definitions no longer fully reflect the reality of areas connected by a range of complex socio-economic linkages. At the European level, statistical methods have been refined to better reflect this complexity and provide a clearer view of the European Union's territory according to a new rural-urban typology. Both types of regions have different assets and resources which can be used in a complementary manner. At the rural/urban interface, however, conflicts can arise in connection to land use, whenever cities spread over what used to be agricultural land. Studies on the nature and extent of urban/rural linkages have identified the key concept of 'functional regions', which are defined by their socio-economic integration rather than by administrative boundaries. In all EU Member States, local and regional authorities have built rural-urban partnerships to better harness the potential of such regions. Over the past two decades, the EU has supported numerous projects and studies to assess the value of these partnerships and the way they can contribute to the objective of greater territorial cohesion. The policy framework for 2014-2020, which reflects the objectives of the EU 2020 strategy and offers better coordination of structural funds as well as new tools fostering integrated strategies, puts even greater emphasis on rural-urban interaction, allowing Member States to invest in mixed areas in a more targeted way. Please click here for the full publication in PDF format

Resource Efficiency Indicators

02-06-2015

This report summarises the presentations and discussions during the Workshop on Resource Efficiency Indicators held on 14 April 2015. There was general agreement that world economic growth will soon be limited by the earth’s carrying capacity. In order to have a system for steering the necessary policy measures a set of resource efficiency indicators is needed. In this indicator set priority should be given to most needed indicators. In addition, footprint type indicators, which take into account ...

This report summarises the presentations and discussions during the Workshop on Resource Efficiency Indicators held on 14 April 2015. There was general agreement that world economic growth will soon be limited by the earth’s carrying capacity. In order to have a system for steering the necessary policy measures a set of resource efficiency indicators is needed. In this indicator set priority should be given to most needed indicators. In addition, footprint type indicators, which take into account indirect flows, are needed. The workshop was organised by Policy Department A at the request of the European Parliament's Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety.

Ekstern forfatter

Hubert Reisinger, Maria Tesar and Brigitte Read

Biofuels policy and indirect land use change

20-04-2015

The EU has been supporting biofuels, mainly as a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in road transport. However, the current policy has been criticised by many, including the European Parliament, for failing to take into account emissions from indirect land use change. To address these shortcomings, the Commission presented a legislative proposal in October 2012. Second reading negotiations with the Council have delivered a compromise, now awaiting a vote in plenary.

The EU has been supporting biofuels, mainly as a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in road transport. However, the current policy has been criticised by many, including the European Parliament, for failing to take into account emissions from indirect land use change. To address these shortcomings, the Commission presented a legislative proposal in October 2012. Second reading negotiations with the Council have delivered a compromise, now awaiting a vote in plenary.

EU biofuels policy: Dealing with indirect land use change

16-02-2015

In 2003, the European Union established a biofuels support policy, primarily with the aim of lowering CO2 emissions in the transport sector. Critics have accused this policy of inducing indirect land use change (ILUC), which triggers an increase in global food prices and in food insecurity for the poor, promotes the creation of large land holdings and the use of available ('marginal') land in developing countries, and not least, boosts carbon emissions. Most research carried out recently suggests ...

In 2003, the European Union established a biofuels support policy, primarily with the aim of lowering CO2 emissions in the transport sector. Critics have accused this policy of inducing indirect land use change (ILUC), which triggers an increase in global food prices and in food insecurity for the poor, promotes the creation of large land holdings and the use of available ('marginal') land in developing countries, and not least, boosts carbon emissions. Most research carried out recently suggests that while concerns regarding food production may have been overstated, those related to ILUC are not, as ILUC can indeed increase the release of CO2 emissions during biofuel production. The biofuels industry argues that it sustains many jobs in European rural areas. In 2012, the European Commission presented a legislative proposal to address some of these concerns while preserving existing investments. It proposed capping conventional biofuels and promoting advanced biofuels. The proposal is expected to go through a second reading in Parliament and the Council in early 2015. Parliament has called for a conventional biofuels cap, a sub-target for advanced biofuels and the consideration of ILUC factors, while stressing the need for a post-2020 policy. Advanced biofuels are not yet produced on a large scale in the EU. Although in principle they have advantages over conventional biofuels, the technologies are not fully mature, investment is lacking and the sustainability of feedstocks needs to be assessed. The biofuels and farming sectors advocate the continued production of conventional biofuels as a source of jobs and economic activity in rural areas and oppose radical changes in policy. Some NGOs are generally opposed to conventional biofuels and would prefer cautious support measures for advanced biofuels. This briefing updates an earlier one of January 2015.

The Impact of Biofuels on Transport and the Environment, and their Connection with Agricultural Development in Europe

16-02-2015

The use of biofuels in transport is being promoted as a means of tackling climate change, diversifying energy sources and securing energy supply. Biofuels production also provides new options for using agricultural crops. However, it also gives rise to environmental, social and economic concerns which are the subject of intense debate worldwide. This study provides a detailed overview of biofuels production and consumption and of related policies worldwide. It also contains comprehensive analysis ...

The use of biofuels in transport is being promoted as a means of tackling climate change, diversifying energy sources and securing energy supply. Biofuels production also provides new options for using agricultural crops. However, it also gives rise to environmental, social and economic concerns which are the subject of intense debate worldwide. This study provides a detailed overview of biofuels production and consumption and of related policies worldwide. It also contains comprehensive analysis and discussion of key aspects affecting the overall sustainability of biofuels. These include, in particular, their impact on agricultural markets, emissions from indirect land-use change, and greenhouse gas emissions.

Ekstern forfatter

Luisa Marelli, Monica Padella, Robert Edwards, Alberto Moro, Marina Kousoulidou, Jacopo Giuntoli, David Baxter, Veljko Vorkapic, Alessandro Agostini, Adrian O’Connell, Laura Lonza and Lilian Garcia-Lledo (European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, Sustainable Transport Unit)

Partnere

Hold dig ajour

email update imageE-mail-opdateringer

Du har mulighed for at følge enhver person og ethvert emne med tilknytning til Parlamentet gennem e-mail-opdateringssystemet, som sender opdateringer direkte til din mailboks. Det kan f.eks. være de seneste nyheder om MEP'erne, nyhedstjenesterne eller Tænketanken.

Du har adgang til systemet fra enhver side på Parlamentets websted. For at tilmelde dig og modtage beskeder om Tænketanken skal du blot indsende din e-mailadresse, vælge det emne, du er interesseret i, angive, hvor ofte du vil informeres (dagligt, ugentligt eller månedligt), og bekræfte registreringen ved at klikke på det link, du får tilsendt.

RSS imageRSS-feeds

Følg nyheder og opdateringer fra Parlamentets websted via vores RSS-feed-tjeneste.

Klik på linket herunder for at generere din feed.