Perspectives on transatlantic cooperation: Security and defence - Achieving efficiency and resilience

22-09-2016

Enhancing EU-US cooperation in security and defence has been a longstanding goal. The EU and the US are natural partners in cooperation in security and defence, as evidenced by their cooperation within international organisations, including NATO, by their shared values and by the perception of shared threats. The two conduct their foreign policies based on common beliefs such as the promotion, protection and observance of human rights and the rule of law, democracy, inclusive political processes, economic development and social inclusion. They also share security concerns in regions ranging from the Balkans, to Africa, the Middle East and Asia, and on issues such as nuclear non-proliferation, terrorism and ethnic conflicts. While the aforementioned areas offer grounds for cooperation towards more effective and efficient transatlantic security and defence, according to several studies, challenges for further cooperation remain in a number of sectors. These include research and technology (R&T), interoperability, defence procurement, crisis management, counter-terrorism and the promotion of global and regional security. This briefing forms part of a broader research project on the perspectives on transatlantic cooperation in the US election year, requested by the Chair of the European Parliament's delegation for relations with the United States.

Enhancing EU-US cooperation in security and defence has been a longstanding goal. The EU and the US are natural partners in cooperation in security and defence, as evidenced by their cooperation within international organisations, including NATO, by their shared values and by the perception of shared threats. The two conduct their foreign policies based on common beliefs such as the promotion, protection and observance of human rights and the rule of law, democracy, inclusive political processes, economic development and social inclusion. They also share security concerns in regions ranging from the Balkans, to Africa, the Middle East and Asia, and on issues such as nuclear non-proliferation, terrorism and ethnic conflicts. While the aforementioned areas offer grounds for cooperation towards more effective and efficient transatlantic security and defence, according to several studies, challenges for further cooperation remain in a number of sectors. These include research and technology (R&T), interoperability, defence procurement, crisis management, counter-terrorism and the promotion of global and regional security. This briefing forms part of a broader research project on the perspectives on transatlantic cooperation in the US election year, requested by the Chair of the European Parliament's delegation for relations with the United States.