Consequences of Brexit in the Area of Consumer Protection

14-04-2017

TThis paper outlines the consequences of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union in the area of consumer protection. It examines the withdrawal’s impact on consumer protection under different scenarios: a futire EEA membership of the UK (a); a relationship governed only by WTO rules; (c) a relationship governed by a “tailor-made agreement”. It comes to the conclusion that from the perspective of consumers in the EU28, an EEA membership of the UK is the most favourable scenario. Irrespective of the scenario, adequate transitory provisions taking into consideration the “two-step” negotiating schedule are necessary to resolve legal uncertainties occurring irrespective of the scenario. This document was prepared for Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection.

TThis paper outlines the consequences of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union in the area of consumer protection. It examines the withdrawal’s impact on consumer protection under different scenarios: a futire EEA membership of the UK (a); a relationship governed only by WTO rules; (c) a relationship governed by a “tailor-made agreement”. It comes to the conclusion that from the perspective of consumers in the EU28, an EEA membership of the UK is the most favourable scenario. Irrespective of the scenario, adequate transitory provisions taking into consideration the “two-step” negotiating schedule are necessary to resolve legal uncertainties occurring irrespective of the scenario. This document was prepared for Policy Department A at the request of the Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection.

External author

Dr. Malte KRAMME, Research Centre for Consumer Law, University of Bayreuth