ThinkTank logo Τα έγγραφα που συμβάλλουν στη διαμόρφωση νέας νομοθεσίας της ΕΕ
Αναρτήθηκε στις 20-01-2017

EU budget reform [What Think Tanks are thinking]

20-01-2017

A long-running discussion on reforming the European Union's budget gained momentum when the High-Level Group on Own Resources, led by former Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti, presented its report in January 2017. The report proposes simpler methods for funding the EU, to make it less reliant on direct contributions from Member States, and recommends that spending be focused on areas where the highest European added value can be achieved, now, for example migration and security emergencies. The ...

A long-running discussion on reforming the European Union's budget gained momentum when the High-Level Group on Own Resources, led by former Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti, presented its report in January 2017. The report proposes simpler methods for funding the EU, to make it less reliant on direct contributions from Member States, and recommends that spending be focused on areas where the highest European added value can be achieved, now, for example migration and security emergencies. The report, entitled 'Future financing of the EU', lists and examines several options for new own resources, such as a reformed VAT-linked resource, an EU corporate tax, a financial transaction tax or taxes linked to efforts to fight climate change. It also proposes to explore other revenue sources stemming directly from the EU policies and programmes. The report will be taken into consideration by the European Commission and EU Member States when they work on the EU's next long-term budget after 2020. This note offers links to reports and commentaries from some major international think tanks and research institutes on the EU budget. Some papers also discuss whether the euro area should have its own, dedicated budget.

Reviving risk capital: The proposal to amend EuVECA and EuSEF

20-01-2017

The European Venture Capital Funds (EuVECA) and European Social Entrepreneurship Funds (EuSEF) are collective investment schemes that have been harmonised at European Union (EU) level since 2011 by means of two Regulations: (EU) No 345/2013 (EuVECA) and (EU) No 346/2013 (EuSEF). In its 2016 review, the Commission noted that these funds remain small and concentrated in a few Member States and that, while the take-up of EuVECA could be considered successful, the EuSEF results have been disappointing ...

The European Venture Capital Funds (EuVECA) and European Social Entrepreneurship Funds (EuSEF) are collective investment schemes that have been harmonised at European Union (EU) level since 2011 by means of two Regulations: (EU) No 345/2013 (EuVECA) and (EU) No 346/2013 (EuSEF). In its 2016 review, the Commission noted that these funds remain small and concentrated in a few Member States and that, while the take-up of EuVECA could be considered successful, the EuSEF results have been disappointing. Three main obstacles to further growth have been identified: limitations imposed on managers; product rules; and the (varying) application of regulatory fees in Member States with regards to funds’ marketing and management. To overcome those obstacles, the Commission has identified some measures that − by removing limitations on larger managers managing EuVECA and EuSEF funds, decreasing costs for EuVECA and EuSEF funds, and broadening the range of eligible assets EuVECA funds may invest in − should increase investment into these funds. Second edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

Reducing air pollution - National emission ceilings for air pollutants

20-01-2017

Despite significant progress in recent decades, air pollution levels in the European Union still have adverse impacts on the environment and on health. The European Commission estimates that health-related costs of air pollution in the EU range from 390 to 940 billion euros per year. The proposed directive, which would replace the current National Emission Ceilings Directive, sets binding national reduction objectives for six air pollutants (SO2, NOx, NMVOCs, NH3, PM2.5 and CH4) to be met by 2020 ...

Despite significant progress in recent decades, air pollution levels in the European Union still have adverse impacts on the environment and on health. The European Commission estimates that health-related costs of air pollution in the EU range from 390 to 940 billion euros per year. The proposed directive, which would replace the current National Emission Ceilings Directive, sets binding national reduction objectives for six air pollutants (SO2, NOx, NMVOCs, NH3, PM2.5 and CH4) to be met by 2020 and 2030. It will also implement the Gothenburg Protocol as amended in 2012. The European Commission estimates that implementation costs would range from 2.2 to 3.3 billion euros per year. After completion of the legislative procedure at first reading in the European Parliament and the Council, the presidents of the co-legislators signed the final act on 14 December 2016. Member States are required to transpose the new directive into national law by 1 July 2018. This briefing updates an earlier edition, of 6 October 2016: PE 589.821.

Trade and sustainable development chapters in CETA

20-01-2017

The EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), signed in October 2016, is currently at the ratification stage. This agreement, concluded between like-minded trade partners, represents the new generation of EU free trade agreements (FTAs), and contains chapters covering sustainable development. The inclusion by the EU of sustainable development chapters in FTAs concluded with its partners plays a role in ensuring that trade and investment liberalisation does not lead to a deterioration ...

The EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), signed in October 2016, is currently at the ratification stage. This agreement, concluded between like-minded trade partners, represents the new generation of EU free trade agreements (FTAs), and contains chapters covering sustainable development. The inclusion by the EU of sustainable development chapters in FTAs concluded with its partners plays a role in ensuring that trade and investment liberalisation does not lead to a deterioration in environmental and labour conditions. In keeping with this trade policy practice, developed over the years, trade-related sustainability provisions, including labour and environmental considerations, are grouped in three chapters (Chapters 22 to 24) within CETA. CETA has only partially exceeded the dialogue-only approach contained in earlier EU trade agreements and has maintained the exclusion of trade and sustainable development (TSD) chapters from the scope of the state-to-state dispute settlement (SSDS) procedure. It also maintains an ad hoc two-stage dispute resolution mechanism already found in the EU-South Korea FTA. However, this mechanism does not include sanctions and focuses on mutually agreed solutions to problems. This choice by the EU is due to the still strongly cooperative nature of the TSD chapters. On CETA please refer also to the 'International Agreements in Progress' briefing on the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement with Canada by Wilhelm Schöllmann.

International Agreements in Progress: Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with Canada

20-01-2017

EU-Canada negotiations for a Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) started in May 2009 and were declared concluded at the EU-Canada Summit on 26 September 2014. The agreement's overall aim is to increase flows of goods, services and investment to the benefit of both partners. For the EU, CETA represents the first comprehensive economic agreement with a highly industrialised Western economy. Except for a few sensitive agricultural products, the agreement would remove practically all tariffs ...

EU-Canada negotiations for a Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) started in May 2009 and were declared concluded at the EU-Canada Summit on 26 September 2014. The agreement's overall aim is to increase flows of goods, services and investment to the benefit of both partners. For the EU, CETA represents the first comprehensive economic agreement with a highly industrialised Western economy. Except for a few sensitive agricultural products, the agreement would remove practically all tariffs on goods exchanged between the two partners. Canada would substantially open up its public procurement at both federal and sub-federal level, thereby eliminating a major asymmetry in access to each other's public procurement markets. The EU succeeded in securing protection for a large number of European Geographical Indications (GIs) on the Canadian market. Provisions on sustainable development should ensure that trade and investment do not develop to the detriment of, but rather support, environmental protection and social development. CETA was signed by the EU and Canada on 30 October 2016. The Council decision on signature was only reached after difficult discussions, so that a total of 38 statements and declarations by Member States, the Commission and the Council, as well as a Joint Interpretative Instrument accompany that Council decision. The European Parliament has launched the consent procedure, with Artis Pabriks (EPP, Latvia) as rapporteur. The vote in the Committee on International Trade (INTA) is scheduled for 24 January 2017, and the vote in plenary for the February part-session in Strasbourg (13 to 16 February). Second edition. The ‘International Agreements in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the process, from initial discussions through to ratification. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 593.491, 26 October 2016.

2017 Recommendations on the Economic Policy of the Euro Area - A Comparison of Commission and Council Texts (The “Comply or Explain” Principle)

20-01-2017

This document compares the draft 2017 Recommendations for the economic policy of the Euro Area proposed by the European Commission on 16 November 2016 with the 2017 Euro Area draft recommendation (revised by the Economic and Financial Committee) and to be approved by the Council (ECOFIN) on 27 January 2017.

This document compares the draft 2017 Recommendations for the economic policy of the Euro Area proposed by the European Commission on 16 November 2016 with the 2017 Euro Area draft recommendation (revised by the Economic and Financial Committee) and to be approved by the Council (ECOFIN) on 27 January 2017.

Αναρτήθηκε στις 19-01-2017

Bioeconomy: Challenges and opportunities

19-01-2017

The bioeconomy refers to the production and extraction of renewable biological resources and their conversion into food and feed, bio-based products and bioenergy. Although primarily based on activities carried out, in some form, for centuries or millennia (such as farming, fisheries or forestry), the bioeconomy emerged in the past decade as a knowledge-driven concept aimed at meeting a number of today's challenges. In the European Union (EU), the bioeconomy sectors have an annual turnover of about ...

The bioeconomy refers to the production and extraction of renewable biological resources and their conversion into food and feed, bio-based products and bioenergy. Although primarily based on activities carried out, in some form, for centuries or millennia (such as farming, fisheries or forestry), the bioeconomy emerged in the past decade as a knowledge-driven concept aimed at meeting a number of today's challenges. In the European Union (EU), the bioeconomy sectors have an annual turnover of about €2 trillion and employ between 17 and 19 million people. They use almost three quarters of the EU land area. A stronger bioeconomy could trigger growth and jobs, and reduce dependency on imports. It could contribute to optimising the use of biological resources, which remain finite although they are renewable. However, it could also create competition between uses and technologies at various levels. Besides, the amount of available biomass remains disputed. A bioeconomy could contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improving public health. However, it could also trigger new greenhouse gas emissions and induce adverse impacts on the environment. The EU policy framework for the bioeconomy is spread across a number of policies (agriculture, forestry, fisheries, climate, circular economy and research). Although a bioeconomy strategy from 2012 aims to ensure policy coherence, inconsistencies remain. The EU provides funding to innovative bioeconomy activities through the framework programme for research (Horizon 2020) and a range of other instruments. The European Parliament has been supportive of the bioeconomy strategy, while highlighting the need for sustainability and policy coherence.

EU pledges further aid to Jordan

19-01-2017

Since 2011, Jordan's economy has suffered from the negative spill-overs of the on-going regional conflicts and the Syrian refugee crisis, weakening the country's fiscal and external financing position. In line with the EU's objective to support the stability and development of Jordan's economy, the European Commission has presented a proposal to grant the country a second package of macro-financial assistance (MFA). Amounting to a maximum of €200 million, the assistance would help the country cover ...

Since 2011, Jordan's economy has suffered from the negative spill-overs of the on-going regional conflicts and the Syrian refugee crisis, weakening the country's fiscal and external financing position. In line with the EU's objective to support the stability and development of Jordan's economy, the European Commission has presented a proposal to grant the country a second package of macro-financial assistance (MFA). Amounting to a maximum of €200 million, the assistance would help the country cover a part of its external financing needs. The first MFA package, worth €180 million, was approved in 2013 and fully disbursed in 2015. In addition to the significant resources mobilised by the multilateral and bilateral donors, this second MFA, adopted in December 2016, will, by strengthening the economy, contribute to Jordan's overall stability, which is a high priority for the EU. The Commission will, if appropriate, put forward a new proposal in 2017 to extend and increase this MFA to Jordan. EU aid will complement the International Monetary Fund's new programme of about US$723 million, focusing on the country’s economic and financial reform programme. Third edition. The ‘EU Legislation in Progress’ briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure. To view earlier editions of this briefing, please see: PE 593.537, November 2016.

Digital skills in the EU labour market

19-01-2017

Digital technology is more and more interwoven into every field of public, private and working life. Consequently, digital skills have a growing importance for everybody. How can society and its citizens, in particular vulnerable groups, such as the disabled or the long-term unemployed, get onto the digital train and stay abreast of new technologies and methods? How can digital skills at the workplace be developed and used more efficiently? What has already been done at Member State and EU level ...

Digital technology is more and more interwoven into every field of public, private and working life. Consequently, digital skills have a growing importance for everybody. How can society and its citizens, in particular vulnerable groups, such as the disabled or the long-term unemployed, get onto the digital train and stay abreast of new technologies and methods? How can digital skills at the workplace be developed and used more efficiently? What has already been done at Member State and EU level and what are the challenges ahead? This publication seeks to answer these questions through by describing the characteristics and types of digital skills, and exploring their presence in society and on the labour market. It further analyses the digital literacy of workers, gives an overview of EU-level actions undertaken in this domain, and points to some best practices aimed at improving the current situation.

From Safe Harbour to Privacy Shield: Advances and shortcomings of the new EU-US data transfer rules

19-01-2017

The CJEU’s Schrems judgment of October 2015, besides declaring the European Commission’s Decision on the EU-US ‘Safe Harbour’ data transfer regime invalid, has also settled a number of crucial requirements corresponding to the foundations of EU data protection. In the assessment of the Privacy Shield, the new framework for EU-US data transfer, these need to be taken into account. In less than one year since the CJEU ruling, the Commission has adopted a new adequacy decision, in which the Privacy ...

The CJEU’s Schrems judgment of October 2015, besides declaring the European Commission’s Decision on the EU-US ‘Safe Harbour’ data transfer regime invalid, has also settled a number of crucial requirements corresponding to the foundations of EU data protection. In the assessment of the Privacy Shield, the new framework for EU-US data transfer, these need to be taken into account. In less than one year since the CJEU ruling, the Commission has adopted a new adequacy decision, in which the Privacy Shield regime is deemed to adequately protect EU citizens. The main improvements of the Privacy Shield (over its predecessor), as well as the critical reactions to the new arrangements, are discussed in this analysis, taking into account, however, that an annual review is expected to take place by summer 2017, which will also take into account the coming into effect of the EU General Data Protection Regulation in 2018.

Προσεχείς εκδηλώσεις

24-01-2017
"The role of lawyers, accountants and bankers in Panama Papers" - Part I
Ακρόαση -
PANA
24-01-2017
Workshop on Building blocks of a future EU cohesion policy - first reflections
Εργαστήριο -
REGI
24-01-2017
Workshop : Human Rights in Iran after the nuclear deal
Ακρόαση -
DROI

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