Migration [What Think Tanks are thinking]

09-03-2018

The European Union's southern borders remain under pressure from irregular migrants escaping poverty and war in the Middle East and Africa. The 2016 agreement between the EU and Turkey significantly slowed the influx to Europe through Greece of people escaping the war in Syria. However, the number of irregular migrant arrivals via other routes, especially across the central Mediterranean, remains high, boosting support for nationalist, anti-immigrant and populist groups across the EU. EU leaders agreed in February that the bloc should allocate more funds in its next long-term budget to the curbing of irregular migration. This note offers links to commentaries and studies on migration by major international think tanks. Earlier papers on the same topic can be found in a previous edition of 'What Think Tanks are thinking', published in June 2017.

The European Union's southern borders remain under pressure from irregular migrants escaping poverty and war in the Middle East and Africa. The 2016 agreement between the EU and Turkey significantly slowed the influx to Europe through Greece of people escaping the war in Syria. However, the number of irregular migrant arrivals via other routes, especially across the central Mediterranean, remains high, boosting support for nationalist, anti-immigrant and populist groups across the EU. EU leaders agreed in February that the bloc should allocate more funds in its next long-term budget to the curbing of irregular migration. This note offers links to commentaries and studies on migration by major international think tanks. Earlier papers on the same topic can be found in a previous edition of 'What Think Tanks are thinking', published in June 2017.