Invasive alien species: List of species of Union concern

15-12-2015

According to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), invasive alien species (IAS) are the second most significant threat to biodiversity after habitat loss. They are also capable of causing significant damage to human health and to the economy. The cost of controlling invasive alien species and repairing the harm they do in the EU is estimated at €12 billion annually. To tackle this cross-border issue, an EU Regulation on IAS was adopted in 2014 and entered into force in January 2015. The European Commission had to submit to Member States' representatives a list of 'invasive alien species of Union concern' by January 2016, as an EU wide containment measure. Under the Regulation, the list of IAS of Union concern will contain only species that are scientifically proven to be particularly harmful and that can be addressed in a cost-efficient manner. The compilation of the list is not a one-off exercise, but is intended as an ongoing process. NGOs and the European Parliament have criticised the draft list for being too short and for not including some species which they consider are particularly widespread and harmful to ecosystems.

According to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), invasive alien species (IAS) are the second most significant threat to biodiversity after habitat loss. They are also capable of causing significant damage to human health and to the economy. The cost of controlling invasive alien species and repairing the harm they do in the EU is estimated at €12 billion annually. To tackle this cross-border issue, an EU Regulation on IAS was adopted in 2014 and entered into force in January 2015. The European Commission had to submit to Member States' representatives a list of 'invasive alien species of Union concern' by January 2016, as an EU wide containment measure. Under the Regulation, the list of IAS of Union concern will contain only species that are scientifically proven to be particularly harmful and that can be addressed in a cost-efficient manner. The compilation of the list is not a one-off exercise, but is intended as an ongoing process. NGOs and the European Parliament have criticised the draft list for being too short and for not including some species which they consider are particularly widespread and harmful to ecosystems.