ThinkTank logo Beiträge zu neuen EU-Rechtsvorschriften
Veröffentlicht auf 26-05-2016

The European Fisheries Control Agency

26-05-2016

Based in Vigo (Spain), the European Fisheries Control Agency was established in 2005 to support enforcement of the rules applicable under the EU Common Fisheries Policy. The Agency fosters cooperation between national authorities and coordinates the operational side of specific joint deployments of national inspections and controls of fishing and fishing-related activities, both at sea and on land. It also contributes to training, the provision of inspection handbooks and the promotion of best practice ...

Based in Vigo (Spain), the European Fisheries Control Agency was established in 2005 to support enforcement of the rules applicable under the EU Common Fisheries Policy. The Agency fosters cooperation between national authorities and coordinates the operational side of specific joint deployments of national inspections and controls of fishing and fishing-related activities, both at sea and on land. It also contributes to training, the provision of inspection handbooks and the promotion of best practice. It collaborates with other EU bodies and agencies in the field of maritime affairs, notably on the development of the EU's integrated maritime surveillance capacities. In the future, it may become part of a new European Border and Coast Guard capacity, an initiative recently proposed by the European Commission.

The Satellite and Cable Directive

26-05-2016

Since 1995, when the Satellite and Cable Directive 93/83 was supposed to be transposed into the national laws of the Member States, the broadcasting landscape has been through various changes. While cable retransmission and satellite broadcasting still play their roles, new forms of broadcasting have found a stable place in the broadcasting landscape. This includes the ability to watch content on demand, through webcasting or simulcasting. Furthermore, a considerable role is played by online broadcasting ...

Since 1995, when the Satellite and Cable Directive 93/83 was supposed to be transposed into the national laws of the Member States, the broadcasting landscape has been through various changes. While cable retransmission and satellite broadcasting still play their roles, new forms of broadcasting have found a stable place in the broadcasting landscape. This includes the ability to watch content on demand, through webcasting or simulcasting. Furthermore, a considerable role is played by online broadcasting. These new forms of broadcasting (e.g. online broadcasting, webcasting or simulcasting) bring various challenges for traditional broadcasting organisations, as well as for the rights connected with the broadcasted content (mainly copyright and related rights). As these new forms of broadcasting are not covered by the existing legal principles, broadening the principles included in Directive 93/83 might be one way to deal with the situation. On several occasions Parliament has called for changes in the existing legislation to reflect the latest technological developments. The European Economic and Social Committee in its opinions and various studies has also noted that existing legislation will need to be adapted in order to react to these developments. The intention of the European Commission to review Directive 93/83 and potential amendments of the existing legislation might result in changes to the existing legislation and bring it up to date with the latest developments.

Barriers to SME growth in Europe

26-05-2016

Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), which represent 99% of all businesses in the EU, play a pivotal role in its economy. Nevertheless, in comparison to larger firms, they often face significant obstacles – internal, administrative and financial – which affect them disproportionately. SMEs have been affected negatively by the economic crisis, which is manifested in a reduction in the sector's employment figures. The financial and sovereign debt crises have also had a negative impact on the ...

Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), which represent 99% of all businesses in the EU, play a pivotal role in its economy. Nevertheless, in comparison to larger firms, they often face significant obstacles – internal, administrative and financial – which affect them disproportionately. SMEs have been affected negatively by the economic crisis, which is manifested in a reduction in the sector's employment figures. The financial and sovereign debt crises have also had a negative impact on the financing of SMEs, especially in the hardest-hit countries. Perhaps unsurprisingly, important differences exist in access to finance both within the euro area and between the 'old' (EU-15) and 'new' (EU-13) Member States. Concerning the recovery from the crises, the picture also remains mixed. Administrative and regulatory obstacles are often highlighted by SMEs as being a significant burden on their growth. It is substantially more costly for smaller firms to comply with regulations and few Member States actively support SMEs when it comes to tax provisions, or take their specific characteristics into account when drafting legislation. The European Parliament has been a long-standing advocate of an environment for SMEs that is conducive to growth.

Harnessing cohesion policy to tackle social exclusion: Opportunities and limitations

26-05-2016

This publication aims to examine the measures available to Member States under cohesion policy to help them address poverty and social exclusion. Through detailed references to EU legislation, national programming documents and the views of stakeholders, the paper will discuss the EU-funded action being taken by individual countries to promote social inclusion and identify the limitations of cohesion policy for tackling poverty and social exclusion. Poverty and social exclusion can have a damaging ...

This publication aims to examine the measures available to Member States under cohesion policy to help them address poverty and social exclusion. Through detailed references to EU legislation, national programming documents and the views of stakeholders, the paper will discuss the EU-funded action being taken by individual countries to promote social inclusion and identify the limitations of cohesion policy for tackling poverty and social exclusion. Poverty and social exclusion can have a damaging effect on individuals' lives, with its impact on people's health and education often leading to a vicious circle of deprivation. To help break this dangerous cycle of poverty, the Europe 2020 Strategy set a headline target of taking at least 20 million people out of poverty and social exclusion by 2020. The revision of the cohesion policy framework for 2014-2020 has strengthened support for the delivery of the Europe 2020 targets by aligning structural funds more closely to the strategy through thematic concentration, which focuses action on a limited number of targets, helping to optimise the use of EU funds where they can be most effective. Cohesion policy can play a vital role in tackling social exclusion, with structural funds accounting for the majority of the public investment budget in many countries. The Partnership Agreements and Operational Programmes prepared by Member States in this context provide valuable insight into countries' plans for delivering social inclusion.

Cloud computing: An overview of economic and policy issues

26-05-2016

Cloud computing is a model for providing information and communication technology (ICT) services over the internet. Businesses, public bodies and individuals can all benefit through lower costs, global access to data and applications, flexibility in provision, and the ability to innovate without large capital costs. Cloud computing may also have beneficial effects on energy consumption and carbon emissions. However, cloud computing raises concerns about personal data protection and privacy, security ...

Cloud computing is a model for providing information and communication technology (ICT) services over the internet. Businesses, public bodies and individuals can all benefit through lower costs, global access to data and applications, flexibility in provision, and the ability to innovate without large capital costs. Cloud computing may also have beneficial effects on energy consumption and carbon emissions. However, cloud computing raises concerns about personal data protection and privacy, security and interoperability and portability of data and applications, as well as contract terms that may be overly restrictive of customers' rights. The European Commission considers cloud computing central to the EU's competitiveness and a key to economic growth and innovation. The EU has provided support to research in cloud computing. Determining the appropriate responses to the challenges of cloud computing is part of the European Commission's Digital Single Market strategy. The Commission has announced its intention to propose a 'free flow of data initiative', tackling restrictions on where data is located, and a European Cloud initiative that will cover certification of cloud services, reduce the risks of vendor lock-in, and provide a research cloud for researchers to share access to data.

Veröffentlicht auf 25-05-2016

Russia-NATO: A difficult relationship

25-05-2016

NATO-Russia relations have never been easy, but hit a new low in 2014 following Russian annexation of Crimea. Since then both sides have stepped up military activity in their shared eastern European neighbourhood. A return to cooperation in the near future seems unlikely.

NATO-Russia relations have never been easy, but hit a new low in 2014 following Russian annexation of Crimea. Since then both sides have stepped up military activity in their shared eastern European neighbourhood. A return to cooperation in the near future seems unlikely.

Russian military in Eastern Partnership countries

25-05-2016

A strong military presence helps Russia to maintain control over the ex-Soviet republics of eastern Europe, which it sees as its legitimate sphere of influence. Some troops are stationed in agreement with the country concerned, whereas others operate in pro-Russian separatist territories in defiance of the internationally recognised authorities. The main recent changes are the military build-up in the occupied territory of Crimea and an alleged Russian presence in the Donbass.

A strong military presence helps Russia to maintain control over the ex-Soviet republics of eastern Europe, which it sees as its legitimate sphere of influence. Some troops are stationed in agreement with the country concerned, whereas others operate in pro-Russian separatist territories in defiance of the internationally recognised authorities. The main recent changes are the military build-up in the occupied territory of Crimea and an alleged Russian presence in the Donbass.

Control of the acquisition and possession of weapons

25-05-2016

In the aftermath of the Paris terrorist attacks, in November 2015 the European Commission presented a package of measures aiming to tighten control on the acquisition and possession of firearms in the European Union, improve traceability of legally held firearms and enhance cooperation between Member States, as well as ensure that deactivated firearms are rendered inoperable. The proposal to amend the current 'Firearms Directive' (Directive 91/477/EEC) was part of this package. It aims to ban some ...

In the aftermath of the Paris terrorist attacks, in November 2015 the European Commission presented a package of measures aiming to tighten control on the acquisition and possession of firearms in the European Union, improve traceability of legally held firearms and enhance cooperation between Member States, as well as ensure that deactivated firearms are rendered inoperable. The proposal to amend the current 'Firearms Directive' (Directive 91/477/EEC) was part of this package. It aims to ban some semi-automatic firearms for civilian use, as well as to include some previously excluded actors (collectors and brokers) and blank-firing weapons within the scope of the Directive. Stakeholders commented particularly on the proposed ban on some semi-automatic firearms and the obligation for collectors to deactivate firearms. The Justice and Home Affairs Council held a debate on the file in March 2016. Parliament's Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO) Committee is expected to adopt its report in June 2016.

Road charges for private vehicles in the EU

25-05-2016

Road charges are fees for the use of a particular road network or section of road. Since the 1990s, the focus of European transport policy has shifted from the application of road pricing purely as a means to generate revenue towards the use of charges as an instrument against pollution and congestion. Charging for road infrastructure is an option to implement basic principles of EU policy such as the 'user-pays principle' or the 'polluter-pays principle'. It can serve different functions such as ...

Road charges are fees for the use of a particular road network or section of road. Since the 1990s, the focus of European transport policy has shifted from the application of road pricing purely as a means to generate revenue towards the use of charges as an instrument against pollution and congestion. Charging for road infrastructure is an option to implement basic principles of EU policy such as the 'user-pays principle' or the 'polluter-pays principle'. It can serve different functions such as financing, managing traffic flow or making all costs perceptible so as to influence the behaviour of road users. As the transport of goods is linked with the functioning of the Single Market, the charging of heavy goods vehicles is regulated at European level. In contrast, there is no regulation at European level on the road charging of private vehicles, though Member States establishing such schemes are obliged to apply the basic principles of the Treaties, in particular the principles of proportionality and of non-discrimination on grounds of nationality. As a consequence of the regulation at national level, many different charging schemes are applied in the EU. These vary, principally according to the way they are levied: distance-based schemes levied by means of tolls, or time-based schemes, levied using vignettes. All schemes are associated with considerable levying costs. Technological developments such as electronic charging can offer opportunities to reduce these costs. However, lack of interoperability between the various systems generates additional costs and hindrances for European mobility.

EU Innovation Policy – Part I: Building the EU innovation policy mix

25-05-2016

This publication aims at providing an overview of the evolution of European Union innovation policy. The paper focuses on the progressive integration of a wide range of policies and instruments into the EU innovation policy mix and reflects on some barriers limiting the development of a EU innovation policy. European Union innovation policy finds its roots in the development of Community policy for research. However the understanding that innovation is a complex process led to the establishment of ...

This publication aims at providing an overview of the evolution of European Union innovation policy. The paper focuses on the progressive integration of a wide range of policies and instruments into the EU innovation policy mix and reflects on some barriers limiting the development of a EU innovation policy. European Union innovation policy finds its roots in the development of Community policy for research. However the understanding that innovation is a complex process led to the establishment of a EU innovation policy mix including both key policies (research, industrial, education and regional policies) and key framework conditions (funding, taxation, single market and competition, regulation, standards, intellectual property rights, etc.). Despite the actions already taken, numerous issues and bottlenecks still hamper the innovation process. It appears necessary to give innovation its full place as an overarching policy at the EU level and fully embrace the concept of open innovation.

Anstehende Veranstaltungen

30-05-2016
Minorities caught between the Syrian civil war and ISIS in Iraq and Syria
Anhörung - DROI
31-05-2016
Innovation policy mix: can we get it right in Europe?
Andere Veranstaltung - EPRS
13-06-2016
Looking at Industry 4.0 together with the impact on industry of robotics and big data
Anhörung - ITRE

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