104

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Road transport: Driving, breaks, rest times and tachographs

08-04-2019

The Driving Time and Tachograph Regulations were adopted to improve drivers' working conditions and road safety, as well as to enhance compliance with the rules, and competition between road operators. In the context of the European Commission's 2017 'Europe on the move' package, the current proposal aims to remedy the shortcomings of these regulations, on which a broad consensus has emerged: lack of clarity, non-uniform implementation, insufficient enforcement and a need for strengthened cooperation ...

The Driving Time and Tachograph Regulations were adopted to improve drivers' working conditions and road safety, as well as to enhance compliance with the rules, and competition between road operators. In the context of the European Commission's 2017 'Europe on the move' package, the current proposal aims to remedy the shortcomings of these regulations, on which a broad consensus has emerged: lack of clarity, non-uniform implementation, insufficient enforcement and a need for strengthened cooperation between Member States and authorities. In June 2018, Parliament's Committee on Transport and Tourism (TRAN) adopted a report and the mandate to start interinstitutional negotiations. However, during the June 2018 plenary session, Parliament did not endorse the mandate and in July it rejected the report, referring it back to the committee. The Council reached a general approach on this proposal in December 2018, under the Austrian Presidency. On 10 January 2019, the TRAN committee failed to reach a new agreement on the proposal for plenary. In March, the Conference of Presidents decided to include this file on the agenda of the March II plenary session. After procedural complications, Parliament adopted its first-reading position during the subsequent plenary session, on 4 April 2019.

CO2 standards for new cars and vans

25-02-2019

In November 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on reducing CO2 emissions from new passenger cars and light commercial vehicles (vans). The proposed measures and targets are aligned with the 2030 climate and energy framework and with the energy union strategy, which envisages a reduction in transport emissions and energy consumption. The Commission sets new targets for the EU fleet-wide average CO2 emissions of new passenger cars and vans. Average CO2 emissions from ...

In November 2017, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on reducing CO2 emissions from new passenger cars and light commercial vehicles (vans). The proposed measures and targets are aligned with the 2030 climate and energy framework and with the energy union strategy, which envisages a reduction in transport emissions and energy consumption. The Commission sets new targets for the EU fleet-wide average CO2 emissions of new passenger cars and vans. Average CO2 emissions from new passenger cars and vans registered in the EU would have to be 15 % lower in 2025, and 30 % lower in 2030, compared to their respective limits in 2021. The proposal includes a dedicated incentive mechanism for zero- and low-emission vehicles, in order to accelerate their market uptake. Interinstitutional trilogue negotiations started in October 2018 and concluded on 17 December with a provisional agreement, to be the subject of a vote in plenary in the coming weeks. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Risk-preparedness in the electricity sector

08-02-2019

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on risk-preparedness in the electricity sector. This proposal addresses shortcomings in the existing legislation, notably a lack of regional coordination, and differing national rules and procedures. It would replace the existing legislation, and establish common rules on crisis prevention and crisis management in the electricity sector. Regional interdependencies would be taken into account in the preparation of national ...

On 30 November 2016, the European Commission adopted a proposal for a regulation on risk-preparedness in the electricity sector. This proposal addresses shortcomings in the existing legislation, notably a lack of regional coordination, and differing national rules and procedures. It would replace the existing legislation, and establish common rules on crisis prevention and crisis management in the electricity sector. Regional interdependencies would be taken into account in the preparation of national riskpreparedness plans and in managing crisis situations. The proposed regulation would enhance transparency by requiring an ex-post evaluation of crisis situations. In the European Parliament, the proposal was referred to the Committee on Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE), which adopted its report in February 2018. In November 2018, Council and Parliament reached an agreement in trilogue negotiations. The ITRE committee approved the text on 23 January 2019 and it needs now to be voted in plenary. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

A global compact on migration: Placing human rights at the heart of migration management

11-01-2019

The global flow of refugees and migrants poses challenges, opportunities and obligations for countries around the world. At the very heart of the debate on migration management is how to ensure that the different interests and needs are addressed within a strong human rights framework. The United Nations (UN) is investigating the issue in great depth, and one of the main outcomes of the UN General Assembly in 2016 was a declaration demanding greater international cooperation on managing migration ...

The global flow of refugees and migrants poses challenges, opportunities and obligations for countries around the world. At the very heart of the debate on migration management is how to ensure that the different interests and needs are addressed within a strong human rights framework. The United Nations (UN) is investigating the issue in great depth, and one of the main outcomes of the UN General Assembly in 2016 was a declaration demanding greater international cooperation on managing migration. This declaration was widely endorsed, including by the European Union (EU). As a result, two global compacts have been adopted in 2018, for refugees and for other migrants; this briefing will focus on the latter. According to the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the UN migration agency in charge of the global compact for safe, orderly and regular migration, these compacts 'provide the opportunity to move ahead in strengthening the norms, principles, rules and decision-making processes that will allow for more effective international cooperation in responding to what is a defining issue'. Providing continued institutional support to address these issues and implement the outcomes of the global compacts will be a challenge. This an updated version of a briefing from December 2017, jointly authored by Joanna Apap, Daniela Adorna Diaz and Gonzalo Urbina Trevino. See also our infographic, Migration flows to the EU, PE 621.862.

Framework for a pan-European personal pension product (PEPP)

21-11-2018

Europe’s population is ageing, due to people living longer and having fewer children, putting pressure on pension systems and leading to reforms to make public pensions more sustainable – and often less generous – in future. To support retirement incomes, the European Commission’s 2012 pensions white paper called for more opportunities for citizens to save in safe and good-value complementary pensions. The proposed framework for a pan-European personal pension product (PEPP) aims to encourage the ...

Europe’s population is ageing, due to people living longer and having fewer children, putting pressure on pension systems and leading to reforms to make public pensions more sustainable – and often less generous – in future. To support retirement incomes, the European Commission’s 2012 pensions white paper called for more opportunities for citizens to save in safe and good-value complementary pensions. The proposed framework for a pan-European personal pension product (PEPP) aims to encourage the development of personal pensions (that is, voluntary, individually funded pensions) in Europe, to support retirement saving and strengthen the single market for capital by making more funds available for investment. Generally the proposal is considered a welcome extra option to support retirement savings and investment. However differing national pension systems and tax treatments are noted as challenges, although the Commission has also issued a tax recommendation. Council agreed a general approach on 19 June 2018 and the ECON committee voted its report and negotiating mandate on 3 September, hence trilogues have started. Second edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. Please note this document has been designed for on-line viewing.

Rules for EU institutions' processing of personal data

12-09-2018

In the context of the comprehensive reform of the EU's legal framework for data protection, the Commission tabled a proposal in January 2017 for a 'regulation on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data by the Union institutions, bodies, offices and agencies and the free movement of such data' and repealing the existing one (Regulation No 45/2001). The aim is to align it to the 2016 General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that has been fully applicable since ...

In the context of the comprehensive reform of the EU's legal framework for data protection, the Commission tabled a proposal in January 2017 for a 'regulation on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data by the Union institutions, bodies, offices and agencies and the free movement of such data' and repealing the existing one (Regulation No 45/2001). The aim is to align it to the 2016 General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that has been fully applicable since 25 May 2018. Interinstitutional trilogue meetings, in which debate focused on also applying the regulation to operational data of EU bodies carrying out law enforcement activities, brought an agreement between the co-legislators in May. The compromise text is due to be voted by the Parliament in the September plenary session. Third edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Der Schutz der Grundrechte in der EU

01-03-2018

Gemäß Artikel 2 des Vertrags über die Europäische Union (EUV) sind die Werte, auf die sich die Europäische Union gründet, die Achtung der Menschenwürde, Freiheit, Demokratie, Gleichheit, Rechtsstaatlichkeit und die Wahrung der Menschenrechte einschließlich der Rechte von Personen, die Minderheiten angehören. Um die Wahrung dieser Werte sicherzustellen, existiert ein EU-Mechanismus, mit dem festgestellt werden kann, ob eine schwerwiegende Verletzung oder die eindeutige Gefahr einer schwerwiegenden ...

Gemäß Artikel 2 des Vertrags über die Europäische Union (EUV) sind die Werte, auf die sich die Europäische Union gründet, die Achtung der Menschenwürde, Freiheit, Demokratie, Gleichheit, Rechtsstaatlichkeit und die Wahrung der Menschenrechte einschließlich der Rechte von Personen, die Minderheiten angehören. Um die Wahrung dieser Werte sicherzustellen, existiert ein EU-Mechanismus, mit dem festgestellt werden kann, ob eine schwerwiegende Verletzung oder die eindeutige Gefahr einer schwerwiegenden Verletzung durch einen Mitgliedstaat besteht, und der vor Kurzem erstmals aktiviert wurde. Die EU unterliegt zudem der Charta der Grundrechte, in der die Rechte aufgelistet werden, die sowohl die Europäische Union als auch die Mitgliedstaaten bei der Umsetzung des EU-Rechts achten müssen. Die EU hat sich zudem verpflichtet, der Europäischen Konvention zum Schutze der Menschenrechte und Grundfreiheiten beizutreten.

The implications of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union on readmission cooperation

06-02-2018

This briefing investigates the implications of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union in the area of readmission policy as part of the wider Area of Freedom, Security and Justice. The authors examine the UK’s current engagement with the EU’s readmission policy and the asymmetrical nature of the impact of the UK’s withdrawal. They also map the potential future relationship on readmission and, using existing models of cooperation with third countries, set out how this can be structured ...

This briefing investigates the implications of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union in the area of readmission policy as part of the wider Area of Freedom, Security and Justice. The authors examine the UK’s current engagement with the EU’s readmission policy and the asymmetrical nature of the impact of the UK’s withdrawal. They also map the potential future relationship on readmission and, using existing models of cooperation with third countries, set out how this can be structured within the future relationship agreement.

Retrofitting smart tachographs by 2020: Costs and benefits

02-02-2018

The scope of this study is to assess the costs and benefits of retrofitting smart tachographs in heavy-duty vehicles operating in international transport by January 2020. Specifically, it addresses economic consequences of a technological upgrade of these vehicles. Moreover, it considers the related economic impacts incurred on national enforcement authorities. It also assesses the costs, which Member States’ national enforcement bodies risk to incur, among others, due to retrieving and processing ...

The scope of this study is to assess the costs and benefits of retrofitting smart tachographs in heavy-duty vehicles operating in international transport by January 2020. Specifically, it addresses economic consequences of a technological upgrade of these vehicles. Moreover, it considers the related economic impacts incurred on national enforcement authorities. It also assesses the costs, which Member States’ national enforcement bodies risk to incur, among others, due to retrieving and processing data from smart tachometers. In assessing both the costs and benefits, the study focuses on the EU-level analysis with consideration of the European Added Value aspect in particular.

Externe Autor

This study has been written by Dr Michał Suchanek of the University of Gdańsk, at the request of the European Added Value Unit of the Directorate for Impact Assessment and European Added Value, within the Directorate General for Parliamentary Research Services (DG EPRS) of the General Secretariat of the European Parliament. The preface has been written by Aleksandra Heflich, European Added Value Unit.

Road infrastructure and tunnel safety

25-01-2018

In 2010, the European Commission adopted the road safety programme, aimed at reducing road deaths in Europe by half in the following decade. Through its strategic objectives, the programme focuses on three main issues: vehicle safety, the infrastructure safety, and road users' behaviour. The initiatives undertaken within the road safety programme refer to both EU and national level. In its efforts to improve road safety, the European Union is considering new measures and activities, as well as reviewing ...

In 2010, the European Commission adopted the road safety programme, aimed at reducing road deaths in Europe by half in the following decade. Through its strategic objectives, the programme focuses on three main issues: vehicle safety, the infrastructure safety, and road users' behaviour. The initiatives undertaken within the road safety programme refer to both EU and national level. In its efforts to improve road safety, the European Union is considering new measures and activities, as well as reviewing existing legislation. In this context, the European Commission decided to assess two pieces of legislation dealing with road infrastructure and tunnel safety issues: Directive 2008/96/EC and Directive 2004/54/EC, with a view to analysing whether they are still fit for current realities and needs. Directive 2008/96/EC requests Member States to put in place and implement 'procedures relating to road safety impact assessments, road safety audits, the management of road network safety and safety inspections' (Article 1), while Directive 2004/54/EC aims at ensuring 'a minimum level of safety for road users in tunnels in the trans-European road network' (Article 1). This implementation appraisal focuses on the evaluation of the two directives, a process that precedes the European Commission's new proposal, expected early this year.

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