The EU and sport

18-02-2010

Sport is very popular among EU citizens, not only as an activity, but also as entertainment. However, the growing commercialisation of sport has challenged its social, educational and cultural dimensions. Until 1st December 2009, sport was not mentioned in the Treaties. The Community's involvement in sport has thus been based on existing policies (e.g. audiovisual or health). Moreover, the case law of the Court of Justice (e.g. Bosman) has played a major role in clarifying the impact on sport of the provisions on both the free movement of workers and on competition. The Lisbon Treaty gives explicit powers to the EU to carry out actions to support, coordinate or supplement the actions of the Member States in the field of sport.

Sport is very popular among EU citizens, not only as an activity, but also as entertainment. However, the growing commercialisation of sport has challenged its social, educational and cultural dimensions. Until 1st December 2009, sport was not mentioned in the Treaties. The Community's involvement in sport has thus been based on existing policies (e.g. audiovisual or health). Moreover, the case law of the Court of Justice (e.g. Bosman) has played a major role in clarifying the impact on sport of the provisions on both the free movement of workers and on competition. The Lisbon Treaty gives explicit powers to the EU to carry out actions to support, coordinate or supplement the actions of the Member States in the field of sport.