ThinkTank logo Beiträge zu neuen EU-Rechtsvorschriften
Veröffentlicht auf 29-06-2016

Australia's double dissolution election

29-06-2016

On 2 July 2016, following the double dissolution of their federal Parliament, Australians will elect the 150 members of the House of Representatives (the lower house) and the 76 members of the Senate (the upper house). Domestic politics has been central to this election campaign, and the outcome of the UK’s EU referendum has made political parties focus even more acutely on domestic stability. On the eve of the election, it is still difficult to predict which of the two major parties will win and ...

On 2 July 2016, following the double dissolution of their federal Parliament, Australians will elect the 150 members of the House of Representatives (the lower house) and the 76 members of the Senate (the upper house). Domestic politics has been central to this election campaign, and the outcome of the UK’s EU referendum has made political parties focus even more acutely on domestic stability. On the eve of the election, it is still difficult to predict which of the two major parties will win and whether either of them will be able to form a majority government.

TTIP - Challenges and Opportunities

29-06-2016

This leaflet provides short compilation of papers prepared by the European Parliament’s Policy Department A: Economic and Scientific Policy in relation to the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP).

This leaflet provides short compilation of papers prepared by the European Parliament’s Policy Department A: Economic and Scientific Policy in relation to the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP).

The Audiovisual Media Services Directive

29-06-2016

To address remaining discrepancies, achieve a level playing field and reflect on market, consumption and technological changes as part of its Digital Single Market strategy, the European Commission presented an update of the EU Audiovisual Media Services Directive on 25 May 2016. The overarching goal of the proposal is to bring about a balance between competitiveness and consumer protection. It therefore aims to introduce flexibility when restrictions only applicable to TV are no longer justified ...

To address remaining discrepancies, achieve a level playing field and reflect on market, consumption and technological changes as part of its Digital Single Market strategy, the European Commission presented an update of the EU Audiovisual Media Services Directive on 25 May 2016. The overarching goal of the proposal is to bring about a balance between competitiveness and consumer protection. It therefore aims to introduce flexibility when restrictions only applicable to TV are no longer justified, promote European films, protect minors and tackle hate speech more efficiently. The proposal also reflects a new approach to online platforms. Although the directive's increased protection for vulnerable viewers in VOD platforms has been greeted with satisfaction, the new rules on promotion of European works and commercial communications have received mixed views from stakeholders.

Digital Union

29-06-2016

This leaflet provides abstracts of a compilation of papers prepared by the European Parliament’s Policy Department A: Economic and Scientific Policy at the request of the ITRE Committee in relation to the Digital policies.

This leaflet provides abstracts of a compilation of papers prepared by the European Parliament’s Policy Department A: Economic and Scientific Policy at the request of the ITRE Committee in relation to the Digital policies.

Energy Policy

29-06-2016

This leaflet provides abstracts of selection of papers prepared by the European Parliament’s Policy Department on Economic and Scientific Policy at the request of the ITRE Committee in relation to the Energy policy.

This leaflet provides abstracts of selection of papers prepared by the European Parliament’s Policy Department on Economic and Scientific Policy at the request of the ITRE Committee in relation to the Energy policy.

Fiscal Compact Treaty: Scorecard for 2015

29-06-2016

The European Council Oversight Unit within the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS) has undertaken a detailed analysis that seeks to assess how far participating EU Member States have met their commitments within the framework of the Treaty on Stability, Coordination and Governance in the Economic and Monetary Union (TSCG). This intergovernmental treaty was agreed and signed by 25 Heads of State or Government in early 2012 and entered into force on 1 January 2013.  As part of a reformed ...

The European Council Oversight Unit within the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS) has undertaken a detailed analysis that seeks to assess how far participating EU Member States have met their commitments within the framework of the Treaty on Stability, Coordination and Governance in the Economic and Monetary Union (TSCG). This intergovernmental treaty was agreed and signed by 25 Heads of State or Government in early 2012 and entered into force on 1 January 2013.  As part of a reformed economic governance framework, the TSCG has sought to introduce more effective and stricter fiscal rules, including further automaticity of sanctions and the transposition of a balanced budget rule into national legislation (under the 'Fiscal Compact'). It has also aimed to enhance economic policy coordination and convergence and improve the governance of the euro area. This study reviews the main elements of the Treaty and seeks to evaluate how far the Contracting Parties have met their commitments. It shows that, three years after its entry into force, against the backdrop of a modest economic recovery across the euro area and the EU, the implementation of the TSCG has delivered mixed results. Most notably, efforts to comply with the terms of the Fiscal Compact – including the set of rules aiming to strengthen budgetary discipline – varied from one country to another. Admittedly, the increasing complexity of the EU fiscal framework, following a series of reforms that took place after the onset of the sovereign debt crisis, did not help foster compliance and monitoring. In addition, the Contracting Parties made some progress on enhancing economic policy coordination and convergence; however, there is still room for improvement. Lastly, the analysis reveals that compliance with the TSCG provisions on the governance of the euro area has not been complete.

Internal Borders in the Schengen Area: Is Schengen Crisis-Proof?

15-06-2016

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizen’s Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, analyses the Schengen area in the wake of the European ‘refugee crisis’ and other recent developments. With several Member States reintroducing temporary internal border controls over recent months, the study assesses compliance with the Schengen governance framework in this context. Despite suggestions that the end of Schengen is nigh or arguments ...

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizen’s Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, analyses the Schengen area in the wake of the European ‘refugee crisis’ and other recent developments. With several Member States reintroducing temporary internal border controls over recent months, the study assesses compliance with the Schengen governance framework in this context. Despite suggestions that the end of Schengen is nigh or arguments that there is a need to get ‘back to Schengen’, the research demonstrates that Schengen is alive and well and that border controls have, at least formally, complied with the legal framework. Nonetheless, better monitoring and democratic accountability are necessary.

Externe Autor

Elspeth Guild (CEPS ; Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands and Queen Mary University of London, the UK), Sergio Carrera (CEPS ; Maastricht University Queen Mary University of London, the UK), Lina Vosyliūtė (CEPS), Kees Groenendijk (Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands), Evelien Brouwer (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands), Didier Bigo (Centre d'études sur les conflits, liberté et sécurité - CCLS ; King’s College London, the UK), Julien Jeandesboz (Université Libre de Bruxelles - ULB ; CCLS) and Médéric Martin-Mazé (King’s College ; CCLS)

Country Specific Recommendations for 2016 - A Comparison of Commission and Council Recommendations (Tthe ‘Comply or Explain’ Principle)

29-06-2016

The table in this document prepared by the Economic Governance Support Unit compares the draft 2016 Country Specific Recommendations (CSRs) proposed by the Commission on 18 May 2016 with the 2016 CSRs approved by the Council (ECOFIN) on 17 June 2016. These CSRs were generally endorsed by the European Council on 28-29 June 2016 and are to be formally adopted on 12 July 2016 by the Council (ECOFIN).

The table in this document prepared by the Economic Governance Support Unit compares the draft 2016 Country Specific Recommendations (CSRs) proposed by the Commission on 18 May 2016 with the 2016 CSRs approved by the Council (ECOFIN) on 17 June 2016. These CSRs were generally endorsed by the European Council on 28-29 June 2016 and are to be formally adopted on 12 July 2016 by the Council (ECOFIN).

Tax Challenges in the Digital Economy

29-06-2016

This paper analyses direct and indirect tax challenges in the digital economy in light of the conclusions of the OECD’s BEPS (Base Erosion and Profit Shifting) Project. While assessing the recent reforms in the area of taxation within the EU and third countries, it revisits the question of whether or not specific measures are needed for the digital sector. Taking into account the recent scandals involving big digital companies and their aggressive tax planning practices in the EU, the specificities ...

This paper analyses direct and indirect tax challenges in the digital economy in light of the conclusions of the OECD’s BEPS (Base Erosion and Profit Shifting) Project. While assessing the recent reforms in the area of taxation within the EU and third countries, it revisits the question of whether or not specific measures are needed for the digital sector. Taking into account the recent scandals involving big digital companies and their aggressive tax planning practices in the EU, the specificities of the digital sector and the legal landscape in the 28 Member States, the paper makes policy recommendations for further tax reforms in order to tackle tax avoidance and harmful competition.

Externe Autor

Eli Hadzhieva

Veröffentlicht auf 28-06-2016

EU Geographical Indications: Protection for non-agricultural products

28-06-2016

At its plenary session on 6 October 2015, the European Parliament (EP) adopted a resolution on the possible extension of protection of geographical indications (GIs) to non-agricultural products. The report adopted by the EP stressed the opportunity and need to create a uniform European framework of protection for GIs for non-food products.

At its plenary session on 6 October 2015, the European Parliament (EP) adopted a resolution on the possible extension of protection of geographical indications (GIs) to non-agricultural products. The report adopted by the EP stressed the opportunity and need to create a uniform European framework of protection for GIs for non-food products.

Anstehende Veranstaltungen

04-07-2016
Hearing of Mr Jos Dings, Executive Director, Federation for Transport and Environment
Anhörung - EMIS
11-07-2016
"Mid-Term Revision of the Financial Regulation
Workshop - BUDG CONT
12-07-2016
Limitation periods for road traffic accidents: The state of play and the way forward
Anhörung - JURI

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