Women on Corporate Boards in Europe

15-03-2013

This note summarises the main findings from research which combined an international overview of trends in women’s representation on corporate boards with in-depth case study analysis of eight European countries. The countries were selected because they encapsulated different policy approaches: quotas, ‘soft law’ governance codes and non-intervention. Well-designed quota tools are found to be an effective means of stimulating change in non-executive board positions, despite being considered contentious by many stakeholders. Policy recommendations are drawn from the results of this project.

This note summarises the main findings from research which combined an international overview of trends in women’s representation on corporate boards with in-depth case study analysis of eight European countries. The countries were selected because they encapsulated different policy approaches: quotas, ‘soft law’ governance codes and non-intervention. Well-designed quota tools are found to be an effective means of stimulating change in non-executive board positions, despite being considered contentious by many stakeholders. Policy recommendations are drawn from the results of this project.

External author

Colette Fagan (University of Manchester, the UK)