The EU's Eastern Partnership [What Think Tanks are thinking]

25-11-2016

The Eastern Partnership was launched in 2009 as a regional programme of the European Neighbourhood Policy to promote integration and cooperation between the European Union, its Member States and Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine. It has achieved limited progress, partly due to conflicts and political instability in the region. Nevertheless, it has sent a signal of the EU’s willingness to strengthen ties with the region, offering incentives to governments and civil society to push ahead with democratic and economic reforms. Three of the six former Soviet republics involved – Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine – have concluded Association Agreements and Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area agreements with the EU. This note offers links to recent commentaries and reports by major international think tanks on the Eastern Partnership. More reports on the topic can be found in a previous edition of 'What Think Tanks are Thinking'.

The Eastern Partnership was launched in 2009 as a regional programme of the European Neighbourhood Policy to promote integration and cooperation between the European Union, its Member States and Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine. It has achieved limited progress, partly due to conflicts and political instability in the region. Nevertheless, it has sent a signal of the EU’s willingness to strengthen ties with the region, offering incentives to governments and civil society to push ahead with democratic and economic reforms. Three of the six former Soviet republics involved – Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine – have concluded Association Agreements and Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area agreements with the EU. This note offers links to recent commentaries and reports by major international think tanks on the Eastern Partnership. More reports on the topic can be found in a previous edition of 'What Think Tanks are Thinking'.