EU position for COP 21 climate change conference

26-11-2015

Ahead of the United Nations (UN) climate conference (COP 21) in Paris, the European Union (EU) institutions and advisory bodies have made statements regarding the EU position for the negotiations towards a new universal climate agreement. They agree on a number of core principles: an ambitious legally binding agreement with strong provisions for transparency and accountability, and a mechanism for raising the ambition over time. Beyond this common negotiating position, each institution emphasised its priorities. The EU's level of ambition was set by the October 2014 European Council conclusions on the EU 2030 climate and energy framework. It forms the basis for the EU's Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC), which commits the EU to a domestic reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40% below 1990 levels by 2030. The EU submitted its INDC on 6 March 2015, as one of the first Parties to do so. The European Commission outlined its vision for the Paris agreement in February 2015. In July the European Economic and Social Committee adopted a recommendation calling for stronger involvement of civil society. In October, the Committee of the Regions and the European Parliament adopted positions calling for more EU ambition. Parliament called on the EU and Member States to agree a roadmap for EU climate finance. Council adopted a negotiating mandate on 18 September and conclusions on climate finance on 10 November. Analysis by think-tanks and academics has focussed on the level of EU ambition, and on the prospects for European leadership in international climate negotiations.

Ahead of the United Nations (UN) climate conference (COP 21) in Paris, the European Union (EU) institutions and advisory bodies have made statements regarding the EU position for the negotiations towards a new universal climate agreement. They agree on a number of core principles: an ambitious legally binding agreement with strong provisions for transparency and accountability, and a mechanism for raising the ambition over time. Beyond this common negotiating position, each institution emphasised its priorities. The EU's level of ambition was set by the October 2014 European Council conclusions on the EU 2030 climate and energy framework. It forms the basis for the EU's Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC), which commits the EU to a domestic reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40% below 1990 levels by 2030. The EU submitted its INDC on 6 March 2015, as one of the first Parties to do so. The European Commission outlined its vision for the Paris agreement in February 2015. In July the European Economic and Social Committee adopted a recommendation calling for stronger involvement of civil society. In October, the Committee of the Regions and the European Parliament adopted positions calling for more EU ambition. Parliament called on the EU and Member States to agree a roadmap for EU climate finance. Council adopted a negotiating mandate on 18 September and conclusions on climate finance on 10 November. Analysis by think-tanks and academics has focussed on the level of EU ambition, and on the prospects for European leadership in international climate negotiations.